WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerator-based shielding experiment

  1. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  3. Shielding design and dose assessment for accelerator based neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W B; Yanch, J C

    1995-05-01

    Preparations are ongoing to test the viability and usefulness of an accelerator source of epithermal neutrons for ultimate use in a clinical environment. This feasibility study is to be conducted in a shielded room located on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus and will not involve patient irradiations. The accelerator production of neutrons is based on the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, and a maximum proton beam current of 4 mA at an energy of 2.5 MeV is anticipated. The resultant 3.58 x 10(12) neutrons s-1 have a maximum energy of 800 keV and will be substantially moderated. This paper describes the Monte Carlo methods used to estimate the neutron and photon dose rates in a variety of locations in the vicinity of the accelerator, as well as the shielding configuration required when the device is run at maximum current. Results indicate that the highest absorbed dose rate to which any individual will be exposed is 3 microSv h-1 (0.3 mrem h-1). The highest possible yearly dose is 0.2 microSv (2 x 10(-2) mrem) to the general public or 0.9 mSv (90 mrem) to a radiation worker in close proximity to the accelerator facility. The shielding necessary to achieve these dose levels is also discussed.

  4. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel.

  5. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  6. Tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetry measurements utililzed aboard aircraft and in accelerator based space radiation shielding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment presents a potential hazard to the humans, electronics and materials that are exposed to it. Particle accelerator facilities such as the NASA Space Ra-diation Laboratory (NSRL) and Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) provide particle radiation of specie and energy within the range of that found in the space radiation environment. Experiments performed at these facilities determine various endpoints for bio-logical, electronic and materials exposures. A critical factor in the performance of rigorous scientific studies of this type is accurate dosimetric measurements of the exposures. A Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a microdosimeter that may be used to measure absorbed dose, average quality factor (Q) and dose equivalent of the particle beam utilized in these experiments. In this work, results from a variety of space radiation shielding studies where a TEPC was used to perform dosimetry in the particle beam will be presented. These results compare the absorbed dose and dose equivalent measured downstream of equal density thicknesses of stan-dard and multifunctional shielding materials. The standard materials chosen for these shielding studies included High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and aluminum alloy, while the multifunc-tional materials included carbon composite infused with single walled carbon nanotubes. High energy particles including proton, silicon and iron nuclei were chosen as the incident radia-tion for these studies. Further, TEPC results from measurements taken during flights aboard ER-2 and KC-135 aircraft will also be discussed. Results from these flight studies include TEPC measurements for shielded and unshielded conditions as well as the effect of vibration and electromagnetic exposures on the TEPC operation. The data selected for presentation will highlight the utility of the TEPC in space radiation studies, and in shielding studies in particular. The lineal energy response function of the

  7. Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter Microdosimetry Measurements Utilized Aboard Aircraft and in Accelerator Based Space Radiation Shielding Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersey, Brad B.; Wilkins, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), a description of the spatially restricted LET Model, high energy proton TEPC and the results of modeling, the study of shielding and the results from the flight exposures with the TEPC.

  8. Latest experiences in inspecting the inside of BWR vessel shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.

    2001-07-01

    In the last few years, the owners of BWR nuclear power plants have been forced to address new fuel shield inspection requirements, TECNATOM has responded to this situation by launching the TEIDE projects, which include development of an inspection machine and the corresponding Non-Destructive Tests to examine the inside of this shield. With these projects, TECNATOM has performed more than 12 fuel shield inspections in different countries. This article describes the experience gained in the last three years. (Author)

  9. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  10. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Lunar/ISS Experiment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Carlos; Hogue, Michael; Johansen, Michael; Mackey, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a dust mitigation experiment and testing it on the lunar surface and on the International Space Station (ISS). The Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) clears dust off surfaces and prevents accumulation by using a pattern of electrodes to generate a non-uniform electric field over the surface being protected. The EDS experiment will repel dust off materials such as painted Kapton and glass to demonstrate applications for thermal radiators, camera lenses, solar panels, and other hardware and equipment.

  11. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-01-01

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be th...

  12. Application of shielding calculation of high-energy linear accelerators based on the NCRP-151 protocol; Aplicacion de calculo de blindajes de aceleradores lineales de alta energia basada en el protocolo NCRP-151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Pozas, S.; Monja Rey, P. de la; Sanchez Carrasca, M.; Yanez Lopez, D.; Macias Verde, D.; Martin Oliva, R.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, the progress experienced in cancer treatment with ionizing radiation can deliver higher doses to smaller volumes and better shaped, making it necessary to take into account new aspects in the calculation of structural barriers. Furthermore, given that forecasts suggest that in the near future will install a large number of accelerators, or existing ones modified, we believe a useful tool to estimate the thickness of the structural barriers of treatment rooms. The shielding calculation methods are based on standard DIN 6847-2 and the recommendations given by the NCRP 151. In our experience we found only estimates originated from the DIN. Therefore, we considered interesting to develop an application that incorporates the formulation suggested by the NCRP, together with previous work based on the rules DIN allow us to establish a comparison between the results of both methods. (Author)

  13. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  14. Radio-Shield, il primo esperimento italiano sulla Luna. (English Title: Radio-Shield, the first Italian experiment on the Moon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, M.

    2017-10-01

    Nextly, the first Italian and European experiment will reach the lunar surface. Selected in the international contest Lab2Moon for under-25, the goal of the experiment is to investigate about the possible shielding properties of cyanobacteria against space radiations. If these microorganisms, in addition to providing oxygen and other resources, can also shield from space radiation, they can be used in the development of radiation shields in future interplanetary missions.

  15. Shielding experiment of heavy-ion produced neutrons using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Takada, M; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T

    2003-01-01

    A shielding experiment was performed at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba), of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), to measure neutron dose using a spherical TEPC (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) of 12.55 cm inner diameter. Neutrons are produced from a 5 cm thick stopping length Cu target bombarded by 400 MeV/nucleon C6+ ions and penetrate concrete or iron shields of various thicknesses at 0 degree to the beam direction. From this shielding experiment. y-distribution, mean lineal energy, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and mean-quality factor were obtained behind the shield as a function of shield thickness. The neutron dose attenuation lengths were also obtained as 126 g cm(-2) for concrete and 211 g cm(-2) for iron. The measured results were compared with the calculated results using the MARS Monte Carlo code.

  16. Instrumentation concepts and requirements for a space vacuum research facility. [molecular shield for spaceborne experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, H. N.

    1979-01-01

    An earth-orbiting molecular shield that offers a unique opportunity for conducting physics, chemistry, and material processing experiments under a combination of environmental conditions that are not available in terrestrial laboratories is equipped with apparatus for forming a molecular beam from the freestream. Experiments are carried out using a moderate energy, high flux density, high purity atomic oxygen beam in the very low density environment within the molecular shield. As a minimum, the following instruments are required for the molecular shield: (1) a mass spectrometer; (2) a multifunction material analysis instrumentation system; and (3) optical spectrometry equipment. The design is given of a furlable molecular shield that allows deployment and retrieval of the system (including instrumentation and experiments) to be performed without contamination. Interfaces between the molecular shield system and the associated spacecraft are given. An in-flight deployment sequence is discussed that minimizes the spacecraft-induced contamination in the vicinity of the shield. Design approaches toward a precursor molecular shield system are shown.

  17. Final Technical Report [Cosmogenic background and shielding R&D for a Ge Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiseppe, Vince

    2013-10-01

    The USD Majorana group focused all of its effort in support of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) experiment. Final designs of the shielding subsystems are complete. Construction of the MJD shielding systems at SURF has begun and the proposed activities directly support the completion of the shield systems. The PI and the group contribute heavily to the onsite construction activities of the MJD experiment. The group led investigations into neutron and neutron-­induced backgrounds, shielding effectiveness and design, and radon backgrounds.

  18. Development of Self-TOF neutron detector and its application to concrete and iron shielding experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, M; Nunomiya, T; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T; Shibata, T

    2002-01-01

    A new type detector, called 'Self-TOF detector', has been developed for high energy neutron spectrometry behind a shield. The detector consists of a veto counter, a set of radiators with 20 thin detectors, a start counter and a stop counter of nine segments. The measurement of the detector response function for high energy neutrons and the concrete and iron shielding experiments were done at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. By using the response functions, neutron spectra behind shield were obtained by unfolding and the results were compared with the LAHET Code System (LCS).

  19. Experience with magnetic shielding of a large scale accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergei Nagaitsev et al.

    2001-08-14

    It is not unusual to place multiple accelerators in a common enclosure to save on civil construction costs. This often complicates operations, especially if accelerators are affecting each other. At Fermilab, the influence of a rapidly cycling Main Injector (MI) synchrotron on an antiproton storage ring (Recycler), placed in a common tunnel, was initially found to be unacceptable for a reliable operation of the Recycler. Initial closed orbit excursions in the Recycler ring during the MI ramp were in excess of 5 mm (rms). This paper describes a shielding technique, used to reduce these orbit excursions by a factor of five.

  20. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  1. Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

  2. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code.

  3. Monte-Carlo simulations of different concepts for shielding in the ATLAS experiment forward region

    CERN Document Server

    Stekl, I; Eschbach, R; Kovalenko, V E; Leroy, C; Marquet, C; Palla, J; Piquemal, F; Pospísil, S; Shupe, M A; Sodomka, J; Tourneur, S; Vorobel, V

    2001-01-01

    The role and performance of various layers (steel, cast iron (CI), concrete, lead, borated polyethylene (BPE), lithium filled polyethylene (LiPE)) and their combinations as shielding against neutrons and photons in the ATLAS experiment forward region (JF shielding) has been studied by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. These simulations permitted one to determine the locations of appearance and disappearance of neutrons and photons and their number at this location. In particular, the determination of the number of newly born neutrons and photons, the number of stopped neutrons and photons, as well as the number of neutrons and photons crossing the borders of shielding layers allowed the assessment of the efficiency of the JF shielding. It provided a basis for comparing the merits of different configurations of shielding layers. The simulation code is based on GEANT, FLUKA, MICAP and GAMLIB. The results of the study give strong support to a segmented shielding made of five layers (steel, CI, BPE, steel, LiPE).

  4. Estimation of the lead thickness required to shield scattered radiation from synchrotron radiation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In the enclosure of synchrotron radiation experiments using a monochromatic beam, secondary radiation arises from two effects, namely fluorescence and scattering. While fluorescence can be regarded as isotropic, the angular dependence of Compton scattering has to be taken into account if the shielding shall not become unreasonably thick. The scope of this paper is to clarify how the different factors starting from the spectral properties of the source and the attenuation coefficient of the shielding, over the spectral and angular distribution of the scattered radiation and the geometry of the experiment influence the thickness of lead required to keep the dose rate outside the enclosure below the desired threshold.

  5. Analysis of the ORNL/TSF GCFR Grid-Plate Shield Design Confirmation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.; Cramer, S.N.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1979-08-01

    The results of the analysis of the GCFR Grid-Plate Shield Design Confirmation Experiment are presented. The experiment, performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility, was designed to test the adequacy of methods and data used in the analysis of the GCFR design. In particular, the experiment tested the adequacy of methods to calculate: (1) axial neutron streaming in the GCFR core and axial blanket, (2) the amount and location of the maximum fast-neutron exposure to the grid plate, and (3) the neutron source leaving the top of the grid plate and entering the upper plenum. Other objectives of the experiment were to verify the grid-plate shielding effectiveness and to assess the effects of fuel-pin and subassembly spacing on radiation levels in the GCFR. The experimental mockups contained regions representing the GCFR core/blanket region, the grid-plate shield section, and the grid plate. Most core design options were covered by allowing: (1) three different spacings between fuel subassemblies, (2) two different void fractions within a subassembly by variation of the number of fuel pins, and (3) a mockup of a control-rod channel.

  6. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerator Based Tools of Stockpile Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seestrom, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Manhattan Project had to solve difficult challenges in physics and materials science. During the cold war a large nuclear stockpile was developed. In both cases, the approach was largely empirical. Today that stockpile must be certified without nuclear testing, a task that becomes more difficult as the stockpile ages. I will discuss the role of modern accelerator based experiments, such as x-ray radiography, proton radiography, neutron and nuclear physics experiments, in stockpile stewardship. These new tools provide data of exceptional sensitivity and are answering questions about the stockpile, improving our scientific understanding, and providing validation for the computer simulations that are relied upon to certify todays' stockpile.

  8. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  9. Arrangement of high-energy neutron irradiation field and shielding experiment using 4 m concrete at KENS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, N; Yashima, H; Kawai, M; Oishi, K; Nakashima, H; Masumoto, K; Matsumura, H; Sasaki, S; Numajiri, M; Sanami, T; Wang, Q; Toyoda, A; Takahashi, K; Iijima, K; Eda, K; Ban, S; Hirayama, H; Muto, S; Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Rasolonjatovo, D R H; Terunuma, K; Yamauchi, K; Sarkar, P K; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Maruhashi, A

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation field of high-energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from a thick tungsten target bombarded by 500 MeV protons was arranged at the KENS spallation neutron source facility. In this facility, shielding experiment was performed with an ordinary concrete shield of 4 m thickness assembled in the irradiation room, 2.5 m downstream from the target centre. Activation detectors of bismuth, aluminium, indium and gold were inserted into eight slots inside the shield and attenuations of neutron reaction rates were obtained by measurements of gamma-rays from the activation detectors. A MARS14 Monte Carlo simulation was also performed down to thermal energy, and comparisons between the calculations and measurements show agreements within a factor of 3. This neutron field is useful for studies of shielding, activation and radiation damage of materials for high-energy neutrons, and experimental data are useful to check the accuracies of the transmission and activation calculation codes.

  10. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  11. Sensitivity of the T2K accelerator-based neutrino experiment with an Extended run to $20\\times10^{21}$ POT

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Autiero, D; Ban, S; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Bienstock, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Avanzini, M Buizza; Calland, R G; Campbell, T; Cao, S; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coplowe, D; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hansen, D; Harada, J; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Hiraki, T; Hiramoto, A; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Lamoureux, M; Larkin, E; Lasorak, P; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Lou, T; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakanishi, Y; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Novella, P; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Stowell, P; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements at the T2K experiment indicate that CP violation in neutrino mixing may be observed in the future by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We explore the physics program of an extension to the currently approved T2K running of $7.8\\times 10^{21}$ protons-on-target to $20\\times 10^{21}$ protons-on-target,aiming at initial observation of CP violation with 3$\\,\\sigma$ or higher significance for the case of maximum CP violation. With accelerator and beam line upgrades, as well as analysis improvements, this program would occur before the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments that are expected to start operation in 2026.

  12. Understanding the potentiality of accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma: dosimetry assessment based on the reported clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, Silva; Postuma, Ian; Protti, Nicoletta; Provenzano, Lucas; Ferrari, Cinzia; Cansolino, Laura; Dionigi, Paolo; Galasso, Olimpio; Gasparini, Giorgio; Altieri, Saverio; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; González, Sara J

    2017-08-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumour, and its incidence is higher in children and adolescents, for whom it represents more than 10% of solid cancers. Despite the introduction of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy that markedly increased the success rate in the treatment, aggressive surgery is still needed and a considerable percentage of patients do not survive due to recurrences or early metastases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), an experimental radiotherapy, was investigated as a treatment that could allow a less aggressive surgery by killing infiltrated tumour cells in the surrounding healthy tissues. BNCT requires an intense neutron beam to ensure irradiation times of the order of 1 h. In Italy, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) proton accelerator has been designed and constructed for BNCT, and a suitable neutron spectrum was tailored by means of Monte Carlo calculations. This paper explores the feasibility of BNCT to treat osteosarcoma using this neutron source based on accelerator. The therapeutic efficacy of BNCT was analysed evaluating the dose distribution obtained in a clinical case of femur osteosarcoma. Mixed field dosimetry was assessed with two different formalisms whose parameters were specifically derived from radiobiological experiments involving in vitro UMR-106 osteosarcoma cell survival assays and boron concentration assessments in an animal model of osteosarcoma. A clinical case of skull osteosarcoma treated with BNCT in Japan was re-evaluated from the point of view of dose calculation and used as a reference for comparison. The results in the case of femur osteosarcoma show that the RFQ beam would ensure a suitable tumour dose painting in a total irradiation time of less than an hour. Comparing the dosimetry between the analysed case and the treated patient in Japan it turns out that doses obtained in the femur tumour are at least as good as the ones delivered in the skull osteosarcoma. The same is

  13. First accelerator-based physics of 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in the East Area received their first beams from the PS this week. Theirs is CERN's first accelerator-based physics since LS1 began last year.   For the East Area, the PS performs a so-called slow extraction, where beam is extracted during many revolution periods (the time it take for particles to go around the PS, ~2.1 μs). The yellow line shows the circulating beam current in the PS, decreasing slowly during the slow extraction, which lasts 350 ms. The green line is the measured proton intensity in the transfer line toward the East Area target. Although LHC physics is still far away, we can now confirm that the injectors are producing physics! In the East Area - the experimental area behind the PS - the T9 and T10 beam lines are providing beams for physics. These beam lines serve experiments such as AIDA - which looks at new detector solutions for future accelerators - and the ALICE Inner Tracking System - which tests components for the ALICE experiment. &qu...

  14. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, D. A.; Rameika, R.; Stanton, N.

    This paper attempts to summarize the neutrino oscillation section of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Beam Facilities. There were very lively discussions about the merits of the different oscillation channels, experiments, and facilities, but we believe a substantial consensus emerged. First, the next decade is one of great potential for discovery in neutrino physics, but it is also one of great peril. The possibility that neutrino oscillations explain the solar neutrino and atmospheric neutrino experiments, and the indirect evidence that Hot Dark Matter (HDM) in the form of light neutrinos might make up 30% of the mass of the universe, point to areas where accelerator-based experiments could play a crucial role in piecing together the puzzle. At the same time, the field faces a very uncertain future. The LSND experiment at LAMPF is the only funded neutrino oscillation experiment in the United States and it is threatened by the abrupt shutdown of LAMPF proposed for fiscal 1994. The future of neutrino physics at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS depends on the continuation of High Energy Physics (HEP) funding after the RHIC startup. Most proposed neutrino oscillation searches at Fermilab depend on the completion of the Main Injector project and on the construction of a new neutrino beamline, which is uncertain at this point. The proposed KAON facility at TRIUMF would provide a neutrino beam similar to that at the AGS but with a much increased intensity. The future of KAON is also uncertain. Despite the difficult obstacles present, there is a real possibility that we are on the verge of understanding the masses and mixings of the neutrinos. The physics importance of such a discovery cannot be overstated. The current experimental status and future possibilities are discussed.

  15. ORNL integral experiment to provide data for evaluating magnetic-fusion-energy shielding concepts. Part I. Attenuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.T.; Morgan, G.L.; McConnell, J.W.

    1982-08-01

    Integral experiments to measure the energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays due to the transport of approximately 14-MeV T(d,n)/sup 4/He neutrons through laminated stainless steel and borated-polyethylene shield configurations have been performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. An NE-213 detector and conventional pulse-shape-discrimination circuitry were used to record the pulse-height distributions from which the energy spectra were derived. Descriptions of the facility and experimental techniques are given in this paper along with tables and curves showing the results of the measurements.

  16. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  17. The LVD Core Facility: a study of LVD as muon veto and active shielding for dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Selvi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the possibility of using the existing structure of a running experiment, the LVD supernova observatory at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, as an active shield and veto for the muon-induced background. In our vision LVD could become (without affecting in any way its main purpose of SN neutrino telescope) a host for a relatively compact but massive experiment looking for rare events. The empty volume that can be obtained removing 2 modules from the most internal part of the detector is 2.1m x 6.2m x 2.8m; we will call it LVD Core Facility (LVD-CF). We have evaluated the active vetoing and shielding power of LVD, with a detailed MC simulation (based on Geant4) of the detector and the rock that surrounds it. The results show that the flux of neutrons that are not associated with a visible muon in LVD is very low; it results reduced by a factor 50, equivalent to the one present in a much deeper underground laboratory, i.e. Sudbury. Moreover we present the results of on-going measur...

  18. Matrix viscoplasticity and its shielding by active mechanics in microtissue models: experiments and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alan S.; Wang, Hailong; Copeland, Craig R.; Chen, Christopher S.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical behavior of tissues under mechanical stimulation is critically important to physiological function. We report a combined experimental and modeling study of bioengineered 3D smooth muscle microtissues that reveals a previously unappreciated interaction between active cell mechanics and the viscoplastic properties of the extracellular matrix. The microtissues’ response to stretch/unstretch actuations, as probed by microcantilever force sensors, was dominated by cellular actomyosin dynamics. However, cell lysis revealed a viscoplastic response of the underlying model collagen/fibrin matrix. A model coupling Hill-type actomyosin dynamics with a plastic perfectly viscoplastic description of the matrix quantitatively accounts for the microtissue dynamics, including notably the cells’ shielding of the matrix plasticity. Stretch measurements of single cells confirmed the active cell dynamics, and were well described by a single-cell version of our model. These results reveal the need for new focus on matrix plasticity and its interactions with active cell mechanics in describing tissue dynamics. PMID:27671239

  19. Evaluation of the concrete shield compositions from the 2010 criticality accident alarm system benchmark experiments at the CEA Valduc SILENE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Celik, Cihangir [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dunn, Michael E [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McMahan, Kimberly L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Authier, Nicolas [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Jacquet, Xavier [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Rousseau, Guillaume [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Wolff, Herve [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Savanier, Laurence [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Baclet, Nathalie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Lee, Yi-kang [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Trama, Jean-Christophe [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Masse, Veronique [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Gagnier, Emmanuel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Naury, Sylvie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Hunter, Richard [Babcock International Group (United Kingdom); Kim, Soon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dulik, George Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, a series of benchmark experiments were conducted at the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems. This series of experiments consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. For the first experiment, the reactor was bare (unshielded), whereas in the second and third experiments, it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. The polyethylene shield of the third experiment had a cadmium liner on its internal and external surfaces, which vertically was located near the fuel region of SILENE. During each experiment, several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor. Nearly half of the foils and TLDs had additional high-density magnetite concrete, high-density barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond shields. CEA Saclay provided all the concrete, and the US Y-12 National Security Complex provided the BoroBond. Measurement data from the experiments were published at the 2011 International Conference on Nuclear Criticality (ICNC 2011) and the 2013 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD 2013) topical meeting. Preliminary computational results for the first experiment were presented in the ICNC 2011 paper, which showed poor agreement between the computational results and the measured values of the foils shielded by concrete. Recently the hydrogen content, boron content, and density of these concrete shields were further investigated within the constraints of the previously available data. New computational results for the first experiment are now available

  20. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  1. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pica, Alessia, E-mail: Alessia.Pica@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moeckli, Raphael [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Balmer, Aubin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Beck-Popovic, Maja [Unit of Pediatric Oncology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Do, Huu-Phuoc [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Munier, Francis L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  2. Characterization of large-area photomultipliers under low magnetic fields: Design and performance of the magnetic shielding for the Double Chooz neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez-Bedoya, C.; Gil-Botella, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, C., E-mail: mc.palomares@ciemat.e [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, I.; Toral, F.; Verdugo, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-21

    A precise quantitative measurement of the effect of low magnetic fields in Hamamatsu R7081 photomultipliers has been performed. These large-area photomultipliers will be used in the Double Chooz neutrino experiment. A magnetic shielding has been developed for these photomultipliers. Its design and performance is also reported in this paper.

  3. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  4. The Monbusho/US shielded HFIR irradiation experiment: HFIR-MFE-RB-11J and 12J (P3-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Lenox, K.E.; Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This experiment is a joint project between the Japanese Monbushu, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It is the first of a series of experiments using europium oxide as a thermal neutron shield to minimize transmutations in vanadium alloys and ferritic/martensitic steels. The europium oxide shields were developed using ceramic processing techniques culminating in cold pressing and sintering. This experiment, which is a prototype for future fast neutron experiments in the HFIR, contains approximately 3200 specimens of 18 different types. The experiment began operating at 300 and 500{degrees}C in February 1997 and is projected to attain its goal fluence of {approximately} 5 dpa in February 1998.

  5. The shield of professional status: Comparing internationally educated nurses' and international medical graduates' experiences of discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiterman, Elena; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the intersecting roles of gender, ethnicity, and professional status in shaping the experiences of internationally educated health professionals in Canada. The article is based on 140 semi-structured qualitative interviews with internationally trained nurses and physicians who came to Canada within past 10 years with the intention to practice their profession. Describing the challenging process of professional integration in Canada, our participants highlighted incidents of discrimination they experienced along the way. Although some of the participants from both professional groups experienced racial discrimination, the context of those experiences differed. Physicians rarely reported instances of discrimination in communication with patients or nurses. Instead, they were concerned with instances of discrimination within their own professional group. Nurses, on the other hand, reported discrimination at the hands of patients and their families as well as racialization by physicians, management, and other nurses. We conclude our article with a reflection on the role that gender and professional status play in shaping the experiences of ethnic discrimination of internationally educated health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  7. Performance of shielded timing RPCs in a {sup 12}C fragmentation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Pol, H. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, R. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Blanco, A. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Carolino, N. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Eschke, J. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Ferreira-Marques, R. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Fonte, P. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Coimbra (Portugal); Garzon, J.A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gonzalez Diaz, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: diego@fpddux.usc.es; Pereira, A. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Pietraszko, J. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Pinhao, J. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Policarpo, A. [LIP, Coimbra (Portugal); Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Stroth, J. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    We show the feasibility of large area timing RPC detectors for experiments dealing with fragmentation-like primary interactions and/or high detector multiplicities, without significative degradation of the detector capabilities. The tested prototype is constituted by three independent cells placed into grounded aluminium boxes, which reduce the cross-talk to the level of 0.4%. Each 2x2x60cm3 box consists of a 4-gap glass-aluminium RPC.At 200Hz/cm2 the counters have shown a time resolution of 60ps{sigma}t80ps with 3{sigma}-tails below 8%. High mechanical robustness and homogeneity of the physical properties along the longitudinal direction of the detector were also observed.

  8. Further analysis and evaluation of the results of the NATO common shield-DAT#7 experiment: defence against terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Stephan; Peichl, Markus; Jirousek, Matthias; Süß, Helmut

    2009-09-01

    The contactless control of persons and the remote surveillance of sensitive infrastructures are important tasks in order to provide the required security measures to protect the human population against the threads of international terrorism. Passive microwave imaging allows a daytime independent observation and examination of objects and persons under nearly all adverse ambient conditions without artificial exposure, hence fully avoiding health risks. The penetration capability of microwaves provides the detection of objects through atmospheric obstacles like bad weather, fog or dust, vapour and smoke, as well as through thin non-metallic materials and clothing. For the latter the detection of hidden objects like weapons, explosives, and contraband is possible by monitoring dielectric anomalies. The experiment "Common Shield" is part of a perennial investigation series leaded by the "Center for Transformation of the German armed forces (Bundeswehr)". In 2008 the protection of soldiers and facilities was experimentally investigated under the aspect of a networked operational leadership. In this context as well a harbour protection trial was carried out in August/September 2008 at the naval base Eckernfoerde in Germany. This trial was part of the NATO CNADs program of work for "Defence Against Terrorism (DAT)" starting in 2003, and Germany is the lead nation for item 7 on "Technology for Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance & Target Acquisition of Terrorists (ISRTA)". One main activity in the Eckernfoerde trial was the simulation of a military entrance control facility by a tent including various imaging and a chemical sensor suite in order to provide security for a military camp. Besides commercial optical and infrared cameras various passive millimeter-wave imagers have been used from different German research institutions. The DLR Microwaves and Radar Institute, Department for Reconnaissance and Security (HR-AS), provided an imaging radiometer scanner

  9. The break of shielding current at pulsed field magnetization of a superconducting annulus (experiment and model simulation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, V. S.; Krasnoperov, E. P.; Kartamyshev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    During the pulsed field magnetization of a high-T c annulus in liquid nitrogen the shielding current drops abruptly, providing rapid penetration of the magnetic flux into the hole of the superconductor. After the break of current the trapped field in the hole is small and negative although the body of the annulus remains highly magnetized. In the present work the current breaking effect is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of the pulse parameter on the shielding current evolution during the break is researched. A simple model for the qualitative description of this process is proposed. The model shows the development of heating localized on the inhomogeneity of the high-temperature superconductor annulus providing the formation of a high resistive channel with temperature near to T c. The appearance of this hot channel leads to the rapid reduction of the shielding current and presents a new scenario of flux jump at high temperature.

  10. Roadmap for the international, accelerator-based neutrino programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, J. [Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. (China); de Gouvêa, A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Duchesneau, D. [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gomes, R. [Federal University of Goias (Brazil); Kim, S. B. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Kobayashi, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Long, K. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Maltoni, M. [Autonomous Univ. of Madrid (Spain); Mezzetto, M. [Univ. of Padua (Italy); Mondal, N. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Shiozawa, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Sobczyk, J. [Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland); Tanaka, H. A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wascko, M. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Zeller, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-26

    In line with its terms of reference the ICFA Neutrino Panel has developed a roadmap for the international, accelerator-based neutrino programme. A "roadmap discussion document" was presented in May 2016 taking into account the peer-group-consultation described in the Panel's initial report. The "roadmap discussion document" was used to solicit feedback from the neutrino community---and more broadly, the particle- and astroparticle-physics communities---and the various stakeholders in the programme. The roadmap, the conclusions and recommendations presented in this document take into account the comments received following the publication of the roadmap discussion document. With its roadmap the Panel documents the approved objectives and milestones of the experiments that are presently in operation or under construction. Approval, construction and exploitation milestones are presented for experiments that are being considered for approval. The timetable proposed by the proponents is presented for experiments that are not yet being considered formally for approval. Based on this information, the evolution of the precision with which the critical parameters governinger the neutrino are known has been evaluated. Branch or decision points have been identified based on the anticipated evolution in precision. The branch or decision points have in turn been used to identify desirable timelines for the neutrino-nucleus cross section and hadro-production measurements that are required to maximise the integrated scientific output of the programme. The branch points have also been used to identify the timeline for the R&D required to take the programme beyond the horizon of the next generation of experiments. The theory and phenomenology programme, including nuclear theory, required to ensure that maximum benefit is derived from the experimental programme is also discussed.

  11. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  12. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  13. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  14. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  15. Analyses of iron and concrete shielding experiments at JAEA/TIARA with JENDL/HE-2007, ENDF/B-VII.1 and FENDL-3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, Chikara, E-mail: konno.chikara@jaea.go.jp; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Ohta, Masayuki

    2015-10-15

    IAEA released a new Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, FENDL-3.0, in 2012. FENDL-3.0 extends the neutron energy range from 20 MeV to greater than 60 MeV. Now there is increasing interest in nuclear data above 20 MeV. Thus we have analyzed the iron and concrete shielding experiments with the 40 and 65 MeV neutron sources at TIARA in Japan Atomic Energy Agency with the latest high-energy nuclear data libraries, JENDL/HE-2007, ENDF/B-VII.1 and FENDL-3.0. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 and ACE files of JENDL/HE-2007, ENDF/B-VII.1 and FENDL-3.0, which are supplied from JAEA, LANL and IAEA, respectively, were used for this analysis. The collimated neutron beam and test shields were modeled in the analysis. The measured source neutron data were adopted in the analysis. The followings are found out from the results; (1) Iron experiments: The calculation result with FENDL-3.0 agrees with the measured one best. That with JENDL/HE-2007 fairly agrees with the measured one. On the contrary that with ENDF/B-VII.1 drastically overestimates the measured one. It is confirmed that this overestimation is due to the smaller non-elastic scattering data of {sup 56}Fe in ENDF/B-VII.1. (2) Concrete experiments: The calculation result with ENDL/HE-2007 agrees with the measured one best, while those with FENDL-3.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 drastically overestimate the measured one. It is confirmed that this overestimation is due to both the larger elastic and smaller non-elastic scattering data of {sup 16}O in FENDL-3.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1.

  16. Determination and Fabrication of New Shield Super Alloys Materials for Nuclear Reactor Safety by Experiments and Cern-Fluka Monte Carlo Simulation Code, Geant4 and WinXCom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Bünyamin; Korkut, Turgay; Karabulut, Abdulhalik

    2016-05-01

    Despite the possibility of depletion of fossil fuels increasing energy needs the use of radiation tends to increase. Recently the security-focused debate about planned nuclear power plants still continues. The objective of this thesis is to prevent the radiation spread from nuclear reactors into the environment. In order to do this, we produced higher performanced of new shielding materials which are high radiation holders in reactors operation. Some additives used in new shielding materials; some of iron (Fe), rhenium (Re), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), boron (B), copper (Cu), tungsten (W), tantalum (Ta), boron carbide (B4C). The results of this experiments indicated that these materials are good shields against gamma and neutrons. The powder metallurgy technique was used to produce new shielding materials. CERN - FLUKA Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation code and WinXCom were used for determination of the percentages of high temperature resistant and high-level fast neutron and gamma shielding materials participated components. Super alloys was produced and then the experimental fast neutron dose equivalent measurements and gamma radiation absorpsion of the new shielding materials were carried out. The produced products to be used safely reactors not only in nuclear medicine, in the treatment room, for the storage of nuclear waste, nuclear research laboratories, against cosmic radiation in space vehicles and has the qualities.

  17. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Initial experience with an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron on operation and radiation safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-shielded medical cyclotron (11 MeV was commissioned at our center, to produce positron emitters, namely, 18 F, 15 O, 13 N and 11 C for positron emission tomography (PET imaging. Presently the cyclotron has been exclusively used for the production of 18 F - for 18 F-FDG imaging. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18 F - production were monitored. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were also monitored to assess the radiation safety status in the facility. The target material, 18 O water, is bombarded with proton beam from the cyclotron to produce 18 F - ion that is used for the synthesis of 18 F-FDG. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18 F - were observed during 292 production runs out of a total of more than 400 runs. The radiation dose levels were also measured in the facility at various locations during cyclotron production runs and in the radiochemistry laboratory during 18 F-FDG syntheses. It was observed that rinsing the target after delivery increased the number of production runs in a given target, as well as resulted in a better correlation between the duration of bombardment and the end of bombardment 18 F - activity with absolutely clean target after being rebuilt. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were observed to be well within prescribed limits with safe work practice.

  19. Development of lowenergy accelerator-based production of medical isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Radcliffe, Naomi; Barlow, Roger; Cywinski, Robert; Beasley, P.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present methods for production of new and existing isotopes for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) and PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging using accelerator-based systems. Such isotopes are already widely used in medical diagnostics and research, and there is constant development of new drugs and isotopes. However the main production method for 99mTc, is currently in research reactors and is at risk due to scheduled and unscheduled shut downs. Therefore, a low c...

  20. Characterization methods for an accelerator based fast-neutron facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, C.; Daniels, G. C.

    2012-02-01

    A fast neutron facility provides a number of complexities in both detection and shielding, the latter arising not only due to uncertainty in the behaviour of the scattered radiation (neutron and gamma-rays) from a fast neutron source, but also on shielding requirements that have to take into account internal and external factors, such as dose limitations, space availability for implementing bulky shielding and secondary interactions of the radiation with materials. This has possible influence on experimental measurements with a low signal to noise ratio. This paper reports on some of the investigations performed at a RFQ accelerator facility generating > 1011 neutrons per second with energies up to 14 MeV, which are used to perform fast neutron radiography studies. Areas highlighted are the neutron cross section libraries, where important data needs to be reviewed or updated.

  1. Shielding Experiments Under JASMIN Collaboration at Fermilab(III) - Measurement of High-Energy Neutrons Penetrating a Thick Iron Shield from the Antiproton Production Target by AU Activation Method

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, H; Iwase, H; Toyoda, A; Kasugai, Y; Matsuda, N; Sakamoto, Y; Nakashima, H; Yashima, H; Mokhov, N; Leveling, A; Boehlein, D; Vaziri, K; Lautenschlager, G; Schmitt, W; Oishi, K

    2012-01-01

    In an antiproton production (Pbar) target station of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), the secondary particles produced by bombarding a target with 120-GeV protons are shielded by a thick iron shield. In order to obtain experimental data on high-energy neutron transport at more than 100-GeV-proton accelerator facilities, we indirectly measured more than 100-MeV neutrons at the outside of the iron shield at an angle of 50{\\deg} in the Pbar target station. The measurement was performed by using the Au activation method coupled with a low-background {\\gamma}-ray counting system. As an indicator for the neutron flux, we determined the production rates of 8 spallation nuclides (196-Au, 188-Pt, 189-Ir, 185-Os, 175-Hf, 173-Lu, 171-Lu, and 169-Yb) in the Au activation detector. The measured production rates were compared with the theoretical production rates calculated using PHITS. We proved that the Au activation method can serve as a powerful tool for indirect measurements of more than 100-MeV neutr...

  2. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  3. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Chow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  4. The Active Muon Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Bezshyiko, Iaroslava

    2016-01-01

    In the SHiP beam-dump of the order of 1011 muons will be produced per second. An active muon-shield is used to magnetically deflect these muons out of the acceptance of the spectrom- eter. This note describes how this shield is modelled and optimized. The SHiP spectrometer is being re-optimized using a conical decay-vessel, and utilizing the possibility to magnetize part of the beam-dump shielding iron. A shield adapted to these new conditions is presented which is significantly shorter and lighter than the shield used in the Technical Proposal (TP), while showing a similar performance.

  5. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  6. Doppler Broadening Analysis of Steel Specimens Using Accelerator Based In Situ Pair Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarashvili, V.; Wells, D. P.; Roy, A. K.

    2009-03-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) techniques can be utilized as a sensitive probe of defects in materials. Studying these microscopic defects is very important for a number of industries in order to predict material failure or structural integrity. We have been developing gamma-induced pair-production techniques to produce positrons in thick samples (˜4-40 g/cm2, or ˜0.5-5 cm in steel). These techniques are called 'Accelerator-based Gamma-induced Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy' (AG-PAS). We have begun testing the capabilities of this technique for imaging of defect densities in thick structural materials. As a first step, a linear accelerator (LINAC) was employed to produce photon beams by stopping 15 MeV electrons in a 1 mm thick tungsten converter. The accelerator is capable of operating with 30-60 ns pulse width, up to 200 mA peak current at 1 kHz repetition rate. The highly collimated bremsstrahlung beam impinged upon our steel tensile specimens, after traveling through a 1.2 m thick concrete wall. Annihilation radiation was detected by a well-shielded and collimated high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). Conventional Doppler broadening spectrometry (DBS) was performed to determine S, W and T parameters for our samples.

  7. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  8. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  9. Integral Data Test of HENDL1.0/MG and VisualBUS with Neutronics Shielding Experiments (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高纯静; 许德政; 李静惊; 吴宜灿; 邓铁如

    2004-01-01

    HENDL1.0/MG, a multi-group working library of the Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, was home-developed by the FDS Team of ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) on the basis of several national data libraries. To validate and qualify the process of producing HENDL1.0/MG, simulating calculations of a series of existent spherical shell benchmark experiments (Al, Mo, Co, Ti, Mn, W, Be and V) have been performed with HENDL1.0/MG and the multifunctional neutronics code system named VisualBUS home-developed also by FDS Team.

  10. Overview of the data-acquisition system (including shielding, isolation and grounding) on the Beta II field-reversed plasma-gun experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, H.H. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Computer-supported acquisition, analysis, and storage of mirror fusion experimental data requires the solution of several problems. The data must be gathered with a minimum amount of noise, and transients must be excluded from the computer so that it can function properly. On Beta II (which was an experiment to produce field-reversed plasma rings from a coaxial plasma gun) the diagnostic system was planned to provide the shielding and isolation necessary to solve these two problems. The Beta II system has been in operation for about two years and provides 300-channel capacity, CAMAC interfaced, to a Hewlett Packard 21MX computer. The system routinely handles signals ranging from 1 mV to 50 kV, with bandwidths from .05 Hz to 10 MHz. The data are captured by transient recorders during a shot, then transferred to the computer. The computer stores the data on disc for immediate processing and on tape for long-term storage. Processed data from any number of channels (usually 20 to 30) is plotted between shots for immediate review. The rest of the data is processed and plotted during off hours.

  11. Lithium neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayanov, B; Belov, V; Kindyuk, V; Oparin, E; Taskaev, S

    2004-11-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target, that produces neutrons via threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies 1.915 or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, the results of experiments on neutron producing target prototype are presented, the results of calculations of hydraulic resistance for heat carrier flow and lithium layer temperature are shown. Calculation showed that the lithium target could run up to 10 mA proton beam before melting. Choice of target variant is substantiated. Program of immediate necessary experiments is described. Target design for neutron source constructed at BINP is presented. Manufacturing the neutron producing target up to the end of 2004 and obtaining a neutron beam on BINP accelerator-based neutron source are planned during 2005.

  12. Lithium neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayanov, B.; Belov, V.; Kindyuk, V.; Oparin, E.; Taskaev, S. E-mail: taskaev@inp.nsk.su

    2004-11-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target, that produces neutrons via threshold {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies 1.915 or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, the results of experiments on neutron producing target prototype are presented, the results of calculations of hydraulic resistance for heat carrier flow and lithium layer temperature are shown. Calculation showed that the lithium target could run up to 10 mA proton beam before melting. Choice of target variant is substantiated. Program of immediate necessary experiments is described. Target design for neutron source constructed at BINP is presented. Manufacturing the neutron producing target up to the end of 2004 and obtaining a neutron beam on BINP accelerator-based neutron source are planned during 2005.

  13. Image-guided linear accelerator-based spinal radiosurgery for hemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selch, Michael T; Tenn, Steve; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lee, Steve P; Gorgulho, Alessandra; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively review the efficacy and safety of image-guided linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for spinal hemangioblastomas. Between August 2004 and September 2010, nine patients with 20 hemangioblastomas underwent spinal radiosurgery. Five patients had von Hipple-Lindau disease. Four patients had multiple tumors. Ten tumors were located in the thoracic spine, eight in the cervical spine, and two in the lumbar spine. Tumor volume varied from 0.08 to 14.4 cc (median 0.72 cc). Maximum tumor dimension varied from 2.5 to 24 mm (median 10.5 mm). Radiosurgery was performed with a dedicated 6 MV linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Median peripheral tumor dose and prescription isodose were 12 Gy and 90%, respectively. Image guidance was performed by optical tracking of infrared reflectors, fusion of oblique radiographs with dynamically reconstructed digital radiographs, and automatic patient positioning. Follow-up varied from 14 to 86 months (median 51 months). Kaplan-Meier estimated 4-year overall and solid tumor local control rates were 90% and 95%, respectively. One tumor progressed 12 months after treatment and a new cyst developed 10 months after treatment in another tumor. There has been no clinical or imaging evidence for spinal cord injury. Results of this limited experience indicate linear accelerator-based radiosurgery is safe and effective for spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the durability of tumor control, but these initial results imply linear accelerator-based radiosurgery may represent a therapeutic alternative to surgery for selected patients with spinal hemangioblastomas.

  14. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  15. Jendl-3.1 iron validation on the PCA-REPLICA (H{sub 2}O/Fe) shielding benchmark experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescarini, M.; Borgia, M. G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche ``Ezio Clementel``, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1997-03-01

    The PCA-REPLICA (H{sub 2}O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmarks experiment is analysed using the SN 2-D DOT 3.5-E code and the 3-D-equivalent flux synthesis method. This engineering benchmark reproduces the ex-core radial geometry of a PWR, including a mild steel reactor pressure vessel (RPV) simulator, and is designed to test the accuracy of the calculation of the in-vessel neutron exposure parameters. This accuracy is strongly dependent on the quality of the iron neutron cross sections used to describe the nuclear reactions within the RPV simulator. In particular, in this report, the cross sections based on the JENDL-3.1 iron data files are tested, through a comparison of the calculated integral and spectral results with the corresponding experimental data. In addition, the present results are compared, on the same benchmark experiment, with those of a preceding ENEA-Bologna validation of the ENDF/B VI iron cross sections. The integral result comparison indicates that, for all the threshold detectors considered (Rh-103 (n, n`) Rh-103m, In-115 (n, n`) In-115m and S-32 (n, p) P-32), the JENDL-3.1 natural iron data produce satisfactory results similar to those obtained with the ENDF/B VI iron data. On the contrary, when the JENDL/3.1 Fe-56 data file is used, strongly underestimated results are obtained for the lower energy threshold detectors, Rh-103 and In-115. This fact, in particular, becomes more evident with increasing the neutron penetration depth in the RPV simulator.

  16. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0{nu}{beta}{beta} experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-07-25

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, which can be investigated using {sup 76}Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) {sup 76}Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new {sup 76}Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of {<=}10{sup -2} events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of {<=}10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in {sup 76}Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced {sup 60}Co is expected to be {proportional_to}2.5.10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV ({lambda}=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for {sup 60}Co and a factor 17 for {sup 232}Th around Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for {sup 232}Th and {sup 60}Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength

  17. Characterization of Magnetic Field Immersed Photomultipliers from Double Chooz Experiment. Design and Construction of their Magnetic Shields; Caracterizacion de los fotomultiplicadores del experimento Double Chooz bajo campo magnetico y diseno y construccion de sus blindajes magneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia Valero, F. J.

    2007-12-28

    Flavour oscillations of neutrinos are a quantum-mechanical effect widely demonstrated. It is explained through interferences of their mass eigenstates, therefore, belonging to the physical area beyond the Standard Model. This work deals with the CIEMAT collaboration in the neutrino experiment Double Chooz. Such an experiment aims to measure the mixture angle {theta}{sub 1}3, one of the PMNS leptonic mixture matrix, with a un reached-before sensibility by decrease of systematic errors. For this, two identical scintillator detectors, equipped with PMT's, will be sited at different distances from two reactors located in the nuclear power plant CHOOZ B (France). The electronic neutrino flux from these reactors will be compared, explaining its deficit by flavour oscillations of these particles. The identity of both detectors will be diminished by the magnetic field effects on the PMT's response. Therefore, this study serves as for quantifying such an effects as for fitting the magnetic shields design that minimize them. Shielding measurements and final design of magnetic shields as much as the effect these ones cause in the PMT's response immersed in a monitored magnetic field are presented. (Author) 85 refs.

  18. Initial experimental demonstration of the principles of a xenon gas shield designed to protect optical components from soft x-ray induced opacity (blanking) in high energy density experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Manha, D.; Galbraith, J.; Datte, P.; Sorce, C.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Widmann, K.; Jones, O. S.; Divol, L.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    The design principles of a xenon gas shield device that is intended to protect optical components from x-ray induced opacity ("x-ray blanking") have been experimentally demonstrated at the OMEGA-60 Laser Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. A volume of xenon gas placed in front of an optical component absorbs the incoming soft x-ray radiation but transmits optical and ultra-violet radiation. The time-resolved optical (532 nm) transmission of samples was recorded as they were exposed to soft x-rays produced by a gold sphere source (1.5 kJ sr-1, 250-300 eV). Blanking of fused silica (SiO2) was measured to occur over a range of time-integrated soft x-ray (nitride (Si3N4) and a 10 cm long volume of 0.04 bar xenon gas succeeded in delaying loss of transmission through a magnesium fluoride sample; optical transmission was observed over a longer period than for the unprotected sample. It is hoped that the design of this x-ray shield can be scaled in order to produce a shield device for the National Ignition Facility optical Thomson scattering collection telescope, in order to allow measurements of hohlraum plasma conditions produced in inertial confinement fusion experiments. If successful, it will also have applications in many other high energy density experiments where optical and ultra-violet measurements are desirable.

  19. Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA has relied on the materials to provide radiation shielding for astronauts since the first manned flights. Until very recently existing materials in the structure of manned spacecraft as well as the equipment and consumables onboard have been taken advantage of for radiation shielding. With the advent of the International Space Station and the prospect of extended missions to the Moon or Mars, it has been found that the materials, which were included in the spacecraft for other reasons, do not provide adequate shielding. For the first time materials are being added to manned missions solely to improve the radiation shielding. It is now recognized that dual use materials must be identified/developed. These materials must serve a purpose as part of the spacecraft or its cargo and at the same time be good shielding. This paper will review methods for evaluating the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials and describe the character of materials that have high radiation shielding effectiveness. Some candidate materials will also be discussed.

  20. Multipurpose applications of the accelerator-based neutron source[1pt] GENEPI2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, F.; Baylac, M.; Billebaud, A.; Boge, P.; Cabanel, T.; Labussière, E.; Méplan, O.; Rey, S.

    2016-11-01

    GENEPI2 (GEnérateur de NEutrons Pulsé Intense) is an accelerator-based neutron source operating at LPSC laboratory in Grenoble (France). The neutrons are produced at 2.5MeV or 14.2MeV trough fusion reactions. GENEPI2 specifications allow performing efficiently accelerated irradiation tests of integrated circuits. This facility can also be operated to test and calibrate different types of detectors. This paper will describe the facility and its performances. Then, measurements of the neutron production will be presented as well as different types of experiments and irradiations. Finally, we describe upgrades undertaken to increase the neutron flux and optimize the facility for multiple applications.

  1. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  2. iSHIELD - A Line Source Application of SHIELD11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-27

    iSHIELD11 performs a line-source numerical integration of radiation source terms that are defined by the iSHIELD11 computer code[1] . An example is provided to demonstrate how one can use iSHIELD11 to perform a shielding analysis for a 250 GeV electron linear accelerator.

  3. Neutronic Reactor Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, Enrico; Zinn, Walter H.

    The argument of the present Patent is a radiation shield suitable for protection of personnel from both gamma rays and neutrons. Such a shield from dangerous radiations is achieved to the best by the combined action of a neutron slowing material (a moderator) and a neutron absorbing material. Hydrogen is particularly effective for this shield since it is a good absorber of slow neutrons and a good moderator of fast neutrons. The neutrons slowed down by hydrogen may, then, be absorbed by other materials such as boron, cadmium, gadolinium, samarium or steel. Steel is particularly convenient for the purpose, given its effectiveness in absorbing also the gamma rays from the reactor (both primary gamma rays and secondary ones produced by the moderation of neutrons). In particular, in the present Patent a shield is described, made of alternate layers of steel and Masonite (an hydrolized ligno-cellulose material). The object of the present Patent is not discussed in any other published paper.

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. Shielded cells transfer automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  6. Experiments on iron shield transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43- and 68-MeV protons via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Nakao, Noriaki [and others

    1996-03-01

    In order to provide benchmark data of neutrons transmitted through iron shields in the intermediate-energy region, spatial distributions of neutron energy spectra and reaction rates behind and inside the iron shields of thickness up to 130 cm were measured for 43- and 68-MeVp-{sup 7}Li neutrons using a quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam source at the 90-MV AVF cyclotron facility of the TLARA facility in JAERI. The measured data by five kinds of detectors: the BC501A detector, the Bonner ball counter, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th fission counters, {sup 7}LiF and {sup nat}LiF TLDs and solid state nuclear track detector, are numerically provided in this report in the energy region between 10{sup -4} eV and the energy of peak neutrons generated by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction. (author).

  7. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  8. Shielding Effectiveness of Composites Containing Flaky Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; QU Zhaoming; WANG Yilong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative relationship between the electromagnetic-shielding property of composites and the distribution of inclusions,a scheme for predicting the shielding effectiveness of composites containing variously-distributed flaky inclusions is proposed.The scheme is based on equivalent parameters of homogeneous comparison materials and the plane-wave shielding theory.It leads to explicit formulas for the shielding effectiveness of multi-layered composites in terms of microstructural parameters that characterize the shape,distribution and orientation of the inclusions.For single layer composite that contains random and aligned flaky silver-coated carbonyl-iron particles with fractions of different volume,the predicted shielding effectiveness agrees well with the experimental data.As for composites containing aligned flaky particles,the shielding effectiveness obtained by the proposed scheme and experiment data is higher than that the random case,e.g.about 20 dB higher at 750 MHz.The proposed scheme is a straightforward method for optimizing future composite designs.

  9. On the time response of background obtained in γ-ray spectroscopy experiments using LaBr3(Ce) detectors with different shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régis, J.-M.; Dannhoff, M.; Jolie, J.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Saed-Samii, N.

    2016-03-01

    Employing the γ-γ fast-timing technique with LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detectors allows the direct determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This limit is increased as soon as background is present in the coincidence spectra underneath the full-energy peaks of the γ-γ cascade. Our aim was to identify the components of the γ-ray background by systematic γ-γ fast-timing measurements using different types of γ shielding within a large γ-ray spectrometer. The energy dependent physical zero-time response was measured using background-free full-energy peak events from the 152Eu γ-ray source. This is compared with the time response of the (Compton-) background distribution as obtained using the prompt 60Co γ-ray source. The time response of the typical Compton background is about 15 ps faster than the time response of background-free full-energy peak events. Below about 500 keV, a second type of background contributes by the detection of Compton-scattered γ rays generated in the materials of the spectrometer around the detector. Due to the additional time-of-flight of the Compton-scattered γ rays, this low-energy background is largely delayed. Compared with a bare cylindrical 1.5 in . × 1.5 in . LaBr3(Ce) detector, the BGO-shielded detector in the Compton-suppression mode improves the peak-to-total ratio by a factor of 1.66(5), while the Pb-shielded detector only slightly reduces the low-energy background.

  10. Magnetic shielding structure optimization design for wireless power transmission coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongyu; Wang, Junhua; Long, Mengjiao; Huang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of the wireless power transmission (WPT) system, a novel design scheme with magnetic shielding structure on the WPT coil is presented in this paper. This new type of shielding structure has great advantages on magnetic flux leakage reduction and magnetic field concentration. On the basis of theoretical calculation of coil magnetic flux linkage and characteristic analysis as well as practical application feasibility consideration, a complete magnetic shielding structure was designed and the whole design procedure was represented in detail. The simulation results show that the coil with the designed shielding structure has the maximum energy transmission efficiency. Compared with the traditional shielding structure, the weight of the new design is significantly decreased by about 41%. Finally, according to the designed shielding structure, the corresponding experiment platform is built to verify the correctness and superiority of the proposed scheme.

  11. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high

  12. Accelerator-based techniques for the support of senior-level undergraduate physics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.; Clark, J. C.; Isaacs-Smith, T.

    2001-07-01

    Approximately three years ago, Auburn University replaced its aging Dynamitron accelerator with a new 2MV tandem machine (Pelletron) manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). This new machine is maintained and operated for the University by Physics Department personnel, and the accelerator supports a wide variety of materials modification/analysis studies. Computer software is available that allows the NEC Pelletron to be operated from a remote location, and an Internet link has been established between the Accelerator Laboratory and the Upper-Level Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory in the Physics Department. Additional software supplied by Canberra Industries has also been used to create a second Internet link that allows live-time data acquisition in the Teaching Laboratory. Our senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students perform a number of experiments related to radiation detection and measurement as well as several standard accelerator-based experiments that have been added recently. These laboratory exercises will be described, and the procedures used to establish the Internet links between our Teaching Laboratory and the Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed.

  13. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  14. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  15. Improved ferrous shielding for flat cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    To improve shielding of flat multicore cables, a thin, seamless ferrous shield around all cores optimizes low frequency magnetic shielding. Such shielding is covered with an ultrathin seamless coat of highly conductive nonferrous material.

  16. Magnetic shielding and exotic spin-dependent interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Li, Y; Thulasi, S; Pustelny, S; Budker, D; Zolotorev, M

    2016-01-01

    Experiments searching for exotic spin-dependent interactions typically employ magnetic shielding between the source of the exotic field and the interrogated spins. We explore the question of what effect magnetic shielding has on detectable signals induced by exotic fields. Our general conclusion is that for common experimental geometries and conditions, magnetic shields should not significantly reduce sensitivity to exotic spin-dependent interactions, especially when the technique of comagnetometry is used. However, exotic fields that couple to electron spin can induce magnetic fields in the interior of shields made of a soft ferro- or ferrimagnetic material. This induced magnetic field must be taken into account in the interpretation of experiments searching for new spin-dependent interactions and raises the possibility of using a flux concentrator inside magnetic shields to amplify exotic spin-dependent signals.

  17. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm.

  18. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  19. European Strategy for Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Cervera, Anselmo; Donini, Andrea; Dracos, Marcos; Duchesneau, Dominique; Dufour, Fanny; Edgecock, Rob; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Gschwendtner, Edda; Kudenko, Yury; Long, Ken; Maalampi, Jukka; Mezzetto, Mauro; Pascoli, Silvia; Palladino, Vittorio; Rondio, Ewa; Rubbia, Andre; Rubbia, Carlo; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Thomas, Jenny; Wark, David; Wildner, Elena; Zito, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Massive neutrinos reveal physics beyond the Standard Model, which could have deep consequences for our understanding of the Universe. Their study should therefore receive the highest level of priority in the European Strategy. The discovery and study of leptonic CP violation and precision studies of the transitions between neutrino flavours require high intensity, high precision, long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments. The community of European neutrino physicists involved in oscillation experiments is strong enough to support a major neutrino long baseline project in Europe, and has an ambitious, competitive and coherent vision to propose. Following the 2006 European Strategy for Particle Physics (ESPP) recommendations, two complementary design studies have been carried out: LAGUNA/LBNO, focused on deep underground detector sites, and EUROnu, focused on high intensity neutrino facilities. LAGUNA LBNO recommends, as first step, a conventional neutrino beam CN2PY from a CERN SPS North Area Neutrino Fac...

  20. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa; Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Oba, Yojiro; Otake, Yoshie; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  1. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  2. Shielding calculations for SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ginneken, A.

    1990-03-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of hadron and muon shielding for SSC are reviewed with emphasis on their application to radiation safety and environmental protection. Models and algorithms for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic showers, and for production and transport of muons in the TeV regime are briefly discussed. Capabilities and limitations of these calculations are described and illustrated with a few examples. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Shielding in Mental Health Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen W. Haugom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shielding is defined as the confinement of patients to a single room or a separate unit/area inside the ward, accompanied by a member of staff. It is understood as both a treatment and a control. The purpose of this study is to examine how staff in psychiatric hospitals describe and assess shielding. This qualitative study uses a descriptive and exploratory design with an inductive approach. The material was acquired through the Acute Network (in Psychiatry nationwide shielding project. Data collection was carried out by the staff, who described the shielding procedure on a semi-structured form. The analysis was inspired by Graneheim and Lundman’s qualitative content analysis. Shielding has been described as an ambiguous practice, that is, shielding can be understood in several ways. There is a clear tension between shielding as a control and shielding as a treatment, with control being described as more important. The important therapeutic elements of shielding have also been mentioned, and shielding involves isolation to different degrees.

  4. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  5. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  6. Performance study of galactic cosmic ray shield materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Nealy, John E.; Badavi, Francis F.; Kiefer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The space program is faced with two difficult radiation protection issues for future long-term operations. First, retrofit of shield material or conservatism in shield design is prohibitively expensive and often impossible. Second, shielding from the cosmic heavy ions is faced with limited knowledge on the physical properties and biological responses of these radiations. The current status of space shielding technology and its impact on radiation health is discussed herein in terms of conventional protection practice and a test biological response model. The impact of biological response on the selection of optimum materials for cosmic ray shielding is presented in terms of the transmission characteristics of the shield material. Although the systematics of nuclear cross sections are able to demonstrate the relation of exposure risk to shield-material composition, the current uncertainty in-nuclear cross sections will not allow an accurate evaluation of risk reduction. This paper presents a theoretical study of risk-related factors and a pilot experiment to study the effectiveness of choice of shield materials to reduce the risk in space operations.

  7. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  8. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-04-11

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding.

  9. A large-scale magnetic shield with 10^6 damping at milli-Hertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Beck, D H; Chupp, T; Fierlinger, K; Fierlinger, P; Kuchler, F; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Singh, J T; Schläpfer, U; Schnabel, A; Stoepler, R; Stuiber, S; Strum, M; Taubenheim, B; Voigt, J

    2015-01-01

    A magnetically shielded environment with a damping factor larger than one million at the milli-Hertz frequency regime and an extremely low field and gradient over an extended volume is presented. This extraordinary shielding perfomance is to our knowledge unprecedented and represents an improvement of the state of the art in damping the difficult regime of very low-frequency distortions by more than an order of magnitude. Thus, a new generation of high precision measurements in fundamental physics and metrology is enabled with this technology, particularly suitable to find traces of new physics far beyond the reach of accelerator based physics. The technical realization of the shield with its improvements in design is discussed.

  10. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  11. (n,γ)反应实验研究中的中子屏蔽设计%Neutron Shielding Design for Experiment Research of (n,γ) Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兴; 贺国珠; 程品晶; 张奇纬; 周祖英

    2015-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section can be measured by Gamma-ray Total Absorption Facility (GTAF) with high precision. To reduce the background of experiments, the neutron source must be collimated and shielded, and the neutrons scattered from the sample must be absorbed to minimise interference after they go into the detector. The shield, collimator and absorber were simulated and designed with MCNP code. Boron-containing polyethylene with 3%BC4 and lead are used as the materials for the neutron collimator and shield. The diameter of the collimating aperture is 13 mm, and the length of the collimator is 500 mm. After being collimated, the diameter of neutron beam plateau at the sample position is 21 mm. The neutron absorber is made of polyethylene and BC4, and the thickness of polyethylene shell and BC4 shell are 60 and 10 mm, respectively. The simulated result shows that neutrons scattered from the sample can decay 93.7%through the neutron absorber.%用γ射线全吸收型装置(Gamma-ray Total Absorption Facility,GTAF),可以对中子俘获反应截面进行高精度测量。为了降低实验本底,实验中需要对源中子进行准直和屏蔽,还要对被样品散射的中子进行吸收以减少它们进入探测器后所形成的干扰。采用MCNP对中子的准直器、屏蔽体和中子吸收体进行了模拟设计,中子准直屏蔽体材料选用含硼聚乙烯(BC4的质量分数为3%)和铅。准直孔直径为13 mm,长度为500 mm,经准直后样品处中子束斑坪顶直径为21 mm。中子吸收体材料选用聚乙烯和碳化硼,吸收体球壳内腔半径30 mm,聚乙烯壳层厚度60 mm,碳化硼壳层厚度10 mm,被样品散射的中子经吸收体后衰减93.7%。

  12. The axion shield

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Mescia, F; Renau, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of a charged particle in a spatially constant, but time dependent, pseudoscalar background. Physically this pseudoscalar background could be provided by a relic axion density. The background leads to an explicit breaking of Lorentz invariance; as a consequence the process p-> p gamma is possible and the background acts as a shield against extremely energetic cosmic rays, an effect somewhat similar to the GZK cut-off effect. The effect is model independent and can be computed exactly. The hypothetical detection of the photons radiated via this mechanism would provide an indirect way of verifying the cosmological relevance of axions.

  13. Watching a disappearing shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  14. Tests of shielding effectiveness of Kevlar and Nextel onboard the International Space Station and the Foton-M3 capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, M; Bengin, V; Casolino, M; Roca, V; Zanini, A; Durante, M

    2010-08-01

    Radiation assessment and protection in space is the first step in planning future missions to the Moon and Mars, where mission and number of space travelers will increase and the protection of the geomagnetic shielding against the cosmic radiation will be absent. In this framework, the shielding effectiveness of two flexible materials, Kevlar and Nextel, were tested, which are largely used in the construction of spacecrafts. Accelerator-based tests clearly demonstrated that Kevlar is an excellent shield for heavy ions, close to polyethylene, whereas Nextel shows poor shielding characteristics. Measurements on flight performed onboard of the International Space Station and of the Foton-M3 capsule have been carried out with special attention to the neutron component; shielded and unshielded detectors (thermoluminescence dosemeters, bubble detectors) were exposed to a real radiation environment to test the shielding properties of the materials under study. The results indicate no significant effects of shielding, suggesting that thin shields in low-Earth Orbit have little effect on absorbed dose.

  15. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  16. Fine-tuning the etch depth profile via dynamic shielding of ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Lixiang; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method for finely adjusting the etch depth profile by dynamic shielding in the course of ion beam etching (IBE), which is crucial for the ultra-precision fabrication of large optics. We study the physical process of dynamic shielding and propose a parametric modeling method to quantitatively analyze the shielding effect on etch depths, or rather the shielding rate, where a piecewise Gaussian model is adopted to fit the shielding rate profile. We have conducted two experiments. In the experiment on parametric modeling of shielding rate profiles, its result shows that the shielding rate profile is significantly influenced by the rotary angle of the leaf. And the experimental result of fine-tuning the etch depth profile shows good agreement with the simulated result, which preliminarily verifies the feasibility of our method.

  17. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  18. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  19. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  20. Enhanced plastic neutron shielding for thermal and epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomino, L A RodrIguez; Blostein, J J; Dawidowski, J [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientIficas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, (8400) Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, S. C. de Bariloche, RIo Negro (Argentina); Cuello, G J [Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: javier@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2008-06-15

    We describe a compound made of paraffin and boron carbide (boraffin) deviced to enhance epithermal neutron shielding. The compound is easily prepared and is specially suited to be adapted to particular surfaces. Transmission experiments show a favourable comparison with a commercial rubber-boron carbide compound in the epithermal range. A detector shielding built with this material is described and the achieved background reduction experimentally determined is shown.

  1. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  2. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  3. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71 st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R 2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R 2 respectively.

  4. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  5. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  6. Specific contributions of the Dutch progamme ``RAS`` towards accelerator-based transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahams, K.; Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H.; Heil, J.A.; Koning, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Accelerator-based transmutation is being studied by ECN within its general nuclear waste transmutation programme RAS. In this paper the following contributions are presented: (1) Evaluation of cross sections at intermediate energies, within an international frame given by NEA, (2) Cell calculations on the equilibration of transuranium actinides in thermal molten-salt transmuters, (3) Irradiation facilities at the European research reactor HFR in Petten, which have been constructed with the purpose to demonstrate and investigate the transmutation of waste in a high neutron flux, (4) Studies of accelerator-based neutron generating systems to transmute neptunium and technetium, (5) Comparison of several systems on the basis of criteria for successful nuclear waste-management. (orig.).

  7. Studies of industrial emissions by accelerator-based techniques: A review of applications at CEDAD

    OpenAIRE

    Calcagnile L.; Quarta G.

    2012-01-01

    Different research activities are in progress at the Centre for Dating and Diagnostics (CEDAD), University of Salento, in the field of environmental monitoring by exploiting the potentialities given by the different experimental beam lines implemented on the 3 MV Tande-tron accelerator and dedicated to AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrome-try) radiocarbon dating and IB A (Ion Beam Analysis). An overview of these activities is presented by showing how accelerator-based analytical techniques can be ...

  8. Treatment planning capability assessment of a beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M.S., E-mail: herrera@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, S.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Burlon, A.A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Minsky, D.M.; Kreiner, A.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 191, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, UNSAM, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) a theoretical study was performed to assess the treatment planning capability of different configurations of an optimized beam shaping assembly for such a facility. In particular this study aims at evaluating treatment plans for a clinical case of Glioblastoma.

  9. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  10. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  11. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  12. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  13. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  14. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  15. On accelerator-based neutron sources and neutron field characterization with low energy neutron spectrometer based on position sensitive 3He counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, I; Miyamaru, H; Kato, I; Mori, Y

    2009-07-01

    The development of new neutron sources for BNCT applications, based on particle accelerators is currently underway all over the world. Though nuclear reactors were used for a long time as the only neutron source available having the requested flux levels, the accelerator-based ones have recently been investigated on the other hand due to its easy-to-use and acceptable performances. However, when using an accelerator, various secondary particles would be emitted which forms a troublesome background. Moreover, the neutrons produced have usually an energy spectrum somewhat different from the requested one and thus should be largely moderated. An additional issue to be taken into account is the patient positioning, which should be close to the neutron source, in order to take advantage of a neutron flux level high enough to limit the BNCT treatment time within 1h. This implies that, inside a relatively narrow space, neutrons should be moderated, while unnecessary secondary particles should be shielded. Considering that a background-free neutron field from an accelerator-driven neutron source dedicated to BNCT application is generally difficult to be provided, the characterization of such a neutron field will have to be clearly assessed. In the present study, a low energy neutron spectrometer has been thus designed and is now being developed to measure the accelerator-based neutron source performance. The presently proposed spectrometer is based on a (3)He proportional counter, which is 50 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, with a gas pressure of 0.5 MPa. It is quite unique that the spectrometer is set up in parallel with the incident neutron beam and a reaction depth distribution is measured by it as a position sensitive detector. Recently, a prototype detector has been developed and the signal test is now underway. In this paper, the feature of the accelerator-based neutron sources is outlined and importance of neutron field characterization is discussed. And the developed

  16. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L.; Grove, R.E. [Radiation Safety Information Computational Center RSICC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6171 (United States); Kodeli, I. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gulliford, J.; Sartori, E. [OECD NEA Data Bank, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-07-01

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  17. Noise Modeling From Conductive Shields Using Kirchhoff Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, Henrik J; Volegov, Petr L; Espy, Michelle A; Matlashov, Andrei N; Savukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J

    2010-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-sensitivity magnetic-field measurements has stimulated interest in understanding the magnetic noise of conductive materials, especially of magnetic shields based on high-permeability materials and/or high-conductivity materials. For example, SQUIDs and atomic magnetometers have been used in many experiments with mu-metal shields, and additionally SQUID systems frequently have radio frequency shielding based on thin conductive materials. Typical existing approaches to modeling noise only work with simple shield and sensor geometries while common experimental setups today consist of multiple sensor systems with complex shield geometries. With complex sensor arrays used in, for example, MEG and Ultra Low Field MRI studies, knowledge of the noise correlation between sensors is as important as knowledge of the noise itself. This is crucial for incorporating efficient noise cancelation schemes for the system. We developed an approach that allows us to calculate the Johnson noise for arbitrary shaped shields and multiple sensor systems. The approach is efficient enough to be able to run on a single PC system and return results on a minute scale. With a multiple sensor system our approach calculates not only the noise for each sensor but also the noise correlation matrix between sensors. Here we will show how the algorithm can be implemented.

  18. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  19. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  20. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  1. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  2. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreiner, A.J., E-mail: kreiner@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castell, W. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Di Paolo, H. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina); Baldo, M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bergueiro, J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  3. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, N; Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Hofmann, P

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005.

  4. Early Results from the Advanced Radiation Protection Thick GCR Shielding Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Clowdsley, Martha; Slaba, Tony; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Zeitlin, Cary; Kenny, Sean; Crespo, Luis; Giesy, Daniel; Warner, James; McGirl, Natalie; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Radiation Protection Thick Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Shielding Project leverages experimental and modeling approaches to validate a predicted minimum in the radiation exposure versus shielding depth curve. Preliminary results of space radiation models indicate that a minimum in the dose equivalent versus aluminum shielding thickness may exist in the 20-30 g/cm2 region. For greater shield thickness, dose equivalent increases due to secondary neutron and light particle production. This result goes against the long held belief in the space radiation shielding community that increasing shielding thickness will decrease risk to crew health. A comprehensive modeling effort was undertaken to verify the preliminary modeling results using multiple Monte Carlo and deterministic space radiation transport codes. These results verified the preliminary findings of a minimum and helped drive the design of the experimental component of the project. In first-of-their-kind experiments performed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, neutrons and light ions were measured between large thicknesses of aluminum shielding. Both an upstream and a downstream shield were incorporated into the experiment to represent the radiation environment inside a spacecraft. These measurements are used to validate the Monte Carlo codes and derive uncertainty distributions for exposure estimates behind thick shielding similar to that provided by spacecraft on a Mars mission. Preliminary results for all aspects of the project will be presented.

  5. Toward a new methodology for measuring the threshold Shields number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Gauthier; Dhont, Blaise; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A number of bedload transport equations involve the threshold Shields number (corresponding to the threshold of incipient motion for particles resting on the streambed). Different methods have been developed for determining this threshold Shields number; they usually assume that the initial streambed is plane prior to sediment transport. Yet, there are many instances in real-world scenarios, in which the initial streambed is not free of bed forms. We are interested in developing a new methodology for determining the threshold of incipient motion in gravel-bed streams in which smooth bed forms (e.g., anti-dunes) develop. Experiments were conducted in a 10-cm wide, 2.5-m long flume, whose initial inclination was 3%. Flows were supercritical and fully turbulent. The flume was supplied with water and sediment at fixed rates. As bed forms developed and migrated, and sediment transport rates exhibited wide fluctuations, measurements had to be taken over long times (typically 10 hr). Using a high-speed camera, we recorded the instantaneous bed load transport rate at the outlet of the flume by taking top-view images. In parallel, we measured the evolution of the bed slope, water depth, and shear stress by filming through a lateral window of the flume. These measurements allowed for the estimation of the space and time-averaged slope, from which we deduced the space and time-averaged Shields number under incipient bed load transport conditions. In our experiments, the threshold Shields number was strongly dependent on streambed morphology. Experiments are under way to determine whether taking the space and time average of incipient motion experiments leads to a more robust definition of the threshold Shields number. If so, this new methodology will perform better than existing approaches at measuring the threshold Shields number.

  6. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL; Kodeli, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Sartori, Enrico [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  7. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  8. Pedestrian movement analysis in transfer station corridor: Velocity-based and acceleration-based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Yongkai; Ran, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, pedestrians are classified into aggressive and conservative ones by their temper. Aggressive pedestrians' walking through crowd in transfer station corridor is analyzed. Treating pedestrians as particles, this paper uses the modified social force model (MSFM) as the building block, where forces involve self-driving force, repulsive force and friction force. The proposed model in this paper is a discrete model combining the MSFM and cellular automata (CA) model, where the updating rules of the CA are redefined with MSFM. Due to the continuity of values generated by the MSFM, we use the fuzzy logic to discretize the continuous values into cells pedestrians can move in one step. With the observation that stimulus around pedestrians influences their acceleration directly, an acceleration-based movement model is presented, compared to the generally reviewed velocity-based movement model. In the acceleration-based model, a discretized version of kinematic equation is presented based on the acceleration discretized with fuzzy logic. In real life, some pedestrians would rather keep their desired speed and this is also mimicked in this paper, which is called inertia. Compared to the simple triangular membership function, a trapezoidal membership function and a piecewise linear membership function are used to capture pedestrians' inertia. With the trapezoidal and the piecewise linear membership function, many overlapping scenarios should be carefully handled and Dubois and Prade's four-index method is used to completely describe the relative relationship of fuzzy quantities. Finally, a simulation is constructed to demonstrate the effect of our model.

  9. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  10. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  11. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  12. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging receiver coil decoupling using circumferential shielding structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jhy-Neng Tasso; Fa-Hsuan Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a flexible phased-array design using circular coils with circumferential shielding structure to achieve robust decoupling between coil elements when the array is either bended or on a flat plane. Two types of circumferential shielding were tested through numerical simulation and imaging experiment. The results demonstrated that our arrays have good decoupling between coils when they are on a curved surface with S21 coil array. Future work will empirically construct a multi-channel array with the number of channel matched to commercial phased array in order to validate the performance in vivo.

  14. WAVS radiation shielding references and assumptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-07

    At ITER, the confluence of a high radiation environment and the requirement for high performance imaging for plasma and plasma-facing surface diagnosis will necessitate extensive application of radiation shielding. Recommended here is a dual-layer shield design composed of lead for gamma attenuation, surrounded by a fire-resistant polyehtylene doped with a thermal neutron absorber for neutron shielding.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of bismuth shields in PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Young [Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei Universtiy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyeon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kung, Sik Nam [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konkuk Univeristy Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Soo [Dept. of Biomedical Enginnering, Chugnbuk National University, Junju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Recently with CT developed, various studies for reduction of exposure dose is underway. Study of bismuth shields in these studies is actively underway, and has already been applied in the clinical. However, the application of the PET/CT examination was not activated. Therefore, through this study, depending on the application of bismuth shields in the PET/CT examination, we identify the quality of the image and the impact on the Standard Uptake Value (SUV). In this study, to apply to the shielding of the breast, by using the bismuth shields that contains 0.06 mm Pb ingredients, was applied to the PET/CT GEMINI TF 64 (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, USA). Phantom experiments using the NEMA IEC Body Phantom, images were acquired according to the presence or absence of bismuth shields apply. Also, When applying, images were obtained by varying the spacing 0, 1, 2 cm each image set to the interest range in the depth of the phantom by using EBW-NM ver.1.0. When image of the PET Emission acquires, the SUV was in increased depending on the use of bismuth shields, difference in the depth to the surface from deep in the phantom increasingly SUV increased (P<0.005). Also, when using shields, as the more gab decreased, SUV is more increased (P<0.005). Through this study, PET/CT examination by using of bismuth shields which is used as purpose of reduction dose. When using shields, the difference of SUV resulting from the application of bismuth shields exist and that difference when gab is decrease and surface is wider. Therefore, setting spacing of shield should be considered, if considering the reduction of the variation of SUV and image quality, disease of deep organs should be a priority rather than superficial organ disease. Use of bismuth shielding factor considering the standard clinical examination, decrease unnecessary exposure can be expected to be considered.

  17. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verst, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  18. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties.

  19. Radiation shielding for future space exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Joel Michael

    weighted figure of merit (WFoM) approach that quantifies the effectiveness of a candidate material to shield space crews from the whole of the space radiation environment. The results of the WFoM approach should prove useful to designers and engineers in seeking alternative materials suitable for the construction of spacecraft or planetary surface habitats needed for long-term space exploration missions. The dosimetric measurements in this study have confirmed the principle of good space radiation shielding design by showing that low-Z¯ materials are most effective at reducing absorbed dose and dose equivalent while high-Z¯ materials are to be avoided. The relatively high WFoMs of carbon composite and lunar- and Martian-regolith composite could have important implications for the design and construction of future spacecraft or planetary surface habitats. The ground-based measurements conducted in this study have validated the heavy ion extension of FLUKA by producing normalized differential LET fluence spectra that are in good agreement with experiment.

  20. Shielding from space radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    This Progress Report covering the period of 1 June 1993 to 1 Dec. 1993 presents the development of an analytical solution to the heavy ion transport equation in terms of a one-layer Green's function formalism. The mathematical developments are recasted into an efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code may also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments. Results from the isotopic version of the code with 80 isotopes present for a single layer target material, for the case of an iron beam projectile at 600 MeV/nucleon in water is presented.

  1. 350 keV accelerator based PGNAA setup to detect nitrogen in bulk samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Gondal, M. A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Isab, A. A.; Raashid, M.; Dastageer, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen concentration was measured in explosive and narcotics proxy material, e.g. anthranilic acid, caffeine, melamine, and urea samples, bulk samples through thermal neutron capture reaction using 350 keV accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup. Intensity of 2.52, 3.53-3.68, 4.51, 5.27-5.30 and 10.38 MeV prompt gamma rays of nitrogen from the bulk samples was measured using a cylindrical 100 mm×100 mm (diameter×height ) BGO detector. Inspite of interference of nitrogen gamma rays from bulk samples with capture prompt gamma rays from BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays has been obtained. This is an indication of the excellent performance of the PGNAA setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  2. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; D'Errico, F; Nath, R; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in sup 1 sup 0 B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast ...

  3. 350 keV accelerator based PGNAA setup to detect nitrogen in bulk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A., E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Physics and King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F.Z.; Gondal, M.A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur [Department of Physics and King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Isab, A.A. [Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Raashid, M.; Dastageer, M.A. [Department of Physics and King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-11-21

    Nitrogen concentration was measured in explosive and narcotics proxy material, e.g. anthranilic acid, caffeine, melamine, and urea samples, bulk samples through thermal neutron capture reaction using 350 keV accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup. Intensity of 2.52, 3.53–3.68, 4.51, 5.27–5.30 and 10.38 MeV prompt gamma rays of nitrogen from the bulk samples was measured using a cylindrical 100 mm×100 mm (diameter×height ) BGO detector. Inspite of interference of nitrogen gamma rays from bulk samples with capture prompt gamma rays from BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays has been obtained. This is an indication of the excellent performance of the PGNAA setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  4. Design for an accelerator-based orthogonal epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D A; Beynon, T D; Green, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the proposed Birmingham accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In particular, the option of producing a therapy beam at an orthogonal direction to the incoming protons is considered. Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, both with and without a head phantom, have shown that an orthogonal beam geometry is not only acceptable but is indeed beneficial, in terms of a lower mean neutron energy and an enhanced therapeutic ratio for the same useful neutron fluence in the therapy beam. Typical treatment times for various beam options have been calculated, and range from 20 to 48 min with a 5 mA beam of 2.8 MeV protons, if the maximum photon-equivalent dose delivered to healthy tissue is to be 12.6 Gy Eq. The effects of proton beam diameter upon the therapy beam parameters have also been considered.

  5. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Quantitative elemental analysis of an industrial mineral talc, using accelerator-based analytical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy) and Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria)]. E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk; Ige, A.O. [Natural History Museum, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Mazzoli, C. [Dipartimento di Mineralogia e Petrologia, Universita di Padova, 35100 Padova (Italy); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy); Ajayi, E.O.B. [Department of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); De Poli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    Accelerator-based technique of PIXE was employed for the determination of the elemental concentration of an industrial mineral, talc. Talc is a very versatile mineral in industries with several applications. Due to this, there is a need to know its constituents to ensure that the workers are not exposed to health risks. Besides, microscopic tests on some talc samples in Nigeria confirm that they fall within the BP British Pharmacopoeia standard for tablet formation. However, for these samples to become a local source of raw material for pharmaceutical grade talc, the precise elemental compositions should be established which is the focus of this work. Proton beam produced by the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro, Padova, Italy was used for the PIXE measurements. The results which show the concentration of different elements in the talc samples, their health implications and metabolic roles are presented and discussed.

  7. About the scheme of the infrared FEL system for the accelerator based on HF wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, V.S.; Dzergach, A.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Accelerators, based on localization of plasmoids in the HF wells (RF traps) of the axially-symmetric electromagnetic field E {sub omn} in an oversized (m,n>>1) resonant system, can give accelerating gradients {approximately}100 kV/{lambda}, e.g. 10 GV/m if {lambda}=10 {mu}m. One of possible variants of HF feeding for these accelerators is based on using the powerful infrared FEL System with 2 frequencies. The corresponding FEL`s may be similar to the Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL ({lambda}{sub 1,2}{approximately}10 pm, e-beam energy {approximately}15 MeV, e-beam current {approximately}100 A). Their power is defined mainly by the HF losses in the resonant system of the supposed accelerator.

  8. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT of explanted livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingeneria Nucleare; Colautti, P. [INFN, Padova (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro; Corrado, M.G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica; d`Errico, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Matzke, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Monti, S.; Tinti, R. [ENEA-ERG-FIRE, Bologna (Italy); Silari, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    An accelerator-based thermal neutron source for BNCT of the explanted liver was designed using the MCNP code. Neutrons are generated via (d,n) reactions by 7 MeV deuterons bombarding a beryllium target. The therapy constraints were approached by simulating an irradiation cavity placed inside a graphite reflector parallelepiped containing a heavy-water moderator in turn enclosing the beryllium target. The experimental verification was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy). The thermal and epithermal neutron flux was measured at various positions in the irradiation cavity by means of activation techniques employing bare and cadmium covered indium foils. Further measurements were performed with BF{sub 3} detectors. The fast neutron component of the dose equivalent and the energy spectrum above 100keV were assessed by means of a recently developed technique employing variable threshold superheated drop detectors. The prompt gamma ray dose was measured with {sup 7}LiF TLDs. (author).

  9. A new radiation shielding material: Amethyst ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay, E-mail: turgaykorkut@hotmail.co [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Korkut, Hatun [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Karabulut, Abdulhalik; Budak, Goekhan [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes a new radiation shielding material, amethyst ore. We have determined the elemental composition of amethyst using WDXRF spectroscopy technique. To see the shielding capability of amethyst for several photon energies, these results have been used in simulation process by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Linear attenuation coefficients have been calculated according to the simulation results. Then, these values have been compared to a fine shielding concrete material. The results show that amethyst shields more gamma beams than concrete. This investigation is the first study about the radiation shielding properties of amethyst ore.

  10. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  11. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Carrillo Hector Rene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  12. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Hernandez-Adame, Luis; Guzman-Garcia, Karen Arlete; Ortiz-Hernandez, Arturo Agustin; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Juarez-Alvarado, Cesar Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl)-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  13. Earth pressure balance control for EPB shield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly deals with the critical technology of earth pressure balance (EPB) control in shield tunneling. On the assumption that the conditioned soil in the working chamber of the shield is plasticized, a theoretical principle for EPB control is proposed. Dynamic equilibrium of intake volume and discharge volume generated by thrust and discharge is modeled theoretically to simulate the earth pressure variation during excavating. The thrust system and the screw conveyor system for earth pressure control are developed based on the electro-hydraulic technique. The control models of the thrust speed regulation of the cylinders and the rotating speed adjustment of the screw conveyor are also presented. Simulation for earth pressure control is conducted with software AMESim and MATLAB/Simulink to verify the models. Experiments are carried out with intake control in clay soil and discharge control in sandy gravel section, respectively. The experimental results show that the earth pressure variations in the working chamber can be kept at the expected value with a practically acceptable precision by means of real-time tuning the thrust speed or the revolving speed of discharge system.

  14. Stellar activity and magnetic shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Grießmeier, J -M; Lammer, H; Grenfell, J L; Stadelmann, A; Motschmann, U; 10.1017/S1743921309992961

    2010-01-01

    Stellar activity has a particularly strong influence on planets at small orbital distances, such as close-in exoplanets. For such planets, we present two extreme cases of stellar variability, namely stellar coronal mass ejections and stellar wind, which both result in the planetary environment being variable on a timescale of billions of years. For both cases, direct interaction of the streaming plasma with the planetary atmosphere would entail servere consequences. In certain cases, however, the planetary atmosphere can be effectively shielded by a strong planetary magnetic field. The efficiency of this shielding is determined by the planetary magnetic dipole moment, which is difficult to constrain by either models or observations. We present different factors which influence the strength of the planetary magnetic dipole moment. Implications are discussed, including nonthermal atmospheric loss, atmospheric biomarkers, and planetary habitability.

  15. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations.

  16. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  17. Paramagnetism shielding in drilling fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    In drilling operations, drilling fluid containing magnetic materials is used when drilling a well. The materials can significantly shield the Earth’s magnetic field as measured by magnetic sensors inside the drilling strings. The magnetic property of the drilling fluid is one of the substantial error sources for the determination of magnetic azimuth for wellbores. Both the weight material, cuttings, clay and other formation material plus metal filings from the tubular wear m...

  18. Light shield for solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  19. Self-shielding effect of a single phase liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Minamino, A; Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Mitsuda, C; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, Y; Namba, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Ueshima, K; Ebizuka, Y; Ota, A; Suzuki, S; Hagiwara, H; Hashimoto, Y; Kamada, S; Kikuchi, M; Kobayashi, N; Nagase, T; Nakamura, S; Tomita, K; Uchida, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Nishijima, K; Maruyama, T; Motoki, D; Itow, Y; Kim, Y D; Lee, J I; Moon, S H; Lim, K E; Cravens, J P; Smy, M B

    2009-01-01

    Liquid xenon is a suitable material for a dark matter search. For future large scale experiments, single phase detectors are attractive due to their simple configuration and scalability. However, in order to reduce backgrounds, they need to fully rely on liquid xenon's self-shielding property. A prototype detector was developed at Kamioka Observatory to establish vertex and energy reconstruction methods and to demonstrate the self-shielding power against gamma rays from outside of the detector. Sufficient self-shielding power for future experiments was obtained.

  20. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  1. Large Magnetic Shielding Factor Measured by Nonlinear Magneto-optical Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jeffery W; Klassen, Wolfgang; Cerasani, Cameron; Andalib, Taraneh; Bidinosti, Christopher P; Lang, Michael; Ostapchuk, David

    2014-01-01

    A passive magnetic shield was designed and constructed for magnetometer tests for the future neutron electric dipole moment experiment at TRIUMF. The axial shielding factor of the magnetic shield was measured using a magnetometer based on non-linear magneto-optical rotation of the plane of polarized laser light upon passage through a paraffin-coated vapour cell containing natural Rb at room temperature. The laser was tuned to the Rb D1 line, near the $^{85}$Rb $F=2\\rightarrow 2,3$ transition. The shielding factor was measured by applying an axial field externally and measuring the magnetic field internally using the magnetometer. The axial shielding factor was determined to be $(1.3\\pm 0.1)\\times 10^{7}$, from an applied axial field of 1.45~$\\mu$T in the background of Earth's magnetic field.

  2. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  3. Laboratory tests on neutron shields for gamma-ray detectors in space

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Hailey, C J

    2000-01-01

    Shields capable of suppressing neutron-induced background in new classes of gamma-ray detectors such as CdZnTe are becoming important for a variety of reasons. These include a high cross section for neutron interactions in new classes of detector materials as well as the inefficient vetoing of neutron-induced background in conventional active shields. We have previously demonstrated through Monte-Carlo simulations how our new approach, supershields, is superior to the monolithic, bi-atomic neutron shields which have been developed in the past. We report here on the first prototype models for supershields based on boron and hydrogen. We verify the performance of these supershields through laboratory experiments. These experimental results, as well as measurements of conventional monolithic neutron shields, are shown to be consistent with Monte-Carlo simulations. We discuss the implications of this experiment for designs of supershields in general and their application to future hard X-ray/gamma-ray experiments...

  4. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium: Plant layout study and related design issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fontana, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Krakowski, R.A.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Williamson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In preparation for and in support of a detailed R and D Plan for the Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium, an ABC Plant Layout Study was conducted at the level of a pre-conceptual engineering design. The plant layout is based on an adaptation of the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) detailed conceptual design that was completed in the early 1070s. Although the ABC Plant Layout Study included the Accelerator Equipment as an essential element, the engineering assessment focused primarily on the Target; Primary System (blanket and all systems containing plutonium-bearing fuel salt); the Heat-Removal System (secondary-coolant-salt and supercritical-steam systems); Chemical Processing; Operation and Maintenance; Containment and Safety; and Instrumentation and Control systems. Although constrained primarily to a reflection of an accelerator-driven (subcritical) variant of MSBR system, unique features and added flexibilities of the ABC suggest improved or alternative approaches to each of the above-listed subsystems; these, along with the key technical issues in need of resolution through a detailed R&D plan for ABC are described on the bases of the ``strawman`` or ``point-of-departure`` plant layout that resulted from this study.

  5. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Martinsson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9–12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS, the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT and the tropical mid troposphere (MT were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA. Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  6. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  7. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlon, A.A. E-mail: burlon@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Kreiner, A.J.; Valda, A.A.; Minsky, D.M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon[reg ], and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  8. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  9. Acceleration-based methodology to assess the blast mitigation performance of explosive ordnance disposal helmets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, J. P.; Levine, J.; Makris, A.

    2017-07-01

    To design the next generation of blast mitigation helmets that offer increasing levels of protection against explosive devices, manufacturers must be able to rely on appropriate test methodologies and human surrogates that will differentiate the performance level of various helmet solutions and ensure user safety. Ideally, such test methodologies and associated injury thresholds should be based on widely accepted injury criteria relevant within the context of blast. Unfortunately, even though significant research has taken place over the last decade in the area of blast neurotrauma, there currently exists no agreement in terms of injury mechanisms for blast-induced traumatic brain injury. In absence of such widely accepted test methods and injury criteria, the current study presents a specific blast test methodology focusing on explosive ordnance disposal protective equipment, involving the readily available Hybrid III mannequin, initially developed for the automotive industry. The unlikely applicability of the associated brain injury criteria (based on both linear and rotational head acceleration) is discussed in the context of blast. Test results encompassing a large number of blast configurations and personal protective equipment are presented, emphasizing the possibility to develop useful correlations between blast parameters, such as the scaled distance, and mannequin engineering measurements (head acceleration). Suggestions are put forward for a practical standardized blast testing methodology taking into account limitations in the applicability of acceleration-based injury criteria as well as the inherent variability in blast testing results.

  10. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  11. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Iraj, E-mail: i_jabbari@ast.ui.ac.ir [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 8174673441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 8174673441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Central Iran Research Complex, NSTRI, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein [Central Iran Research Complex, NSTRI, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-21

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  12. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  13. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, D L; Donahue, R J; Ludewigt, B A; Vujic, J

    1998-09-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF3, 7LiF, and D2O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF3 or 7LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to approximately 50% higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a 7LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq.

  14. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hannah E. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  15. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  16. Dique seco, en South Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stott, Peter

    1958-10-01

    Full Text Available La conocida empresa Brigham & Cowan Ltd, de South Shields (Inglaterra, acaba de construir un dique de carena en la desembocadura del río Tyne, destinado a la reparación de tanques y cargas de gran tonelaje y de relativamente poco calado. El vaso tiene 217 m de longitud, 29 de anchura mínima en la entrada, 6,40 de a l tura de agua sobre el umbral de entrada y una compuerta metálica rebatible hacia adelante. En este trabajo se describen las partes que mejor caracterizan esta importante obra.

  17. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  18. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  19. A new lead-free radiation shielding material for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kun; Luo, Wenyun; Dong, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chuanshan; Wu, Guohua; Jiang, Mawei; Zha, Yuanzi

    2009-02-01

    Lead has recently been recognised as a source of environmental pollution, including the lead used for radiation shielding in radiotherapy. The bremsstrahlung radiation caused by the interaction between the electron beam and lead may reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy. To avoid the use of lead, a new material composed of tungsten and hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer is studied with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and experiment in this paper. The component of the material is chosen after simulation with the MC method and the practical measurement is taken to validate the shielding ability of the material. The result shows that the shielding ability of the new material is good enough to fulfill the requirement for application in radiotherapy. Compared with lead alloy, the present new material is so flexible that can be easily customized into arbitrary shapes. Moreover, the material is environmentally friendly and can be recycled conveniently. Therefore, the material can be used as an effective lead substitute for shielding against electron beams in radiotherapy.

  20. Shielding in biology and biophysics: Methodology, dosimetry, interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.; Temuryants, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    An interdisciplinary review of the publications on the shielding of organisms by different materials is presented. The authors show that some discrepancies between the results of different researchers might be attributed to methodological reasons, including purely biological (neglect of rhythms) and technical (specific features of the design or material of the screen) ones. In some cases, an important factor is the instability of control indices due to the variations in space weather. According to the modern concept of biological exposure to microdoses, any isolation of a biological object by any material necessarily leads to several simultaneous changes in environmental parameters, and this undermines the principle of "all other conditions being equal" in the classical differential scheme of an experiment. The shielding effects of water solution are universally recognized and their influence is to be observed for all organisms. Data on the exposure of living organisms to weak combined magnetic fields and on the influence of space weather enabled the development of theoretical models generally explaining the effect of shielding for bioorganisms. Ferromagnetic shielding results in changes of both the static magnetic field and the field of radio waves within the area protected by the screen. When screens are nonmagnetic, changes are due to the isolation from the radio waves. In both cases, some contribution to the fluctuations of measured parameters can be made by variations in the level of ionizing radiation.

  1. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D).

  2. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results.

  3. Shielding of emitting dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca Delzanno, Gian; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2003-10-01

    In the present work we focus on the role of electron emission (either thermionic or photoelectric) in charging an object immersed in a plasma. In fact, it is well known that the higher mobility of the plasma electrons (that would lead to negatively charged objects) can be overcome by electron emission, thus reversing the object polarity. Moreover, recent work [1] has shown how electron emission can fundamentally affect the shielding potential around the dust. In particular, depending on the physical parameters of the system (that were chosen such to correspond to common experimental conditions), the shielding potential can develop an attractive potential well. The aim of the present work is two-fold. First, we will present a parametric study in order to enlight the conditions for the formation, as well as the stability of the well. Furthermore, simulations will be presented with physical parameters corresponding to the ionosphere, thus extending our study to the case of meteroids. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, "Attractive Potential among Thermionically Emitting Microparticles", submitted.

  4. Development of ITER shielding blanket prototype mockup by HIP bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Hatano, Toshihisa; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Takatsu, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Office of ITER Project Promotion, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    minimize thermal effects on the mechanical properties and to reduce the number of fabrication steps. Based on the results of study for optimization of the simultaneous HIP bonding conditions, the HIP conditions were 1050degC, 150 MPa and holding time of 2 hours. Before this assembly for the HIP process, a deep drilling was performed for the coolant channels of the shield block from both sides of the block, then the shield block was bent by 10000-ton press machine to provide the specified curvature. During the bending, iced water was inserted into the drilled holes to prevent excessive deformation of the holes. Iced water was applied as the inserted material in this study because it was easy to remove the inserted material from the drilled holes and chemical reaction could be prevented during removal of the inserted materials. After the HIP process, the first wall surface was finally machined. The back part of the module was also machined to provide coolant manifolds, then cover plates of the manifolds were welded by TIG welding. A series of measurements and inspections was performed in the course of fabrication to make sure the dimensional accuracy and integrity of pressure boundaries. A destructive inspection was also performed with a cut specimen from the edge of the fabricated module to examine the bondability of HIPed interfaces. As a result of this fabrication experience, sufficient bonding by the single step solid HIP process has been demonstrated, and sufficient technical data base on the fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket module has been obtained. (author)

  5. Experimental shielding evaluation of the radiation protection provided by the structurally significant components of residential structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-03-01

    The human health and environmental effects following a postulated accidental release of radioactive material to the environment have been a public and regulatory concern since the early development of nuclear technology. These postulated releases have been researched extensively to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency planning purposes. The objective of this investigation is to provide an updated technical basis for contemporary building shielding factors for the US housing stock. Building shielding factors quantify the protection from ionising radiation provided by a certain building type. Much of the current data used to determine the quality of shielding around nuclear facilities and urban environments is based on simplistic point-kernel calculations for 1950s era suburbia and is no longer applicable to the densely populated urban environments realised today. To analyse a building's radiation shielding properties, the ideal approach would be to subject a variety of building types to various radioactive sources and measure the radiation levels in and around the building. While this is not entirely practicable, this research analyses the shielding effectiveness of ten structurally significant US housing-stock models (walls and roofs) important for shielding against ionising radiation. The experimental data are used to benchmark computational models to calculate the shielding effectiveness of various building configurations under investigation from two types of realistic environmental source terms. Various combinations of these ten shielding models can be used to develop full-scale computational housing-unit models for building shielding factor calculations representing 69.6 million housing units (61.3%) in the United States. Results produced in this investigation provide a comparison between theory and experiment behind building shielding factor methodology.

  6. The investigation of Am-Be neutron source shield effect used on landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei Ochbelagh, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohagheg Ardebily, P.O. Box 179, Ardebil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: ddrezaey@yahoo.com; Miri Hakimabad, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, R. Izadi [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-11

    In this work, experiments were carried out to investigate the possible use of neutron backscattering for the detection of sample buried in the soil. A series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the complexity of the neutron backscattering process and to optimize the source shield thickness. The results of these simulations indicate that neutron source shield plays an important role for the detection of nonmetallic landmines. This paper experimentally demonstrates, by using suitable shield around Am-Be neutron source, the increase of signal-to-noise ratio up to 130%.

  7. Effect of simulated thermal shield motion on nuclear instrument response: measurements and calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Emert, C.J.; Shure, K.; Natelson, M.

    1979-08-01

    An experiment has been performed to determine the effect of motion of a thermal shield on the neutron signal expected from ex-core detectors. Using a mockup of the LWBR reactor vessel, thermal shield, and core barrel in conjunction with a /sup 252/Cf neutron source, the change in detector signal with displacement of the various components was investigated. It was found that moving the thermal shield would produce a significant change in detector signal, although the effect was smaller than would be produced by moving the source and core barrel together. The results were substantiated by two-dimensional discrete-ordinate calculations.

  8. Dynamical analysis of an accelerator-based fluid-fueled subcritical radioactive waste burning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, Michael Louis, Jr.

    The recent revival of interest in accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled systems is documented. Several important applications of these systems are mentioned. In particular, new applications have focused on the destruction of high-level radioactive waste. Systems can be designed to quickly destroy the actinides and long-lived fission products from light water reactor fuel, weapons plutonium, and other high-level defense wastes. The proposed development of these systems is used to motivate the need for the development of dynamic analysis methods for their nuclear kinetics. A physical description of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) concept is provided. This system is used as the basis for the kinetics study in this research. The current approach to the dynamic simulation of an accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled system includes three elements: A discrete ordinates model is used to calculate the flux distribution for the source-driven system; A nodal convection model is used to calculate time-dependent isotope and temperature distributions which impact reactivity; A nodal importance weighting model is used to calculate the reactivity impact of temperature and isotope distributions and to feed this information back to the time-dependent nodal convection model. Specific transients which have been analyzed with the current modeling system are discussed. These transients include loss-of-flow and loss-of-cooling accidents, xenon and samarium transients, and cold-plug and overfueling events. The results of various transients have uncovered unpredictable behavior, unresolved design issues, and the need for active control. Modest initiating events can cause significant swings in system temperature and power. The circulation of the fluid fuel can lead to oscillations on the relatively short scale of the loop circulation time. The system responds quickly to reactivity changes because the large neutron source overwhelms the damping effect of delayed

  9. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. E-mail: stefano.agosteo@polimi.it; Curzio, G.; D' Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in {sup 10}B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  10. Neutron streaming along ducts and labyrinths at the JET biological shielding: Effect of concrete composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were performed at the Joint European Torus (JET) in order to validate the computational tools and methods applied for neutron streaming calculations through penetrations in the JET Hall biological shielding. In the present work the sensitivity of the simulations on the hydrogen and boron content in concrete shielding was investigated. MCNP code was used to simulate neutron streaming along the JET Hall personnel entrance labyrinth for deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma sources for different concrete wall compositions. Neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent along the labyrinth were calculated. Simulation results for the "as built" JET concrete composition were compared against measurements performed using thermoluminescence detectors. This study contributes to the optimization of the radiation shielding of JET and, furthermore, provides information from JET experience that may assist in optimizing and validating the radiation shielding design methodology used in its successor fusion devices ITER and DEMO.

  11. Magnetic Shielding Method and Experiment Study of Inertial Measurement Unit Based on High Precision Fiber-optic Gyroscope%高精度光纤IMU的磁屏蔽方法及实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金涛; 房建成

    2011-01-01

    惯性测量单元(IMU)是位置姿态系统(POS)的核心部分,IMU的精度很大程度上决定着POS精度.由于高精度光纤陀螺(FOG)的光纤线圈对磁场敏感,基于高精度FOG的IMU精度会受磁场影响而降低.本文研究了FOG磁敏感性机理,通过实验得出高精度光纤IMU对磁场敏感的结论.采用电磁场有限元分析软件Ansoft Maxwell研究了磁屏蔽体采用不同材料、不同厚度时的磁屏蔽效能(SE),并进行了IMU磁屏蔽结构设计.通过亥姆霍兹线圈测试得到的磁屏蔽体实际屏蔽效能最高为48.20 dB,与有限元分析结果基本一致.转台环境测试表明:屏蔽体使FOG漂移减小到9%以上;亥姆霍兹线圈测试表明:通过磁屏蔽使FOG零偏磁敏感度衰减2~21 dB,漂移磁敏感度衰减9~23 dB,对提高光纤IMU测试和应用精度以及机载环境适应性有重要意义.%The inertial measurement unit (IMU) is the core of a position and orientation system (POS), whose accuracy has a crucial impact on POS accuracy. But the IMU accuracy based on high precision fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) is degraded because of the sensitivity of the FOG fiber coil to the magnetic field. This paper studied the magnetic sensitivity mechanism of the FOG. And through experimental study reached the conclusion that the IMU based on a high precision FOG is also sensitive to the magnetic field. An IMU shielding is designed, and its shielding effectiveness (SE) is analyzed by electromagnetic field finite element analysis software Ansoft Maxwell for different materials with different thicknesses. The best SE of 48.20 Db is achieved with a Helmholtz coil test, which is consistent with the results of the finite element analysis. The turn table test shows that a reduction of over 9% of the FOG drift is achieved with the enclosure. The Helmholtz coil test with magnetic shielding demonstrates that the bias and drift magnetic sensitivity of the FOG are decreased by 2-21 Db and 9-23 Db

  12. Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

  13. Artificial Dielectric Shields for Integrated Transmission Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Rejaei, B.; Zhuang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel shielding method for on-chip transmission lines built on conductive silicon substrates. The shield consists of an artificial dielectric with a very high in-plane dielectric constant, built from two patterned metal layers isolated by a very thin dielectric film. Inserted below an i

  14. Shielding for beta-gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J J

    1993-06-01

    The build-up factor, B, for lead was expressed as a polynominal cubic function of the relaxation length, mu x, and incorporated in a "general beta-gamma shielding equation." A computer program was written to determine shielding thickness for polyenergetic beta-gamma sources without resorting to the conventional "add-one-HVL" method.

  15. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. (McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole.

  16. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  17. A shielding chamber for the Rossendorf whole-body counter; Eine Abschirmkammer fuer den Rossendorfer Ganzkoerperzaehler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Stephan; Loehnert, Daniela [VKTA - Strahlenschutz, Analytik und Entsorgung Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany).; Schreiber, Wolfgang [Ingenieurbedarf G. Schoene und W. Schreiber GmbH, Radeberg (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    A large part of radionuclides to be evaluated in the frame of incorporation monitoring are gamma emitter that can be directly measured (in vivo). In order to reach the required detection limits for the relevant radionuclides in the short measuring time high effort is necessary for the shielding of natural radioactivity. The contribution describes planning, construction and installation of the shielding chamber for the new in vivo whole body counter in Rossendorf. First experiences and preliminary results are discussed.

  18. Results of shielding characteristics tests in Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Shin; Suzuoki, Zenro; Deshimaru, Takehide; Nakashima, Fumiaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the prototype fast breeder reactor Monju, the shielding characteristics tests were made around the reactor core, the primary heat transport system, and the fuel handling and storage system as a part of the system start-up tests from 0% to 45% of rated power from October 1993 through December 1995. The results of the measurements, analyses and evaluations in these tests validated the FBR shielding analysis methods and demonstrated that there was a safe shielding design margin in Monju. The important basic data for use in future FBR shielding design were successfully acquired. In order to obtain more substantial basic data and to improve the accuracy of the analyses, the next shielding measurements are planned for the period of the system start-up tests at the restart of Monju. (author)

  19. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  20. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  1. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  2. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  3. Shielding superconductors with thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, Sam; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias U; Sethna, James P

    2015-01-01

    Determining the optimal arrangement of superconducting layers to withstand large amplitude AC magnetic fields is important for certain applications such as superconducting radiofrequency cavities. In this paper, we evaluate the shielding potential of the superconducting film/insulating film/superconductor (SIS') structure, a configuration that could provide benefits in screening large AC magnetic fields. After establishing that for high frequency magnetic fields, flux penetration must be avoided, the superheating field of the structure is calculated in the London limit both numerically and, for thin films, analytically. For intermediate film thicknesses and realistic material parameters we also solve numerically the Ginzburg-Landau equations. It is shown that a small enhancement of the superheating field is possible, on the order of a few percent, for the SIS' structure relative to a bulk superconductor of the film material, if the materials and thicknesses are chosen appropriately.

  4. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of Convective Heat Transfer in a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration, the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. A crucial issue for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. This presence could require greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are well suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. Radiation shielding is a key component of any surface power reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), and boron carbide. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to fix the location of any vapor that could form radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on the predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed the experience and facilities necessary to do this evaluation in its Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  6. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  7. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  8. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  9. Treatment of arteriovenous malformations with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery compared with Gamma Knife surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Peter; Stelzer, Keith J; Goodkin, Robert; Douglas, James G

    2006-12-01

    The authors sought to compare the outcomes of patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated by Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) with those of patients treated by linear accelerator-based (LINAC) radiosurgery. One hundred and eighty-seven patients with AVMs were treated at our institution between 1992 and 2003. Ninety-one patients were treated with GKS and 96 patients were treated with LINAC radiosurgery. Patient and treatment characteristics in the two groups included the following. In the LINAC group, the median age was 33 years (range 9-66 years); the median dose was 16 Gy (70% isodose line); the median treated AVM volume was 5.5 cm3; and 46% of patients in this group were treated after hemorrhage. In the GKS group, the median age was 38 years (range 6-63 years); the median dose was 20 Gy (50% isodose line); the median treated AVM volume was 4.3 cm3; and 44% of patients in this group were treated after hemorrhage. Obliteration of AVMs was determined by performing computed tomography (CT) angiography and/or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and angiography. Patient follow-up evaluation included obtaining an MR angiogram/MR image or CT angiogram at 6 months, at 1 year, and then annually thereafter. Angiography was performed to confirm obliteration when MR angiography and/or CT angiography no longer revealed evidence of an AVM. The 5-year estimated AVM obliteration rate was 66% in the entire patient group; the LINAC group was 60%; the GKS group was 72%; this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.97). Twelve patients who underwent treatment with LINAC radiosurgery underwent retreatment with GKS and one was retreated with LINAC radiosurgery. The obliteration rate was 82%. Six patients treated with GKS were retreated with GKS, but the follow-up time is of short duration. Chronic toxicity occurred in 8% of both the GKS and the LINAC groups (p = 0.61). Posttreatment hemorrhage during the time of risk before AVM obliteration was 13% in the GKS group

  10. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  11. International Space Station Radiation Shielding Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, G. D.; Wilson, J. W.; Sandridge, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Hugger, C. P.; Verhage, J.; Anderson, B. M.; Atwell, W.

    2001-01-01

    The projected radiation levels within the International Space Station (ISS) have been criticized by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in their report to the NASA Administrator. Methods for optimal reconfiguration and augmentation of the ISS shielding are now being developed. The initial steps are to develop reconfigurable and realistic radiation shield models of the ISS modules, develop computational procedures for the highly anisotropic radiation environment, and implement parametric and organizational optimization procedures. The targets of the redesign process are the crew quarters where the astronauts sleep and determining the effects of ISS shadow shielding of an astronaut in a spacesuit. The ISS model as developed will be reconfigurable to follow the ISS. Swapping internal equipment rack assemblies via location mapping tables will be one option for shield optimization. Lightweight shield augmentation materials will be optimally fit to crew quarter areas using parametric optimization procedures to minimize the augmentation shield mass. The optimization process is being integrated into the Intelligence Synthesis Environment s (ISE s) immersive simulation facility at the Langley Research Center and will rely on High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) for rapid evaluation of shield parameter gradients.

  12. Optimization design of electromagnetic shielding composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Wang, Qingguo; Qin, Siliang; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2013-03-01

    The effective electromagnetic parameters physical model of composites and prediction formulas of composites' shielding effectiveness and reflectivity were derived based on micromechanics, variational principle and electromagnetic wave transmission theory. The multi-objective optimization design of multilayer composites was carried out using genetic algorithm. The optimized results indicate that material parameter proportioning of biggest absorption ability can be acquired under the condition of the minimum shielding effectiveness can be satisfied in certain frequency band. The validity of optimization design model was verified and the scheme has certain theoretical value and directive significance to the design of high efficiency shielding composites.

  13. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  14. Measurement of neutron attenuation through thick shields and comparison with calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, J.S.; Donahue, J.B.; Burman, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    The large neutrino experiments conducted over the last several years at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) have provided the opportunity to measure the effects of neutron attenuation in very thick shields. These experiments have featured detectors with active masses of 6 to 150 tons and shield thicknesses ranging from 3000 to 5280 g/cm{sup 2}. An absolute measurement of the high-energy neutron flux was made from the beam stop in a neutrino cave at ninety degrees and nine meters from the beam stop. Differential neutron shielding measurements in iron were also performed, resulting in an attenuation length of 148 g/cm{sup 2}. These measurements allow for the testing of radiation shielding codes for deep penetration problems. The measured flux and attenuation length is compared to calculations using the LAHET Code System (LCS). These codes incorporate biasing techniques, allowing for direct calculation of deep penetration shielding problems. Calculations of the neutron current and attenuation length are presented and compared with measured values. Results from the shielding codes show good agreement with the measured values.

  15. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanch, J C; Zhou, X L; Shefer, R E; Klinkowstein, R E

    1992-01-01

    Recent interest in the production of epithermal neutrons for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has promoted an investigation into the feasibility of generating such neutrons with a high current proton accelerator. Energetic protons (2.5 MeV) on a 7Li target produce a spectrum of neutrons with maximum energy of roughly 800 keV. A number of combinations of D2O moderator, lead reflector, 6Li thermal neutron filtration, and D2O/6Li shielding will result in a useful epithermal flux of 1.6 x 10(8) n/s at the patient position. The neutron beam is capable of delivering 3000 RBE-cGy to a tumor at a depth of 7.5 cm in a total treatment time of 60-93 min (depending on RBE values used and based on a 24-cm diameter x 19-cm length D2O moderator). Treatment of deeper tumors with therapeutic advantage would also be possible. Maximum advantage depths (RBE weighted) of 8.2-9.2 (again depending on RBE values and precise moderator configuration) are obtained in a right-circular cylindrical phantom composed of brain-equivalent material with an advantage ratio of 4.7-6.3. A tandem cascade accelerator (TCA), designed and constructed at Science Research Laboratory (SRL) in Somerville MA, can provide the required proton beam parameters for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. An optimized configuration of materials required to shift the accelerator neutron spectrum down to therapeutically useful energies has been designed using Monte Carlo simulation in the Whitaker College Biomedical Imaging and Computation Laboratory at MIT. Actual construction of the moderator/reflector assembly is currently underway.

  16. Analytical approximations for matter effects on CP violation in the accelerator-based neutrino oscillations with E ≲ 1 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhu, Jing-yu

    2016-07-01

    Given an accelerator-based neutrino experiment with the beam energy E ≲ 1 GeV, we expand the probabilities of ν μ → ν e and {overline{ν}}_{μ}to {overline{ν}}_e oscillations in matter in terms of two small quantities Δ21 /Δ31 and A/Δ31, where Δ 21≡ m 2 2 - m 1 2 and Δ 31≡ m 3 2 - m 1 2 are the neutrino mass-squared differences, and A measures the strength of terrestrial matter effects. Our analytical approximations are numerically more accurate than those made by Freund in this energy region, and thus they are particularly applicable for the study of leptonic CP violation in the low-energy MOMENT, ESS νSM and T2K oscillation experiments. As a by-product, the new analytical approximations help us to easily understand why the matter-corrected Jarlskog parameter tilde{J} peaks at the resonance energy E ∗ ≃ 0 .14GeV (or 0 .12 GeV) for the normal (or inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, and how the three Dirac unitarity triangles are deformed due to the terrestrial matter contamination. We also affirm that a medium-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with the beam energy E lying in the E ∗ ≲ E ≲ 2 E ∗ range is capable of exploring leptonic CP violation with little matter-induced suppression.

  17. OPTIMAL BETA-RAY SHIELDING THICKNESSES FOR DIFFERENT THERAPEUTIC RADIONUCLIDES AND SHIELDING MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-06

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides.

  18. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  19. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life.

  20. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important consideration of the use of superconducting magnets in ADR applications is shielding of the other instruments in the vicinity of the superconducting...

  1. Boron-10 loaded inorganic shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S. I.; Ryskiewicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Shielding material containing Boron 10 and gadoliunium for neutron absorption has been developed to reduce interference from low energy neutrons in measurement of fission neutron spectrum using Li-6 fast neutron spectrometer.

  2. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal magnets...

  3. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  4. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  5. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  6. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelka-Lange, André, E-mail: andre.kubelka@zarm.uni-bremen.de; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Rasel, Ernst M. [Institut für Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  7. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelka-Lange, André; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10(5) (87)Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  8. Shielding Design for a Medical Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Feng; SONG; Guo-fang; GUAN; Feng-ping; LV; Yin-long; ZHANG; Xing-zhi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A 10 MeV 100 μA medical cyclotron is constructed at CIAE which is used in the production of FDG. The energy of the cyclotron can reach 14 MeV by adjusting the magnetic field and RF system parameters, and the shielding design is in accordance with the 14 MeV beam energy. In this shielding design only neutron is considered, and the neutron source is produced by proton

  9. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Hadad Kamal; Majidi Hosein; Sarshough Samira

    2015-01-01

    A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (contai...

  10. Influence of Shielding Arrangement on ECT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Fernandez Marron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full 3D study of a shielded ECT sensor. The spatialresolution and effective sensing field are obtained by means of Finite Element Methodbased simulations and are the compared to a conventional sensor's characteristics. Aneffective improvement was found in the sensitivity in the pipe cross-section, resulting inenhanced quality of the reconstructed image. The sensing field along the axis of the sensoralso presents better behaviour for a shielded sensor.

  11. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  12. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  13. Corrugation Stuffed Shield for Spacecraft and Its Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU You-ying; WANG Hai-fu

    2006-01-01

    A corrugation stuffed shield system protecting spacecrafts against meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) is presented. The semi-empirical ballistic limit equations (BLEs)defining the protection capability of the shield system are given, an d the shielding performance is also discussed. The corrugation stuffed shield (CSS) is more effective than stuffed Whipple shield for M/OD protection,and its shielding performance will be improved significantly as increasing the impact angle. Orbital debris up to 1cm in diameter can be shielded effectively as increasing the impact angle to 25° at the corrugated angle of 30°. The results are significant to spacecraft design.

  14. Micromagnetic modeling of the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandarova, I. M.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Popkov, A. F.; Potapkin, B. V.; Stainer, Q.; Lombard, L.; Mackay, K.

    2016-09-01

    Ferromagnetic shields are widely used to concentrate magnetic fields in a target region of space. Such shields are also used in spintronic nanodevices such as magnetic random access memory and magnetic logic devices. However, the shielding properties of nanostructured shields can differ considerably from those of macroscopic samples. In this work, we investigate the shielding properties of nanostructured NiFe layers around a current line using a finite element micromagnetic model. We find that thin ferromagnetic layers demonstrate saturation of magnetization under an external magnetic field, which reduces the shielding efficiency. Moreover, we show that the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers strongly depend on the uniformity of the layer thickness. Magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers can also influence their shielding efficiency. In addition, we show that domain walls in nanoscale ferromagnetic shields can induce large increases and decreases in the generated magnetic field. Therefore, ferromagnetic shields for spintronic nanodevices require careful design and precise fabrication.

  15. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  16. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  17. Neutron irradiation tests on B4C/epoxy composite for neutron shielding application and the parameters assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Ruhollah; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman; Ahmadi, Seyed Javad

    2016-10-01

    In this investigation, epoxy resin with a low viscosity amine-based curing agent was chosen as matrix and additives were added to epoxy resin using low speed stirring with ultrasonic waves approach. The chemical stability of resin during fabrication of composites was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effect of B4C particle size (20 and 150 μm) on neutron shielding was investigated. Besides, in order to develop the high performance composites, the effect of ATH (flame retardant) and WO3 powders (for shielding from against gamma rays) on neutron shielding property is considered. The neutron experiments were based on foil activation analysis in thermal column of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). According to experimental data, required shield thickness (B4C, 150 μm, 3 wt%) for 80% absorption of neutron fluence was calculated about 9.8 mm. Consequently, data show thermal neutron absorption is dependent also on the size of the boron compound filler and show a significant enhancement in shielding performance when using smaller particle size of B4C filler. Furthermore, data obviously show that the neutron attenuation coefficient of reinforced composites increases to 0.345 cm-1 for B4C (20 μm, 5 wt%)/ Epoxy composite shield. As clearly data indicate, adding WO3 and ATH additive had a significant influence on the thermal neutron attenuation property and hybrid shield shows an enhancement of more than 60% in shielding performance.

  18. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-03-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9%. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2-55% depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 - 46% for head and 41 - 55% for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2-3%.

  19. Targeted and shielded adenovectors for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Susan J; Chen, Jian; Mountz, John D; Li, Jing; Curiel, David T; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre

    2006-11-01

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are novel vectors with utility as virotherapy agents for alternative cancer therapies. These vectors have already established a broad safety record in humans and overcome some of the limitations of non-replicative adenovirus (Ad) vectors. In addition, one potential problem with these vectors, attainment of tumor or tissue selectivity has widely been addressed. However, two confounding problems limiting efficacy of these drug candidates remains. The paucity of the native Ad receptor on tumor tissues, and host humoral response due to pre-existing titers of neutralizing antibodies against the vector itself in humans have been highlighted in the clinical context. The well-characterized CRAd, AdDelta24-RGD, is infectivity enhanced, thus overcoming the lack of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), and this agent is already rapidly progressing towards clinical translation. However, the perceived host humoral response potentially will limit gains seen from the infectivity enhancement and therefore a strategy to blunt immunity against the vector is required. On the basis of this caveat a novel strategy, termed shielding, has been developed in which the genetic modification of a virion capsid protein would provide uniformly shielded Ad vectors. The identification of the pIX capsid protein as an ideal locale for genetic incorporation of shielding ligands to conceal the Ad vector from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies is a major progression in the development of shielded CRAds. Preliminary data utilizing an Ad vector with HSV-TK fused to the pIX protein indicates that a shield against neutralizing antibodies can be achieved. The utility of various proteins as shielding molecules is currently being addressed. The creation of AdDelta24S-RGD, an infectivity enhanced and shielded Ad vector will provide the next step in the development of clinically and commercially feasible CRAds that can be dosed multiple times for

  20. Passive magnetic cylindrical shielding at gauss-range static fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Gil-Botella, I.; Palomares, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: iker.rodriguez@ciemat.es; Toral, F.; Verdugo, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-03-11

    A study has been performed in order to find the optimal solution for the magnetic shielding of the 10 in. photomultipliers which will be used in the Double Chooz neutrino experiment under a very low magnetic field (less than 2 G). The results obtained with analytical and numerical calculations are compared with measurements made using test prototypes of several magnetic materials, with different dimensions and from different manufacturers. An exhaustive analysis of the magnetic materials was needed to understand the observed disagreement between calculations and test results obtained at low field values.

  1. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  2. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  3. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  4. Asymmetric Electrostatic Radiation Shielding for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Lane, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A paper describes the types, sources, and adverse effects of energetic-particle radiation in interplanetary space, and explores a concept of using asymmetric electrostatic shielding to reduce the amount of such radiation impinging on spacecraft. Typically, such shielding would include a system of multiple inflatable, electrically conductive spheres deployed in clusters in the vicinity of a spacecraft on lightweight structures that would maintain the spheres in a predetermined multipole geometry. High-voltage generators would maintain the spheres at potential differences chosen in conjunction with the multipole geometry so that the resulting multipole field would gradually divert approaching energetic atomic nuclei from a central region occupied by the spacecraft. The spheres nearest the center would be the most positive, so as to repel the positively charged impinging nuclei from the center. At the same time, the monopole potential of the overall spacecraft-and-shielding system would be made negative so as to repel thermal electrons. The paper presents results of computational simulations of energetic-particle trajectories and shield efficiency for a trial system of 21 spheres arranged in three clusters in an overall linear quadrupole configuration. Further development would be necessary to make this shielding concept practical.

  5. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  6. Electromagnetic shielding mats: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, N; Cech, R

    2007-01-01

    The use of electricity is accompanied by electric and magnetic fields which, intended or not, became a part of our environment. However, fear from environmental electromagnetic fields (EMFs) is widespread and so is business with fear. A number of more or less serious products including miracle products are placed on the market partly at excessive costs. By numerical simulation the efficiency of electromagnetic shielding mats was investigated and claims of manufacturers and their cited expert opinions checked. It could be shown that such products do not fulfil the justified expectations of customers, neither in the extremely low frequency (ELF) nor in the radiofrequency (RF) range. On the contrary, these mats usually make things even worse. The connection to ground, if available, might increase the belief on shielding efficiency, but in fact it even enhances fields instead of improving shielding. The electric conductivity of the mat material plays a minor role in the ELF range and enhances field increase in the RF range. It can not explain the enormous price differences. It could be shown that positive reports can be explained by result picking and exceptional arrangements of selected field sources. Overall, the investigation showed that manufacturer's claims about the shielding effectiveness are misleading and fool the customers about the real situation. Therefore, acquisition and use of electromagnetic shielding mats must be strongly discouraged.

  7. Acceleration-based joint stability parameters for total knee arthroplasty that correspond with patient-reported instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dustyn; Khan, Humera; Kim, Joo H; Slover, James; Walker, Peter S

    2013-10-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of human joint stability, particularly in nonperiodic general activities of daily living. Instability has proven to be a difficult parameter to define and quantify, since both spatial and temporal measures need to be considered to fully characterize joint stability. In this preliminary study, acceleration-based parameters were proposed to characterize the joint stability. Several time-statistical parameters of acceleration and jerk were defined as potential stability measures, since anomalous acceleration or jerk could be a symptom of poor control or stability. An inertial measurement unit attached at the level of the tibial tubercle of controls and patients following total knee arthroplasty was used to determine linear acceleration of the knee joint during several activities of daily living. The resulting accelerations and jerks were compared with patient-reported instability as determined through a standard questionnaire. Several parameters based on accelerations and jerks in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity were significantly different between patients and controls and correlated with patient reports of instability in that activity. The range of the positive to negative peak acceleration and infinity norm of acceleration, in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity, proved to be the best indicators of instability. As time derivatives of displacement, these acceleration-based parameters represent spatial and temporal information and are an important step forward in developing a definition and objective quantification of human joint stability that can complement the subjective patient report.

  8. John Adams Lecture | Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Kenneth Long | 8 December

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    John Adams Lecture: Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Dr. Kenneth Long (Imperial College London & STFC).   Monday, 8 December 2014 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at CERN ( 503-1-001 - Council Chamber ) Abstract: The study of the neutrino is the study of physics beyond the Standard Model. We now know that the neutrinos have mass and that neutrino mixing occurs causing neutrino flavour to oscillate as neutrinos propagate through space and time. Further, some measurements can be interpreted as hints for new particles known as sterile neutrinos. The measured values of the mixing parameters make it possible that the matter-antimatter (CP) symmetry may be violated through the mixing process. The consequences of observing CP-invariance violation in neutrinos would be profound. To discover CP-invariance violation will require measurements of exquisite precision. Accelerator-based neutrino sources are central to the future programme and advances in technique are required ...

  9. Design of a beam shaping assembly and preliminary modelling of a treatment room for accelerator-based BNCT at CNEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlon, A.A.; Girola, S. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina); Valda, A.A., E-mail: valda@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina); Minsky, D.M.; Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sanchez, G. [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, San Martin (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    This work reports on the characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly (BSA) prototype and on the preliminary modelling of a treatment room for BNCT within the framework of a research programme for the development and construction of an accelerator-based BNCT irradiation facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The BSA prototype constructed has been characterised by means of MCNP simulations as well as a set of experimental measurements performed at the Tandar accelerator at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements: total and epi-cadmium neutron fluxes and beam homogeneity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations: Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP code. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measured and calculated figure-of-merit parameters in agreement with those of IAEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial MCNP dose calculations for a treatment room to define future design actions.

  10. Preliminary study of acceleration based sensor to record nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) feeding behavior at water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subakti, Aji; Khotimah, Zarah F.; Darozat, Fajar M.

    2017-01-01

    In this preliminary study, the acceleration based sensor was developed to monitor the activity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) feeding behavior at the water surface. This study was conducted for three weeks in a fish pond with 40 m2 in size, stocked with 850 fingerlings of Nile tilapia strain Nirwana-2 (average biomass of 13 g, fed four times a day at 8 am, 12 pm, 4 pm, and 8 pm). The acceleration sensor system was installed floating in the pond and was designed in a way so that the xz plane of the sensor will be parallel with water surface, while the y-axis will be pointing downward. By sensing the acceleration caused by the surface wave, the activities of fish near surface water could be monitored. The result showed that there were three distinctive patterns could be observed which was related to the feeding activity of fish. Generally, it can be concluded that this acceleration based sensor system can be integrated with automatic feeder machine, in particular by analyzing the recorded patter, it is possible to monitor when the fish stop eating, and so the right amount of feed could be given to the fish.

  11. Radiation Shielding of Lunar Regolith/Polyethylene Composites and Lunar Regolith/Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Quincy F.; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Zhou, Jianren

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is a complex mixed field of ionizing radiation that can pose hazardous risks to sophisticated electronics and humans. Mission planning for lunar exploration and long duration habitat construction will face tremendous challenges of shielding against various types of space radiation in an attempt to minimize the detrimental effects it may have on materials, electronics, and humans. In late 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) discovered that water content in lunar regolith found in certain areas on the moon can be up to 5.6 +/-2.8 weight percent (wt%) [A. Colaprete, et. al., Science, Vol. 330, 463 (2010). ]. In this work, shielding studies were performed utilizing ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and aluminum, both being standard space shielding materials, simulated lunar regolith/ polyethylene composites, and simulated lunar regolith mixed with UHMWPE particles and water. Based on the LCROSS findings, radiation shielding experiments were conducted to test for shielding efficiency of regolith/UHMWPE/water mixtures with various percentages of water to compare relative shielding characteristics of these materials. One set of radiation studies were performed using the proton synchrotron at the Loma Linda Medical University where high energy protons similar to those found on the surface of the moon can be generated. A similar experimental protocol was also used at a high energy spalation neutron source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). These experiments studied the shielding efficiency against secondary neutrons, another major component of space radiation field. In both the proton and neutron studies, shielding efficiency was determined by utilizing a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) behind various thicknesses of shielding composite panels or mixture materials. Preliminary results from these studies indicated that adding 2 wt% water to regolith particles could increase shielding of

  12. Simulation studies of laser wakefield acceleration based on typical 100 TW laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大章; 高杰; 朱雄伟; 何安

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, 2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations are made for Laser Wakefield Accelerations (LWFA). As in a real experiment, we perform plasma density scanning for typical 100 TW laser facilities. Several basic laws for self-injected acceleration in a bubb

  13. Overview of recent experimental works on high energy neutron shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Yashima, H; Yonai, S

    2004-01-01

    Several experiments on high energy neutron shielding have recently been performed using medium to high energy accelerators of energies above 20 MeV. Below 100 MeV, the benchmark experiments have been done using 25 and 35 MeV p-Li quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Japan, 43 and 68 MeV p-Li quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron facility, TIARA of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Above 100 MeV, the neutron shielding experiments have been done using 800 MeV protons at ISIS, Rutherford Appleton laboratory (RAL), England, 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions at the heavy ion medical accelerator facility, HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, 500 MeV protons at the spallation neutron source facility, KEK spallation neutron source facility (KENS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan, 500 MeV protons at the accelerator facility, TRIUMF, Canada, 1.6 to 24 G...

  14. Mathematical model of thermal shields for long-term stability optical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjuan, Josep; Braxmaier, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Modern experiments aiming at tests of fundamental physics, like measuring gravitational waves or testing Lorentz Invariance with unprecedented accuracy, require thermal environments that are highly stable over long times. To achieve such a stability, the experiment including typically an optical resonator is nested in a thermal enclosure, which passively attenuates external temperature fluctuations to acceptable levels. These thermal shields are usually designed using tedious numerical simulations or with simple analytical models. In this paper, we propose an accurate analytical method to estimate the performance of passive thermal shields in the frequency domain, which allows for fast evaluation and optimization. The model analysis has also unveil interesting properties of the shields, such as dips in the transfer function for some frequencies under certain combinations of materials and geometries. We validate the results by comparing them to numerical simulations performed with commercial software based on ...

  15. A Monte Carlo study for the shielding of γ backgrounds induced by radionuclides for CDEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yue, Qian; Tang, Chang-Jian; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yuan-Jing; Ma, Hao; T. Wong, H.; Xue, Tao; Zeng, Zhi

    2011-03-01

    The CDEX (China Dark matter EXperiment) Collaboration will carry out a direct search for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) using an Ultra-Low Energy Threshold High Purity Germanium (ULE-HPGe) detector at the CJPL (China JinPing deep underground Laboratory). A complex shielding system was designed to reduce backgrounds and a detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation was performed to study the achievable reduction of γ rays induced by radionuclides and neutron backgrounds by D(γ,n)p reaction. Furthermore, the upper level of allowed radiopurity of shielding materials was estimated under the constraint of the expected goal. Compared with the radiopurity reported by other low-background rare-event experiments, it indicates that the shielding used in the CDEX can be made out of materials with obtainable radiopurity.

  16. Cosmic-ray induced background intercomparison with actively shielded HPGe detectors at underground locations

    CERN Document Server

    Szücs, T; Reinhardt, T P; Schmidt, K; Takács, M P; Wagner, A; Wagner, L; Weinberger, D; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    The main background above 3\\,MeV for in-beam nuclear astrophysics studies with $\\gamma$-ray detectors is caused by cosmic-ray induced secondaries. The two commonly used suppression methods, active and passive shielding, against this kind of background were formerly considered only as alternatives in nuclear astrophysics experiments. In this work the study of the effects of active shielding against cosmic-ray induced events at a medium deep location is performed. Background spectra were recorded with two actively shielded HPGe detectors. The experiment was located at 148\\,m below the surface of the Earth in the Reiche Zeche mine in Freiberg, Germany. The results are compared to data with the same detectors at the Earth's surface, and at depths of 45\\,m and 1400\\,m, respectively.

  17. A Monte Carlo study for the shielding of γ backgrounds induced by radionuclides for CDEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; MA Hao; H.W.Wong; XUE Tao; ZENG Zhi; YUE Qian; TANG Chang-Jian; CHENG Jian-Ping; KANG Ke-Jun; LI Jian-Min; LI Jin; LI Yu-Lan; LI Yuan-Jing

    2011-01-01

    The CDEX(China Dark matter EXperiment)Collaboration will carry out a direct search for WIMPs(Weakly Interacting Massive Particles)using an Ultra-Low Energy Threshold High Purity Germanium(ULE-HPGe)detector at the CJPL(China JinPing deep underground Laboratory).A complex shielding system was designed to reduce backgrounds and a detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation was performed to study the achievable reduction of T rays induced by radionuclides and neutron backgrounds by D(γ,n)p reaction.Furthermore,the upper level of allowed radiopurity of shielding materials was estimated under the constraint of the expected goal.Compared with the radiopurity reported by other low-background rare-event experiments,it indicates that the shielding used in the CDEX can be made out of materials with obtainable radiopurity.

  18. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: halfon@phys.huji.ac.il; Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Steinberg, D. [Biofilm Laboratory, Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Hebrew University-Hadassah (Israel); Nagler, A.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Polacheck, I. [Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center (Israel); Srebnik, M. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)

    2009-07-15

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  19. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Steinberg, D; Nagler, A; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Polacheck, I; Srebnik, M

    2009-07-01

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  20. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  1. Electronics Shielding and Reliability Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; ONeill, P. M.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr.; Pandolf, John E.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that electronics placement in large-scale human-rated systems provides opportunity to optimize electronics shielding through materials choice and geometric arrangement. For example, several hundred single event upsets (SEUs) occur within the Shuttle avionic computers during a typical mission. An order of magnitude larger SEU rate would occur without careful placement in the Shuttle design. These results used basic physics models (linear energy transfer (LET), track structure, Auger recombination) combined with limited SEU cross section measurements allowing accurate evaluation of target fragment contributions to Shuttle avionics memory upsets. Electronics shielding design on human-rated systems provides opportunity to minimize radiation impact on critical and non-critical electronic systems. Implementation of shielding design tools requires adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and an adequate follow-up on final design evaluation including results from a systems/device testing program tailored to meet design requirements.

  2. Carbohydrate based materials for gamma radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbakh, F.; Babaee, V.; Naghsh-Nezhad, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the limitation in using lead as a shielding material for its toxic properties and limitation in abundance, price or non-flexibility of other commonly used materials, finding new shielding materials and compounds is strongly required. In this conceptual study carbohydrate based compounds were considered as new shielding materials. The simulation of radiation attenuation is performed using MCNP and Geant4 with a good agreement in the results. It is found that, the thickness of 2 mm of the proposed compound may reduce up to 5% and 50% of 1 MeV and 35 keV gamma-rays respectively in comparison with 15% and 100% for the same thickness of lead.

  3. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  4. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  5. Complications following linear accelerator based stereotactic radiation for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane; Roed, Henrik; Ohlhues, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    Primarily, gamma knife centers are predominant in publishing results on arteriovenous malformations (AVM) treatments including reports on risk profile. However, many patients are treated using a linear accelerator-most of these at smaller centers. Because this setting is different from a large...... gamma knife center, the risk profile at Linac departments could be different from the reported experience. Prescribed radiation doses are dependent on AVM volume. This study details results from a medium sized Linac department center focusing on risk profiles....

  6. Comparison of the effects of cadmium-shielded and boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrefah, R.G., E-mail: adibola2001@yahoo.com [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O Box LG80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Sogbadji, R.B.M.; Ampomah-Amoako, E.; Birikorang, S.A. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O Box LG80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Odoi, H.C. [School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, University of Ghana, P.O Box AE1, Atomic Energy Post, Accra (Ghana); Nyarko, B.J.B. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O Box LG80, Legon, Accra (Ghana)

    2011-08-15

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was redesigned to incorporate cadmium-shielded irradiation channel as well as boron carbide-shielded channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Further investigations were made after initial work in the cadmium-shielded channel to consider the boron carbide-shielded channel and both results were compared to determine the best material for the shielded channel. Before arriving at the final design of only one shielded outer irradiation channel extensive investigations were made into several other possible designs; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model which has a shielded channel is to equip GHARR-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. The use of epithermal neutron activation analysis can be very useful in many experiments and projects (e.g. it can be used to determine uranium and thorium in sediment samples). After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the boron carbide-shielded channel model for the GHARR-1 and the epicadmium-shielded channel was made. The inner irradiation channels of the two designs recorded peak values of approximately 1.18 x 10{sup 12} {+-} 0.0036 n/cm{sup 2} s, 1.32 x 10{sup 12} {+-} 0.0036 n/cm{sup 2} s and 2.71 x 10{sup 11} {+-} 0.0071 n/cm{sup 2} s for the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux, respectively. Likewise the outer irradiation channels of the two designs recorded peak values of approximately 7.36 x 10{sup 11} {+-} 0.0042 n/cm{sup 2} s, 2.53 x 10{sup 11} {+-} 0.0074 n/cm{sup 2} s and 4.73 x 10{sup 10} {+-} 0.0162 n/cm{sup 2} s for the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux, respectively. The epicadmium design recorded a peak thermal flux of 7.08 x 10{sup 11} {+-} 0.0033 n/cm{sup 2} s and an epithermal flux of 2.09 x 10{sup 11} {+-} 0.006 n/cm{sup 2} s in the irradiation channel where the shield was

  7. Novel Concepts for Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that safety factors be maximized with respect to long duration, extraterrestrial space flight. Any significant improvement in radiation protection will be critical in ensuring the safety of crew and hardware on such missions. The project goal is to study novel concepts for radiation shielding materials that can be used for long-duration space missions. As part of this project we will investigate the use of thin films for the evaluation of a containment system that can retain liquid hydrogen and provide the necessary hydrogen density for effective shielding.

  8. Experimental realization of open magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C.; Chen, S.; Pang, T.; Qu, T.-M.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of extremely low magnetic fields has various applications in the area of fundamental research, medical diagnosis, and industry. Extracting the valuable signals from noises often requires magnetic shielding facilities. We demonstrated directly from Maxwell's equations that specifically designed superconductor coils can exactly shield the magnetic field to an extremely low value. We experimentally confirmed this effect in the frequency spectrum of 0.01-10 000 Hz and improved the electromagnetic environment in a hospital, a leading hospital in magnetocardiograph study in China.

  9. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  10. Shielding effectiveness of rectangular cavity made of a new shielding material and resonance suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    New shielding material has become an alternative to traditional metal to shield boxes from electromagnetic interferences. This article introduces the theory of transmission line method to study the shield boxes made of a new sort of material, and then expands the fundamental formulas to deal with the cases of multiple holes and polarization with arbitrary angle. By means of genetic algorithms with the aid of a three dimensional simulation tool, the damping of electromagnetic resonances in enclosures is researched.The computation indicates that under resonant frequency, electromagnetic resonance results in low, even negative shielding coefficient; whereas, for the same areas, shielding effectiveness of a single hole is worse than that of multiple holes. Shielding coefficient varies when polarization angle increases, and the coupled field through the rectangular aperture with the long side parallel to the thin wire is much weaker than that with the long side vertical to the thin wire. By using the metallic-loss dielectric layer of optimized calculation on the internal surface of the cavity, the best result of resonance suppression has been realized with the same thickness of coating. Finally, according to the calculation result, suggestions for shielding are proposed.

  11. Simulation studies of laser wakefield acceleration based on typical 100 TW laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da-Zhang; GAO Jie; ZHU Xiong-Wei; HE An

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations are made for Laser Wakefield Accelerations(LWFA).As in a real experiment,we perform plasma density scanning for typical 100 TW laser facilities.Several basic laws for self-injected acceleration in a bubble regime are presented.According to these laws,we choose a proper plasma density and then obtain a high quality quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch with arms energy of more than 650 MeV and a bunch length of less than 1.5 μn.

  12. RadShield: semiautomated shielding design using a floor plan driven graphical user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Matthew C; Wu, Dee H; Yang, Kai; Rutel, Isaac B

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce and describe the development of RadShield, a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI), which provides a base design that uniquely performs thorough, spatially distributed calculations at many points and reports the maximum air-kerma rate and barrier thickness for each barrier pursuant to NCRP Report 147 methodology. Semiautomated shielding design calculations are validated by two approaches: a geometry-based approach and a manual approach. A series of geometry-based equations were derived giving the maximum air-kerma rate magnitude and location through a first derivative root finding approach. The second approach consisted of comparing RadShield results with those found by manual shielding design by an American Board of Radiology (ABR)-certified medical physicist for two clinical room situations: two adjacent catheterization labs, and a radiographic and fluoroscopic (R&F) exam room. RadShield's efficacy in finding the maximum air-kerma rate was compared against the geometry-based approach and the overall shielding recommendations by RadShield were compared against the medical physicist's shielding results. Percentage errors between the geometry-based approach and RadShield's approach in finding the magnitude and location of the maximum air-kerma rate was within 0.00124% and 14 mm. RadShield's barrier thickness calculations were found to be within 0.156 mm lead (Pb) and 0.150 mm lead (Pb) for the adjacent catheterization labs and R&F room examples, respectively. However, within the R&F room example, differences in locating the most sensitive calculation point on the floor plan for one of the barriers was not considered in the medical physicist's calculation and was revealed by the RadShield calculations. RadShield is shown to accurately find the maximum values of air-kerma rate and barrier thickness using NCRP Report 147 methodology. Visual inspection alone of the 2D X-ray exam distribution by a medical physicist may not

  13. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  14. An accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam design for BNCT and dosimetric evaluation using a voxel head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-jae; Han, Chi Young; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    The beam shaping assembly design has been investigated in order to improve the epithermal neutron beam for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy in intensity and quality, and dosimetric evaluation for the beams has been performed using both mathematical and voxel head phantoms with MCNP runs. The neutron source was assumed to be produced from a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a thick (7)Li target. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance epithermal neutron flux remarkably as well as to embody a good spectrum shaping to epithermal neutrons only with the proper combination of moderator and reflector. It is also found that a larger number of thermal neutrons can reach deeply into the brain and, therefore, can reduce considerably the treatment time for brain tumours. Consequently, the epithermal neutron beams designed in this study can treat more effectively deep-seated brain tumours.

  15. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the evaluation of some Nigeria's natural minerals: Fluorite, tourmaline and topaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk; Ige, O.A. [Natural History Museum, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Mazzoli, C. [Dipartimento di Mineralogia e Petrologia, Universita di Padova, 35100 Padova (Italy); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy); Akintunde, J.A. [CERD, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); De Poli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    For the first time, the complementary accelerator-based analytical technique of PIXE and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) were employed for the characterization of some Nigeria's natural minerals namely fluorite, tourmaline and topaz. These minerals occur in different areas in Nigeria. The minerals are mainly used as gemstones and for other scientific and technological applications and therefore are very important. There is need to characterize them to know the quality of these gemstones and update the geochemical data on them geared towards useful applications. PIXE analysis was carried out using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro, Padova, Italy. The novel results which show many elements at different concentrations in these minerals are presented and discussed.

  16. The BSA modeling for the accelerator-based BNCT facility at INFN LNL for treating shallow skin melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, C; Esposito, J

    2009-07-01

    The SPES-BNCT ongoing project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) is aimed at the construction at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) of an accelerator-based (AB), high-flux thermal neutron beam facility devoted to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma, in the framework of SPES (selective production of exotic species) project. The neutron source will be produced via the (9)Be(p,xn) reactions by a 5 MeV, 30 mA proton beam into a thick beryllium target. The resulting neutron spectrum is slowed down using a beam shaping assembly (BSA), for which modeling is in an advanced neutronic design stage. An overview on the BSA current status, based on the Be neutron converter prototype designed and already constructed, is reported.

  17. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  18. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  19. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  20. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  1. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  2. Neutron Shielding Effectiveness of Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Neutrons are moderated or reduced in energy by scattering off of nuclei. When cosmic neutrons with high kinetic energy enter earth’s atmosphere...neutron flux. The simulation volume was modeled as a sphere centered at the origin with a radius of 100 cm. The shielding material was modeled as a

  3. Is Collegiality a Weapon or a Shield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Robert E.; Buller, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    There are two primary means to prevent the abuse of collegiality and transform it into a shield to protect the most vulnerable. First, colleges and universities should follow the examples of their peers by developing clear definitions of what types of behavior constitute collegiality and what types of activity are protected as academic freedom or…

  4. Radiation Shielding for Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The arrival of the Expedition 1 Crew at the International Space Station represents the beginning of the continuous presence of man in space. Already we are deploying astronauts and cosmonauts for missions of approx. 6 months onboard the ISS. In the future we can anticipate that more people will be in space and they will be there for longer periods. Even with 6-months deployments to the ISS, the radiation exposure that crew members receive is approaching the exposure limits imposed by the governments of the space- faring nations. In the future we can expect radiation protection to be a dominant consideration for long manned missions. Recognizing this, NASA has expanded their research program on radiation health. This program has three components, bioastronautics, fundamental biology and radiation shielding materials. Bioastronautics is concerned with the investigating the effects of radiation on humans. Fundamental biology investigates the basic mechanisms of radiation damage to tissue. Radiation shielding materials research focuses on developing accurate computational tools to predict the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials. It also investigates new materials that can be used for spacecraft. The radiation shielding materials program will be described and examples of results from the ongoing research will be shown.

  5. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  6. Design and analysis of ITER shield blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmori, Junji; Hatano, Toshihisa; Ezato, Kouichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-12-01

    This report includes electromagnetic analyses for ITER shielding blanket modules, fabrication methods for the blanket modules and the back plate, the design and the fabrication methods for port limiter have been investigated. Studies on the runaway electron impact for Be armor have been also performed. (J.P.N.)

  7. EFFECTS OF INTERFACES ON GAMMA SHIELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, C.E.

    1963-06-15

    A survey is presented of studies of interface effects in gamma shielding problems. These studies are grouped into three types of approaches, viz.: sources at the interface; radiation backscattered from the interface; and radiation transmitted through the interface. A bibliography of 54 references is included. Limitations on the applicability of the results are discussed. (T.F.H.)

  8. In-beam background suppression shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, V.; Cai, Xiao Xiao; DiJulio, D. D.

    2015-01-01

    , which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative...

  9. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (˜1 m), high-current (˜1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ˜5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  10. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  11. Using thin metal layers on composite structures for shielding the electromagnetic pulse caused by nearby lightning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, F.J.K.; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, F.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic systems in composite structures could be vulnerable to the (dominant magnetic) field caused by a lightning strike, because only thin layers of metal can be used on composite structures. Thin layers result in a very low shielding effectiveness against magnetic fields. Many experiments usin

  12. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, H., E-mail: bayle@bergoz.com [Bergoz Instrumentation, Saint-Genis-Pouilly (France); Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  13. On New Limits of the Coefficient of Gravitation Shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michele Caputo

    2006-12-01

    New limits of the shielding coefficients in the supposed phenomenon of gravitation shielding have recently become available. The new values are briefly reviewed and discussed in order to update the state of art since some new limits for gravitation shielding are not necessarily the lowest ones which, instead, are those of interest when planning new experimental research or studying theoretically the possible effects of gravitation shielding.

  14. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of accelerator based epithermal neutron yields for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J. R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J. G.; Alburger, D. E.; Zucker, M. S.; Lowenstein, D. I.

    1999-06-01

    At BNL, we have evaluated the beam current required to produce a clinical neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) with an epithermal neutron flux of 1012n/cm2/hr. Experiments were carried out on a Van de Graaff accelerator at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) at Columbia University. A thick Li target was irradiated by protons with energies from 1.8 to 2.5 MeV. The neutron spectra resulting from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, followed by various filter configurations, were determined by measuring pulse height distributions with a gas filled proton recoil spectrometer. These distributions were unfolded into neutron energy spectra using the PSNS code, from which the required beam currents were estimated to be about 5 mA. Results are in good agreement with calculations using the MCNP-4A transport code. In addition comparison was also made between the neutron flux obtained at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (where clinical trials of BNCT are ongoing), and measurements at RARAF, using a 10BF3 detector in a phantom. These results also support the requirement for about 5 mA beam current.

  15. Electromagnetic shielding. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography presents research on electromagnetic shielding of electronic and electrical equipment personnel, and ordnance. The shielding effectiveness of materials and structures is covered. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse shielding is included. This updated bibliography contains 301 abstracts, 19 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  16. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  17. Telescoping Shield for Point-Focusing Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoud, M.; Walker, W.; Butler, L. V.

    1985-01-01

    Telescoping shield normally stowed around solar receiver protects heat engine and supporting structure from overheating when concentrator aimed few degrees away from line to Sun. When extended, shield intercepts off center concentrated solar radiation. Heat spread out over thermally conductive shield and reradiated diffusely not to cause structural damage.

  18. Optimal Magnetic Field Shielding Method by Metallic Sheets in Wireless Power Transfer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To meet the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs such as the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines, thin metallic sheets are often used to shield magnetic field leakage in high power applications of wireless power transfer (WPT systems based on magnetic field coupling. However, the metals in the vicinity of the WPT coils cause the decrease of self and mutual inductances and increase of effective series resistance; as such, the electric performance including transmission power and the efficiency of the system is affected. With the research objective of further investigating excellent shielding effectiveness associated with system performance, the utilization of the optimal magnetic field shielding method by metallic sheets in magnetic field coupling WPT is carried out in this paper. The circuit and 3D Finite Element Analysis (FEA models are combined to predict the magnetic field distribution and electrical performance. Simulation and experiment results show that the method is very effective by obtaining the largest possible coupling coefficient of the WPT coils within the allowable range and then reducing the value nearest to and no smaller than the critical coupling coefficient via geometric unbroken metallic sheets. The optimal magnetic field shielding method which considers the system efficiency, transmission power, transmission distance, and system size is also achieved using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP. The results can benefit WPT by helping to achieve efficient energy transfer and safe use in metal shielded equipment.

  19. Global Navigation Satellite System Multipath Mitigation Using a Wave-Absorbing Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Yang, Xuhai; Sun, Baoqi; Su, Hang

    2016-08-22

    Code multipath is an unmanaged error source in precise global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observation processing that limits GNSS positioning accuracy. A new technique for mitigating multipath by installing a wave-absorbing shield is presented in this paper. The wave-absorbing shield was designed according to a GNSS requirement of received signals and collected measurements to achieve good performance. The wave-absorbing shield was installed at the KUN1 and SHA1 sites of the international GNSS Monitoring and Assessment System (iGMAS). Code and carrier phase measurements of three constellations were collected on the dates of the respective installations plus and minus one week. Experiments were performed in which the multipath of the measurements obtained at different elevations was mitigated to different extents after applying the wave-absorbing shield. The results of an analysis and comparison show that the multipath was mitigated by approximately 17%-36% on all available frequencies of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), Global Positioning System (GPS), and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) satellites. The three-dimensional accuracies of BDS, GPS, and GLONASS single-point positioning (SPP) were, respectively, improved by 1.07, 0.63 and 0.49 m for the KUN1 site, and by 0.72, 0.79 and 0.73 m for the SHA1 site. Results indicate that the multipath of the original observations was mitigated by using the wave-absorbing shield.

  20. The shielding function of task rules in the context of task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenauer, Renate; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that task rules help shield the response against distractor interference. Here, the authors investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying this assumed shielding function of task rules and how it is adjusted to changing task demands. In two experiments, participants switched between a noun categorization and an adjective categorization task. Target words were superimposed on distractor pictures. These pictures were always irrelevant and depicted either objects also used as target words in the noun task (noun distractors) or objects that were not part of the noun target-set but could be categorized according to the noun task (noun-related distractors). Results show that (a) on task repetitions shielding prevents interference from any distractors associated with a competing task; this is indicated by the lack of interference on adjective task repetitions; and (b) shielding is reduced on task switches. In the noun task, this reduction resulted in attenuated interference by noun-related distractors. In the adjective task, spatial distractors did not interfere despite the reduction. This result suggests that shielding is supported by a processing advantage for task-related information and not by distractor suppression.

  1. Neutron radiation shielding properties of polymer incorporated self compacting concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkapur, Santhosh M; Divakar, L; Narasimhan, Mattur C; Karkera, Narayana B; Goverdhan, P; Sathian, V; Prasad, N K

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the neutron radiation shielding characteristics of a class of novel polymer-incorporated self-compacting concrete (PISCC) mixes are evaluated. Pulverized high density polyethylene (HDPE) material was used, at three different reference volumes, as a partial replacement to river sand in conventional concrete mixes. By such partial replacement of sand with polymer, additional hydrogen contents are incorporated in these concrete mixes and their effect on the neutron radiation shielding properties are studied. It has been observed from the initial set of experiments that there is a definite trend of reductions in the neutron flux and dose transmission factor values in these PISCC mixes vis-à-vis ordinary concrete mix. Also, the fact that quite similar enhanced shielding results are recorded even when reprocessed HDPE material is used in lieu of the virgin HDPE attracts further attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Calculation of radiation loads in a space station compartment with a secondary shielding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashov, D A; Tolochek, R V; Shurshakov, V A; Yarmanova, E N

    2013-01-01

    Doses from space ionizing radiation were estimated using a model of ISS cosmonaut's quarters (CQ) outfitted with secondary shielding ("Protective shutter" (PS) as part of experiment MATRYOSHKA-R). Protective shutter is a "blanket" of water-containing material with mass thickness of - 6 g/cm2 covering the CQ exterior wall. Calculation was performed specifically for locations of experimental dosimetry assemblies. Agreement of calculations and experimental data reaching accuracy - 15% proves model applicability to estimating protective effectiveness of secondary shielding in the present-day and future space vehicles. This shielding may reduce radiation loading onto crewmembers as an equivalent dose by more than 40% within a broad range of orbit altitudes equally during the solar minimum and maximum.

  3. How stable are the 'stable ancient shields'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    "Archean cratons are relatively flat, stable regions of the crust that have remained undeformed since the Precambrian, forming the ancient cores of the continents" (King, EPSL, 2005). While this type of statement is supported by a wealth of constraints in the case of episodes of thoroughgoing ductile deformation affecting shield regions of Archean and also Peleoproterozoic age, a growing amount of research indicates that shields are not nearly as structurally stable within the broad field of environmental conditions leading to brittle deformation. In fact, old crystalline basements usually present compelling evidence of long brittle deformation histories, often very complex and challenging to unfold. Recent structural and geochronological studies point to a significant mechanical instability of the shield areas, wherein large volumes of 'stable' rocks actually can become saturated with fractures and brittle faults soon after regional cooling exhumes them to below c. 300-350° C. How cold, rigid and therefore strong shields respond to applied stresses remains, however, still poorly investigated and understood. This in turn precludes a better definition of the shallow rheological properties of large, old crystalline blocks. In particular, we do not yet have good constraints on the mechanisms of mechanical reactivation that control the partial (if not total) accommodation of new deformational episodes by preexisting structures, which remains a key to untangle brittle histories lasting several hundred Myr. In our analysis, we use the Svecofennian Shield (SS) as an example of a supposedly 'stable' region with Archean nucleii and Paleoproterozoic cratonic areas to show how it is possible to unravel the details of brittle histories spanning more than 1.5 Gyr. New structural and geochronological results from Finland are integrated with a review of existing data from Sweden to explore how the effects of far-field stresses are partitioned within a shield, which was growing

  4. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Heui [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 201}Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were {sup 99m}Tc 31.59%, {sup 201}Tl 68.42%, and {sup 123}I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of {sup 13}'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and {sup 18}F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers.

  5. Electromagnetic fields and torque for a rotating gyroscope with a superconducting shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, C.; Sung, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    In a proposed experiment, a measurement is to be made of the angular precession of a rotating superconducting gyroscope for the purpose of testing different general-relativity theories. For various reasons having to do with the design of the experiment, the superconducting shield surrounding the gyroscope is not spherically symmetric and produces a torque. There are two distinct features of the shield which lead to a torque on the gyroscope. First, its shape is a sphere intersected by a plane. If the angular momentum of the gyroscope is not parallel to the rotational symmetry axis of the shield, there is a torque which is calculated. Second, there are small holes in the spherical portion of the shield. The earth's field can penetrate through these holes and give an additional torque which is also calculated. In the actual experiment, these torques must be accurately known or made very small in order to obtain meaningful results. The present calculation is sufficiently general for application over a wide range of experimental design parameters.

  6. Measurement of shielding characteristics in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Shin; Sasaki, Kenji; Deshimaru, Takehide; Nakashima, Fumiaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    In the prototype fast breeder reactor Monju, shielding measurements were made around the reactor core, the primary heat transport system (PHTS), and the fuel handling and storage system during the system start-up tests at different power levels between 0% and 45%. The objectives of the tests were to evaluate the margins by which the shielding performance exceeds the original design requirements, to demonstrate the validity of the shielding analysis method, and to acquire basic data for use in future FBR design. This paper summarizes the important features of the Monju shielding structures and the shielding measurement. (author)

  7. Shielding of Electronic Systems against Transient Electromagnetic Interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to protect electronic systems against the effects of transient electromagnetic interferences, shields made of electrically conductive material can be used. The subject of this paper is an electrically conductive textile. When applying the shield, a reliable measure is needed in order to determine the effectiveness of the shield to protect against electromagnetic pulses. For this purpose, a time domain measurement technique is presented using double exponential pulses. With these pulses, the susceptibility of an operating electronic device with and without the shield is determined. As a criterion of quality of a shield, the breakdown failure rate found in both cases is compared.

  8. Shield Insertion to Minimize Noise Amplitude in Global Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana.A.B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shield insertion is an effective technique for minimise crosstalk noise and signal delay uncertainty .To reduce the effects of coupling uniform or simultaneous shielding may be used on either or both sides of a signal line. Shields are ground or power lines placed between two signal wires to prevent direct coupling between them as the shield width increases, the noise amplitude decreases, in this paper inserting a shield line between two coupled interconnects is shown to be more effective in reducing crosstalk noise for different technology nodes .

  9. Analytical model of neutral gas shielding for hydrogen pellet ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V.; Tsendin, Lev D. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic gasdynamic scaling for hydrogen pellet ablation is obtained in terms of a neural gas shielding model using both numerical and analytical approaches. The scaling on plasma and pellet parameters proposed in the monoenergy approximation by Milora and Foster dR{sub pe}/dt{approx}S{sub n}{sup 2/3}R{sub p}{sup -2/3}q{sub eo}{sup 1/3}m{sub i}{sup -1/3} is confirmed. Here R{sub p} is the pellet radius, S{sub n} is the optical thickness of a cloud, q{sub eo} is the electron energy flux density and m{sub i} is the molecular mass. Only the numeral factor is approximately two times less than that for the monoenergy approach. Due to this effect, the pellet ablation rates, which were obtained by Kuteev on the basis of the Milora scaling, should be reduced by a factor of 1.7. Such a modification provides a reasonable agreement (even at high plasma parameters) between the two-dimensional kinetic model and the one-dimensional monoenergy approximation validated in contemporary tokamak experiments. As the could (in the kinetic approximation) is significantly thicker than that for the monoenergy case as well as the velocities of the gas flow are much slower, the relative effect of plasma and magnetic shielding on the ablation rate is strongly reduced. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Personal Shields Used in Selected Radiology Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Salmanvandi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate personal shields in radiation departments of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods First, the information related to 109 personal shields was recorded and evaluated by imaging equipment. Afterwards, the equivalent lead thickness (ELT of 62 personal shields was assessed, using dosimeter and standard lead layers at 100 kVp. Results In this study, 109 personal shields were assessed in terms of tears, holes and cracks. The results showed that 18 shields were damaged. Moreover, ELT was evaluated in 62 shields. As the results indicated, ELT was unacceptable in 8 personal shields and lower than expected in 9 shields. Conclusion According to the results, 16.5% of personal shields had defects (tears, holes and cracks and 13% of them were unacceptable in terms of ELT and needed to be replaced. Therefore, regular quality control of personal shields and evaluation of new shields are necessary at any radiation department.

  11. In-Beam Background Suppression Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Santoro, V; DiJulio, D D; Ansell, S; Bentley, P M

    2015-01-01

    The long (3ms) proton pulse of the European Spallation Source (ESS) gives rise to unique and potentially high backgrounds for the instrument suite. In such a source an instrument capabilities will be limited by it's Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. The instruments with a direct view of the moderator, which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative to the background suppression. This shielding configuration has been worked into a beam line model using Geant4. We study particularly the advantages of single crystal sapphire and silicon blocks .

  12. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  13. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  14. Shielding performance of metal fiber composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; WU Bin; CHEN Ze-fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal fibers have been applied to construct composites with desirable electromagnetic interference shiel ding effectiveness and mechanical properties. Copper and stainless steel fibers were prepared with micro-saw fiberpulling combined cutting method. The cross section of the fibers is hook-like, which is beneficial to the improvement of bonding strength. Cement-based composites with copper and stainless steel fibers were fabricated and their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness was measured in the frequency range of 1 - 5 GHz. The results show that the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of those composites is enhanced by the addition of metal fibers,which functions mainly due to the absorption. At some frequencies, 20 dB or more difference is obtained between the materials with and without metal fibers.

  15. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  16. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

  18. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, M E; Chow, C H; Loyd, M D

    1989-09-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when "set" or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

  19. Grounding and shielding circuits and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Applies basic field behavior in circuit design and demonstrates how it relates to grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design This book connects the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory to the problems of interference in all types of electronic design. The text covers power distribution in facilities, mixing of analog and digital circuitry, circuit board layout at high clock rates, and meeting radiation and susceptibility standards. The author examines the grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design and applies basic physics to circuit behavior. The sixth edition of this book has been updated with new material added throughout the chapters where appropriate. The presentation of the book has also been rearranged in order to reflect the current trends in the field.

  20. Application of MCBEND to PBMR shielding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G A; Wall, S J

    2005-01-01

    Shielding analysis of an early design of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) has been carried out by using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The issues of concern were damage to the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), activation of the core barrel, RPV, top plate and bottom plate, and also burn-up of boron in the control layer underneath the core. The analysis below the core was complicated due to the presence of the de-fuelling chute, which meant that multiplication had to be taken into account. The analysis of boron burn-up was particularly challenging and was tackled using a combination of MCBEND and the criticality code MONK in the depletion mode. The application of MCBEND to the shielding analysis of the PBMR is described, with particular attention being paid to the regions below the core.

  1. Dosimetric characterization of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery of large or complex brain tumors versus linear accelerator-based treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Peng; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Braunstein, Steve; Theodosopoulos, Philip; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Ma, Lijun

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Noninvasive Gamma Knife (GK) platforms, such as the relocatable frame and on-board imaging, have enabled hypofractionated GK radiosurgery of large or complex brain lesions. This study aimed to characterize the dosimetric quality of such treatments against linear accelerator-based delivery systems that include the CyberKnife (CK) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). METHODS Ten patients treated with VMAT at the authors' institution for large brain tumors (> 3 cm in maximum diameter) were selected for the study. The median prescription dose was 25 Gy (range 20-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 9.57 cm(3) (range 1.94-24.81 cm(3)). Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse External Beam Planning V11 for VMAT on the Varian TrueBeam system, Multiplan V4.5 for the CyberKnife VSI System, and Leksell GammaPlan V10.2 for the Gamma Knife Perfexion system. The percentage of the PTV receiving at least the prescription dose was normalized to be identical across all platforms for individual cases. The prescription isodose value for the PTV, conformity index, Paddick gradient index, mean and maximum doses for organs at risk, and normal brain dose at variable isodose volumes ranging from the 5-Gy isodose volume (V5) to the 15-Gy isodose volume (V15) were compared for all of the cases. RESULTS The mean Paddick gradient index was 2.6 ± 0.2, 3.2 ± 0.5, and 4.3 ± 1.0 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p 0.06). The average prescription isodose values were 52% (range 47%-69%), 60% (range 46%-68%), and 88% (range 70%-94%) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively, thus producing significant variations in dose hot spots among the 3 platforms. Furthermore, the mean V5 values for GK and CK were similar (p > 0.79) at 71.9 ± 36.2 cm(3) and 73.3 ± 31.8 cm(3), respectively, both of which were statistically lower (p < 0.01) than the mean V5 value of 124.6 ± 67.1 cm(3) for VMAT. CONCLUSIONS Significantly better near-target normal brain

  2. Heavy Metal Pad Shielding during Fluoroscopic Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Dromi, Sergio; Wood, Bradford J.; Oberoi, Jay; Neeman, Ziv

    2006-01-01

    Significant direct and scatter radiation doses to patient and physician may result from routine interventional radiology practice. A lead-free disposable tungsten antimony shielding pad was tested in phantom patients during simulated diagnostic angiography procedures. Although the exact risk of low doses of ionizing radiation is unknown, dramatic dose reductions can be seen with routine use of this simple, sterile pad made from lightweighttungsten antimony material.

  3. Homogeneous Dielectric Equivalents of Composite Material Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the methodology of replacing complicated parts of an airplane skin by simple homogeneous equivalents, which can exhibit similar shielding efficiency. On one hand, the airplane built from the virtual homogeneous equivalents can be analyzed with significantly reduced CPU-time demands and memory requirements. On the other hand, the equivalent model can estimate the internal fields satisfactory enough to evaluate the electromagnetic immunity of the airplane.

  4. Shielding design for PWR in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, G.; Charransol; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding calculation scheme used in France for PWR is presented here for 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants built by EDF the French utility giving electricity. Neutron dose rate at areas accessible by personnel during the reactor operation is calculated and compared with the measurements which were carried out in 900 MWe units up to now. Measurements on the first French 1300 MWe reactor are foreseen at the end of 1983.

  5. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  6. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  7. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  8. Shape Effect Analysis of Aluminum Projectile Impact on Whipple Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquilla, Maria J.; Miller, Joshua E.

    2017-01-01

    The informed design with respect to hypervelocity collisions involving micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) is influential to the success of space missions. For an orbit comparable to that of the International Space Station, velocities for MMOD can range from 1 to 15 km/s, with an average velocity around 10 km/cu s. The high energy released during collisions at these speeds can result in damage to a spacecraft, or worst-case, loss of the spacecraft, thus outlining the importance of methods to predict the likelihood and extent of damage due to an impact. Through experimental testing and numerical simulations, substantial work has been conducted to better understand the effects of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) on spacecraft systems and shields; however, much of the work has been focused on spherical impacting particles. To improve environment models for the analysis of MMOD, a large-scale satellite break-up test was performed at the Arnold Engineering and Development Complex to better understand the varied impactor geometries that could be generated from a large impact. As a part of the post-experiment analysis, an undertaking to characterize the irregular fragments generated is currently being performed by the University of Florida under the management of NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC). DebriSat was a representative, modern LEO satellite that was catastrophically broken up in a HVI test. The test chamber was lined with a soft-catch system of foam panels that captured the fragments after impact. Initial predictions put the number of fragments larger than 2mm generated from the HVI at roughly 85,000. The number of fragments thus far extracted from the foam panels has exceeded 100,000, with that number continuously increasing. The shapes of the fragments vary dependent upon the material. Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer pieces, for instance, are abundantly found as thin, flat slivers. The characterization of these fragments with

  9. Beta radiation shielding with lead and plastic: effect on bremsstrahlung radiation when switching the shielding order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, Wesley R; Drzyzga, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Lead and plastic are commonly used to shield beta radiation. Radiation protection literature is ubiquitous in advising the placement of plastic first to absorb all the beta particles before any lead shielding is used. This advice is based on the well established theory that radiative losses (bremsstrahlung production) are more prevalent in higher atomic number (Z) materials than in low Z materials. Using 32P beta radiation, we measured bremsstrahlung photons transmitted through lead and plastic (Lucite) shielding in different test configurations to determine the relative efficacy of lead alone, plastic alone, and the positional order of lead and plastic. With the source (32P) and detector held at a constant separation distance, we inserted lead and/or plastic absorbers and measured the reduction in bremsstrahlung radiation level measured by the detector. With these test conditions, analysis of measured bremsstrahlung radiation in various thicknesses and configurations of lead and plastic shielding shows the following: placing plastic first vs. lead first reduces the transmitted radiation level only marginally (10% to 40%); 2 mm of additional lead is sufficient to correct the "mistake" of placing the lead first; and for equal thicknesses or weights of lead and plastic, lead is a more efficient radiation shield than plastic.

  10. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Bratholm, L.A.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    Full-protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants based on ab initio calculations are desirable, because they can assist in elucidating protein structures from NMR experiments. In this work, we present NMR shielding constants computed using a new automated fragmentation (J. Phys. ...... can obtain a representative subset of snapshots that gives the smallest predicted error, compared to experiment. Finally, we use this subset of snapshots to calculate the NMR shielding constants at the PE-KT3/pcSseg-2 level of theory for all atoms in the protein GB3....

  11. Accelerator based fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chao, Alexander Wu

    2017-08-01

    A feasibility study of fusion reactors based on accelerators is carried out. We consider a novel scheme where a beam from the accelerator hits the target plasma on the resonance of the fusion reaction and establish characteristic criteria for a workable reactor. We consider the reactions d+t\\to n+α,d+{{}3}{{H}\\text{e}}\\to p+α , and p+{{}11}B\\to 3α in this study. The critical temperature of the plasma is determined from overcoming the stopping power of the beam with the fusion energy gain. The needed plasma lifetime is determined from the width of the resonance, the beam velocity and the plasma density. We estimate the critical beam flux by balancing the energy of fusion production against the plasma thermo-energy and the loss due to stopping power for the case of an inert plasma. The product of critical flux and plasma lifetime is independent of plasma density and has a weak dependence on temperature. Even though the critical temperatures for these reactions are lower than those for the thermonuclear reactors, the critical flux is in the range of {{10}22}-{{10}24}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2}~{{\\text{s}}-1} for the plasma density {ρt}={{10}15}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} in the case of an inert plasma. Several approaches to control the growth of the two-stream instability are discussed. We have also considered several scenarios for practical implementation which will require further studies. Finally, we consider the case where the injected beam at the resonance energy maintains the plasma temperature and prolongs its lifetime to reach a steady state. The equations for power balance and particle number conservation are given for this case.

  12. Application of thin-shielded mercury microelectrodes in anodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Salvatore; Bragato, Carlo; Baldo, M Antonietta; Ciani, Ilenia

    2008-10-19

    The performance in anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) of hemispherical mercury microelectrodes, fabricated by electrodeposition of liquid mercury on the surface of Pt microdisks which were surrounded by a rather thick or thin insulating shield, was compared. The Pt microdisks were produced by sealing a wire of 25 microm diameter into a glass capillary, and by coating the cylindrical length of the Pt wire with a cathodic electrophoretic paint. The ratio of the overall tip radius b, to the basal radius of the electrode a, so-called RG=b/a, was equal to 110+/-10 and 1.52+/-0.01 for the thick- and thin-shielded microdisk, respectively. The mercury microelectrodes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mVs(-1), in 1mM Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) aqueous solution. The steady-state voltammogram recorded with the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode displayed less hysteresis, while the steady-state current was about 30% higher than that of the thicker one. This was a consequence of the additional flux due to diffusion from behind the plane of the electrode. The flux enhancement, which was operative at the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode during the deposition step in the ASV experiments, allowed recording stripping peaks for Cd and Pb, which resulted about 32% larger than those recorded at the thicker shielded mercury microelectrode, under same experimental conditions. The usefulness of the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode for ASV measurements in real samples was verified by determining the content of heavy metal ions released in the pore water (pH 4.5) of a soil slurry.

  13. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the study of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Omobuwajo, O. R.; Ceccato, D.; Adebajo, A. C.; Buoso, M. C.; Moschini, G.

    2008-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia due to deficiency of insulin, is a disease involving the endocrine pancreas and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the world. In Nigeria, many plants, especially those implicated in herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes, have not been screened for their elemental constituents while information on phytochemistry of some of them is not available. There is therefore the need to document these constituents as some of these plants are becoming increasingly important as herbal drugs or food additives. The accelerator-based technique PIXE, using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro (Padova) Italy, was employed in the determination of the elemental constituents of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants. Leaves of Gardenia ternifolia, Caesalpina pulcherrima, Solemostenon monostachys, whole plant of Momordica charantia and leaf and stem bark of Hunteria umbellata could be taken as vegetables, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in the management of diabetes. However, Hexabolus monopetalus root should be used under prescription.

  14. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the study of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy)], E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk; Omobuwajo, O.R. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Adebajo, A.C. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Buoso, M.C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Diabetes mellitus, a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia due to deficiency of insulin, is a disease involving the endocrine pancreas and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the world. In Nigeria, many plants, especially those implicated in herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes, have not been screened for their elemental constituents while information on phytochemistry of some of them is not available. There is therefore the need to document these constituents as some of these plants are becoming increasingly important as herbal drugs or food additives. The accelerator-based technique PIXE, using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro (Padova) Italy, was employed in the determination of the elemental constituents of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants. Leaves of Gardenia ternifolia, Caesalpina pulcherrima, Solemostenon monostachys, whole plant of Momordica charantia and leaf and stem bark of Hunteria umbellata could be taken as vegetables, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in the management of diabetes. However, Hexabolus monopetalus root should be used under prescription.

  15. Radiation shielding materials characterization in the MoMa-Count program and further evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobascio, Cesare

    In the frame of the space research programme MoMa (From Molecules to Man) -Count (Coun-termeasures), funded by the Italian Space Agency, multi-functional protections for human space exploration have been investigated, paying particular attention to flexible materials, selected also for their excellent structural, thermal and ballistic performances. Flexible materials such as Kevlar R are qualified for space application, but have poorly known space radiation prop-erties, with consequent uncertainties about their shielding efficiency against the radiation en-vironment. The necessary evaluation of their shielding efficiency has been chiefly based on dedicated ground experiments in accelerators, supplemented by Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in the materials or multi-layers. In addition, flight experiments have been performed in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the re-entry capsule Foton, to measure the shielding behaviour in the actual operating environment of space, via dedicated detectors and dosimeters. This paper aims at presenting the results and lessons learned accrued within the MoMa-Count program, as well as the future actions planned for improving radiation shielding in long duration human exploration missions.

  16. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatar Vento, V., E-mail: Vladimir.ThatarVento@gmail.com [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bergueiro, J.; Cartelli, D. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, M. Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, M. Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  17. Analysis and improvement of cyclotron thallium target room shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiloo, N; Raisali, G; Aslani, G

    2008-01-01

    Because of high neutron and gamma-ray intensities generated during bombardment of a thallium-203 target, a thallium target-room shield and different ways of improving it have been investigated. Leakage of neutron and gamma ray dose rates at various points behind the shield are calculated by simulating the transport of neutrons and photons using the Monte Carlo N Particle transport computer code. By considering target-room geometry, its associated shield and neutron and gamma ray source strengths and spectra, three designs for enhancing shield performance have been analysed: a shielding door at the maze entrance, covering maze walls with layers of some effective materials and adding a shadow-shield in the target room in front of the radiation source. Dose calculations were carried out separately for different materials and dimensions for all the shielding scenarios considered. The shadow-shield has been demonstrated to be one suitable for neutron and gamma dose equivalent reduction. A 7.5-cm thick polyethylene shadow-shield reduces both dose equivalent rate at maze entrance door and leakage from the shield by a factor of 3.

  18. Numerical Analysis on Neutron Shielding Structure of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Changle; WU Songtao; YU Jie; SHENG Daolin

    2008-01-01

    The neutron shielding component of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experi-mental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a kind of structure resembling a wall in appearance. A FE (finite element) model is set up by using ANSYS code in terms of its structural features. Static analysis, thermal expansion analysis and dynamic analysis are performed. The static results show that the stress and displacement distribution are allowable, but the high stress appears in the junction between the upper and lower parts. The modal analysis indicates that the biggest defor-mation exists in the port area. Through modal superposition, the single-point response has been found with the lower rank frequency of the acceleration seismic response spectrum. But the defor-mation and the stress values are within the permissible limit. The analysis results would benefit the work in the next step and provide some reference for the implementation of the engineering plan in the future.

  19. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

    2007-11-16

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

  20. Updated measurements from CREAM & CREDO & implications for environment & shielding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, C S; Truscott, P R; Peerless, C L; Watson, C J; Evans, H E; Knight, P; Cosby, M; Underwood, C; Cousins, T; Noulty, R

    1998-06-01

    Flight data obtained between 1995 and 1997 from the Cosmic Radiation Environment Monitors CREAM & CREDO carried on UoSat-3, Space Shuttle, STRV-1a (Space Technology Research Vehicle) and APEX (Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiment Spacecraft) have been added to the dataset affording coverage since 1990. The modulation of cosmic rays and evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly are observed, the former comprising a factor three increase at high latitudes and the latter a general increase accompanied by a westward drift. Comparison of particle fluxes and linear energy transfer spectra is made with improved environment & radiation transport calculations which account for shield distributions and secondary particles. While there is an encouraging convergence between predictions and observations, significant improvements are still required, particularly in the treatrnent of locally produced secondary particles.

  1. Structural Monitoring of Metro Infrastructure during Shield Tunneling Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  2. Structural monitoring of metro infrastructure during shield tunneling construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, L; Ye, X W; Ming, G; Dong, X B

    2014-01-01

    Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  3. Neutron shielding performance of water-extended polyester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M. [Zacatecas Univ. Autonoma, Nuclear Studies (Mexico); Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M. [Zacatecas Univ. Autonoma, Electric Engineering Academic Units (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, cNuclear Engineering Department (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    A Monte Carlo study to determine the shielding features to neutrons of water-extended polyester (WEP) was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through elastic and inelastic collisions. In addition to neutron attenuation properties, other desirable properties for neutron shielding materials include mechanical strength, stability, low cost, and ease of handling. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method (MCNP code) was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, for comparison the calculations were extended to water shielding, the bare source in vacuum and in air. (authors)

  4. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  5. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  6. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, Robert D. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  7. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  8. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O; Nelson, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness $\\ell$ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter $\

  9. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 10$^{7}$~K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  10. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  11. Radiation-Shielding Polymer/Soil Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed to fabricate polymer/ soil composites primarily from extraterrestrial resources, using relatively low-energy processes, with the original intended application being that habitat structures constructed from such composites would have sufficient structural integrity and also provide adequate radiation shielding for humans and sensitive electronic equipment against the radiation environment on the Moon and Mars. The proposal is a response to the fact that it would be much less expensive to fabricate such structures in situ as opposed to transporting them from Earth.

  12. Cerrobend shielding stents for buccal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karma Yangchen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common oral malignant neoplasms, especially in the South Asian region. Radiotherapy, which plays a significant role in the treatment of this carcinoma, has severe adverse effects. Different types of prosthesis may be constructed to protect healthy tissues from the adverse effects of treatment and concentrate radiation in the region of the tumor mass. However, the technique for fabrication of shielding stent with Lipowitz's alloy (cerrobend/Wood's alloy has not been well documented. This article describes detailed technique for fabrication of such a stent for unilateral buccal carcinoma patients to spare the unaffected oral cavity from potential harmful effects associated with radiotherapy.

  13. Geochronologic data for the Arabian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Lyman Thomas; Brown, G.F.; Hedge, Carl; Marvin, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The radiometric ages reported below were completed during the period 1957-1936. the rock samples were provided and examined petrographically by Glen F. Brown and his associates at the U.S. Geological Survey. The 25 Rb-Sr ages of biotites and feldspars and the 25 K-Ar ages of biotites, hornblendes, and total rock samples constituted the initial suite of ages for the Arabian Shield. Zircons in the quantity required for analysis were not found in any of the rocks examined.

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  15. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Quentin E., E-mail: quentin-adams@uiowa.edu; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Enger, Shirin A. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Ave, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  16. Gamma shielding properties of Tamoxifen drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanberoglu, Gulsah Saydan; Oto, Berna; Gulebaglan, Sinem Erden

    2017-02-01

    Tamoxifen (MW=371 g/mol) is an endocrine therapeutic drug widely prescribed as chemopreventive in women to prevent and to treat all stages of breast cancer. It is also being studied for other types of cancer. In this study, we have calculated some gamma shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) for Tamoxifen drug. The values of μρ were calculated using WinXCom computer program and then the values of Zeff and Nel were derived using μρ values in the wide energy range (1 keV - 100 GeV).

  17. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene as a base material for shielding cosmic radiation in aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marlon A., E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Fisica Aplicada; Goncalez, Odair L. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (PG/CTE/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias Espaciais

    2013-07-01

    Materials with high content of hydrogen have good properties of shielding against the effects of cosmic rays (CR) because are less effective than materials with high nuclear masses in the generation of secondary radiation. Beside the Aluminum, Polyethylene has been used as a reference and as a base material for composites applied in structures and in shielding of ionizing radiation for aerospace applications. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), pure and doped 10% by mass with cadmium chloride, had its shielding properties for CR evaluated in this paper. Methodology used was based in conventional radioactive sources employed on simple geometries experiments and then computational simulation for isotropic fluxes of cosmic-ray high energy particles. Transmission experiments were performed with a3.7GBq (100 mCi){sup 241}Am-Be neutron source and a set of conventional calibration gamma radiation sources. Samples were characterized according to their gamma total attenuation coefficients from 59 to 1,408 keV, dose deposition curve for {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, fast neutron transmission coefficient, generation and self-absorption of thermal neutrons as well as their generation of internal cascades of secondary electrons and gamma-rays by nuclear interactions of fast neutrons with shielding material. Main effects of the additive in the polyethylene base were the most effective removal of gamma radiation and of secondary electrons with energies below 200 keV, the reduction of the albedo as well as the thermal neutrons transmission. Dose reduction due to primary CR were not significant, since the largest contribution to the doses due to high energy ionizing particles transmitted and, also, due to secondary radiation with energy above 1 MeV produced in shielding. (author)

  18. InfuShield: a shielded enclosure for administering therapeutic radioisotope treatments using standard syringe pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, Dominic P; Pratt, Brenda E; Chittenden, Sarah J; Murray, Iain S; Causer, Louise; Grey, Matthew J; Gear, Jonathan I; Du, Yong; Flux, Glenn D

    2017-03-01

    The administration of radionuclide therapies presents significant radiation protection challenges. The aim of this work was to develop a delivery system for intravenous radioisotope therapies to substantially moderate radiation exposures to staff and operators. A novel device (InfuShield) was designed and tested before being used clinically. The device consists of a shielded enclosure which contains the therapeutic activity and, through the hydraulic action of back-to-back syringes, allows the activity to be administered using a syringe pump external to the enclosure. This enables full access to the pump controls while simultaneously reducing dose to the operator. The system is suitable for use with all commercially available syringe pumps and does not require specific consumables, maximising both the flexibility and economy of the system. Dose rate measurements showed that at key stages in an I mIBG treatment procedure, InfuShield can reduce dose to operators by several orders of magnitude. Tests using typical syringes and infusion speeds show no significant alteration in administered flow rates (maximum of 1.2%). The InfuShield system provides a simple, safe and low cost method of radioisotope administration.

  19. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  20. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  1. Movable radiation shields for the CLEO II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, D.J.; Ward, C.W.; Alexander, J.; Cherwinka, J.; Henderson, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cinabro, D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fast, J. [Purdue University, Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Morrison, R. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O`Neill, M. [CRPP, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

    1998-02-11

    Two movable tungsten radiation shields were installed on the beam pipe during the upgrade of the CLEO II detector, operating at the Cornell electron storage ring (CESR). This upgrade included the installation of a silicon vertex detector (SVX) and the purpose of the shields is to protect the SVX readout electronics from synchrotron radiation produced during injection and non-high-energy physics operation of CESR. Shield motion is controlled remotely by cables, keeping the associated motors and controls outside the detection volume. We discuss the design and performance of the radiation shields and the associated control system. (orig.). 8 refs.

  2. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  3. Polyolefin-Nanocrystal Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — EIC Laboratories Inc. is proposing a lightweight multifunctional polymer/nanoparticle composite for radiation shielding during long-duration lunar missions. Isolated...

  4. Neutron shielding for a {sup 252} Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Eduardo Gallego, Alfredo Lorente [Depto. de Ingenieria Nuclear, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the {sup 252}Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare {sup 252}Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  5. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for use on initial lunar surface power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxiliary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2007). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n). These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  6. Electrostatic Probe with Shielded Probe Insulator Tube for Low Disturbing Plasma Measurements in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Staack, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2003-07-10

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters of the quasi-neutral plasma in Hall thrusters and similar ExB electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In Hall thrusters, probe-induced perturbations can produce changes in the discharge current and plasma parameters on the order of their steady state values. These perturbations are explored by varying the material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. A possible cause of these perturbations appears to be the secondary electron emission, induced by energetic plasma electrons, from insulator ceramic tubes in which the probe wire is inserted. A new probe in which a low secondary electron emission material, such as metal, shields the probe ceramic tube, is shown to function without producing such large perturbations. A segmentation of this shield further prevents probe -induced perturbations, by not shortening the plasma through the conductive shield. In a set of experiments with a segmented shield probe, the thruster was operated in the input power range of 500-2.5 kW and discharge voltages of 200-500 V, while the probe-induced perturbations of the discharge current were below 4% of its steady state value in the region in which 90% of the voltage drop takes place.

  7. Hypervelocity impact testing of advanced materials and structures for micrometeoroid and orbital debris shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of 66 hypervelocity impact experiments have been performed to assess the potential of various materials (aluminium, titanium, copper, stainless steel, nickel, nickel/chromium, reticulated vitreous carbon, silver, ceramic, aramid, ceramic glass, and carbon fibre) and structures (monolithic plates, open-cell foam, flexible fabrics, rigid meshes) for micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding. Arranged in various single-, double-, and triple-bumper configurations, screening tests were performed with 0.3175 cm diameter Al2017-T4 spherical projectiles at nominally 6.8 km/s and normal incidence. The top performing shields were identified through target damage assessments and their respective weight. The top performing candidate shield at the screening test condition was found to be a double-bumper configuration with a 0.25 mm thick Al3003 outer bumper, 6.35 mm thick 40 PPI aluminium foam inner bumper, and 1.016 mm thick Al2024-T3 rear wall (equal spacing between bumpers and rear wall). In general, double-bumper candidates with aluminium plate outer bumpers and foam inner bumpers were consistently found to be amongst the top performers. For this impact condition, potential weight savings of at least 47% over conventional all-aluminium Whipple shields are possible by utilizing the investigated materials and structures. The results of this study identify materials and structures of interest for further, more in-depth, impact investigations.

  8. Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ibrahim, Ahmad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report documents the analysis of the dose rate in the experiment area outside the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target station shielding monolith with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV. The analysis implemented a coupled three dimensional (3D)/two dimensional (2D) approach that used both the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) 3D Monte Carlo code and the Discrete Ordinates Transport (DORT) two dimensional deterministic code. The analysis with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV showed that the dose rate in continuously occupied areas on the lateral surface outside the SNS target station shielding monolith is less than 0.25 mrem/h, which complies with the SNS facility design objective. However, the methods and codes used in this analysis are out of date and unsupported, and the 2D approximation of the target shielding monolith does not accurately represent the geometry. We recommend that this analysis is updated with modern codes and libraries such as ADVANTG or SHIFT. These codes have demonstrated very high efficiency in performing full 3D radiation shielding analyses of similar and even more difficult problems.

  9. Technique for high axial shielding factor performance of large-scale, thin, open-ended, cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields

    CERN Document Server

    Malkowski, S; Hona, B; Mattie, C; Woods, D; Yan, H; Plaster, B; 10.1063/1.3605665

    2011-01-01

    Metglas 2705M is a low-cost commercially-available, high-permeability Cobalt-based magnetic alloy, provided as a 5.08-cm wide and 20.3-$\\mu$m thick ribbon foil. We present an optimized construction technique for single-shell, large-scale (human-size), thin, open-ended cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields. The measured DC axial and transverse magnetic shielding factors of our 0.61-m diameter and 1.83-m long shields in the Earth's magnetic field were 267 and 1500, for material thicknesses of only 122 $\\mu$m (i.e., 6 foil layers). The axial shielding performance of our single-shell Metglas magnetic shields, obtained without the use of magnetic shaking techniques, is comparable to the performance of significantly thicker, multiple-shell, open-ended Metglas magnetic shields in comparable-magnitude, low-frequency applied external fields reported previously in the literature.

  10. Crack tip shielding and anti-shielding effects of parallel cracks for a superconductor slab under an electromagnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhi Wen; Zhou, You He [Ministry of Education, Singapore (China); Lee, Kang Yong [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In this letter, the shielding or anti-shielding effect is firstly applied to obtain the behavior of two parallel cracks in a two-dimensional type-II superconducting under electromagnetic force. Fracture analysis is performed by the finite element method and the magnetic behavior of superconductor is described by the critical state Bean model. The stress intensity factors at the crack tips can be obtained and discussed for decreasing field after zero-field cooling. The shielding or anti-shielding effect at the crack tips depend on the distance between two parallel cracks and the crack length. The results indicate that the shielding effects of the two parallel cracks increase when the distance between the two parallel cracks decreases. It can be also obtained that the superconductors with shorter cracks has more remarkable shielding effect than those with longer cracks.

  11. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  12. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  13. Concrete enclosure to shield a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagrana M, L. E.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Soto B, T. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: emmanuelvillagrana@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the aim to design a shielding for a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source several Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using MCNP5 code. First, a point-like source was modeled in vacuum and the neutron spectrum and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated at several distances ranging from 5 up to 150 cm, these calculations were repeated including air, and a 1 x 1 x 1 m{sup 3} enclosure that was shielded with 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50 and 80 cm-thick Portland type concrete walls. At all the points located inside the enclosure neutron spectra from 10{sup -8} up 0.5 MeV were the same regardless the distance from the source showing the room-return effect, for energies larger than 0.5 MeV neutron spectra are diminished as the distance increases. Outside the enclosure it was noticed that neutron spectra becomes -softer- as the concrete thickness increases due to reduction of mean neutron energy. With the ambient dose values the attenuation curve in terms of concrete thickness was calculated. (Author)

  14. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (containing lead were used. The built samples have high density of 4470 kg/m3 to 5623 kg/m3 and compressive strength of 628 kg/m2 to 685 kg/m2. The half and tenth value layers (half value layer and tenth value layers for the galena concrete, when irradiated with 137Cs gamma source, were found to be 1.45 cm and 4.94 cm, respectively. When irradiated with 60Co gamma source, half value layer was measured to be 2.42 cm. The computation modeling by FLUKA and XCOM shows a good agreement between experimental and computational results.

  15. A superconducting shield to protect astronauts

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Superconductors team in the Technology department is involved in the European Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) project, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using superconducting magnetic shielding technology to protect astronauts from cosmic radiation in the space environment. The material that will be used in the superconductor coils on which the project is working is magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor developed in the form of wire for CERN for the LHC High Luminosity Cold Powering project.   Image: K. Anthony/CERN. Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it wi...

  16. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  17. SHIELD: Observations of Three Candidate Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvolo, Elizabeth; Miazzo, Masao; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Salzer, John Joseph; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Elson, Edward C.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Leisman, Luke; Ott, Juergen; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Van Sistine, Angela; Warren, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract:The “Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength study of local volume low-mass galaxies. Using the now-complete Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) source catalog, 82 systems are identified that meet distance, line width, and HI flux criteria for being gas-rich, low-mass galaxies. These systems harbor neutral gas reservoirs smaller than 3x10^7 M_sun, thus populating the faint end of the HI mass function with statistical confidence for the first time. In a companion poster, we present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array D-configuration HI spectral line observations of 32 previously unobserved galaxies. Three galaxies in that study have been discovered to lie in close angular proximity to more massive galaxies. Here we present VLA HI imaging of these candidate interacting systems. We compare the neutral gas morphology and kinematics with optical images from SDSS. We discuss the frequency of low-mass galaxies undergoing tidal interaction in the complete SHIELD sample.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant 1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  18. Technique and results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil I Vadiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Use of cartilage for repair of tympanic membrane is recommended by many otologists. The current study aims at evaluating results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty in terms of graft take up and hearing outcomes. Material and Methods: In the current study, cartilage shield tympanoplasty(CST is used in ears with high risk perforations of the tympanic membrane. A total of 40 ears were selected where type I CST was done in 30 ears and type III CST was done in 10 ears. Results: An average of 37.08 dB air bone gap(ABG was present in pre operative time and an average of 19.15 dB of ABG was observed at 6 months after the surgery with hearing gain of 17.28 dB on average was observed. Graft take up rate of 97.5% was observed. The technique is modified to make it easier and to minimize chances of lateralization of graft. Conclusion: The hearing results of this technique are comparable to other methods of tympanic membrane repair.

  19. The AA disappearing under concrete shielding

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    When the AA started up in July 1980, the machine stood freely in its hall, providing visitors with a view through the large window in the AA Control Room. The target area, in which the high-intensity 26 GeV/c proton beam from the PS hit the production target, was heavily shielded, not only towards the outside but also towards the AA-Hall. However, electrons and pions emanating from the target with the same momentum as the antiprotons, but much more numerous, accompanied these through the injection line into the AA ring. The pions decayed with a half-time corresponding to approximately a revolution period (540 ns), whereas the electrons lost energy through synchrotron radiation and ended up on the vacuum chamber wall. Electrons and pions produced the dominant component of the radiation level in the hall and the control room. With operation times far exceeding original expectations, the AA had to be buried under concrete shielding in order to reduce the radiation level by an order of magnitude.

  20. Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured

  1. Mechanized timbering for faces with artificial Petrosani shield type roofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koronka, F.

    1979-01-01

    A new type of mechanized shield timbering is described for faces of continuous extraction which can be successfully used at coal mines of the Valya-Zhiuluy (Socialist Republic of Romania) coal beds in working bed 3. The component elements of the metal timbering section are: base frame, inclined curvilinear shield, 2-span curvilinear hinged beam, coupling, 2 extension support rods, hydraulic push rod for moving the main frame into the face and hydraulic cylinder for controlling the discharge coupling. The maximum height of the timbering section is 3.4, the minimum height is 2.7 m, the width of coverage of the section is 0.7 m, the carrier capacity of the section is 1600 kN, working pressure in the hydraulic system is 200 N/cm/sup 2/, the spacing of timbering feed is 0.8 m, natural weight of section 3.5 T. A plan is presented for geometric elements of the timbering and its assemblies with indication of their controllable movement. Results are reported on the experimental tests of the timbering in the mine shafts Lonea and the parameters for quantitative evaluation of the timbering achieved in this case, in particular, diagrams are presented for the change in pressure absorbed by the timbering and reaction of the supports changing with time. Experience has indicated that timbering of the Petrosani type is used efficiently together with extraction combines 2K-52, Ks 1 Kg, Ravageuse and others. The most effective is the use of the described timbering in faces of width 50-60 m. The obtained indicators in technical-economic parameters make it possible to evaluate the Petrosani type timbering on a higher operating level as compared to the imported types of timbering.

  2. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Dadkhah, Hossein; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Xu, Weiyu; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm3 (D2cm3) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy3, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D90 increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy10, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D90, compared to D-RSBT, were 16.6, 12.9, 7.2, 3.7, and 1.7 Gy10

  3. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  4. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-01-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 \\pm 200) pT within a central volume of 1m x 1m x 1m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m is described. This performance represents more than a hundred-fold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus.

  5. The value of thyroid shielding in intraoral radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenoot, Bart; Sanderink, Gerard C H; Berkhout, W Erwin R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of the application of a thyroid shield in intraoral radiography when using rectangular collimation. Methods: Experimental data were obtained by measuring the absorbed dose at the position of the thyroid gland in a RANDO® (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) male phantom with a dosemeter. Four protocols were tested: round collimation and rectangular collimation, both with and without thyroid shield. Five exposure positions were deployed: upper incisor (Isup), upper canine (Csup), upper premolar (Psup), upper molar (Msup) and posterior bitewing (BW). Exposures were made with 70 kV and 7 mA and were repeated 10 times. The exposure times were as recommended for the exposure positions for the respective collimator type by the manufacturer for digital imaging. The data were statistically analyzed with a three-way ANOVA test. Significance was set at p Isup, thyroid dose levels were comparable with both collimators at a level indicating primary beam exposure. Thyroid shield reduced this dose with circa 75%. For the Csup position, round collimation also revealed primary beam exposure, and thyroid shield yield was 70%. In Csup with rectangular collimation, the thyroid dose was reduced with a factor 4 compared with round collimation and thyroid shield yielded an additional 42% dose reduction. The thyroid dose levels for the Csup, Psup, Msup and BW exposures were lower with rectangular collimation without thyroid shield than with round collimation with thyroid shield. With rectangular collimation, the thyroid shield in Psup, Msup and BW reduced the dose 10% or less, where dose levels were already low, implying no clinical significance. Conclusions: For the exposures in the upper anterior region, thyroid shield results in an important dose reduction for the thyroid. For the other exposures, thyroid shield augments little to the reduction achieved by rectangular collimation. The use of thyroid shield is to be advised, when performing

  6. Evidence for bacterially generated hydrocarbon gas in Canadian shield and fennoscandian shield rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Frape, S. K.; Fritz, P.; Macko, S. A.; Welhan, J. A.; Blomqvist, R.; Lahermo, P. W.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrocarbon-rich gases found in crystalline rocks on the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields are isotopically and compositionally similar, suggesting that such gases are a characteristic feature of Precambrian Shield rocks. Gases occure in association with saline groundwaters and brines in pressurized "pockets" formed by sealed fracture systems within the host rocks. When released by drilling activities, gas pressures as high as 5000 kPa have been recorded. Typical gas flow rates for individual boreholes range from 0.25 L/min to 4 L/min. The highest concentrations of CH 4 are found in the deepest levels of the boreholes associated with CaNaCl (and NaCaCl) brines. N 2 is the second major component of the gases and with CH 4 accounts for up to 80 to >90 vol%. Higher hydrocarbon (C 2+) concentrations range from C2 = C3) ratios from 10-1000. Isotopically the gases show a wide range of values overall ( σ 13C = -57.5 to -41.1%; σ D = -245 to -470‰ ) but a relatively tight cluster of values within each sampling locality. The Enonkoski Mine methanes are unique with σ 13C values between -65.4 and -67.3‰ and σD values between -297 and -347‰. The shield gases are not readily reconcilable with conventional theories of methanogenesis. The range of C1/(C2 + C3) ratios for the shield gases is too low to be consistent with an entirely bacterial origin. In addition, σD CH 4 values are in general too depleted in the heavy isotope to be produced by thermogenic methanogenesis or by secondary alteration processes such as bacterial oxidation or migration. However, isotopic and compositional evidence indicates that bacterially derived gas can account for a significant component of the gas at all shield sites. Conventional bacterial gas accounts for 75-94 vol% of the occurrences at Enonkoski Mine in Finland. At each of the other shield sites, bacterial gas can account for up to 30-50 vol% of the total gas accumulation. This study and other recent evidence of active

  7. Optimization of Photovoltaic Performance Through the Integration of Electrodynamic Dust Shield Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Steven; Davis, Kris; Hickman, Nicoleta; McFall, Judith; Arens, Ellen; Calle, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The viability of photovoltaics on the Lunar and Martian surfaces may be determined by their ability to withstand significant degradation in the Lunar and Martian environments. One of the greatest threats is posed by fine dust particles which are continually blown about the surfaces. In an effort to determine the extent of the threat, and to investigate some abatement strategies, a series of experiments were conducted outdoors and in the Moon and Mars environmental chamber at the Florida Solar Energy Center. Electrodynamic dust shield prototypes based on the electric curtain concept have been developed by our collaborators at the Kennedy Space Center [1]. These thin film layers can remove dust from surfaces and prevent dust accumulation. Several types of dust shields were designed, built and tested under high vacuum conditions and simulated lunar gravity to validate the technology for lunar exploration applications. Gallium arsenide, single crystal and polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic integrated devices were designed, built and tested under Moon and Mars environmental conditions as well as under ambient conditions. Photovoltaic efficiency measurements were performed on each individual cell with the following configurations; without an encapsulation layer, with a glass covering, and with various thin film dust shields. It was found that the PV efficiency of the hybrid systems was unaffected by these various thin film dust shields, proving that the optical transmission of light through the device is virtually uninhibited by these layers. The future goal of this project is to incorporate a photovoltaic cell as the power source for the electrodynamic dust shield system, and experimentally show the effective removal of dust obstructing any light incident on the cell, thus insuring power production is maximized over time.

  8. Potential Use of In Situ Material Composites such as Regolith/Polyethylene for Shielding Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Gersey, Buddy; Bacon, Eugene; Johnson, Quincy; Zhang, Ye; Norman, Jullian; Foley, Ijette; Wilkins, Rick; Zhou, Jianren; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    NASA has an extensive program for studying materials and methods for the shielding of astronauts to reduce the effects of space radiation when on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, especially in the use of in situ materials native to the destination reducing the expense of materials transport. The most studied material from the Moon is Lunar regolith and has been shown to be as efficient as aluminum for shielding purposes (1). The addition of hydrogenous materials such as polyethylene should increase shielding effectiveness and provide mechanical properties necessary of structural materials (2). The neutron radiation shielding effectiveness of polyethylene/regolith stimulant (JSC-1A) composites were studied using confluent human fibroblast cell cultures exposed to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons at the 30deg-left beam line (ICE house) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. At this angle, the radiation spectrum mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons generated in the upper atmosphere and encountered when aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. Cell samples were exposed in series either directly to the neutron beam, within a habitat created using regolith composite blocks, or behind 25 g/sq cm of loose regolith bulk material. In another experiment, cells were also exposed in series directly to the neutron beam in T-25 flasks completely filled with either media or water up to a depth of 20 cm to test shielding effectiveness versus depth and investigate the possible influence of secondary particle generation. All samples were sent directly back to JSC for sub-culturing and micronucleus analysis. This presentation is of work performed in collaboration with the NASA sponsored Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M.

  9. A 3D Faraday Shield for Interdigitated Dielectrometry Sensors and Its Effect on Capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risos, Alex; Long, Nicholas; Hunze, Arvid; Gouws, Gideon

    2016-12-31

    Interdigitated dielectrometry sensors (IDS) are capacitive sensors investigated to precisely measure the relative permittivity ( ϵ r ) of insulating liquids. Such liquids used in the power industry exhibit a change in ϵ r as they degrade. The IDS ability to measure ϵ r in-situ can potentially reduce maintenance, increase grid stability and improve safety. Noise from external electric field sources is a prominent issue with IDS. This paper investigates the novelty of applying a Faraday cage onto an IDS as a 3D shield to reduce this noise. This alters the spatially distributed electric field of an IDS affecting its sensing properties. Therefore, dependency of the sensor's signal with the distance to a shield above the IDS electrodes has been investigated experimentally and theoretically via a Green's function calculation and FEM. A criteria of the shield's distance s = s 0 has been defined as the distance which gives a capacitance for the IDS equal to 1 - e - 2 = 86.5 % of its unshielded value. Theoretical calculations using a simplified geometry gave a constant value for s 0 / λ = 1.65, where λ is the IDS wavelength. In the experiment, values for s 0 were found to be lower than predicted as from theory and the ratio s 0 / λ variable. This was analyzed in detail and it was found to be resulting from the specific spatial structure of the IDS. A subsequent measurement of a common insulating liquid with a nearby noise source demonstrates a considerable reduction in the standard deviation of the relative permittivity from σ unshielded = ± 9.5% to σ shielded = ± 0.6%. The presented findings enhance our understanding of IDS in respect to the influence of a Faraday shield on the capacitance, parasitic capacitances of the IDS and external noise impact on the measurement of ϵ r .

  10. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Gertrud, E-mail: gkonrad@ati.ac.at [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Ayala Guardia, Fidel [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Baeßler, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Borg, Michael [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Glück, Ferenc [Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O.B. 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wigner Research Institute for Physics, P.O.B. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Heil, Werner [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Hiebel, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Sekels GmbH, Dieselstraße 6, D-61239 Ober-Mörlen (Germany); Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (−1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and <1×10{sup −4} (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  11. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    CERN Document Server

    Konrad, Gertrud; Baeßler, Stefan; Borg, Michael; Glück, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Hiebel, Stefan; Horta, Raquel Munoz; Sobolev, Yury

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeabi...

  12. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  13. 30 CFR 57.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 57.14213... welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to persons. (b) All welding operations shall be well-ventilated....

  14. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  15. Shield-related signal instability in magnetoresistive heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, K.; Narumi, S.; Kawabe, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, H.

    1999-04-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) heads with various upper shield materials were fabricated and their read-write performance was tested to clarify the shield-related effect on the signal instability in MR heads. Comparison of a head with an upper shield layer of higher magnetostriction and one with lower magnetostriction showed that the latter had better stability in the output signal of a repeated read-write test. The output amplitude of a head with an upper shield layer of Co52Ni27Fe21 film, which had a high magnetostriction of about +3×10-6, was varied by applying a low external longitudinal field, which affected just the shield layers. This change in the output corresponded well to the output variation in the repeated read-write test. The spin scanning electron micrograph image of this head revealed a distinct domain wall in the air bearing surface near the MR sensor. These results indicated that instability of the domain structure in a shield layer was one of the causes of the signal instability in MR heads; an unusual bias field from a domain wall of the shield layer, which could be moved easily by a repeated writing operation, caused a variation in the biased state of the MR layer which resulted in the signal variation, and that low magnetostriction was required for a shield material to achieve a stable head.

  16. Estimation of Temperature Patterns in Multiply-Shielded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-01-01

    convenient model to use in estimating the contribution of end radiation to variations in the temnerature natterns of a shield system. The ratio TJ ATw...radiation ma- be imoortant. The cuantitative influence of convection, radiation, the number of shields, etc. on the thermoccuole readina may be seen

  17. Gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography: disadvantages prevail over benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frantzen, M.J.; Robben, S.; Postma, A.A.; Zoetelief, J.; Wildberger, J.E.; Kemerink, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To re-evaluate gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography in terms of attainable radiation risk reduction and associated loss of diagnostic information. Methods A study on patient dose and the quality of gonad shielding was performed retrospectively using 500 pelvic radiographs of ch

  18. Preliminary review of Precambrian Shield rocks for potential waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yardley, D.H.; Goldich, S.S.

    1975-11-01

    This review of the Canadian Shield is primarily concerned with the part (such as in the Lake Superior region) that is seismically the least active of the North American continent. The crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks of the more stable elements of the shield provide excellent possibilities for dry excavations suitable for long-term storage of radioactive waste materials. (DLC)

  19. Late Proterozoic extensional collapse in the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasband, B.B.; White, S.H.; Brooijmans, P.; Boorder, H. de; Visser, W.

    2000-01-01

    A structural and petrological study of the Late Proterozoic rocks in the Wadi Kid area, Sinai, Egypt indicates the presence of an extensional metamorphic core complex in the northern Arabian–Nubian Shield. Gneissic domes throughout the Arabian–Nubian Shield resemble the core complex of the Wadi Kid

  20. Design of ITER vacuum vessel in-wall shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X., E-mail: xiaoyu.wang@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ioki, K. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Morimoto, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Choi, C.H.; Utin, Y.; Sborchia, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); TaiLhardat, O. [Assystem EOS, ZAC SAINT MARTIN, 23 rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Mille, B.; Terasawa, A.; Gribov, Y.; Barabash, V.; Polunovskiy, E.; Dani, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H.; Raval, J. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Liu, S.; Lu, M.; Du, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with in-wall shielding (IWS) and cooling water. The main purpose of the in-wall shielding is to provide neutron shielding together with the blanket and VV shells and water during ITER plasma operation and to reduce the ripple of the Toroidal magnetic field. Based on ITER vacuum vessel structure and related requirements, in-wall shielding are designed as about 8900 individual blocks with different sizes and several different materials distributed over nine vessel sectors and nine field joints of vessel sectors. This paper presents the design of the IWS, considering loads, structural stresses and assembly method, and also shows neutron shielding effect and TF ripple reduced by the IWS.

  1. Electromagnetic interference shielding with 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Alhabeb, Mohamed; Hatter, Christine B.; Anasori, Babak; Man Hong, Soon; Koo, Chong Min; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    Materials with good flexibility and high conductivity that can provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding with minimal thickness are highly desirable, especially if they can be easily processed into films. Two-dimensional metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, combine metallic conductivity and hydrophilic surfaces. Here, we demonstrate the potential of several MXenes and their polymer composites for EMI shielding. A 45-micrometer-thick Ti3C2Tx film exhibited EMI shielding effectiveness of 92 decibels (>50 decibels for a 2.5-micrometer film), which is the highest among synthetic materials of comparable thickness produced to date. This performance originates from the excellent electrical conductivity of Ti3C2Tx films (4600 Siemens per centimeter) and multiple internal reflections from Ti3C2Tx flakes in free-standing films. The mechanical flexibility and easy coating capability offered by MXenes and their composites enable them to shield surfaces of any shape while providing high EMI shielding efficiency.

  2. Transparent Metal-Salt-Filled Polymeric Radiation Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Lennhoff, John; Harris, George

    2003-01-01

    "COR-RA" (colorless atomic oxygen resistant -- radiation shield) is the name of a transparent polymeric material filled with x-ray-absorbing salts of lead, bismuth, cesium, and thorium. COR-RA is suitable for use in shielding personnel against bremsstrahlung radiation from electron-beam welding and industrial and medical x-ray equipment. In comparison with lead-foil and leaded-glass shields that give equivalent protection against x-rays (see table), COR-RA shields are mechanically more durable. COR-RA absorbs not only x-rays but also neutrons and rays without adverse effects on optical or mechanical performance. The formulation of COR-RA with the most favorable mechanical-durability and optical properties contains 22 weight percent of bismuth to absorb x-rays, plus 45 atomic percent hydrogen for shielding against neutrons.

  3. Utilizing electromagnetic shielding textiles in wireless body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Grace H H; Aoyagi, Takahiro; Hernandez, Marco; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Kohno, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    For privacy and radio propagation controls, electromagnetic shielding textile could be adopted in WBANs. The effect of including a commercially available electromagnetic shielding apron in WBANs was examined in this paper. By having both the coordinator and the sensor covered by the shielding apron, signal could be confined around the body; however signal strength can be greatly influenced by body movements. Placing the shielding apron underneath both antennas, the transmission coefficient could be on average enhanced by at least 10dB, with less variation comparing to the case when apron does not exist. Shielding textiles could be utilized in designing a smart suit to enhance WBANs performance, and to prevent signals travelling beyond its intended area.

  4. Verification of some building materials as gamma-ray shields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Singla, Jyoti; Kumar, Vipan; Sidhu, G S

    2012-08-01

    The shielding properties for gamma rays of a few low Z materials were investigated. The values of the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, effective atomic number, exposure buildup factor and energy absorption buildup factor were calculated and used to estimate the shielding effectiveness of the samples under investigation. It has been observed that the shielding effectiveness of a sample is directly related to its effective atomic number. The shielding character of any sample is a function of the incident photon energy. Good shielding behaviour has been verified in soil samples in the photon energy region of 0.015-0.30 MeV and of dolomite in 3-15 MeV. The results have been shown graphically with more useful conclusions.

  5. Shielding of CO from dissociating radiation in interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Langer, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper investigates the photodissociation of CO in interstellar clouds in the light of recent laboratory studies which suggest that line rather than continuum processes dominate its dissociation by ultraviolet radiation. Using a simple radiative transfer model, the shielding of representative dissociating bands is estimated, including self-shielding, mutual shielding between different isotopes, and near coincidences with strong lines of H2. Each of these processes materially affects the photodestruction rates of the various isotopic species in the transition regions of molecular clouds. These results are combined with an appropriate gas phase chemical model to determine how the abundances of the CO isotopes vary with depth into the cloud. It is found that self-shielding and mutual shielding cause significant variations in isotopic ratios. In addition, fractionation enhances species containing C-13. The relationship between the column densities of CO and H2 is found to vary for the different isotopes and to be sensitive to local conditions.

  6. Radiation fields from neutron generators shielded with different materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D. L.; Blackburn, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around a DT neutron generator numerical modeling has been performed to assess neutron and photon dose profiles for a variety of shield materials ranging from 1 to 100 cm thick. In agreement with accepted radiation safety practices high-Z materials such as bismuth and lead have been found to be ineffective biological shield materials, owing in part to the existence of (n,2n) reaction channels available with 14.1 MeV DT neutrons, while low-Z materials serve as effective shields for these sources. Composite materials such as a mixture of polyethylene and bismuth, or regular concrete, are ideal shield materials for neutron generator radiation because of their ability to attenuate internally generated photon radiation resulting from neutron scattering and capture within the shields themselves.

  7. Shielding Area Optimization Under the Solution of Interconnect Crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ci Cai; Xin Zhao; Qiang Zhou; Xian-Long Hong

    2005-01-01

    As the technology advances into deep sub-micron era, crosstalk reduction is of paramount importance for signal integrity. Simultaneous shield insertion and net ordering (SINO) has been shown to be effective to reduce both capacitive and inductive couplings. As it introduces extra shields, area minimization is also critical for an efficient SINO algorithm.In this paper, three novel algorithms using fewer shields to solve crosstalk reduction problem with RLC noise constraint are proposed, namely, net coloring (NC), efficient middle shield insertion (EMSI) and NC+EMSI two-step algorithm. Compared with the corresponding algorithms in previous work, these algorithms can reduce shielding area up to 25.77%, 46.19%, and7.17%, respectively, with short runtime.

  8. A Micromachined Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor with a Shield Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Wang, Xiaoping; Xu, Yong; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-13

    This paper presents a piezoresistive pressure sensor with a shield layer for improved stability. Compared with the conventional piezoresistive pressure sensors, the new one reported in this paper has an n-type shield layer that covers p-type piezoresistors. This shield layer aims to minimize the impact of electrical field and reduce the temperature sensitivity of piezoresistors. The proposed sensors have been successfully fabricated by bulk-micromachining techniques. A sensitivity of 0.022 mV/V/kPa and a maximum non-linearity of 0.085% FS are obtained in a pressure range of 1 MPa. After numerical simulation, the role of the shield layer has been experimentally investigated. It is demonstrated that the shield layer is able to reduce the drift caused by electrical field and ambient temperature variation.

  9. Thes - Website for Thermal Shields Upgrade Management

    CERN Document Server

    Micula, Adina

    2013-01-01

    There are a total of 1695 thermal shields (TS) in the interconnections between the superconducting magnets. During LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) all of these TS are being upgraded with a new fixation design. This procedure involves the transport of all the TS from LHC to a workshop on the surface where they are being modified and the subsequent transport of the upgraded TS back to the tunnel where they are laid on the cryostats and await the closure of the interconnection. These operations have to be carefully coordinated in order to ensure that there are always enough modified TS to satisfy the demand in the tunnel and respect the time constraint imposed by the schedule of LS1. As part of my summer project, I developed a database driven website whose aim is to enable the TS upgrade monitoring.

  10. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    McNichols, Andrew T; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Józsa, Gyula I G; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Salzer, John J; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E C; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V; Thomann, Clara M; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the HI 21cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find circular velocities <30 km/s for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish HI fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical ...

  11. Lagrange interpolation for the radiation shielding calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Isozumi, Y; Miyatake, H; Kato, T; Tosaki, M

    2002-01-01

    Basing on some formulas of Lagrange interpolation derived in this paper, a computer program for table calculations has been prepared. Main features of the program are as follows; 1) maximum degree of polynomial in Lagrange interpolation is 10, 2) tables with both one variable and two variables can be applied, 3) logarithmic transformations of function and/or variable values can be included and 4) tables with discontinuities and cusps can be applied. The program has been carefully tested by using the data tables in the manual of shielding calculation for radiation facilities. For all available tables in the manual, calculations with the program have been reasonably performed under conditions of 1) logarithmic transformation of both function and variable values and 2) degree 4 or 5 of the polynomial.

  12. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  13. Radiation shielding in dentistry: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, G D; Abbott, P V

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the literature and provide guidelines on the use of radiation protection for patients in the dental setting. There are limited published data on the effects of low radiation doses such as those used in dental radiology. Most of the evidence is subject to bias, with risk models extrapolated from higher dose models such as studies of the Hiroshima bomb survivors. However, the lack of evidence does not denote the absence of risk, as there is no established 'safe' level of radiation exposure. All imaging utilizing ionizing radiation carries a risk for the patient. Hence the patient benefits of imaging must outweigh the potential risk. All diagnostic imaging should adhere to three basic principles, these being justification, optimization and application of dose limits. This article discusses dose reduction techniques and shielding of sensitive organs, particularly the thyroid, during procedures such as intraoral imaging, orthopantomograms and imaging of the pregnant patient. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of Dalkon Shield tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, H L; Williamson, H O

    1983-09-01

    Scanning electron micrographs of Dalkon Shield tails removed from asymptomatic patients show a variety of microbes and debris throughout their entire length. Apparently, even in undamaged tails, bacterial flora thrive in the protein-rich environment within the multifilament tail. The presence of microbes in the portion of the tail beyond the double knot indicates that an alternative mechanism of microbial transport can occur. Since transient endometritis often occurs immediately after insertion of intrauterine devices, microbes may come in contact with both exposed ends of the multifilament tail and be drawn into the tail by capillary action from the uterine environment down the tail toward the double knot as well as upward from the vagina. Such microorganisms could serve as an inoculum for infection.

  16. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  17. Response to Jakobsson on Human Body Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Block

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A grabs B and uses him as a body shield. That is, A hides behind B (A renders B helpless to resist his grasp, and from that vantage point, shoots at C. According to libertarian theory, may B shoot at C, or, is it proper that C pull the trigger at B? In the view of Rothbard (1984, the former is correct: B is entitled to gun down C. In my (Block, forthcoming view, this is incorrect. Rather, it would be lawful to C to properly kill B. (Both Rothbard and I assume that neither B nor C can end A’s reign of terror. Jakobsson (2010 supports the Rothbardian position. The present paper is at an attempt of mine to refute Jakobsson, and, thus, also, Rothbard (1984, once again.

  18. On the accuracy of the Debye shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Fuentes, M A

    2012-01-01

    The expression for the Debye shielding in plasma physics is usually derived under the assumptions that the plasma particles are weakly coupled, so their kinetic energy is much larger than the potential energy between them, and that the velocity distributions of the plasma species are Maxwellian. The first assumption also establishes that the plasma parameter ND, the number of particles within a sphere with a Debye radius should be greater than 1, and determines the difference between weakly and strongly coupled plasmas. Under such assumptions, Poisson's equation can be linearised, and a simple analytic expression obtained for the electrostatic potential. However, textbooks rarely discuss the accuracy of this approximation. In this work we compare the linearised solution with the exact one, obtained numerically, and show that the linearisation, which underestimates the exact solution, is reasonably good even for ND ~ 40. We give quantitative criteria to set the limit of the approximation when the number of par...

  19. Overview of the SHIELDS Project at LANL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Godinez, H. C.; Jeffery, C. A.; Lawrence, E. C.; Meierbachtol, C.; Moulton, D.; Vernon, L.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Yu, Y.; Birn, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Albert, J.; Horne, R. B.; Lemon, C. L.; Markidis, S.; Young, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The near-Earth space environment is a highly dynamic and coupled system through a complex set of physical processes over a large range of scales, which responds nonlinearly to driving by the time-varying solar wind. Predicting variations in this environment that can affect technologies in space and on Earth, i.e. "space weather", remains a big space physics challenge. We present a recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program that is developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to specify the dynamics of the hot (keV) particles (the seed population for the radiation belts) on both macro- and micro-scale, including important physics of rapid particle injection and acceleration associated with magnetospheric storms/substorms and plasma waves. This challenging problem is addressed using a team of world-class experts in the fields of space science and computational plasma physics and state-of-the-art models and computational facilities. New data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites are developed in addition to physics-based models. This research will provide a framework for understanding of key radiation belt drivers that may accelerate particles to relativistic energies and lead to spacecraft damage and failure. The ability to reliably distinguish between various modes of failure is critically important in anomaly resolution and forensics. SHIELDS will enhance our capability to accurately specify and predict the near-Earth space environment where operational satellites reside.

  20. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Luo, W; Fourkal, E; Lin, T; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2007-07-07

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 x 10(21) W cm(-2). Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  1. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Luo, W.; Fourkal, E.; Lin, T.; Li, J.; Veltchev, I.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 × 1021 W cm-2. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  2. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology; SHIELD 1.0: desenvolvimento de um programa de calculo de blindagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  3. Comparison of some lead and non-lead based glass systems, standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of shielding parameters in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel; Şimşek, Önder; Durak, Rıdvan

    2010-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some glass systems with and without Pb have been calculated in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV including the K absorption edges of high Z elements present in the glass. Also, these glass systems have been compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of mean free paths and total mass attenuation coefficients in the continuous energy range. Comparisons with experiments were also provided wherever possible for glasses. It has been observed that the glass systems without Pb have higher values of Z eff than that of Pb based glasses at some high energy regions even if they have lower mean atomic numbers than Pb based glasses. When compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses, generally it has been shown that the given glass systems have superior properties than concretes and window glasses with respect to the radiation-shielding properties, thus confirming the availability of using these glasses as substitutes for some shielding concretes and commercial window glasses to improve radiation-shielding properties in the continuous energy region.

  4. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayut, Noam; Sobol, Shiri; Nave, Nahum; Samach, Alon

    2014-07-11

    Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants' developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2-4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution.

  5. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Chayut

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2–4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution.

  6. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  7. Flexible neutron shielding composite material of EPDM rubber with boron trioxide: Mechanical, thermal investigations and neutron shielding tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Reyhancan, İ. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, EPDM and boron trioxide composite was produced and mechanical, thermal and neutron shielding tests were performed. EPDM rubber (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer) having a considerably high hydrogen content is an effective neutron shielding material. On the other hand, the materials containing boron components have effective thermal neutron absorption crossection. The composite of EPDM and boron trioxide would be an effective solution for both respects of flexibility and effectiveness for developing a neutron shielding material. Flexible nature of EPDM would be a great asset for the shielding purpose in case of intervention action to a radiation accident. The theoretical calculations and experimental neutron absorption tests have shown that the results were in parallel and an effective neutron shielding has been achieved with the use of the developed composite material.

  8. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are enabling to shield humans in aerospace transportation vehicles and other human habited spaces....

  9. Measurement of 56Fe activity produced in inelastic scattering of neutrons created by cosmic muons in an iron shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, M; Jovančević, N; Nikolić, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the study of the intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons in (56)Fe. Neutrons were produced via nuclear processes induced by cosmic muons in the 20tons massive iron cube placed at the Earth's surface and used as a passive shield for the HPGe detector. Relative intensities of detected gamma lines are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the (252)Cf neutrons. Assessment against the published data from neutron scattering experiments at energies up to 14MeV is also provided. It allowed us to infer the qualitative information about the average energy of muon-created neutrons in the iron shield.

  10. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron shielding for the ATLAS forward region

    CERN Document Server

    Stekl, I; Kovalenko, V E; Vorobel, V; Leroy, C; Piquemal, F; Eschbach, R; Marquet, C

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of different types of neutron shielding for the ATLAS forward region has been studied by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and compared with the results of an experiment performed at the CERN PS. The simulation code is based on GEANT, FLUKA, MICAP and GAMLIB. GAMLIB is a new library including processes with gamma-rays produced in (n, gamma), (n, n'gamma) neutron reactions and is interfaced to the MICAP code. The effectiveness of different types of shielding against neutrons and gamma-rays, composed from different types of material, such as pure polyethylene, borated polyethylene, lithium-filled polyethylene, lead and iron, were compared. The results from Monte-Carlo simulations were compared to the results obtained from the experiment. The simulation results reproduce the experimental data well. This agreement supports the correctness of the simulation code used to describe the generation, spreading and absorption of neutrons (up to thermal energies) and gamma-rays in the shielding materials....

  11. Potential space debris shield structure using impact-initiated energetic materials composed of polytetrafluoroethylene and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Qingming; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Kai; Guo, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A whipple shield using Al/PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) energetic material to protect against space debris is presented. The hypervelocity impact characteristics were investigated experimentally using a two-stage light gas gun at velocities between 3 and 6 km/s. A good protection of the shield was obtained through comparative experiments which used the same bumper areal density. The results showed that the critical projectile diameter can be improved by 28% by contrast with the Christiansen ballistic limit equations. The Al/PTFE energetic material bumper can break up the projectile into smaller, less massive, and slower projectiles due to the combined effect of impact and explosion, thereby producing a sharp rise in the spacecraft protection ability.

  12. The assembly of the disk shielding is finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Hedberg

    At the end of March, the shielding project engineer, Jan Palla, could draw a sigh of relief when the fourth and final rotation of the disk shielding was carried out without incident. The two 80-ton heavy shielding assemblies were built in a horizontal position and they had to be first turned upside-down and then rotated to a vertical position during the assembly. The relatively thin disk plate with a diameter of 9 meters, made this operation quite delicate and a lot of calculation work and strengthening of the shielding was carried out before the rotations could take place. The disk shielding is being turned upside-down. The stainless steel cylinder in the centre supports the shielding as well as the small muon wheel. The two disk shielding assemblies consist of different materials such as bronze, gray steel, cast iron, stainless steel, boron doped polyethylene and lead. The project is multinational with the major pieces having been made by companies in Armenia, Serbia, Spain, Bulgaria, Italy, Slovaki...

  13. Nuclear magnetic shieldings of stacked aromatic and antiaromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raul; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonable well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  14. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  15. Evaluation of syringe shield effectiveness in handling radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yong-In

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the radiation shield of radionuclide syringes and the personal dose equivalent by performing a simulation of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine diagnosis. In order to evaluate the dose depending on the distance between the radiation source and the ICRU sphere against the thickness of the shielding device, the distance at which a nuclear medicine worker may inadvertently come into contact with radiation from the radiation source was set at 0 cm to 30 cm according to the thickness of the shield, thus fixing the ICRU sphere. For a dose evaluation, Hp(10, Hp(3, and Hp(0.07 measurable in specific depth of the ICRU were evaluated. It was found that a dose measured on skin surface of nuclear medicine workers was relatively higher, that the dose varied in relation to the thickness of the radiation shield, and that the shielding effect decreased for some radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It proved necessary to increase thickness of shielding device to the radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It is also considered that a study of proper shielding thickness will be needed in future.

  16. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  17. Checklist of the terrestrial vertebrates of the Guiana Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Distributions are given for 1850 species of terrestrial vertebrates in the Guiana Shield region of northeastern South America, with introductory text by the authors of each section. Distributions cover the three Guianas (Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana), and the states of the Venezuelan Guayna (Amazonas, Bolivar, and Delta Amacuro), and in some cases the states of the Brazilian portion of the Guiana Shield (Amazonas, Roraima, Para, and Amapa), and the Colombian portion of the Guiana Shield. The first section is a checklist of amphibians of the Guiana Shield, by J. Celsa Sefiaris and Ross MacCulloch, detailing the distribution of 269 species. The second section is a checklist of the reptiles of the Guiana Shield by Teresa C. S. de Avila Pires, detailing the distribution of 295 species. The third section is a checklist of the birds of the Guiana Shield, by Chris Milensky, Wiltshire Hinds, Alexandre Aleixo, and Maria de Fatima C. Lima, detailing the distribution of 1004 species. The fourth section is a checklist of the mammals of the Guiana Shield, by Burton K. Lim, Mark D. Engstrom, and Jose Ochoa G., detailing the distribution of 282 species.

  18. Simulation of divertor targets shielding during transients in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, Sergey, E-mail: serguei.pestchanyi@kit.edu [KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pitts, Richard; Lehnen, Michael [ITER Organization,Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We simulated plasma shielding effect during disruption in ITER using the TOKES code. • It has been found that vaporization is unavoidable under action of ITER transients, but plasma shielding drastically reduces the divertor target damage: the melt pool and the vaporization region widths reduced 10–15 times. • A simplified 1D model describing the melt pool depth and the shielded heat flux to the divertor targets have been developed. • The results of the TOKES simulations have been compared with the analytic model when the model is valid. - Abstract: Direct extrapolation of the disruptive heat flux on ITER conditions predicts severe melting and vaporization of the divertor targets causing their intolerable damage. However, tungsten vaporized from the target at initial stage of the disruption can create plasma shield in front of the target, which effectively protects the target surface from the rest of the heat flux. Estimation of this shielding efficiency has been performed using the TOKES code. The shielding effect under ITER conditions is found to be very strong: the maximal depth of the melt layer reduced 4 times, the melt layer width—more than 10 times and vaporization region shrinks 10–15 times due to shielding for unmitigated disruption of 350 MJ discharge. The simulation results show complex, 2D plasma dynamics of the shield under ITER conditions. However, a simplified analytic model, valid for rough estimation of the maximum value for the shielded flux to the target and for the melt depth at the target surface has been developed.

  19. DARHT : integration of shielding design and analysis with facility design /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudrie, R. L. (Richard L.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Gilmore, W. E. (Walter E.); Downing, J. N. (James N.), Jr.; Hack, Alan; McClure, D. A. (Donald A.); Nelson, C. A. (Christine A.); Wadlinger, E. Alan; Zumbro, M. V. (Martha V.)

    2002-01-01

    The design of the interior portions of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility incorporated shielding and controls from the beginning of the installation of the Accelerators. The purpose of the design and analysis was to demonstrate the adequacy of shielding or to determine the need for additional shielding or controls. Two classes of events were considered: (1) routine operation defined as the annual production of 10,000 2000-ns pulses of electrons at a nominal energy of 20 MeV, some of which are converted to the x-ray imaging beam consisting of four nominal 60-ns pulses over the 2000-ns time frame, and (2) accident case defined as up to 100 2000-ns pulses of electrons accidentally impinging on some metallic surface, thereby producing x rays. Several locations for both classes of events were considered inside and outside of the accelerator hall buildings. The analysis method consisted of the definition of a source term for each case studied and the definition of a model of the shielding and equipment present between the source and the dose areas. A minimal model of the fixed existing or proposed shielding and equipment structures was used for a first approximation. If the resulting dose from the first approximation was below the design goal (1 rem/yr for routine operations, 5 rem for accident cases), then no further investigations were performed. If the result of the first approximation was above our design goals, the model was refined to include existing or proposed shielding and equipment. In some cases existing shielding and equipment were adequate to meet our goals and in some cases additional shielding was added or administrative controls were imposed to protect the workers. It is expected that the radiation shielding design, exclusion area designations, and access control features, will result in low doses to personnel at the DARHT Facility.

  20. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-03-22

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Planar quadrature coil design using shielded-loop resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have a low capacitive sample loss due to a perfect balancing. In this paper, it is demonstrated that shielded-loop technology also can be used to improve design of planar quadrature coils. Both a dual-loop circuit and especially a dual-mode circuit may...... benefit from use of shielded-loop resonators. Observations in measurements agree with theory for both a dual-loop coil and a dual-mode coil. The coils were designed for use as transmit/receive coil for 1H imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 T in rat brain....

  2. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  3. Low permeability asphalt concrete gamma ray shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, S E; Sykes, K L

    1997-01-01

    Energy-dependent gamma ray shielding properties were measured as a function of gamma ray energy for a low permeability asphalt concrete that is used as a cap to prevent water infiltration into radioactive waste sites. Experimental data were compared to ISO-PC point kernel shielding calculations. Calculated dose equivalent rates compared well with experimental values, especially considering the poor detector resolution involved. The shielding properties of the asphalt concrete closely resembled those of aluminum. The results presented can be used to determine the asphalt concrete thickness required to reduce dose equivalent rates from several gamma ray emitting radionuclides.

  4. Crustal properties in the continuum Baltic Shield-Scandinavian Mountains from seismic ambient noise and magnetotelluric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mansour, Walid; England, Richard W.; Fishwick, Stewart; Köhler, Andreas; Moorkamp, Max; Ottemøller, Lars; Smirnov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian passive margin is a good example of a region where a Precambrian shield is directly in contact with a younger mountain belt. Located along the Atlantic coast, the Scandinavian mountains, formed 440 Ma ago, show high peaks (> 1 km from the sea level) due to an uplift event 12 Ma ago. This topography contrasts strongly with the low topography of the Baltic shield (around 500 m from the sea level). If the mountain shows high topography compared to the shield, P-receiver functions analysis indicates that the Moho is deeper beneath the shield than beneath the orogenic belt. This result is surprising, as simple crustal isostasy would produce the opposite result. It is therefore likely that there is further variation in crustal and lithospheric properties between the shield and the mountain belt. In this perspective, several geophysical experiments (SCANLIPS2, POLENET-LAPNET, SCANLIPS3D, Norwegian National Seismic Network) have been deployed in the region in order to better understand the lateral variation in the crustal properties. From these different seismic arrays, we used the technique of ambient noise cross correlation in order to reconstruct the Rayleigh wave Green's function (R-R and Z-Z components) and produced a new Vs model of the upper crust in the transition between the Scandinavian mountains and Baltic Shield. In addition of this study, a magnetotelluric survey was done in the framework of MaSCa (MAgnetotellurics in the SCandes) project between 2011 and 2013 in the same area of broadband seismic network (Northern Scandinavia Mountains and the Baltic Shield). This project shows higher resistivity in the crust beneath the Baltic shield than beneath the orogenic belt. The results of this study are used in a joint inversion with seismic ambient noise in order to improve existing models. We used the multi objective genetic algorithms (GA) to inverse in the same time seismological data (receiver functions and dispersion curves from seismic ambient

  5. Numerical simulation and experimental study of PbWO4/EPDM and Bi2WO6/EPDM for the shielding of {\\gamma}rays

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chi; Zhang, Quanping; Li, Yintao; Li, Yingjun; Zhou, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The MCNP5 code was employed to simulate the {\\gamma}ray shielding capacity of tungstate composites. The experimental results were applied to verify the applicability of the Monte Carlo program. PbWO4 and Bi2WO6 were prepared and added into ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) to obtain the composites, which were tested in the {\\gamma}ray shielding. Both the theoretical simulation and experiments were carefully chosen and well designed. The results of the two methods were found to be highly consistent. In addition, the conditions during the numerical simulation were optimized and double-layer {\\gamma}ray shielding systems were studied. It was found that the {\\gamma}-ray shielding performance can be influenced not only by the material thickness ratio but also by the arrangement of the composites.

  6. Shield Effect Of Functional Interlining Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaravanja Bosiljka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI have become very serious in a variety of different electronic equipments, such as personal computers (frequency at several GHz, mobile devices (0.9 – 2.4 GHz and similar. This imposes the need for setting boundaries for EM emission of electric and electronic devices in order to minimize the possibility of interference with radio and wireless communications. Functional textiles can offer protective properties against EM radiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree of protection against EM radiation provided by polyamide copper-coated interlining fabric before and after dry cleaning treatment. EM protection efficiency of the interlining functional fabric is explored on both sides at the frequencies of 0.9; 1.8; 2.1 and 2.4 GHz. The results obtained have shown that the interlining fabric has good protective properties against EM radiation, but after dry cleaning, treatment reduction is observed. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of the interlining surface confirms shield effect decline due to degradation and firing of the copper layers during the process of dry cleaning.

  7. Shielded Coaxial Optrode Arrays for Neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jeffrey R; Connolly, Timothy; Varela, Juan A; Lundberg, Jaclyn; Burns, Michael J; Chiles, Thomas C; Christianson, John P; Naughton, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of the brain has been greatly facilitated by the development of new tools capable of minimally-invasive, robust coupling to neuronal assemblies. Two prominent examples are the microelectrode array (MEA), which enables electrical signals from large numbers of neurons to be detected and spatiotemporally correlated, and optogenetics, which enables the electrical activity of cells to be controlled with light. In the former case, high spatial density is desirable but, as electrode arrays evolve toward higher density and thus smaller pitch, electrical crosstalk increases. In the latter, finer control over light input is desirable, to enable improved studies of neuroelectronic pathways emanating from specific cell stimulation. Here, we introduce a coaxial electrode architecture that is uniquely suited to address these issues, as it can simultaneously be utilized as an optical waveguide and a shielded electrode in dense arrays. Using optogenetically-transfected cells on a coaxial MEA, we demonstrate the utility of the architecture by recording cellular currents evoked from optical stimulation. We also show the capability for network recording by radiating an area of seven individually-addressed coaxial electrode regions with cultured cells covering a section of the extent.

  8. Improved Spacecraft Materials for Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tai, H.; Thibeault, S. A.; Simonsen, L. C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.

    1999-01-01

    In the execution of this proposal, we will first examine current and developing spacecraft materials and evaluate their ability to attenuate adverse biological mutational events in mammalian cell systems and reduce the rate of cancer induction in mice harderian glands as a measure of their protective qualities. The HZETRN code system will be used to generate a database on GCR attenuation in each material. If a third year of funding is granted, the most promising and mission-specific materials will be used to study the impact on mission cost for a typical Mars mission scenario as was planned in our original two year proposal at the original funding level. The most promising candidate materials will be further tested as to their transmission characteristics in Fe and Si ion beams to evaluate the accuracy of the HZETRN transmission factors. Materials deemed critical to mission success may also require testing as well as materials developed by industry for their radiation protective qualities (e.g., Physical Sciences Inc.) A study will be made of designing polymeric materials and composite materials with improved radiation shielding properties as well as the possible improvement of mission-specific materials.

  9. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  10. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergueiro, J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Igarzabal, M.; Suarez Sandin, J.C. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina); Somacal, H.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina); Thatar Vento, V. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Huck, H.; Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina); Repetto, M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  11. Case of electro-magnetic shielding building. Pt. 2. Reduction method of magnetic noise due to microtremor in magnetically shielded room; Kenchiku setsubi ni okeru denji shield no jitsurei. 2. Shield room no bishindo ni kiinsuru jiki noise taisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Abe, T.; Kamei, Y. [Takenaka Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    2000-01-05

    Magnetic sensitivity can be limited by microtremor of magnetically shielded room (MSR) used for the measurements of extremely magnetic fields such as biomagnetic measurements as well as environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies caused by trains, motorcars traffics and elevators but each of which can be reduced by MSR. The relation between the vibration of MSR and magnetic noise, and the reduction method of the magnetic noise due to microtremor of MSR are discussed experimentally. The correlations were high between acceleration in horizontal direction of ceiling panel and magnetic signal in horizontal and vertical directions. The magnetic noises were almost proportional to the displacement on the ceiling panel of MSR. Further an active isolation system was installed as a base of MSR to reduce the microtremor of the MSR. We also measured reduction effect of vibration and magnetic noise in an MSR actually mounted on TACMI by experiment when artificial vibrations were applied to the MSR by means of heal impacts and by a truck which run over a wood panel (height is 50 mm) on the road nearby at a speed of 20km per hour. (author)

  12. Multifunctional B/C Fiber Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding is an enabling technology required for extended manned missions to the Moon, Mars and the planets beyond. Multifunctional structural must protect...

  13. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  14. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishvanath P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable combination of low- and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors.

  15. Self-shielding Electron Beam Installation for Sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linac; Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) has developed a self-shielding electron beam installationfor sterilization as handling letters with anthrax germ or spores which has the least volume and the least

  16. Characterizing and Manufacturing Multifunctional Radiation Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  17. Electromagnetic shielding of polymer-matrix composites with metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jalali, M; Dauterstedt, S; Michaud, A; Wuthrich, R

    2011-01-01

    To improve electromagnetic (EM) shielding and especially absorption of carbon fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites for aircraft applications in high frequencies, the inclusion of metallic nanoparticles of iron, cobalt, nickel...

  18. PHYSICS UPDATE: Does electrostatic shielding work both ways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Natthi L.; Reid, David D.

    1998-09-01

    We demonstrate that there is a sense in which electrostatic shielding works both ways and that Richard Feynman's discussion to this effect in The Feynman Lectures on Physics, though ambiguous, is not incorrect.

  19. Low Cost, Lightweight, Multifunctional Structural Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR involves the development of a lightweight innovative material for use as structure and radiation shielding in one. APS has assembled a uniquely qualified...

  20. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna; LYNKOV Leonid Mihailovich; MAHMOOD Mohammed Shakir; NASONOVA Natalia Viktorovna

    2013-01-01

    Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  1. The blattodeas.s. (Insecta, dictyoptera) of the Guiana shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Dominic A; Chan, Kimberly; Kaplan, Kayla L; Wilson, Megan M; Ware, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Here we provide a checklist of cockroach species known from areas within the Guiana Shield based on literature records and new field collection. We give records of sixteen species collected in Guyana, eight of which are new records for Guyana and one of which is a new generic record for the entire Guiana Shield. We also provide a description for a geographically disparate species of Calhypnorna Stal, and the new species Xestoblattaberenbaumae. The complete checklist contains 234 species of Blattodeas.s. currently known in the shield. This checklist shows particularly low richness in Guianan Venezuela, Roraima and Amapa Brazil, but this is likely an artifact due to under-sampling. Indeed, based on previously published data and current fieldwork, we believe that most regions of the Guiana Shield are under-sampled for cockroaches. Despite this, French Guiana (151 spp.) and Suriname (136 spp.) rank as the second and sixth most species dense faunas of cockroaches in the neotropics.

  2. Thyroid shields and neck exposures in cephalometric radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Cruz Joana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thyroid is among the more radiosensitive organs in the body. The goal of this study was twofold: (1 to evaluate age-related changes in what is exposed to ionizing radiation in the neck area, and (2 to assess thyroid shield presence in cephalometric radiographs Methods Cephalometric radiographs at one academic setting were sampled and neck exposure was related to calendar year and patient's gender and age. Results In the absence of shields, children have more vertebrae exposed than adults (p Conclusion In the absence of a thyroid shield, children have more neck structure exposed to radiation than adults. In agreement with other reports, thyroid shield utilization in this study was low, particularly in children.

  3. Application of Advanced Radiation Shielding Materials to Inflatable Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovation is a weight-optimized, inflatable structure that incorporates radiation shielding materials into its construction, for use as a habitation module or...

  4. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  5. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to leverage near-term high-temperature superconducting technologies to assess applicability of magnetic shielding for protecting against exposure...

  6. Measurement Procedure for Surface Emissivity of Heat-Shielding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is suggested for the measurement of the integral emissivity coefficient of heat-shielding materials in the temperature range close to the thermal destruction temperature.

  7. Space Radiation and the Challenges Towards Effective Shielding Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulnasser

    2014-01-01

    The hazards of space radiation and their effective mitigation strategies continue to pose special science and technology challenges to NASA. It is widely accepted now that shielding space vehicles and structures will have to rely on new and innovative materials since aluminum, like all high Z materials, are poor shields against the particulate and highly ionizing nature of space radiation. Shielding solutions, motivated and constrained by power and mass limitations, couple this realization with "multifunctionality," both in design concept as well as in material function and composition. Materials endowed with effective shielding properties as well as with some degree of multi-functionality may be the kernel of the so-called "radiation-smart" structures and designs. This talk will present some of the challenges and potential mitigation ideas towards the realization of such structures and designs.

  8. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II program, builds on the phase I feaibility where a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite was developed and fabricated. This...

  9. Optimized Design of the Shielded-Loop Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anders

    1996-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have low capacitive sample loss due to perfect balancing. We present a new analysis of the unbalanced driven shielded-loop resonator that calculates the resonance frequencies and also determines some design considerations. The analysis enables us to optimiz...... the use of this resonator. Theory and design considerations are shown to agree with observations in measurements on two coils, with various sizes and frequencies......The shielded-loop resonator is known to have low capacitive sample loss due to perfect balancing. We present a new analysis of the unbalanced driven shielded-loop resonator that calculates the resonance frequencies and also determines some design considerations. The analysis enables us to optimize...

  10. Dark Skin No Shield from Deadly Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166194.html Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer Death rates from melanoma are higher for people of color, skin expert says To use the sharing features on ...

  11. A Radiation shielding study for the Fermilab Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    Radiation shielding calculations are performed for the Fermilab Linac enclosure and gallery. The predicted dose rates around the access labyrinth at normal operation and a comparison to measured dose rates are presented. An accident scenario is considered as well.

  12. Radiation Shielding and Hydrogen Storage with Multifunctional Carbon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  13. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerhofer, L.; Feldbaumer, E.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Vincke, H.

    2017-09-01

    MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  14. Neutron shielding and activation of the MASTU device and surrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, David; Turner, Andrew; Davis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A significant functional upgrade is planned for the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) device, located at Culham in the UK, including the implementation of a notably greater neutral beam injection power. This upgrade will cause the emission of a substantially increased intensity of neutron radiation for a substantially increased amount of time upon operation of the device. Existing shielding and activation precautions are shown to prove insufficient in some regards, and recommendations for improvements are made, including the following areas: shielding doors to MAST shielded facility enclosure (known as "the blockhouse"); north access tunnel; blockhouse roof; west cabling duct. In addition, some specific neutronic dose rate questions are addressed and answered; those discussed here relate to shielding penetrations and dose rate reflected from the air above the device ("skyshine").

  15. Multifunctional, Boron-Foam Based Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA vision of Space Exploration requires new approaches to radiation shielding. Both Spiral 2 and Spiral 3 concepts are extremely sensitive to weight reduction....

  16. DEEP UNDERGROUND NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Robert J. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration will perform an experiment centered on accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino studies along with nucleon decay and topics in neutrino astrophysics. It will consist of a modular 40-kt (fiducial) mass liquid argon TPC detector located deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and a high-resolution near detector at Fermilab in Illinois. This conguration provides a 1300-km baseline in a megawatt-scale neutrino beam provided by the Fermilab- hosted international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility.

  17. The effect of breast shielding during lumbar spine radiography:

    OpenAIRE

    Žontar, Dejan; Škrk, Damijan; Mekiš, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the influence of lead shielding on the dose to female breasts in conventional x-ray lumbar spine imaging. The correlation between the body mass index and the dose received by the breast was also investigated. Materials and methods Breast surface dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In the first phase measurements of breast dose with and without shielding from lumbar spine imaging in two projections were conducted on an anthr...

  18. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Vishvanath P.; Badiger Nagappa M.; Gerward Leif

    2016-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neu...

  19. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishvanath P.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Gerward, Leif

    2016-01-01

    at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable...

  20. Electromagnetic and transient shielding effectiveness for near-field sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Möller

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with an investigation of the recently proposed definitions for the electromagnetic and transient shielding effectiveness (SE in the case of an electric-dipole near-field source. To this end, new factors are introduced which depend on the distance between the dipole source and the measurement point inside the shield and which are valid for perpendicularly (with respect to the distance vector polarized dipoles. Numerical results support and confirm the theoretical derivations.