WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerator mass spectrometry

  1. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Laboratory of acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.; Chrapan, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the principle of the method of acceleration mass spectrometry and the construction plans of this instrument at the Faculty of ecology and environmental sciences in Banska Stiavnica. Using of this instrument for radiocarbon dating is discussed. A review of laboratories with acceleration mass spectrometry is presented

  4. Accelerator-based ultrasensitive mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gove, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter describes a new mass spectrometry technique involving charged particle accelerators normally used for basic research in nuclear science. Topics considered include the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, the limitations of the direct measurement of radioactive decay, mass spectrometry using a tandem electrostatic accelerator, mass spectrometry using a cyclotron, how accelerator mass spectrometry circumvents the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, measurements of stable isotopes, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications, modifications to existing accelerators, descriptions of dedicated systems, and future applications

  5. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  6. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  7. Mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator use is renewing the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry in extending the detection limits. These new devices allow the measurement of rare isotope ratio, as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl or 41 Ca, from the earth natural reservoirs [fr

  8. Principle of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The principle of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is described mainly on technical aspects: hardware construction of AMS, measurement of isotope ratio, sensitivity of measurement (measuring limit), measuring accuracy, and application of data. The content may be summarized as follows: rare isotope (often long-lived radioactive isotope) can be detected by various use of the ion energy obtained by the acceleration of ions, a measurable isotope ratio is one of rare isotope to abundant isotopes, and a measured value of isotope ratio is uncertainty to true one. Such a fact must be kept in mind on the use of AMS data to application research. (M.H.)

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry in NIPNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.; Cata-Danil, D.; Petrascu, M.; Popescu, I.; Stan-Sion, C.; Radulescu, M.; Plostinaru, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in sample materials. The method has applications in environmental physics, medicine, measurements of cosmic-ray or nuclear power plant produced radionuclides in the earth's atmosphere. All over the world, more than 40 charged particles and heavy ion accelerators are performing such analyses concerning the research interest of a huge number of laboratories. The Romanian Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest has initiated a construction project for the AMS facility at the FN - Van de Graaff Tandem accelerator. This program benefits of technical and financial assistance provided by IAEA in the frame of the IAEA-TC Project ROM 8014-265C. A general lay-out of the AMS project is presented. The construction work has begun and first tests of the AMS injector will take place between July - September this year. (authors)

  10. Atom counting with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of the current status and some recent applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are presented. Some connections to resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIS) as the alternate atom counting method are discussed

  11. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry: background and contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukens, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Since the advent of radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) many studies have been conducted to understand the background from mass spectrometric processes and the origins of contamination associated with the ion source and sample preparation. By studying the individual contributions a better understanding of these processes has been obtained and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to date samples reliably up to 60 000 BP. (orig.)

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Rossendorf 5 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Buerger, W.; Curian, H.; Hartmann, B.; Hentschel, E.; Matthes, H.; Probst, W.; Seidel, M.; Turuc, S.; Hebert, D.; Rothe, T.; Stolz, W.

    1992-01-01

    The Rossendorf electrostatic accelerators (5 MV tandem accelerator and single ended 2 MV van de Graaff accelerator) are already used for ion beam analysis. The existing methods (RBS, PIXE, ERDA, NRA, nuclear microprobe and external beam) will be completed by introduction of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). A short description of the Rossendorf AMS system is given and first experimental results are presented. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 6 figs

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  15. Mass spectrometry by means of tandem accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based on an accelerator allows to measure rare cosmogenic isotopes found in natural samples with isotopic abundances up to 10E-15. The XTU Tandem of Legnaro National Laboratories can measure mean heavy isotopes (36Cl, 41Ca, 129I) in applications interesting cosmochronology and Medicine. The TTT-3 Tandem of the Naples University has been modified in view of precision studies of C14 in Archeology, Paleantology and Geology. In this paper a review is made of principles and methodologies and of some applicationy in the framework of the National Program for mass spectrametry research with the aid of accelerators

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry - From DNA to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14 C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made. (authors)

  17. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems

  18. Subattomole sensitivity in biological accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge

    2008-05-15

    The Uppsala University 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has been used to study (14)C-labeled biological samples utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) technology. We have adapted a sample preparation method for small biological samples down to a few tens of micrograms of carbon, involving among others, miniaturizing of the graphitization reactor. Standard AMS requires about 1 mg of carbon with a limit of quantitation of about 10 amol. Results are presented for a range of small sample sizes with concentrations down to below 1 pM of a pharmaceutical substance in human blood. It is shown that (14)C-labeled molecular markers can be routinely measured from the femtomole range down to a few hundred zeptomole (10 (-21) mol), without the use of any additional separation methods.

  19. New applications of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its invention in the late 70's, and reduction to near-routine practice by the mid-80's, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful tool for archaeological and geochemical measurements in which cosmogenic isotopes such as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I are used as either tracers or chronometers. The utility of such measurements is demonstrated by the fact that most accelerators having AMS capabilities have significant backlogs of samples awaiting measurement. In designing and justifying a new accelerator facility in which AMS was to be a major feature, we sought to advance the field and increase the resources available for it by two steps: (1) development of new research applications in which intentionally added isotopic labels were used rather than just naturally present ones; and (2) enhancement of spectrometer throughout, making new classes of experiments possible by greatly increasing the number of samples that could be measured in individual experiments. Results of the effort to date suggest that development of a family of very small spectrometers optimized for just tritium and/or radiocarbon will be attractive in the near future

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronk, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used routinely for radiocarbon measurements for several years. This thesis describes theoretical work to understand the reasons for low accuracy and range and offers practical solutions. The production and transport of the ions used in the measurements are found to be the most crucial stages in the process. The theories behind ion production by sputtering are discussed and applied to the specific case of carbon sputtered by caesium. Experimental evidence is also examined in relation to the theories. The phenomena of space charge and lens aberrations are discussed along with the interaction between ion beams and gas molecules in the vacuum. Computer programs for calculating phase space transformations are then described; these are designed to help investigations of the effects of space charge and aberrations on AMS measurements. Calculations using these programs are discussed in relation both to measured ion beam profiles in phase space and to the current dependent transmission of ions through the Oxford radiocarbon accelerator. Improvements have been made to this accelerator and these are discussed in the context of the calculations. C - ions are produced directly from carbon dioxide at the Middleton High Intensity Sputter Source. Experiments to evaluate the performance of such a source are described and detailed design criteria established. An ion source designed and built specifically for radiocarbon measurements using carbon dioxide is described. Experiments to evaluate its performance and investigate the underlying physical processes are discussed. (author)

  1. 14C Accelerator mass spectrometry in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, Roberto M.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.A.; Oliveira, F.M.; Cardozo, L.; Carvalho, C.R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive technique that enables the direct measurement of carbon isotopes in samples as small as a few milligrams. The possibility of dating or tracing rare or even compound specific carbon samples has application in many fields of science such as Archaeology, Geosciences and Biomedicine. Several kinds of material such as wood, charcoal, carbonate and bone can be chemically treated and converted to graphite to be measured in the accelerator system. The Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil will soon be able to perform the complete 14 C-AMS measurement of samples. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are prepared and converted to carbon dioxide. A stainless steel vacuum system was constructed for carbon dioxide purification and graphitization is performed in sealed tubes in a muffle oven. Graphite samples will be analyzed in a 250 kV Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation which will be installed in the beginning of 2012. With the sample preparation laboratory at LACRON and the SSAMS system, the Physics Institute of UFF will be the first 14 C-AMS facility in Latin America. (author)

  2. Calibration samples for accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, R.L.; Flynn, D.S.; Gabbard, F.

    1981-01-01

    Radioactive samples with precisely known numbers of atoms are useful as calibration sources for lifetime measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry. Such samples can be obtained in two ways: either by measuring the production rate as the sample is created or by measuring the decay rate after the sample has been obtained. The latter method requires that a large sample be produced and that the decay constant be accurately known. The former method is a useful and independent alternative, especially when the decay constant is not well known. The facilities at the University of Kentucky for precision measurements of total neutron production cross sections offer a source of such calibration samples. The possibilities, while quite extensive, would be limited to the proton rich side of the line of stability because of the use of (p,n) and (α,n) reactions for sample production

  3. Radiocarbon dating with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has two great advantages over conventional dating: 1) much smaller samples can be handled and 2) counting time is significantly shorter. Three examples are given for Holocene-age material from east-central Ellesmere Island. The results demonstrate the potential use of this technique as a powerful research tool in studies of Quaternary chronology. Individual fragments of marine shells as small as 0.1 g have been dated successfully at the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. In the case of an aquatic moss from a lake sediment core, an increment 0.5 cm thick could be used instead of a 5 cm-thick slice, thus allowing a much more precise estimate of the onset of organic sedimentation

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Gore, J.A.; Sparrow, H.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.

    2006-01-01

    Accelerator based mass spectrometry (ABMs) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half life and available in small amount. The 14 U D Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out ABMs studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radio isotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using ABMs as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc. As a part of the ongoing ABMs programme at 14UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has been developed. Further progress made in this programme is discussed in this paper. (author)

  6. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Chuan

    2002-01-01

    As an ultra high sensitive analyzing method, accelerator mass spectrometry is playing an important role in the studies of nuclear physics and astrophysics. The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications in searching for violation of Pauli exclusion principle and study on supernovae are discussed as examples

  7. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry-current status in techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mineo; Nagai, Hisao; Kobayashi, Koichi.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the mass spectrometry by incorporating an accelerator. After samples are ionized, they are accelerated to a certain energy, and mass, energy, nuclear charge (atomic number) are distinguished, and ion counting is made one by one with a heavy ion detector. For the measurement of long half-life radioisotopes, mass spectrometry has been used because of the high sensitivity, but in low energy mass spectrometry, there are the difficulties due to the mixing of the molecular ions having nearly same mass and the existence of isobars. One of the methods solving these difficulties is an accelerator which enables background-free measurement. The progress of AMS is briefly described, and at present, it is carried out in about 30 facilities in the world. In AMS, the analysis is carried out in the order of the ionization of samples, the acceleration of beam, the electron stripping with a thin film, the sorting of the momentum and energy of beam and the identification of particles. The efficiency, sensitivity and accuracy of detection and the application are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Issues and opportunities in accelerator mass spectrometry for stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has developed in the last 30 years many notable applications to the spectrometry of radioisotopes, particularly in radiocarbon dating. The instrumentation science of trace element AMS (TEAMS) that analyzes stable isotopes, also called Accelerator SIMS or MegaSIMS, while unique in many features, has also shared in many of these significant advances and has pushed TEAMS sensitivity to concentration levels surpassing many competing mass spectroscopic technologies. This review examines recent instrumentation developments, the capabilities of the new instrumentation and discernable trends for future development. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry: advances and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Emerging trends in the applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are identified and illustrated with specific examples. Areas of application covered include rapid landscape evolution, calibration of the radiocarbon time scale, compound-specific radiocarbon studies, tracing of nuclear discharges, and searches for extraterrestrial isotopes

  11. 14 C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The different aspects concerning the 14 C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of 14 C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9 ) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13--15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14 C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3 H, 41 Ca and 26 Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications

  13. Determination of {sup 135}Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, C.M.; Charles, C.R.J. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Cornett, R.J. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Litherland, A.E. [IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The ratio of anthropogenic {sup 135}Cs and {sup 137}Cs isotopes is characteristic of a uranium fission source. This research evaluates the technique of isotope dilution (yield tracing) for the purpose of quantifying {sup 135}Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry with on-line isobar separation. Interferences from Ba, Zn{sub 2}, and isotopes of equal mass to charge ratios were successfully suppressed. However, some sample crosstalk from source contamination remains. The transmission and di-fluoride ionization efficiencies of Cs isotopes were found to be 8 × 10{sup −3} and 1.7 × 10{sup −7} respectively. This quantification of {sup 135}Cs using yield tracing by accelerator mass spectrometry shows promise for future environmental sample analysis once the issues of sample crosstalk and low efficiency can be resolved.

  14. Heavy-ion accelerator mass spectrometry with a 'small' accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steier, P.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Vockenhuber, C.; Irlweck, K.; Kutschera, W.; Lichtenstein, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: VERA, the Vienna environmental research accelerator, is based on a 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator and is designed to allow the transport of ions of all elements, from the lightest to the heaviest. The VERA heavy ion program tries to establish measurement methods which work for the long-lived radionuclides where suppression of isobars is not required. Among these are 129 I, 210 Pb, 236 U and all heavier ions where no stable isobars exist. To suppress neighboring masses, the resolution of VERA was increased, both by improving the ion optics of existing elements and by installing a new electrostatic separator after the analyzing magnet. Interfering ions which pass all beam filters are identified with a high-resolution time-of-flight system, using a 0.5 μg/cm 2 DLC (diamond-like carbon) foil in the start detector, which substantially reduces beam straggling. Compared to heavy ion AMS at large tandem accelerators (TV ≥ 8 MV) and for cases where stable isobar interference is absent, it is possible to offset the disadvantage of lower ion energy. Moreover, the more compact facilities like VERA achieve higher stability and reliability and provide advanced computer control. This promises even higher precision and sensitivity for a larger number of samples, which is a prerequisite for research on natural-occurring heavy radioisotopes at environmental levels. First results on the measurement of 210 Pb (half-life 22 a) and 236 U (23 Ma) encourages us to push towards even heavier radionuclides (e.g. 224 Pu, 81 Ma). (author)

  15. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences.

  16. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences

  17. Computer automation of an accelerator mass spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressett, J.D.; Maxson, D.L.; Matteson, S.; McDaniel, F.D.; Duggan, J.L.; Mackey, H.J.; North Texas State Univ., Denton, TX; Anthony, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of trace impurities in electronic materials using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) requires efficient automation of the beam transport and mass discrimination hardware. The ability to choose between a variety of charge states, isotopes and injected molecules is necessary to provide survey capabilities similar to that available on conventional mass spectrometers. This paper will discuss automation hardware and software for flexible, high-sensitivity trace analysis of electronic materials, e.g. Si, GaAs and HgCdTe. Details regarding settling times will be presented, along with proof-of-principle experimental data. Potential and present applications will also be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry and associated facilities at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Bohra, Archna; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Roonwal, G.S.; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J.K.; Balakrishnan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility at Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) is developed by upgrading its existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. Since last two decades Pelletron is mainly used for nuclear physics, materials science, atomic physics, radiation biology and accelerator mass spectrometry is recent development. In addition, a chemistry laboratory in clean room for the chemical processing of samples for AMS studies has also been established. At present the AMS facility is used for 10 Be, 26 Al measurements and soon other long lived radio-isotopes will also be used

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, D; Phillips, F M

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes (10)Be, (14)C,(26)A1, 36Cl, and (129)1 can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10(-12) to 10(- 5) and as few as 10(5) atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of halflives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences.

  20. Tritium depth profiling in carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Bekris, N.; Penzhorn, R.-D.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry have been performed at the facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. In order to achieve a uniform erosion at the target surface inside a commercial Cs ion sputtering source and to avoid edge effects, the samples were mechanically scanned and the signals were recorded only during sputtering at the centre of the sputtered area. The sputtered negative ions were mass analysed by the injection magnet of the Tandetron. Hydrogen and deuterium profiles were measured with the Faraday cup between the injection magnet and the accelerator, while the tritium was counted after the accelerator with semiconductor detectors. Depth profiles have been measured for carbon samples which had been exposed to the plasma at the first wall of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and from the European fusion experiment JET, Culham, UK

  1. Continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.S.C.; Han, B.X.; Von Reden, K.F.; Schneider, R.J.; Roberts, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a widely used technique for radiocarbon dating of archaeological or environmental samples that are very small or very old (up to 50,000 years before present). Because of the method's extreme sensitivity, AMS can also serve as an environmental tracer and supplements conventional nuclear counting techniques for monitoring 14 C emissions from operating nuclear power plants and waste repositories. The utility of present AMS systems is limited by the complex sample preparation process required. Carbon from combusted artefacts must be incorporated into a solid metallic target from which a negative ion beam is produced and accelerated to MeV energies by an accelerator for subsequent analysis. This paper will describe a novel technique being developed by the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (NOSAMS) Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the production of negative carbon ion beams directly from a continuously flowing sample gas stream, eliminating the requirement for a solid target. A key component of the new technique is a microwave-driven, gaseous-feed ion source originally developed at Chalk River Laboratories for the very different requirements of a high current proton linear accelerator. A version of this ion source is now being adapted to serve as an injector for a dedicated AMS accelerator facility at NOSAMS. The paper begins with a review of the fundamentals of radiocarbon dating. Experiments carried out at NOSAMS with a prototype of the microwave ion source are described, including measurements of sample utilization efficiency and sample 'memory' effect. A new version of the microwave ion source, optimized for AMS, is also described. The report concludes with some predictions of new research opportunities that will become accessible to the technique of continuous-flow AMS. (author)

  2. Continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.S.C.; Han, B.X.; Von Reden, K.F.; Schneider, R.J.; Roberts, M.L.

    2006-05-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a widely used technique for radiocarbon dating of archaeological or environmental samples that are very small or very old (up to 50,000 years before present). Because of the method's extreme sensitivity, AMS can also serve as an environmental tracer and supplements conventional nuclear counting techniques for monitoring 14 C emissions from operating nuclear power plants and waste repositories. The utility of present AMS systems is limited by the complex sample preparation process required. Carbon from combusted artefacts must be incorporated into a solid metallic target from which a negative ion beam is produced and accelerated to MeV energies by an accelerator for subsequent analysis. This paper will describe a novel technique being developed by the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (NOSAMS) Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the production of negative carbon ion beams directly from a continuously flowing sample gas stream, eliminating the requirement for a solid target. A key component of the new technique is a microwave-driven, gaseous-feed ion source originally developed at Chalk River Laboratories for the very different requirements of a high current proton linear accelerator. A version of this ion source is now being adapted to serve as an injector for a dedicated AMS accelerator facility at NOSAMS. The paper begins with a review of the fundamentals of radiocarbon dating. Experiments carried out at NOSAMS with a prototype of the microwave ion source are described, including measurements of sample utilization efficiency and sample 'memory' effect. A new version of the microwave ion source, optimized for AMS, is also described. The report concludes with some predictions of new research opportunities that will become accessible to the technique of continuous-flow AMS. (author)

  3. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in aluminum metabolism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Johnson, R.R.; Sutton, R.A.L.; Walker, V.R.; Halabe, A.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.; Klein, J.

    1990-06-01

    The recent recognition that aluminum causes toxicity in uremic patients and may be associated with Alzheimer's disease has stimulated many studies of its biochemical effects. However, such studies were hampered by the lack of a suitable tracer. In a novel experiment, we have applied the new technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to investigate aluminum kinetics in rats, using as a marker the long-lived isotope 26 Al. We present the first aluminum kinetic model for a biological system. The results clearly demonstrate the advantage this technique holds for isotope tracer studies in animals as well as humans. (Author) (24 refs., 3 figs.)

  4. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in aluminum metabolism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirav, O; Vetterli, D; Johnson, R R [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Sutton, R A.L.; Walker, V R; Halabe, A [British Columbia U.iv., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Fink, D; Middleton, R; Klein, J [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1990-06-01

    The recent recognition that aluminum causes toxicity in uremic patients and may be associated with Alzheimer`s disease has stimulated many studies of its biochemical effects. However, such studies were hampered by the lack of a suitable tracer. In a novel experiment, we have applied the new technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to investigate aluminum kinetics in rats, using as a marker the long-lived isotope {sup 26}Al. We present the first aluminum kinetic model for a biological system. The results clearly demonstrate the advantage this technique holds for isotope tracer studies in animals as well as humans. (Author) (24 refs., 3 figs.).

  5. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  6. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschera, W

    1988-05-20

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -15/ relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 8/ years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and manmade (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotopes are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, mineral exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS will be discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned field. Depending on the specific problem to be investigated, different aspects of an AMS system are of importance. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators.

  7. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1987-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10 -10 to 10 -15 relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10 2 to 10 8 years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and man-made (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotope are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, minerals exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS are discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned fields. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry with the Grenoble and Orsay cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.

    1981-01-01

    Three and one half years ago, at the Rochester meeting, we presented our first accelerator mass spectrometry measurements of 10 Be using the external ion source of the Grenoble cyclotron. Since that time the technique has been used to measure 10 Be in more than 100 geophysical samples. We have also used the ALICE accelerator facility (linear accelerator plus cyclotron) at Orsay to detect 26 Al (half-life 730,000 years) and 41 Ca (100,000 years). While the latter measurements have so far been carried out only with enriched samples, they did demonstrate the feasibility of eliminating interference from lower atomic number isobars by analyzing fully stripped ions of the species being sought. We describe here the present experimental status of these two techniques, following closely two papers presented recently at another conference. We would like to stress that these techniques have not been developed arbitrarily, or as goals in themselves, but rather with certain applications in mind. It is therefore perhaps useful to first briefly outline these applications, which can be divided into three areas

  9. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaobo; Hu Jinjun; Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a promising method to provide extreme sensitivity measurements of the production yields of long-lived radioisotopes, which cannot be detected by other methods. AMS technique plays an important role in the research of nuclear physics, as well as the application field of AMS covered nuclear science and technology, life science, earth science, environmental science, archaeology etc. The newest AMS field is that of actinide, particularly U and Pu, isotopic assay with expanding applications in nuclear safeguards and monitoring, and as a modern bomb-fallout tracer for atmospheric transport and surface sediment movement. This paper reviews the applications of AMS in the research of nuclear energy and nuclear security including the research of half life of radionuclides, cross section of nuclear reaction. (authors)

  10. Dating of some fossil Romanian bones by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Skog, Goeran; Emilian Alexandrescu; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Krstina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per

    2002-01-01

    Some fossil bones from Romanian territories have been dated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using the pelletron system from Lund University. The preparation of samples has been the classical procedure to produce pure graphite from bones specimens, The Paleolithic site from Malu Rosu, near Giurgiu was thoroughly analyzed. Two human fossil skulls from Cioclovina and Baia de Fier of special archaeological importance have been estimated to be of around 30 000 years old, a conclusion with great implications for the history of ancient Romania. By this physical analysis, a long scientific dispute was settled. The two fossil human skulls are the only ones of this age from Romania. One could advance the hypothesis that the skulls belong to a certain type of a branch of Central European Cro-Magon, the classical western type, considering both the chronological and the anthropological features. They constitute eastern limit of the Cro-Magnon man type. (authors)

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry - Indian scenario. PD-1-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator based ultra sensitive Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programmes are being vigorously pursued world over for the past three decades. There are more than 50 accelerator facilities devoted to this multidisciplinary activity. Realizing the importance of this programme, the work related to AMS has commenced at three major accelerator facilities in India: Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar; Interuniversity Accelerator Centre, Delhi; BARC - TIFR Pelletron accelerator facility, Mumbai. At Bhubaneswar, facilities have been set up to carry our high precision 14 C based AMS programmes using the 3 MV Pelletron. A magnetic bouncer, an electrostatic analyzer and a chemistry lab for making samples in graphite form are some of the important features of this AMS facility. A number of users have already got their samples analysed using this AMS facility. The AMS programme has used upto 20 % of beam time available from the 3 MV Pelletron at Bhubaneswar. At Delhi efforts are underway and initial success has been achieved for carrying out 10 Be based AMS programme. Novel method based on simultaneously injecting oxide of Be - ( 9 Be and 17 O) and ( 10 Be and 16 O) has been tried to obtain the ratio of 9 Be / 10 Be. A velocity filter is also available for this programme. Both at Bhubaneswar and Delhi, provision exists in the form of a multi cathode target wheel for carrying out measurements for a number of samples. At Mumbai the emphasis has been in precision measurement of 36 Cl in samples. Segmented anode detector has been developed for the separation of interfering 36 S and 36 Cl isobars

  12. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) sample preparation laboratory in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, Kita D.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Anjos, Roberto M. dos; Linares, Roberto; Queiroz, Eduardo; Oliveira, Fabiana M. de; Cardozo, Laio; Carvalho, Carla R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: For decades Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been widely used for radiocarbon measurements all over the world with application in several fields of science from archaeology to geosciences. This technique provides ultrasensitive analysis of reduced size samples or even specific compounds since sample atoms are accelerated to high energies and measured using nuclear particle detectors. Sample preparation is extremely important for accurate radiocarbon measurement and includes chemical pre-treatment to remove all possible contaminants. For beam extraction in the accelerator ion source, samples are usually converted to graphite. In this work we report a new radiocarbon sample preparation facility installed at the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are chemically treated and converted to carbon dioxide by hydrolysis or combustion. A stainless steel based vacuum line was constructed for carbon dioxide separation and graphitization is performed in sealed quartz tubes in a muffle oven. Successful graphite production is important to provide stable beam currents and to minimize isotopic fractionation. Performance tests for graphite production are currently under way and isotopic analysis will soon be possible with the acquisition of a Single Stage AMS System by our group. The Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation is a 250 kV air insulated accelerator especially constructed to measure the amount of 14 C in small modern graphite samples to a precision of 0.3 % or better. With the installation of such equipment in the first half of 2012, UFF will be ready to perform the 14C -AMS technique. (author)

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry at IFIN-HH in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.

    1999-01-01

    An AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV Tandem Accelerator of the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest. It represents the first experimental setup of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarised at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses), a double focussing, 90 angle analysing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the Tandem Accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analysing magnets of 150 MEP. For particle detection a Bragg-curve Spectroscopy Detector (ionisation chamber) is used and a multi-anode gas detector with TOF discrimination is under construction. The research programme at this new facility is focused on using 26 Al for medical applications. In future it will be use for 129 I - AMS measurements as a nuclear safeguard. This long lived isotope will be used to monitor and investigate the transport of 129 I in vicinity of three nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe: Kozloduy (Bulgaria), Cernavoda (Romania) and Chernobyl (Ukraine). Measurements will concern soil, precipitation and air samples. Water samples will be collected along the flow of rivers Danube and Dnieper, from the Danube Delta and from coastal areas of the Black Sea. (authors)

  14. 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry with a bespoke instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcken, K.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Schnabel, C.; Binnie, S.A.; Xu, S.; Phillips, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmogenic 36 Cl analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a valuable environmental and geological sciences research tool. Overcoming the stable nuclide 36 S isobar interfering with measurement is challenging, however. Traditionally this has required large accelerators, but following recent technical advances it is now possible with ∼30 MeV ion energies. Consequently 5 MV or even smaller modern bespoke spectrometers are now 36 Cl-capable, increasing accessibility and promoting wider and more varied 36 Cl use. However, the technical ability to identify 36 Cl ions is quite distinct from demonstrated high-performance AMS. Such is the theme of this paper. We present a systematic analysis of the accurate measurement of sample radioisotope relative to the stable chlorine, the normalisation of the measured ratio and correction for remaining 36 S interference, all combined with the use of stable-isotope dilution to determine sample Cl concentration to begin with. We conclude by showing that repeated analyses support our claims for routine 3% 36 Cl-AMS data. Accordingly, the modest SUERC spectrometer well competes with the performance of larger longer-established instruments, and the results may be quite generic for modern bespoke instruments.

  15. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomand, A; Bucholz, B A; Clifford, A J; Duecker, S R; Johnson, H; Schneider, P D; Zulim, R A.

    1999-01-01

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkins disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer

  16. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watrous, Matthew George; Adamic, Mary Louise; Olson, John Eric; Baeck, D. L.; Fox, R. V.; Hahn, P. A.; Jenson, D. D.; Lister, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world's best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  17. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Matthew George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adamic, Mary Louise [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, John Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baeck, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, R. V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hahn, P. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jenson, D. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lister, T. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry: ultrasensitive analysis of global science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.; Bird, J.B.; Fink, D.; Herzog, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), an innovative analytical technique, measures rare atoms at unprecedented levels of sensitivity, revolutionizing the science of radiocarbon dating and accessing new environmental tracers and chronometers. AMS can study extraterrestrial materials, the earth sciences, the future of the global environment, and the history of mankind. The Shroud of Turin, meteorites from Mars, the crown of Charlemagne, and ancient air trapped in Antarctic ice indicate some of the samples on which AMS has been applied. This book has compiled the diverse set of scientific literature into a single volume, suitable as a text or resource on the major AMS-related outcomes, issues, and methods. It explains how scientists and researchers succeeded in counting Carbon-14 atoms at an extraordinary level, examines the impact of AMS on the branches of scientific technology and historical research, provides an understanding of the chronology and significance of past and present environmental changes, details the advances in AMS equipment, technology, and methods as well as the expansion of AMS research

  19. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, A.H.; Hunt, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.; Knezovich, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. (orig.)

  20. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmacological and toxicological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen; Tompkins, Elaine M; White, Ian N H

    2006-01-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), known for radiocarbon dating of archeological specimens, has revolutionized high-sensitivity isotope detection in pharmacology and toxicology by allowing the direct determination of the amount of isotope in a sample rather than measuring its decay. It can quantify many isotopes, including 26Al, 14C, 41Ca, and 3H with detection down to attomole (10(-18)) amounts. Pharmacokinetic data in humans have been achieved with ultra-low levels of radiolabel. One of the most exciting biomedical applications of AMS with 14C-labeled potential carcinogens is the detection of modified proteins or DNA in tissues. The relationship between low-level exposure and covalent binding of genotoxic chemicals has been compared in rodents and humans. Such compounds include heterocyclic amines, benzene, and tamoxifen. Other applications range from measuring the absorption of 26Al to monitoring 41Ca turnover in bone. In epoxy-embedded tissue sections, high-resolution imaging of 14C label in cells is possible. The uses of AMS are becoming more widespread with the availability of instrumentation dedicated to the analysis of biomedical samples. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ion source memory in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourles, Didier; Martschini, Martin [ASTER, Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Steier, Peter [VERA, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Since the DREAMS (Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility went operational in 2011, constant effort was put into enabling routine measurements of long-lived radionuclides as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca. For precise AMS-measurements of the volatile element Cl the key issue is the minimization of the long term memory effect. For this purpose one of the two original HVE sources was mechanically modified, allowing the usage of bigger cathodes with individual target apertures. Additionally a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, a small inter-laboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect in the Cs sputter ion sources of the AMS facilities VERA, ASTER and DREAMS had been investigated by running samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples containing highly enriched {sup 35}Cl({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl > 500). Primary goals of the research are the time constants of the recovery from the contaminated sample ratio to the initial ratio of the sample and the level of the long-term memory effect in the sources.

  2. Detection of {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Larsson, Ragnar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Chemical Engineering II; Skog, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Geology

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of {sup 59}Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. {sup 59}Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of {sup 59}Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of {sup 59}Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of {sup 59}Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of {sup 59}Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for {sup 59}Ni has been determined to 100{+-}30 Bq per gram nickel (100{+-}30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Vogel, J. S.; Knezovich, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. PMID:14735274

  4. Detection of 59Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K.; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, G.

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of 59 Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. 59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of 59 Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of 59 Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of 59 Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of 59 Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for 59 Ni has been determined to 100±30 Bq per gram nickel (100±30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system

  5. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, 14 C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ 14 C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of 14 C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS 14 C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 41Ca with a positive-ion source and the UNILAC accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhof, A.; Henning, W.; Mueller, M.; Roeckl, E.; Schuell, D.; Korschinek, G.; Nolte, E.; Paul, M.

    1987-06-01

    We have made first tests investigating the performance characteristics of the UNILAC accelerator system at GSI, in order to explore the sensitivity achievable in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 41 Ca with high-current positive-ion sources. Positively charged Ca 3+ ions of up to about 100 micro-amperes electrical current were injected from a penning-sputter source and, after further stripping to Ca 9+ , accelerated to 14.3 MeV/nucleon. The combination of velocity-focussing accelerator and magnetic ion-beam transport system completely eliminated background from the other calcium isotopes. Full-stripping and detection of 41 Ca 20+ ions with a magnetic spectrograph provides separation from isobaric 41 K and, at present, a level of sensitivity of 41 Ca/Ca ≅ 2x10 -15 . Future improvements and implications for dating of Pleistoscene samples will be discussed. (orig.)

  7. Radio-tracing 'without' radioactivity: accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a form of isotope-ratio mass spectrometry that quantifies concentrations of certain long-lived radioisotopes independently of their radioactive decay. AMS is primarily used in the geosciences for determining the age of a material that contains naturally occurring radioisotopes. AMS uses the same high specificity for enriched levels of these radioisotopes in tracing low chemical doses for long periods in biological systems, including humans. AMS provides the safety of low radiative exposure to experimental subjects and investigators, while obtaining attomole sensitivities that are not possible with stable isotope tracers because of their natural isotopic abundances. AMS isotope tracing was first applied to quantifying the genotoxicity of low level environmental chemicals in animals and later in humans. Physiologic concentrations of 14 C-labeled trace nutrients (folate, carotene, and tocopherol) are now measured directly in humans without concern about radiation. The radiative exposure is less than the commonly accepted risks of natural background radiation or the radiation fields found in high altitude air flights. AMS measures very small biological samples (such as 20 microliters of blood) that are easily obtained from human volunteers or model animals at frequent intervals for detailed analysis of kinetic profiles. This high data density enables the construction of compartmental models that elucidate nutrient behavior in tissues that cannot be directly sampled. The pharmaceutical industry is enthusiastic about AMS as a detector for 'micro-dosing' in which the human kinetics of an assuredly non-toxic dose of a candidate drug is tested early in a development project. Molecular tracing uses 3 H or 14 C as common isotopic labels, but AMS contributes to elemental tracing with certain radioisotopes having very long lives, such as 26 AL or 41 Ca. Calcium-41 is a particularly useful isotope in biomedical research because it is used

  8. The future of the accelerator mass spectrometry of rare long-lived radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerators, originally designed for nuclear physics, can be added to mass spectrometric apparatus to increase the sensitivity so that isotope ratios in the range 10 -12 to 10 -15 can be measured routinely. This significant improvement of high-sensitivity mass spectrometry has been called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The present article addresses the basic principles of accelerator mass spectrometry and some recent applications which show its versatility. In particular, it is noted that accelerator mass spectrometry could play an increasing role in the measurement of the levels of long lived radioactivities in the environment, including the actinides, which result from human activities such as the use of nuclear power. To fulfill this promise, continued research and development is necessary to provide ion sources, various types of heavy ion accelerators and peripheral magnetic and electric analysers. (N.K.)

  9. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  10. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-08

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  11. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  12. 36Chlorine accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator. RSP-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Gore, J.A.; Sparrow, H.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.; Hemalatha, M.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half life and available in small amount. The 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out AMS studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radio isotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using AMS as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc. As a part of the ongoing AMS programme at 14UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, Mumbai, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has been developed. 36 Cl measurements carried out to detect and measure the ratio of 36 Cl to 35 Cl in an irradiated sample and dated sample are reported in this paper

  13. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry with 15 UD pelletron at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 15 UD Pelletron machine is widely used to carry on investigations in a variety of disciplines like nuclear physics, materials science, radiobiology etc. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry studies with 15 UD pelletron machine at Nuclear Science Centre are elaborated

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator. PD-1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half-life and available in small amount. The 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out AMS studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radioisotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using AMS as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc . The AMS programme at the 14 UD Mumbai Pelletron Accelerator has taken off with the installation of the state of the art Terminal Potential Stabilizer setup and operation of the accelerator in Generating Volt Meter (GVM) mode. Feasibility studies have been carried out for detection/identification of 14 C from a charcoal sample and 3 He in natural Helium. As the primary interest of AMS programme at Mumbai Pelletron Accelerator is related to the cosmogenic nuclei, 36 Cl and 129 I, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has also been developed

  15. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Ditada, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J.P.; Clacher, A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  16. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R; Ditada, M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J P; Clacher, A [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N D [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry at Peking University: experiments and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiaer; Guo Zhiyu; Yan Shengqing; Li Renxing; Xiao Min; Li Kun; Liu Hongtao; Liu Kexin; Wang Jianjun; Li Bin; Lu Xiangyang; Yuan Sixun; Chen Tiemei; Gao Shijun; Zheng Shuhui; Chen Chengye; Liu Yan

    1997-01-01

    The Peking University Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (PKUAMS) has been put into routine operation. 14 C measurements of archaeological samples with fast cycling injection have shown good results. The new multi-target high-intensity sputtering ion source has been tested and 10 Be measurements were carried out with a new detector in which both the stopping of the intense flux of 10 B ions and the identification of 10 Be ions are performed. 26 Al samples were also measured. While various applications show good prospects for PKUAMS, further upgrade is desirable

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry with a coupled tandem-linac system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled system provides higher energies, which allows one to extend AMS to hitherto untouched mass regions. Another important argument is that the complexity, although bothersome for the operation, increases the selectivity of detecting a particular isotope. The higher-energy argument holds for any heavy-ion accelerator which is capable of delivering higher energy than a tandem. The present use of tandem-linac combinations for AMS, rather than cyclotrons, linacs or combinations of these machines, has mainly to do with the fact that this technique was almost exclusively developed around tandem accelerators. Therefore the tandem-linac combination is a natural extension to higher energies. The use of negative ions has some particular advantages in suppressing background from unwanted elements that do not form stable negative ions (e.g., N, Mg, Ar). On the other hand, this limits the detection of isotopes to elements which do form negative ions. For particular problems it may therefore be advantageous to use a positive-ion machine. What really matters most for choosing one or the other machine is to what extent the entire accelerator system can be operated in a truly quantiative way from the ion source to the detection system. 20 references, 4 figures

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the heaviest long-lived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator is the heart of the Vienna environmental research accelerator (VERA). ... Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Institute for Isotopic Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Russian Research Center, “Kurchatov Institute”, Institute of Nuclear ...

  20. Feasibility studies of RFQ based 14C accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Liu Kexin; Yan Xueqing; Xie Yi; Fang Jiaxun; Chen Jiaer

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic accelerators with terminal voltage less than 1 MeV have been successfully used for 14 C AMS. This contribution shows that a small RFQ accelerator may also be suitable for AMS 14 C measurements. A well-designed RFQ accelerator can realize a low energy spread and high isotopic selection with a length of less than 1 m and reasonable power consumption. Compared with small tandem accelerators, a RFQ does not need isolation gas and can accept much higher beam currents. Its stripper would be at ground potential and there would be no further acceleration after stripping, so the background from charge exchange processes should be lower. The RFQ design and system are described

  1. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, Pavel P., E-mail: povinec@fmph.uniba.sk; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-15

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  2. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for 14C and 129I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 59Ni and Fe isotopes at the Argonne superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.; Kutschera, W.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pardo, R.C.; Smither, R.K.; Yntema, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained initial results in an attempt to use the Argonne tandem-linac system for accelerator mass spectrometry of medium-heavy nuclei. Nuclei of the radioisotope 59 Ni (T/sub 1/2 = 7.5 x 10 5 y) and of the stable isotope 58 Fe at low concentrations have been accelerated and clearly identified. The latter experiment is in preparation of a measurement of the half-life of 60 Fe

  4. Development of accelerator mass spectrometry in China Institute of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ming; Jiang Shan; Dong Kejun; Qiu Jiuzi; Peng Bo; Guan Yongjing; Yin Xinyi; Wu Shaoyong; Li Shihong; Zhou Duo

    2005-01-01

    The measurement method for some radio isotope such as 99 Tc, 182 Hf, 151 Sm is developing in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, and applications in the fields of nuclear physics, geosciences, life science and materials science is carried out. The brief introduction of these methods and applications are described in this paper. (authors)

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages of amino acid extracts from Californian palaeoindian skeletons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bada, J.L.; Gillespie, R.; Gowlett, J.A.J.; Hedges, R.E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used accelerator mass spectrometry to determine the radiocarbon ages of the amino acid extracts used in the original racemization studies of skeletal remains found in California. The studies indicate that some of the controversial Californian skeletons, which had been assigned to the Upper Pleistocene, are in fact Holocene. (author)

  6. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry using TANDEM accelerator in National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizota, Takeshi; Nakao, Setsuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazuo [Particle Beam Sceince Laboratory, Multi-Function Material Science Department, National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) analysis was studied using TANDEM accelerator. The heavy ions of MeV range emit the secondary ions of atoms, molecules, polymers and clusters from the irradiated samples without destruction. The analysis system of PDMS designed and set-up using a mass spectrometer of Time of Flight and the TANDEM accelerator. The system performance was tested for C-60 fullerene on the surface of the samples using 11.2 MeV {sup 28}Si beams produced by the TANDEM accelerator of 1.7MV. The result shows that the hydrogen and hydrocarbons can be analyzed in the range of 1amu unit. The resolution (M/{delta}M) of the Mass Spectrometry system is confirmed to be about 1000 from the separation of the 720 and 721amu peaks, which is attributed to the C-60 fullerene including {sup 13}C atoms. (H. Katsuta)

  7. Pushing the accelerator - speeding up drug research with accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, R.C. E-mail: colin.garner@cbams.co.uk; Leong, D

    2000-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive analytical method yet developed for elemental isotope analysis and has a broad range of applications. The measurement of {sup 14}C is of most interest to biomedical researchers but few studies have been reported using AMS in drug discovery and development. For biomedical use, {sup 14}C is incorporated into organic molecules by either radiosynthesis or biosynthetically and the isotope is used as a surrogate for the distribution of the radiolabelled molecule either in animal or human studies. The majority of users of {sup 14}C quantitate the radioactivity using decay counting usually with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Our Centre over the past 12 months has been evaluating and validating the use of AMS as an alternative detection method. In vitro spiking studies of human plasma with {sup 14}C-Fluconazole, a prescription antifungal drug has demonstrated an excellent correlation between AMS and LSC (correlation coefficient 0.999). Human Phase I clinical studies have been conducted with radioactive doses ranging from 120 Bq (7000 dpm) to 11 kBq (300 nCi) to provide mass balance, plasma concentration and radioactive metabolite profiling data. Limits of detection of 0.00022 Bq {sup 14}C-labelled drug/ml plasma have been accurately quantitated in a plasma background of 0.0078 Bq/ml (0.013 dpm/ml in a plasma background of 0.47 dpm/ml or 2.72 pMC in a background of 90.19 pMC)

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry researches at NIES-TERRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuyuki; Yoneda, Minoru; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uehiro, Takashi; Morita, Masatoshi; Uchida, Masao; Yoshinaga, Jun

    2003-01-01

    In the AMS facility at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA; Tandem accelerator for Environmental Research and Radiocarbon Analysis), several research programs have been proceeded, including a program, called GC-AMS, for the compound-specific 14 C analysis in environmental samples

  9. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Nuclear Science Laboratory: Applications to Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, P.; Bauder, W.; Bowers, M.; Lu, W.; Ostdiek, K.; Robertson, D.

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) program at the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame is focused on measurements related to galactic radioactivity and to nucleosynthesis of main stellar burning as well as the production of so called Short-Lived Radionuclides (SLRs) in the Early Solar System (ESS). The research program is based around the 11MV FN tandem accelerator and the use of the gas-filled magnet technique for isobar separation. Using a technique that evolved from radiocarbon dating, this paper presents a number of research programs that rely on the use of an 11MV tandem accelerator at the center of the AMS program.

  10. A compact permanent magnet cyclotrino for accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, A.T.; Clark, D.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors describe the development of a new instrument for the detection of trace amounts of rare isotopes, a Cyclotron Mass Spectrometer (CMS). A compact low energy cyclotron optimized for high mass resolution has been designed and has been fabricated. The instrument has high sensitivity and is designed to measure carbon-14 at abundances of < 10{sup {minus}12}. A novel feature of the instrument is the use of permanent magnets to energize the iron poles of the cyclotron. The instrument uses axial injection, employing a spiral inflector. The instrument has been assembled and preliminary measurements of the magnetic field show that it has a uniformity on the order of 2 parts in 10{sup 4}.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.; Grootes, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Our program is directed toward measurement of 10 Be and 14 C using the FN Tandem accelerator of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory. We began work in June 1977. Our progress and results up to August, 1979, were reported at the Tenth International Radiocarbon Conference. The present report covers chiefly our work since then. For 14 C, we are in the final stages of testing a new sample changer and alternator and are comparing three systems of normalizing the rare and abundant ion beams to give isotope ratios. We have successfully prepared graphitized carbon source samples from contemporary and other material; while the graphitized sources have given the largest carbon beams, we are exploring other possibilities, among which the use of C/Ag combinations appears very promising. For 10 Be, we have begun testing and measuring samples prepared from Antarctic and Peruvian snow and ice. In both the carbon and the beryllium programs various technical developments are in progress in addition to those reported here

  12. Determination of "1"3"5Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, C.M.; Charles, C.R.J.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E.; Cornett, R.J.; Litherland, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of anthropogenic "1"3"5Cs and "1"3"7Cs isotopes is characteristic of a uranium fission source. This research evaluates the technique of isotope dilution (yield tracing) for the purpose of quantifying "1"3"5Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry with on-line isobar separation. Interferences from Ba, Zn_2, and isotopes of equal mass to charge ratios were successfully suppressed. However, some sample crosstalk from source contamination remains. The transmission and di-fluoride ionization efficiencies of Cs isotopes were found to be 8 × 10"−"3 and 1.7 × 10"−"7 respectively. This quantification of "1"3"5Cs using yield tracing by accelerator mass spectrometry shows promise for future environmental sample analysis once the issues of sample crosstalk and low efficiency can be resolved.

  13. The advantages of orthogonal acceleration in ICP time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaal, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The OptiMass 8000 incorporates an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A general schematic of the instrument is given. The continuous ion beam is chopped by an orthogonal accelerator. A push out pulse supply is coupled to the accelerator for providing repetitive push-out voltages at a frequency of 30 kHz. The ion packets that are sliced out of the beam then travel within the field free space towards the SMARTGATE ion blanker. Orthogonal accelerator parameters are set to enable temporal-spatial focusing at the SMARTGATE ion blanker, so that iso-mass ion packets are resolved in time. Any ion packets of unwanted specie are ejected from the direction of travel by supplying pulsed voltages onto the deflection plates of the SMARTGATE. The ions to be measured are let through SMARTGATE and travel further down the field free space, to enter the ion reflectron. The ion reflectron increases the resolution of the mass spectrometer by means of temporal-energy focussing. After reflection, the ions travel within the field free space towards the discrete-dynode detector. In comparison to other acceleration geometries used in elemental time-of-flight mass spectrometry the OptiMass 8000 orthogonal acceleration geometry ultimately leads to superior resolution. As the energy spread is about 3 orders of magnitude lower in the time-of-flight direction for an oaTOFMS in comparison to an on-axis system, aberration acquired in the initial stages of acceleration are much lower. As a result the orthogonal acceleration scheme provides superior resolution at the first spatial focus point and the detector. The orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight analyzer of the OptiMass 8000 is able to provide resolution of at least 1800 at mass 238. (author)

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled studies: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomand, Ali

    2010-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is a detection platform with exceptional sensitivity compared with other bioanalytical platforms. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is widely used in archeology for radiocarbon dating applications. Early exploration of the biological and pharmaceutical applications of AMS began in the early 1990s. AMS has since demonstrated unique problem-solving ability in nutrition science, toxicology and pharmacology. AMS has also enabled the development of new applications, such as Phase 0 microdosing. Recent development of AMS-enabled applications has transformed this novelty research instrument to a valuable tool within the pharmaceutical industry. Although there is now greater awareness of AMS technology, recognition and appreciation of the range of AMS-enabled applications is still lacking, including study-design strategies. This review aims to provide further insight into the wide range of AMS-enabled applications. Examples of studies conducted over the past two decades will be presented, as well as prospects for the future of AMS.

  15. Sample preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The adaptation of the University of Washington FN tandem Van de Graaff to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), as well as some of the results obtained, are described in another paper in this volume (Farwell et al., 1981). Here we discuss our experiences in preparing carbon and beryllium samples that give large and stable ion beams when used in our Extrion cesium sputter source with an inverted cesium beam geometry

  16. An improved method for statistical analysis of raw accelerator mass spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutjahr, A.; Phillips, F.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.

    1987-01-01

    Hierarchical statistical analysis is an appropriate method for statistical treatment of raw accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) data. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that this method yields more accurate estimates of isotope ratios and analytical uncertainty than the generally used propagation of errors approach. The hierarchical analysis is also useful in design of experiments because it can be used to identify sources of variability. 8 refs., 2 figs

  17. Radioecological studies at the National Accelerator Centre based on the determination of 129I by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, J. M.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Chamizo, E.; Santos, F. J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006 a compact system of mass spectrometry with Accelerator (AMS) is installed at the National Center of Accelerators, Seville. After an initial set-up and study have been opening many lines of research in fields such as archeology, geology, paleontology, oceanography, oceanography, internal dosimetry and characterization of radioactive waste, among others. In particular, based on the measurement of 1 29I have made contributions to the field of radioecology and radiation protection. In this work they are summarized and presented some of these investigations. (Author)

  18. Radionuclides in man and his environment measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Erlandsson, Bengt; Kiisk, Madis; Persson, Per; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina; Mattsson, Soeren; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Olofsson, Mikael

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive analytical method for measuring very low concentrations of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. For radioanalytical purposes, the main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than one hour). In this report some current applications of the AMS technique at the Lund Pelletron accelerator are presented, in particular studies of 14 C-labeled pharmaceuticals used in clinical nuclear medicine and biomedical research

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry of Strontium-90 for homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumey, S J; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F; Hillegonds, D J

    2008-03-03

    Strontium-90 is one of the most hazardous materials managed by agencies charged with protecting the public from radiation. Traditional radiometric methods have been limited by low sample throughput and slow turnaround times. Mass spectrometry offers the advantage of shorter analysis times and the ability to measure samples immediately after processing, however conventional mass spectrometric techniques are susceptible to molecular isobaric interferences that limit their overall sensitivity. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry is insensitive to molecular interferences and we have therefore begun developing a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr by accelerator mass spectrometry. Despite a pervasive interference from {sup 90}Zr, our initial development has yielded an instrumental background of {approx} 10{sup 8} atoms (75 mBq) per sample. Further refinement of our system (e.g., redesign of our detector, use of alternative target materials) is expected to push the background below 10{sup 6} atoms, close to the theoretical limit for AMS. Once we have refined our system and developed suitable sample preparation protocols, we will utilize our capability in applications to homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry of heavy elements: /sup 36/Cl to /sup 205/Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, W

    1987-08-25

    Measurements are discussed in which the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry was applied to problems involving heavy radioisotopes. These measurements, which depend on the ion energies that can be reached with the new heavy-ion accelerator facilities, were performed at the Argonne tandem linac accelerator system (ATLAS) and at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. The topics include a discussion of measurements of long nuclear lifetimes, of radioisotope detection of interest to solar neutrino experiments, and of a determination of the /sup 41/Ca concentration in natural samples of terrestrial origin by making use of isotopic pre-enrichment in an isotope separator. A long-known method of isobar separation, employing a gas-filled magnetic field region, has been revived for some of these measurements and its characteristics and advantages are briefly reviewed.

  1. CologneAMS, a dedicated center for accelerator mass spectrometry in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Zilges, A. [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Dunai, T.; Rethemeyer, J.; Melles, M.; Staubwasser, M. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany); Kuczewski, B. [Division of Nuclear Chemistry, University of Cologne (Germany); Richter, J. [Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, University of Cologne (Germany); Radtke, U. [Institute of Geography, University of Cologne, Germany, Rectorate, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Klein, M. [HVEE, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    CologneAMS is a new centre for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at University of Cologne. It has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to improve the experimental conditions especially for those German scientists that apply the AMS technique for their geologic, environmental, nuclear chemical, and nuclear astrophysical research. The new AMS-device has been built by High Voltage Engineering Europe (HVEE) and has been installed in the existing accelerator area of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The AMS-facility is designed for the spectrometry of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I in and heavy ions up to {sup 236}U and {sup 244}Pu. The central part of the AMS-facility is a 6 MV Tandetron Trade-Mark-Sign accelerator. Downstream of the high energy mass spectrometer an additional switching magnet is used as a further filter element which supplies also additional ports for future extensions of the detector systems. The current status of CologneAMS and the results of the first test measurements will be presented.

  2. IAEA meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry, Zagreb, Croatia, April 19-21, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. It is of paramount importance to promote the use of AMS within the IAEA. This would be particularly beneficial for the following IAEA programs: Safeguards, Physical and chemical sciences, Human health, Food and agriculture, Radioactive waste management, Radiation safety, Industry and earth sciences. The IAEA is working in the area of development of reference materials, interlaboratory comparisons and quality assurance. This meeting recommends that this program further developed and extended to include all the AMS isotopes.

  3. IAEA meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry, Zagreb, Croatia, April 19-21, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. It is of paramount importance to promote the use of AMS within the IAEA. This would be particularly beneficial for the following IAEA programs: Safeguards, Physical and chemical sciences, Human health, Food and agriculture, Radioactive waste management, Radiation safety, Industry and earth sciences. The IAEA is working in the area of development of reference materials, interlaboratory comparisons and quality assurance. This meeting recommends that this program further developed and extended to include all the AMS isotopes

  4. Dating of two human fossil bones from Romania by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Skog, Goeran; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Kristina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per; Alexandrescu, Emilian

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have dated two fossil remains found in Romania, by the method of radiocarbon using the technique of the accelerator mass spectrometry. The human fossil remains from Woman's cave, Baia de Fier, have been dated to the age 30150 ± 800 years BP, and the skull, from the Cioclovina cave has been dated to the age 29000 ± 700 years BP. These are among the most ancient dated human fossil remains from Romania, possibly belonging to the upper Paleolithic, the Aurignacian period. (authors)

  5. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Analysis of trace elements by means of accelerator secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ender, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of material composition and trace element concentration is of increasing interest primarily in semiconductor technology but also in metallurgy, geology, biology and medicine. At present, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is in many respects the best technique to provide 3-dimensional information on the distribution of trace elements with concentrations below 1 ppm. However, due to the presence of molecular ions the detectability of many trace elements it restricted because of molecular mass interferences. In addition, detectors used in SIMS have a background counting rate of 0.1-1 Hz, which further limits trace element analysis. In Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) long-lived radionuclides are detected free of molecular interferences and detector background at isotopic ratios as low as 10 -15 . Moreover, isobaric interferences can be reduced as well. In order to benefit from these advantages a combination of SIMS and AMS (Accelerator SIMS) has been proposed almost 20 years ago, but no facility has ever been fully developed. It has been the aim of this work to add a new sputtering chamber for AMS measurements of ultrapure semiconductor material to the existing PSI/ETH AMS facility. To fulfill the requirements of material analysis, an UHV chamber with special precautions against contamination has been built and adapted to the existing AMS setup. For sputtering, a commercial Cs gun with an ExB filter and a 1 o beam bend for neutral particle suppression is used to obtain a pure Cs ion beam. The gun is equipped with different apertures for varying the diameter of the beam spot. With the integrated scanning unit the 10 keV Cs beam can be rastered over approximately 1 mm 2 . This allows different applications such as bulk analysis, depth profiling and imaging. The secondary ion extraction is matched to the ion optical and geometrical requirements of the existing accelerator mass spectrometer. (author) figs., tabs., 67 refs

  7. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Ivascu, M.; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the experimental physical method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in a sample material. Ratios of radionuclides in the range 10 -13 - 10 -15 are normally measured with this technique, corresponding to a sensitivity which makes possible the detection of only 1 Atom in a surrounding material of about 1 Million of Billions of other Atoms. Thus, the AMS has advanced the art of Classical Mass Spectrometry (sensitivity 10 -11 ) to a sensitivity which allows for the first time the performance of special applications in environmental physics, medicine, pharmacology, geology, archaeology, measurements of radio nuclides in the Earth's atmosphere produced by cosmic-rays or by nuclear power plants, applications in astrophysics and in nuclear physics.An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering . The construction was possible in the frame of a co-operation with the Technical University Munich and with financial support from IAEA-Vienna. It represents the first experimental set-up of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarized at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses) a double focussing, 90 angle analyzing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight-stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the tandem accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high-energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analyzing magnets of

  8. Improved detection limit for {sup 59}Ni using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    2002-11-01

    59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. To be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage it is important to measure the 59 Ni level. Accelerator mass spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive method for counting atoms, suitable for 59 Ni measurements. Improvements in the reduction of the background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt, the interfering isobar, have been made. This chemical purification is essential when using small tandem accelerators, <3 MV, combined with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. These improvements have lowered the detection limit for 59 Ni by a factor of twenty compared with the first value reported for the Lund AMS facility. Material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analysed and examples of the results are presented.

  9. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, B.D.; Ognibene, T.; Vogel, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of 14 C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14 C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14 C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14 C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS

  10. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  11. Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments and peats by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The small sample size requirement of accelerator mass spectrometry has allowed the measurement of the 14C/12C ratio for components of various lake sediment and peat samples, with a view to gaining greater understanding of sedimentary processes and to overcome some of the problems associated with conventional radiocarbon dating of sediments, where the 14C/12C ratio of the whole sample, less carbonate, is measured. Some of the fractions of sedimentary organic matter are amenable to analysis. Different molecules are specific to higher plants, algae and bacteria, so estimates of the major sources of input to the sediment can be made. The lipid fraction, though a small component (1%) of the total organic matter, yields most source information. Analyses of n-fatty acids and n-alkanes by capillary gas chromatography are used to interpret the radiocarbon result for the total crude lipid samples in the light of the environmental information so gained. Comparison of the various radiocarbon results for different components of the sediment has provided evidence for the importance of the amount of organic carbon in the samples, microbial attack during storage, the presence of mineral carbon, mixing, hard-water effects and the influence of terrestrial material on lake sediments. A regime has been proposed for the routine preparation of samples at an accelerator mass spectrometry facility in order to provide maximum useful information on a sediment sample. (author)

  12. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained...

  13. Detection of sputtered molecular doubly charged anions: a comparison of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2004-01-01

    The detection of small molecular dianions by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is compared. In SIMS, the existence of these dianions can be identified safely if the total mass number of the molecule is odd and the dianion is hence detected at a half-integral mass number. The occurrence of fragmentation processes which may interfere with this scheme, is illustrated by means of the energy spectra of singly and doubly charged negative cluster ions. As compared to SIMS, AMS can rely, in addition, on the break-up of molecular species in the stripping process: this allows to monitor the simultaneous arrival of several atomic constituents with a clear energetic pattern in coincidence at the detector. This feature is exemplified for the C 10 2- dianion

  14. Precise isotope analysis. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to human sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Isotope 14 C is a radioisotope with a half-life of 5,730 years, and the measurement of its concentration makes it possible to calculate 'carbon 14 age.' This paper introduces up-to-date accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), which is used in 14 C concentration measurement, and outlines its applied researches in pharmaceutical and medical fields. AMS technique has been applied in Europe and the United States to microdose clinical tests. In Japan, implementation foundation has been ready through the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, five years behind Europe and the United States. Although conventional AMS measurement of 14 C required an acceleration voltage of 3 million volts or more, technological development has enabled a high accuracy of 14 C concentration measurement with the low acceleration voltage of about 400,000 volts. A sample for AMS method is graphitized, transformed to carbon ions ( 12 C-, 13 C-, and 14 C-) through negative ionization with cesium irradiation, accelerated under 450 kV, bombarded with argon gas, charge-converted to 12 C+, 13 C+, and 14 C+, and measured. Biological samples for microdose study are plasma, urine, feces, and biological tissue. Model tests showed a very good linearity between the concentrations of 14 C-containing compounds and 14 C concentrations. Applied research on microdose clinical tests is expected to increase its usability in the future, as an effective means of drug development. (A.O.)

  15. Correlation analysis of measurement result between accelerator mass spectrometry and gamma counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Cheng, C.; Oka, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Shimoda, Marika

    2010-01-01

    The guidelines for microdosing in clinical trials were published in Japan in 2008 following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. They recommend utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and positron emission tomography as candidates for monitoring drug metabolites in preclinical studies. We correlate the two methods by measuring appropriately labeled tissue samples from various mouse organs using both AMS and gamma counter. First, we measured the 14 C background levels in mouse organs using the AMS system. We then clarified the relationship between AMS and gamma counter by simultaneously administering 14 C-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 14 C-FDG) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Tissue distribution was examined after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h using the AMS system for 14 C-FDG and gamma counter for 18 F-FDG. Background 14 C levels were subtracted from the data obtained with radiotracer administration. The background 14 C concentration differed with tissue type measured. Background 14 C concentration in mouse liver was higher than in other organs, and was approximately 1.5-fold that in blood. The correlation coefficient (r) of the measurements between AMS ( 14 C-FDG) and gamma counter ( 18 F-FDG) was high in both normal (0.99 in blood, 0.91 in brain, 0.61 in liver and 0.78 in kidney) and tumor-bearing mice (0.95 in blood and 0.99 in tumor). The clearance profile of 18 F-FDG was nearly identical to that of 14 C-FDG measured with AMS. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis has an excellent correlation with biodistribution measurements using gamma counter. Our results suggest that the combination of AMS and positron emission tomography (PET) can act as a complementary approach to accelerate drug development. (author)

  16. Biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry-isotope measurements at the level of the atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J; Garner, R C

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a nuclear physics technique developed about twenty years ago, that uses the high energy (several MeV) of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to measure very small quantities of rare and long-lived isotopes. Elements that are of interest in biomedicine and environmental sciences can be measured, often to parts per quadrillion sensitivity, i.e. zeptomole to attomole levels (10(-21)-10(-18) mole) from milligram samples. This is several orders of magnitude lower than that achievable by conventional decay counting techniques, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC). AMS was first applied to geochemical, climatological and archaeological areas, such as for radiocarbon dating (Shroud of Turin), but more recently this technology has been used for bioanalytical applications. In this sphere, most work has been conducted using aluminium, calcium and carbon isotopes. The latter is of special interest in drug metabolism studies, where a Phase 1 adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study can be conducted using only 10 nanoCurie (37 Bq or ca. 0.9 microSv) amounts or less of 14C-labelled drugs. In the UK, these amounts of radioactivity are below those necessary to request specific regulatory approval from the Department of Health's Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC), thus saving on valuable development time and resources. In addition, the disposal of these amounts is much less an environmental issue than that associated with microCurie quantities, which are currently used. Also, AMS should bring an opportunity to conduct "first into man" studies without the need for widespread use of animals. Centre for Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CBAMS) Ltd. is the first fully commercial company in the world to offer analytical services using AMS. With its high throughput and relatively low costs per sample analysis, AMS should be of great benefit to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for 14 C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5–10 μg C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hakansson, Karl; Possnert, Goeran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for {sup 14}C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5-10 {mu}g C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona: geochronology of the climate record and connections with the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Burr, G.S.; Beck, J.W.; Donahue, D.J.; Biddulph, D.; Hatheway, A.L.; Lange, T.E.; McHargue, L.R.

    2003-01-01

    There are many diverse uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Carbon-14 studies at our laboratory include much research related to paleoclimate, both with 14 C as a tracer of past changes in environmental conditions as observed in corals, marine sediments and many terrestrial records. Terrestrial records such as forest fires can also show the influence of oceanic oscillations, whether they are short-term such as ENSO, or on the millennial time scale. In tracer applications, we have developed the use of 129 I as well as 14 C as tracers for nuclear pollution studies around radioactive waste dump sites, in collaboration with IAEA. We discuss some applications carried out in Tucson for several of these fields and hope to give some idea of the breadth of these studies

  20. "1"4C ages and calendar years of Japanese swords measured with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Akihiro; Kokubu, Yoko; Nakamura, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Steel of Japanese swords has been produced with Tatara process from iron sand and charcoal. Carbon dissolved in steel was absorbed from wooden charcoal fuel during the production of the steel. From the decay of "1"4C activity in the steel, the "1"4C age of Japanese sword can be determined. The "1"4C ages of 4 Japanese swords were measured with accelerator mass spectrometry and calibrated to calendar years. Each "1"4C age provided plural calendar year periods with definite probabilities, and one of the periods agreed with the production year of each sword that was determined from the sword master's name cut in the grip of his sword after taking the age range of charcoal used for steel production and usage for several generations of the same names of sword masters into account. (author)

  1. Radiocarbon dating study of ancient iron artifacts with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Kenzo; Nakamura, Toshio; Hirasawa, Masahiro; Kato, Masako; Sano, Masamichi.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the correlation between the highly resistive property against corrosion and the production method of the ancient iron artifacts, it is essentially necessary to determine the accurate ages of them. 14 C dating with accelerator mass spectrometry was applied to the two ancient artifacts, a Japanese sword of wrought iron with a production age ranged from the Kamakura to the Muromachi period, estimation based on the fabrication technique, and a planning adze of cast iron with no definite origin. The former was dated as 880±150 y.B.P., corresponding to the calendar age ranged from AD 1021 to AD 1263, and the latter as 1720±160 y.B.P. with the calendar age ranged from AD 119 to AD 457 and from AD 483 to AD 508. These calibrated 14 C ages for both iron artifacts are consistent with the relevant ages conjectured by historical considerations. (author)

  2. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona: Geochronology of the Climatic Record and Connections with the Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Jull

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many diverse uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. 14C studies at our laboratory include much research related to paleoclimate, with 14C as a tracer of past changes in environmental conditions as observed in corals, marine sediments, and many terrestrial records. Terrestrial records can also show the influence of oceanic oscillations, whether they are short term, such as ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation, or on the millennial time scale. In tracer applications, we have developed the use of 129I as well as 14C as tracers for nuclear pollution studies around radioactive waste dump sites, in collaboration with IAEA. We discuss some applications carried out in Tucson, AZ, for several of these fields and hope to give some idea of the breadth of these studies.

  3. Penetration of bomb radiocarbon in the tropical Indian Ocean measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, E.; Arnold, M.; Maurice, P.; Monfray, P.; Duplessy, J.C.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Radiocarbon measurements performed on seawater samples by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enable to reduce by a factor of 2000 the water sample size needed for the 14 C measurements. Therefore no chemical treatment on board the oceanographic vessel is required. Seventy-four AMS 14 C determinations on samples collected in the tropical-equatorial Indian Ocean during the second leg of the INDIGO program (1986) are presented and compared with the β-counting results obtained during the same campaign and the GEOSECS program (1978). A pronounced reduction of the equatorial 14 C deficit suggests that substantial amounts of bomb- 14 C are associated with the westward flowing Pacific water which enters the Indian Ocean via passages through the Indonesia Archipelago and/or to meridional mixing with 14 C-rich water of the southern subtropical gyre. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  5. Decay kinetics of nicotine/NNK-DNA adducts in vivo studied by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, H.F.; He, L.; Liu, Y.F.; Liu, K.X.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Ma, H.J.; Li, K.

    2000-01-01

    The decay kinetics of nicotine-DNA adducts and NNK-DNA adducts in mice liver after single dosing was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The decay is characterized by a two-stage process. The half-lives of nicotine-DNA adducts are 1.3 d (4-24 h) and 7.0 d (1-21 d), while for NNK-DNA adducts are 0.7 d (4-24 h) and 18.0 d (1-21 d). The relatively faster decay of nicotine-DNA adducts suggests that the genotoxicity of nicotine is weaker than that of NNK. The in vitro study shows that the metabolization of nicotine is necessary for the final formation of nicotine-DNA adducts, and nicotine Δ1'(5') iminium ion is a probable metabolite species that binds to DNA molecule covalently

  6. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ( 14 C) and radiocalcium ( 41 Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS 14 C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO 2 to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high 13 C - ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, 14 C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP

  7. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  8. On the identification of carbonaceous aerosols via 14C accelerator mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.; Fletcher, R.A.; Klouda, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon isotopic measurements ( 12 C, 14 C), derived from chemical measurements of total carbon plus AMS measurements of 14 C/ 12 C have become an accepted means for estimating fossil and contemporary carbon source contributions to atmospheric carbon. Because of the limited sensitivity of these techniques, however, such measurements are restricted to 'bulk' samples comprising at least 10-100 μg of carbon. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry (LMMS) offers an important complementary opportunity to investigate the chemical nature of individual particles as small as 0.1 μm in diameter. Although there is little hope to measure 14 C/ 12 C in such small samples, the compositional and structural information available with the laser microprobe is of interest for possible source discrimination. Also, the analysis of individual particles, which may reflect individual sources, yields significant potential increases in spatial, temporal and source resolution, in comparison to bulk sample analysis. Results of our exploratory investigation of known sources of carbonaceous particles, using LMMS, are presented. By applying multivariate techniques to laser mass spectra of soot from the combustion of heptane and wood, we found striking differences in the alkali metals (notably potassium) in the positive ion mass spectra. For ambient particles, 14 C has proved to be a crucial adjunct for the development and validation of the LMMS approach to single particle source assignment via carbon cluster pattern recognition. The combined techniques offer great promise for objective modeling (number and types of carbon sources) and for extension of the dichotomous carbon apportionment (fossil, contemporary) to subclasses such as soot from wood and agricultural burning, and that from coal and petroleum combustion. (orig.)

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry and the prehistoric occupation of the coast of rio de janeiro - brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio Macario, K.; Anjos, R.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Facure, A.D.; Elmore, M.; Coimbra, M.; Padron, I.; Najjar, R.; Kneip, L.; Lima, T.A.; Buarque, A.; Barbosa, M.; Seda, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique is a very attractive method for mass spectrometry, since it allows determination of concentrations with sensitivity down to 1 atom of isotope in 1015 atoms, using few milligrams samples. A Tandem accelerator is used as a magnetic and electrostatic analyzer. The determination of these extremely low concentrations of rare isotopes, accelerated to the MeV range, is measured by the direct counting of the atoms by nuclear detection techniques. The AMS technique has been implemented recently in Brazil, at the Pelletron 8UD Tandem accelerator (Sao Paulo), following many improvements on the ion source, VGM control, machine parameters control and detection system. In this contribution we report an important application on AMS on archaeological studies, performed at the Prime Lab (USA), on the dating of ceramics, bones, charcoals, nuts and shells samples of the of the coast of Rio de Janeiro. The main objective of this work is to improve the present knowledge on the occupation of Brazil by the Indians in the prehistoric period, studying archaeological sites located in Rio de Janeiro. Studies show that the Brazilian coast was first occupied in the beginning of the Holocene, with the settlements of the collectors of mollusk, builders of shell mounds, called S ambaquis . The word is of Tupi etymology, tamba meaning shellfish and ki to pile up. The Tupi were a horticultural/potter group who used to live on the Brazilian coast at the time of the European arrivals; they coined the term that describes the main characteristic of the sites - the accumulation of great quantities of mollusk shells. One of objectives of this research is to understand those societies functioning structure, spatial ordering, interaction in the environment and their transformation processes, from the study of their remains. It is intended to analyze the region occupation process dynamics and search for possible links between the pre-pottery population socio

  10. Earth and environmental sciences by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with the large tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Takahashi, T.; Sueki, K.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-nuclide AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) has been able to measure environmental levels of long lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I by employing a molecular pilot beam method. In addition, we have been developing 32 Si and 41 Ca AMS systems for future research programs. Recently, the performance of 36 Cl AMS was improved in AMS technique. The standard deviation is within ±2%, and the background is better than 5 x 10 -15 for the 36 Cl/Cl ratio. At present, our Tsukuba AMS research group has focused its activities especially on the measurement of 36 Cl. We have measured more than 500 samples in year including earth and environmental sciences with the Tsukuba AMS system. A detailed description of the Tsukuba AMS system is given and earth and environmental applications are also described briefly. (author)

  11. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  12. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R.Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14 C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided. (orig.)

  13. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided.

  14. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan, E-mail: s.pavetich@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Akhmadaliev, Shavkat [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Golser, Robin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keddadouche, Karim [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Martschini, Martin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Steier, Peter [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in {sup 35}Cl ({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion

  15. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of 36 Cl/Cl and 129 I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35 Cl/ 37 Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35 Cl ( 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between

  16. Joint Bratislava–Prague studies of radiocarbon and uranium in the environment using accelerator mass spectrometry and radiometric methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Povinec, P. P.; Světlík, Ivo; Ješkovský, M.; Sivo, A.; John, J.; Špendlíková, I.; Němec, M.; Kučera, Jan; Richtáriková, M.; Breier, R.; Fejgl, Michal; Černý, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, č. 1 (2015), s. 67-73 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Accelerator mass spectrometry * Atmosphere * Environmental radioactivity * Radiocarbon * Tree rings * Uranium Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  17. Observational infant exploratory [14C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garner, C.R.; Park, K.B.; French, N.S.; Earnshaw, C.; Schipani, A.; Selby, A.M.; Byrne, L.; Siner, S.; Crawley, F.P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Duijn, E. van; ligt, R. de; Varendi, H.; Lass, J.; Grynkiewicz, G.; Maruszak, W.; Turner, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to compare [14C]-paracetamol ([14C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0-2 year old age group.

  18. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry on Environmental studies concerning ages of holocene fires in Central amazon forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Anjos, R. M.; Lubian, J.; Cordeiro, R.C.; Turcq, B.; Sifeddine, A.; Di Tada, M.; Cresswell, R. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    1999-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique was used to determine the radiocarbon age of Holocene fires in forests of the Amazon Region. Most of the ages were found to be within the 1000-1500 years range. These disturbances were probably caused by climatic anomalies, and they have modified the structure and dynamics of the region vegetation

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry analyses of environmental radionuclides: sensitivity, precision and standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkis; Fink; Tuniz; Vogt

    2000-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. AMS allows an isotopic sensitivity as low as one part in 10(15) for 14C (5.73 ka), 10Be (1.6 Ma), 26Al (720 ka), 36Cl (301 ka), 41Ca (104 ka), 129I (16 Ma) and other long-lived radionuclides occurring in nature at ultra-trace levels. These radionuclides can be used as tracers and chronometers in many disciplines: geology, archaeology, astrophysics, biomedicine and materials science. Low-level decay counting techniques have been developed in the last 40-50 years to detect the concentration of cosmogenic, radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides in a variety of specimens. Radioactivity measurements for long-lived radionuclides are made difficult by low counting rates and in some cases the need for complicated radiochemistry procedures and efficient detectors of soft beta-particles and low energy x-rays. The sensitivity of AMS is unaffected by the half-life of the isotope being measured, since the atoms not the radiations that result from their decay, are counted directly. Hence, the efficiency of AMS in the detection of long-lived radionuclides is 10(6)-10(9) times higher than decay counting and the size of the sample required for analysis is reduced accordingly. For example, 14C is being analysed in samples containing as little as 20 microg carbon. There is also a world-wide effort to use AMS for the analysis of rare nuclides of heavy mass, such as actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. Finally, AMS microprobes are being developed for the in-situ analysis of stable isotopes in geological samples, semiconductors and other materials. Unfortunately, the use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required, but there are several attempts to develop compact AMS spectrometers at low (advances in AMS

  20. Dating of two paleolithic human fossils from Romania by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Alexandrescu, Emilian; Skog, Goeran; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Kristina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have dated two human fossil remains from Romania by the method of radiocarbon using the technique of the accelerator mass spectrometry at the Pelletron system of Lund University, Sweden. Two fossil remains appear to be the most ancient human remains ever dated in our country: 1. A skull, a scapula and a tibia found in Baia de Fier in the Women's Cave, in Gorj county in the province Oltenia, by Constantin Nicolaescu-Plopsor in 1952; 2. A skull found in Cioclovina cave, near commune Bosorod, Hunedoara county in Transilvania by a worker at the exploitation of phosphate deposits in the year 1941. The skull was examined by Francisc Rainer, anthropologist, and Ioan Simionescu, geologist, who published a study. The lack of stratigraphic observations made very difficult the cultural and chronological assignments of this skull. These authors advanced the hypothesis that the skull belongs to the man of the type Homo sapiens fossilis. At the same time, a number of archaeologists believed that the skull might belong to a modern man, but there have been doubts about this matter. Under this circumstance, dating of the two skulls by physical analysis methods appears to be decisive. Samples of bone were taken from the scapula and tibia from Woman's cave, Baia de Fier and from the skull from Cioclovina cave. The content of Carbon 14 have been determined in the two samples by using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), performed at the AMS system of Lund University, in Sweden. Usually, the collagen amount sufficient for AMS measurements can be extracted from bone fragments with masses of 1 g or more (what provides 5 to 10% of the original collagen content). But, in the situation of the present studied fossil remains, because of the small quantity of bone samples and because the bones were very old, the determination of radiocarbon in the skulls was not so simple. For the preparation of the bone samples, we have essentially applied the Longin method

  1. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Deodhar, A.S.; Saravana Kumar, U.; Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Hemalatha, M.; Sparrow, H.; Mahata, K.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36 Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36 Cl from the interfering 36 S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36 Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37 Cl ions. The background 36 Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl was of the order of 10 -13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14 C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36 Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10 -12 . Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36 Cl in these samples. (author)

  2. Use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Human Health and Molecular Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Heather A; Malfatti, Michael A; Zimmermann, Maike; Ognibene, Ted; Henderson, Paul; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-12-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been adopted as a powerful bioanalytical method for human studies in the areas of pharmacology and toxicology. The exquisite sensitivity (10 -18 mol) of AMS has facilitated studies of toxins and drugs at environmentally and physiologically relevant concentrations in humans. Such studies include risk assessment of environmental toxicants, drug candidate selection, absolute bioavailability determination, and more recently, assessment of drug-target binding as a biomarker of response to chemotherapy. Combining AMS with complementary capabilities such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) can maximize data within a single experiment and provide additional insight when assessing drugs and toxins, such as metabolic profiling. Recent advances in the AMS technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have allowed for direct coupling of AMS with complementary capabilities such as HPLC via a liquid sample moving wire interface, offering greater sensitivity compared to that of graphite-based analysis, therefore enabling the use of lower 14 C and chemical doses, which are imperative for clinical testing. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent efforts in human studies using AMS, including technological advancements and discussion of the continued promise of AMS for innovative clinical based research.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating from the modern age to the past million age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tosaki, Y.; Sueki, K.; Bessyo, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-nuclide Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) is able to measure the long-lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I. The Tsukuba AMS system is able to perform AMS measurements with the terminal voltage of more than 10 MV. It is difficult to estimate the modern age dating (timescale of the past ten years) by the AMS dating method because the low attenuation of long-lived radioisotopes. The atomic bomb-produced radioisotopes are proposed as the environmental traces for the modern age dating. There is the advantage that the long half life of radioisotopes makes the attenuation negligilbe compared with the short half life of radioisotopes. We applied the 36 Cl bomb pulse as a dating tool for modern groundwater (∼50 years) instead of the 3 H bomb pulse. In addition, we have developed 32 Si-AMS system. The half life of 32 Si is about 140 years, therefore 32 Si-AMS is a useful tool for the modern age dating. On the other hand, we have started a new project to measure the cosmogenic nuclide of 36 Cl in an ice core retrieved from Dome Fuji station at Antarctic in order to investigate the past solar activity and the past earth environment as the timescale of the past million age. (author)

  4. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Knies, D.L.; Grabowski, K.S.; DeTurck, T.M.; Treacy, D.J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C 1 -C 5 ) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO 2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO 2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day

  5. Adduction of DNA with MTBE and TBA in mice studied by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, H F; Sun, H F; Du, H F; Xu, L H; Liu, Y F; Ding, X F; Fu, D P; Liu, K X

    2007-12-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a currently worldwide used octane enhancer substituting for lead alkyls and gasoline oxygenate. Our previous study using doubly (14)C-labeled MTBE [(CH(3))(3) (14)CO(14)CH(3)] has shown that MTBE binds DNA to form DNA adducts at low dose levels in mice. To elucidate the mechanism of the binding reaction, in this study, the DNA adducts with singly (14)C-labeled MTBE, which was synthesized from (14)C-methanol and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), or (14)C-labeled TBA in mice have been measured by ultra sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry. The results show that the methyl group of MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol definitely form adducts with DNA in mouse liver, lung, and kidney. The methyl group of MTBE is the predominant binding part in liver, while the methyl group and the tert-butyl group give comparable contributions to the adduct formation in lung and kidney.

  6. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    β-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of β-[ 14 C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 (micro)mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed β-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of β-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between β-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism

  7. Quantitation of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in human serum samples by using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Shiraishi, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of human pharmacokinetics is important for development of new drugs. Microdosing studies have been proposed as means of obtaining human pharmacokinetics information at early stages of drug development. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has high detection sensitivity and is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we used the AMS microdosing facility at Yamagata University to measure the concentration of 14 C in 14 C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum samples. The calibration curve of 14 C concentration in serum was linear, and the correlation coefficient was 0.9994. The precision, accuracy, and stability values obtained (freeze and thaw cycles, and short- and long-term stability) satisfied the criteria. The mean background 14 C concentrations in samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers were 1.635dpm/mL in blood and 0.56dpm/mL in plasma. These results suggest the suitability of AMS-based quantitation for analyzing samples from microdosing studies. (author)

  8. Radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry: some recent results and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.

    1987-01-01

    14 C differs from other nuclides measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in that an extensive database of dates already exists. AMS dates should therefore have comparable accuracy, and the measurement of isotopic ratios to better than 1%, which was an important technical goal, has been reached. The main advantage of being able to date samples 1000 times smaller than previously lies in the extra selectivity that can be employed. This is reflected in the results and applications. Selection can apply at several levels; from objects that formerly contained too little carbon, to the choice of archaeological material, to the extraction of specific chemical compounds from a complex environmental sample. This is particularly useful in removing uncertainty regarding the validity of a date, since a given sample may comprise carbon atoms from different sources each with their own 14 C 'age'. Examples from archaeological and environmental research illustrating these points are given. 14 C dating by AMS differs from conventional radiocarbon dating by having the potential to measure much lower levels of 14 C, and therefore should double the time span of the method. This potential has not yet been realized because of sample contamination effects, and work in progress to reduce these is described. (author)

  9. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C determination in CO2 produced from laser decomposition of aragonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, Brad E; Thorrold, Simon R; Roberts, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    The determination of (14)C in aragonite (CaCO(3)) decomposed thermally to CO(2) using an yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped neodymium laser is reported. Laser decomposition accelerator mass spectrometry (LD-AMS) measurements reproduce AMS determinations of (14)C from the conventional reaction of aragonite with concentrated phosphoric acid. The lack of significant differences between these sets of measurements indicates that LD-AMS radiocarbon dating can overcome the significant fractionation that has been observed during stable isotope (C and O) laser decomposition analysis of different carbonate minerals. The laser regularly converted nearly 30% of material removed into CO(2) despite it being optimized for ablation, where laser energy breaks material apart rather than chemically altering it. These results illustrate promise for using laser decomposition on the front-end of AMS systems that directly measure CO(2) gas. The feasibility of such measurements depends on (1) the improvement of material removal and/or CO(2) generation efficiency of the laser decomposition system and (2) the ionization efficiency of AMS systems measuring continuously flowing CO(2).

  11. Genotoxicity study on nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.S.; Wang, H.F.; Shi, J.Y.; Wang, X.Y.; Liu, Y.F.; Li, K.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Liu, K.X.; Guo, Z.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied DNA adduction with 14 C-labelled nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in mouse liver at doses equivalent to low-level exposure of humans. The dose ranges of nicotine and NNK administered were from 0.4 μg to 4.0 x 10 2 μg·kg -1 , and from 0.1 μg to 2.0 x 10 4 μg·kg -1 , respectively. In the exposure of mice to either nicotine or NNK, the number of DNA adducts increased linearly with increasing dose. The detection limit of DNA adducts was 1 adduct per 10 11 nucleotide molecules. This limit is 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than that of other techniques used for quantification of DNA adducts. The results of the animal experiments enabled us to speculate that nicotine is a potential carcinogen. According to the procedure for 14 C-labelled-NNK synthesis, the authors discuss the ultimate chemical speciation of NNK bound to DNA. From the animal tests the authors derived a directly perceivable relation between tobacco consumption and DNA adduction as the carcinogenic risk assessment

  12. Evaluation of 14C abundance in soil respiration using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Moriizumi, Jun; Asano, Tomohiro

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the behavior of 14 C in terrestrial ecosystems, 14 C abundance in soil respiration was evaluated in an urban forest with a new method involving a closed chamber technique and 14 C measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Soil respiration had a higher Δ 14 C than the contemporary atmosphere. This indicates that a significant portion of soil respiration is derived from the decomposition of soil organic matter enriched in 14 C by atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, with a notable time lag between atmospheric 14 C addition and re-emission from soil. On the other hand, δ 14 C in soil respiration demonstrated that 14 C abundance ratio itself in soil-respired CO 2 is not always high compared with that in atmospheric CO 2 because of the isotope fractionation during plant photosynthesis and microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. The Δ 14 C in soil respiration was slightly lower in August than in March, suggesting a relatively high contribution of plant root respiration and decomposition of newly accumulated and/or 14 C-depleted soil organic matter to the total soil respiration in August

  13. Detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in environmental samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, Karin; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez Guzman, Jose Manuel; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Shinonaga, Taeko [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Plutonium isotopes {sup 239}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=2.4.10{sup 4}a), {sup 240}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=6.5.10{sup 3}a) and {sup 242}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=3.7.10{sup 5}a) are anthropogenic radionuclides emitted into the environment by nuclear activities. Pu is accumulated in the human body and hence, poses a considerable hazard to human health. Due to the long half-lives, these isotopes are present in the biosphere on large time scales and a build-up can be expected. Therefore it is important to study the contamination pathway of Pu into the drinking water. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich a method to detect long-lived Pu isotopes by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being developed. AMS requires only few milligrams of sample material, which is a substantial advantage over decay counting techniques. Consequently, more samples from different locations can be taken which is essential when searching for locally increased Pu concentrations as in the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident in March 2011. Samples from different locations in the Pacific Ocean and from the snow-hydrosphere are planned to be investigated by AMS. The principle detection method using AMS and an overview of the status of the project is presented.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry for analysis of 10Be. Applications in marine geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segl, M.

    1985-01-01

    Using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry the behaviour of long-lived (half time 1.5 Million years) cosmogenic isotopes 10 Be in a marine environment was examined. The geochemical behaviour of 10 Be in oceans was examined in a water profile of the eastern Atlantic and on sediment cores from the eastern Atlantic and the Antarctica. The retention period in oceans was calculated from the water profile to be 700-1000 years. The examination of sedimentary cores showed, that the 10 Be flow into the sediment in areas of high bioproductivity surpasses the production rate. Comparison of 10 Be flow with 230 Th flow into the examined sedimentary cores showed a period of retention of 10 Be in the ocean of only about 400 years. Changes in the sedimentation rate and changes in the mineralogical composition correlate with paleooceanographic events, the start of the Antarctica icing 14 million years ago, changes in the deep water circulation 6.5 million years ago and the icing over of the northern hemisphere 3 million years ago. The same paleooceanographic events find correlation with the inside structure of a total of 16 manganese nodes and crusts from diverse parts of the ocean which were also dated with 10 Be. (orig./DG) [de

  15. Verification of the sputter-generated 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, R. G.; Surendran, P.; Kumar, Sanjay; Nair, J. P.; Yadav, M. L.; Hemalatha, M.; Thomas, R. G.; Mahata, K.; Kailas, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have performed systematic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements at our ion source test set up and have demonstrated that gas phase 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions for all size 'n' can be readily generated from a variety of surfaces undergoing Cs+ ion sputtering in the presence of high purity SF6 gas by employing the gas spray-cesium sputter technique. In our SIMS measurements, the isotopic yield ratio 34SFn-/32SFn- (n = 1-6) was found to be close to its natural abundance but not for all size 'n'. In order to gain further insight into the constituents of these molecular anions, ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were conducted with the most abundant 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions, at BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron accelerator. The results from these measurements are discussed in this paper.

  16. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement...... show that preboiling and aging are important for obtaining high chemical yields for both Pu and Np, which is possibly related to the aggregation and adsorption behavior of organic substances contained in urine. Although the optimal condition for Np and Pu simultaneous determination requires 5-day aging...

  17. New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages for the Mazama tephra layer from Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallett, D.J.; Hills, L.V.; Clague, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Charcoal fragments recovered from the Mazama air-fall tephra layer in cores from Dog and Cobb lakes, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, yielded accelerator mass spectrometry ages of 6720 ± 70 and 6760 ± 70 14 C years BP, respectively. These two new ages, together with other previously published radiocarbon ages on charcoal and twig fragments from Mazama air-fall deposits, indicate that the climatic eruption of Mount Mazama occurred 6730 ± 40 14 C years BP. (author)

  18. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-05

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  19. Accurate determination of 41Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-01-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long‐Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 41 Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). 41 Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF 2 precipitations. Measured 41 Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The 41 Ca/ 60 Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 41 Ca in spent resins using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. • A chemical treatment procedure was developed to quantitatively recover calcium in solution and selectively extract it. • Developed firstly on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • Accelerator mass spectrometry allowed measuring concentrations of 41 Ca in spent resins as low as 0.02 ng/g of dry resin. • Final results are in agreement with current data used for spent resins management

  20. Study of mechanism of cancer caused by carcinogenic substances with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shan; He Ming; Wu Shaoyong; You Qubo; Xu Guoji; Wang Qien; Liu Shijie

    2001-01-01

    Full text: It is reported that most of the cancerous patients were caused by cancerogenic substances. The research in recent years shows that carcinogenesis is related with Ca in the cells. In normal cells, the level of free Ca 2+ is very stable, the Ca 2+ as messenger plays an important role to keep normal function of cells. However, the level of free Ca 2+ in cells increases when the cells are exposed to cancerogenic substances such as cigarette smoking solution and chrysotile. But where do the increased Ca 2+ come from? There are three possibilities: 1) from outside of cell membrane; 2) from inside of nucleus; or 3) from both outside and inside of cells. By using external cultivation of cells 41 Ca as tracer and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) as measurement method, we investigate the origin of the increased Ca 2+ when the cells are exposed to cigarette smoking solution or chrysoltile is being undertaken. Several results as below have been gotten. 1. 41 Ca synthesis. A high purification of isotope of 40 Ca (99.95%) in form of CaO was irradiated by thermal neutron with a heavy water reactor at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The irradiation time and neutron flux were 988h and 4.9x10 13 , respectively. A 41 Ca/ 40 Ca ratio of 7x10 -5 was obtained. The conversion efficiency of Ca metal to CaH 2 was 80% to 90%. 2. CaH 2 sample preparation. There are two steps for CaH 2 sample preparation in AMS measurement. In the first step, CaO is reduced to metallic calcium via vacuum distillation and in the second, the CaO is converted into a hybrid. 3. 41 Ca AMS measurement. The first 41 Ca AMS measurement was performed with Hl-13 tandem AMS system in the CIAE. By using a 41 Ca blank sample, 30 nA of CaH 3 - ions from ion source can be obtained. Ions were accelerated with a terminal voltage of 7.8 and Ca 8+ (E=69.7 MeV) ions were selected. From the measurement, a 41 Ca/ 40 Ca ratio of about 10 -14 was deduced. (author)

  1. Study of the 27Al(n,2,)26Al reaction via accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.

    2000-06-01

    The excitation function for the 27 Al(n,2n) 26 Al reaction is expected to show a strongly non-linear behavior in the neutron-energy region around 14 MeV, the neutron energy in D-T plasmas; thus the production rate of 26 Al (t 1/2 =7.2*10 5 a) in D-T fusion environments can in principle be used to measure the temperature of such plasmas. Existing measurements, however, are strongly discordant. Therefore, a new accurate measurement of the 27 Al(n,2n) 26 Al cross sections in the near threshold region (E n =13.5-14.8 MeV) was performed with the goal to achieve relative cross sections with the highest accuracy possible. In addition, the measurements were also designed to provide good absolute cross-section values, as absolute cross sections are important for radioactive waste predictions. Samples of Al metal were irradiated with neutrons in the energy range near threshold (E th =13.55 MeV) at the Radiuminstitutes of both Vienna and St. Petersburg, and in Tokai-mura, Japan. In Tuebingen irradiations with neutrons of higher energies (17 and 19 MeV) were performed. The amount of 26 Al produced during the irradiations was measured via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). This work represents the first 26 Al measurements for this new facility. With this system, a background as low as 3*10 -15 for 26 Al/ 27 Al isotope ratios was obtained, corresponding to a (n,2n) cross section of 0.04 mb. Utilizing AMS, cross sections with much higher precision and considerably closer to the threshold than in previous investigations could be measured. The prerequisite for its application as a temperature monitor, namely a very well known shape of the excitation function was met. A quantitative prediction of the sensitivity of this method for monitoring the temperature in a D-T fusion plasma was therefore possible. For thermal plasmas temperature changes in the order of 5 to 15 % should be detectable. An even higher sensitivity was found

  2. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to environmental research, Trial of GC-AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2003-01-01

    The accelerator analysis facility of the National Institute for Environmental Studies, which aims to develop a new device capable of measuring "1"4C age for each compound, is promoting the study to establish the GC-AMS that combines two-dimensional gas chromatograph (GC) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The on-line GC-AMS system for the metabolic measurement of "1"4C-labeled compounds for medicinal biochemical research is a system, in which a GC-separated sample is continuously converted into CO_2 in a combustion tube and introduced directly to a gas ion source to continuously measure "1"4C. In the "1"4C detection experiment, the concentration of CO_2 gas was changed using a helium introduction line and a sample injection valve, and CO_2 gas plus helium gas were introduced into the gas ion source. As a result, it was found that the online GC-AMS has feasibility and high potential capability. For off-line GC-AMS for environmental samples, after purification with preparative gas chromatography, the sample is converted to graphite in a vacuum line and applied to common AMS measurement. The authors collected Northwest Pacific Ocean bottom sediment cores, and performed the extraction and purification of fatty acids of specific stratigraphy and the "1"4C measurement of each compound. The age of the compound derived from the surface layer planktons was the result capable of indicating the sedimentary age of the stratigraphy. In addition, as an application study to explore the source of pollutants in the environment using "1"4C as a tracer representing the characteristics of each source, the authors started to conduct the research choosing atmospheric dust samples. As a starting point, the authors attempted to measure the "1"4C concentration of vehicle exhaust particles and incinerator fly ash particles respectively. There was hardly any "1"4C in vehicle exhaust particles. (A.O.)

  3. Interface for the rapid analysis of liquid samples by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Thomas, Avi; Daley, Paul F; Salazar Quintero, Gary A; Bench, Graham

    2014-02-04

    An interface for the analysis of liquid sample having carbon content by an accelerator mass spectrometer including a wire, defects on the wire, a system for moving the wire, a droplet maker for producing droplets of the liquid sample and placing the droplets of the liquid sample on the wire in the defects, a system that converts the carbon content of the droplets of the liquid sample to carbon dioxide gas in a helium stream, and a gas-accepting ion source connected to the accelerator mass spectrometer that receives the carbon dioxide gas of the sample in a helium stream and introduces the carbon dioxide gas of the sample into the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  4. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Garbak, J.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., 14 C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level 14 C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of 14 C in living things ( 14 C/C = 1.2 x 10 -12 or 110 fmol 14 C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of 14 C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopic elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase 14 C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of 14 C. In each case, the virtual absence of 14 C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low 14 C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM can be oxidized with catalysts in the exhaust stream to further decrease PM. The effectiveness

  5. 14C accelerator mass spectrometry - applications in archaeology, biomedicine and in the atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.

    1990-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is superior to all other analytical techniques in its detection sensitivity of radiocarbon ( 14 C). It has therefore influenced or even laid down the foundations for applications in many fields of science. In the current work, various applications of 14 C AMS are presented through published articles for which the measurements were performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These articles are embedded into an in-depth discussion about characteristic features of the respective fields, emphasizing the broad range of issues which need to be considered in interdisciplinary research. In archaeology new 14 C dates on equipment of the Iceman ('Oetzi'), the world's oldest intact mummy, show reasonable agreement with dates previously obtained on the Iceman himself (3360-3100 BC). However, several botanical remains from the finding place clearly belong to other time periods, indicating that the discovery site of Oetzi has been used as a mountain pass 1500 yr earlier and also 2000 yr later. Dating on spruce logs from the world's oldest salt mines at Hallstatt, Austria provide evidence that salt mining started 1-2 centuries earlier than previously supposed, i.e. in the 14th to the 13th century BC. Recently, Bayesian mathematics is a frequently used tool in calibrating radiocarbon data. So-called vague or non-informative priors employed in this method may cause severe problems as shown by extensive computer simulations. In biomedicine problems in toxicology and in forensic medicine were investigated. Heterocyclic amines (HAs) are probably the epidemiologically most relevant class of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances since they are produced naturally in cooking protein-rich food. A study of 14 C labeled HAs (MeIQx and PhIP) in rodents and humans, one of the first studies using 14 C-labeled mutagens also in healthy human volunteers, severely calls in question the validity of animal models for assessing heterocyclic

  6. Development of aluminium-26 accelerator mass spectrometry for biological and toxicological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James

    Aluminium is now recognised as a toxic element. Its accumulation in the body leads to serious conditions in renal failure patients on haemodialysis, and there is suspected involvement in the aetiology of Alzheimer's Disease. Although uptake from food and water are important exposure pathways, there is so far little quantitative knowledge about gastrointestinal absorption of aluminium, its general speciation in the blood or its metabolism. This is partly because seven of aluminium's eight radioisotopes have half-lives too short to conduct accurate biochemical studies. The use of [67]Ga as a tracer for aluminium begs the question of its biochemical similarity. Radiotracer studies on aluminium are possible with [26]Al (T[2] = 716,000 years), but a comparatively large amount of this scarce and expensive radioisotope (price ca. 50 pence per Bq) would be needed to measure by normal counting techniques. Use of conventional mass spectrometry is impracticable due to [26]Mg interference (comprises 11 % of total stable Mg and inherent in all biological or environmental samples), but high energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (A.M.S.), resulting in some fully-stripped ions (Al[13+], Mg[12+]) , potentially overcomes this problem. [26]Al is particularly attractive in human toxicology because of its negligible natural abundance and low radiological hazard. We have used the 20 MV tandem Van De Graaff accelerator (S.E.R.C. Daresbury) to conduct 1A1 A.M.S. measurements in biological media. Stable currents of ALQ[-](100 nA for > 5 hours) were obtained from a modified Middleton ion source, using alumina/silver ion source preparations of 50 mug Al. [26]Al is unambiguously identified from and [26]Mg [27]AlO[-] is repeatedly measured on a Faray Cup placed in the beamline after adjusting the ion source magnet. Linear calibration (C.V. range tested ([26]Al/[27]Al ratios from 10[-6] to 10[-11]) and a detection limit (2?) of ca. 7 x 10[-18]g (5 nBq) [26]Al ratio [26]Al/[27]Al limit of 1.4 x

  7. Measurements of natural levels of 14C in human's and rat's tissues by accelerator mass spectrometry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.Y.; Khu, H.J.; Kang, J.H.; Yoon, M.Y.; Kim, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive, safe and precise analytical method for quantifying long-lived isotope in biomedical research with animals as well as human beings. In Korea, AMS Laboratory has been operating successfully for years measuring especially archaeological samples for 14 C dating. In this year, a biological sample pretreatment facility was setup to work on biomedical applications. As a preliminary study, we have measured the natural background levels of 14 C in tissues and blood of humans and rats have been measured. The results were agreed with the other reported levels and gave stable and reproducible results within 1-2%. (author)

  8. Design Study of a Mini Cyclotron for the Application of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Yun, Chong-Chul; Youn, Min-Yong; Wang, Sonjong

    2009-01-01

    A small cyclotron has been considered for the use of biomedical accelerator mass spectrometer (BAMS). Over a decade ago a few cyclotrons had been constructed and tested for AMS, but technical problems of instability and poor transmission efficiency caused to discontinue further developments. The major reason of the demise of cyclotron AMS was the dominance of commercial Tandem-based AMS facilities. Now BAMS may ask for more compact system, and perhaps using positive ions to accelerate isotope tracers is a favorable feature. The design of a cyclotron to meet the requirements of BAMS has been performed by adopting a compact magnet with high stability and a flat-topping rf system to increase transmission efficiency.

  9. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry: accelerated kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2017-01-01

    Kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was recorded in microdroplets by fusing a stream of microdroplets containing 40 µM chlorophyll a or b dissolved in methanol with a stream of aqueous microdroplets containing 35 mM hydrochloric acid (pH = 1·46). The kinetics of the demetallation of chlorophyll in the fused microdroplets (14 ± 6 µm diameter; 84 ± 18 m s-1 velocity) was recorded by controlling the traveling distance of the fused microdroplets between the fusion region and the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The rate of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was about 960 ± 120 times faster in the charged microdroplets compared with that reported in bulk solution. If no voltage was applied to the sprayed microdroplets, then the acceleration factor was about 580 ± 90, suggesting that the applied voltage is not a major factor determining the acceleration. Chlorophyll a was more rapidly demetallated than chlorophyll b by a factor of ~26 in bulk solution and ~5 in charged microdroplets. The demetallation kinetics was second order in the H+ concentration, but the acceleration factor of microdroplets compared with bulk solution appeared to be unchanged in going from pH = 1·3 to 7·0. The water:methanol ratio of the fused microdroplets was varied from 7:3 to 3:7 causing an increase in the reaction rate of chlorophyll a demetallation by 20%. This observation demonstrates that the solvent composition, which has different evaporation rates, does not significantly affect the acceleration. We believe that a major portion of the acceleration can be attributed to confinement effects involving surface reactions rather than either to evaporation of solvents or to the introduction of charges to the microdroplets.

  10. Accurate determination of 129I concentrations and 129I/137Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-01-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 129 I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO 3 /HClO 4 , (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of 129 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 129 I in spent resins using accelerator mass spectrometry. • The treatment procedure included microwave acid digestion of samples, iodine extraction by CL resins and AgI precipitation. • Developed first on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g of dry resin. • Results are in agreement with previous measurements and support reference values currently used for nuclear resin management

  11. Techniques of tandem accelerator mass spectrometry and their applications to 14C measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Nakai, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Michiaki

    1990-01-01

    A tandem accelerator mass spectrometer, named Tandetron was installed at Nagoya University in 1982 for 14 C measurement. The Tandetron spectrometer consists of a Cs sputter ion source to produce negative carbon ions, a Schenkel-type 2.2 MV tandem accelerator, an ion-beam analyzing apparatus with a charge-energy selector and mass spectrometer, and a heavy ion detector to identify and count 14 C 3+ ions from various background ions. The 14 C concentrations in pine needles, sampled at the Higashiyama Campus of Nagoya University, have been measured since 1984. The present article describes some of the measurements of 14 C in pine needles, focusing on the annual changes in the Δ 14 C value of atmospheric CO 2 , and on the effect upon 14 C concentrations for pine needles of a local 14 CO 2 emission from incineration of radioactive organic solvent wastes containing 14 C, at the Radioisotope Center in the Higashiyama Campus. The pine needles at some locations seemed to be influenced by local artificial CO 2 emission. The Δ 14 C values increased noticeably from 1956 to 1964 as a result of artificial 14 C produced in nuclear weapon tests. (N.K.)

  12. Plan for mass accelerator spectrometry at Gif-sur-Yvette and Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.; Bianchi, L.; Delibrias, G.; Koechlin, Y.

    1981-05-01

    From early 50', a carbon 14 dating laboratory was created at the Centre des Faibles Radioactivites de Gif-sur-Yvette (C.F.R.). From this time, more than 5,000 archaeological and geological samples were measured with the Libby method by this laboratory. C.F.R. is in the way to actualize its dating activities with the new accelerator method. A 3 MV General Ionex Tandetron is planed to be located at Gif-sur-Yvette next year and shared with Orsay University for 14 C. 10 Be and 36 Cl mass spectroscopy measurement. During the same time attempts have been made to adapt the Super FN Tandem of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay for 14 C dating

  13. Label-assisted mass spectrometry for the acceleration of reaction discovery and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pardo, Jaime R.; Chai, David I.; Liu, Song; Mrksich, Milan; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of new reactions expands our knowledge of chemical reactivity and enables new synthetic applications. Accelerating the pace of this discovery process remains challenging. We describe a highly effective and simple platform for screening a large number of potential chemical reactions in order to discover and optimize previously unknown catalytic transformations, thereby revealing new chemical reactivity. Our strategy is based on labelling one of the reactants with a polyaromatic chemical tag, which selectively undergoes a photoionization/desorption process upon laser irradiation, without the assistance of an external matrix, and enables rapid mass spectrometric detection of any products originating from such labelled reactants in complex reaction mixtures without any chromatographic separation. This method was successfully used for high-throughput discovery and subsequent optimization of two previously unknown benzannulation reactions.

  14. Development of an extraction method for the determination of dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Togawa, Orihiko; Amano, Hikaru

    2009-01-01

    We developed an extraction method for accurately and reproducibly determining dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by ultraviolet oxidation of dissolved organic carbon and subsequent accelerator mass spectrometry. We determined the irradiation time required for oxidation of the dissolved organic carbon. By modifying the experimental apparatus, we decreased contamination by dead carbon, which came mainly from petrochemical products in the apparatus and from the incursion of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The modifications decreased the analytical blank level to less than 1% of sample size, a percentage that had not previously been achieved. The recovery efficiency was high, 95±1%. To confirm both the accuracy and reproducibility of the method, we tested it by analyzing an oxalic acid radiocarbon reference material and by determining the dissolved organic carbon in surface seawater samples. (author)

  15. First accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates documenting contemporaneity of nonanalog species in late Pleistocene mammal communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Semken, H.A. Jr.; Graham, R.W.; Klippel, W.F.; Markova, A.; Smirnov, N.G.; Southon, J.

    1999-10-01

    Worldwide late Pleistocene terrestrial mammal faunas are characterized by stratigraphic associations of species that now have exclusive geographic ranges. These have been interpreted as either taphonomically mixed or representative of communities that no longer exist. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates (n = 60) on single bones of stratigraphically associated fossil micromammals from two American and two Russian sites document for the first time that currently allopatric mammals occurred together between 12,000 and 22,000 yr B.P. on two continents. The existence of mammal communities without modern analogs demonstrates that Northern Hemisphere biological communities are ephemeral and that many modern biomes are younger than 12 ka. Future climate change may result in new nonanalog communities.

  16. Ultra-trace determination of neptunium-237 and plutonium isotopes in urine samples by compact accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, X.; Christl, M.; Kramer-Tremblay, S., E-mail: sheila.kramer-tremblay@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Synal, H-A. [ETH Zurich, Lab. of Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Ultra-trace analysis of actinides, such as Pu isotopes and {sup 237}Np, in bioassay samples is often needed for radiation protection programs at nuclear facilities. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), particularly the compact ETH Zurich system “Tandy”, has evolved over the years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analysis. Employment of the AMS technique can reduce the demands on sample preparation chemistry and increase sample analysis throughput, due to very low instrumental detection limit, high rejection of interferences, and low susceptibility to adverse sample matrices. Initial research and development tests were performed to explore and demonstrate the analytical capability of AMS for Pu and Np urine bioassay. In this study, urine samples spiked with femtogram levels of Np and Pu isotopes were prepared and measured using compact ETH AMS system and the results showed excellent analytical capability for measuring Np and Pu isotopes at femtogram/litre levels in urine. (author)

  17. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in Kara Sea and Novaya Zemlya sediments using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.; Skipperud, L.; Salbu, B.; Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.C.; Day, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used to determine Pu activity concentrations and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratios in sediments from the Kara Sea and radioactive waste dumping sites at Novaya Zemlya. Measured 239,240 Pu activities ranged from 0.06 - 9.8 Bq/kg dry weight, 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.13 to 0.28, and 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu activity ratios from 0.02 to 0.6. Perturbations from global fallout isotope ratios were evident at three sites: the Yenisey Estuary and Abrosimov Fjords where 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios were lower (0.13-0.14); and Stepovogo Fjord sediments where ratios were higher (up to 0.28) than fallout ratios. Based on procedural blanks, detection limits for AMS were below 1 fg Pu and the method showed good precision for isotope ratio measurements, minimal matrix, interference and memory effects. For high level samples, comparison between alpha spectrometry and AMS gave good agreement for measurement of 239,240 Pu activity concentrations. (author)

  18. Determination of long-lived radionuclide (10Be, 41Ca, 129I) concentrations in nuclear waste by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bertaux, Maite; Bourles, Didier; Arnold, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste is essential for storage sites management. However, most of Long-Lived Radionuclides (LLRN), important for long-term management, are difficult to measure since concentration levels are very low and waste matrices generally complex. In an industrial approach, LLRN concentrations are not directly measured in waste samples but assessed from scaling factors with respect to easily measured gamma emitters. Ideally, the key nuclide chosen ( 60 Co, 137 Cs) should be produced by a similar mechanism (fission or activation) as the LLRN of interest and should have similar physicochemical properties. However, the uncertainty on the scaling factors, determined from experimental and/or calculation data, can be quite important. Consequently, studies are performed to develop analytical procedures which would lead to determine precisely the concentration of LLRN in nuclear waste. In this context, the aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of three LLRN: 129 I (T 1/2 = 15.7*10 6 a), 41 Ca (T 1/2 = 9.94*10 4 a) and 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.387*10 6 a) in spent resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurized Water Reactors using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for measurement. The AMS technique combined mass spectrometry and nuclear physics to achieve highly efficient molecular and elemental isobars separation. Energies of several Million Electron-Volt transferred to the ions in the first accelerating part of specifically developed tandem accelerators lead to molecular isobars destruction through interaction with the argon gas used to strip the injected negative ions to positive ones. At the exit of the tandem accelerator, the energy acquired in both accelerating parts allows an elemental isobars separation based on their significantly different energy loss (dE) while passing through a thickness of matter dx that is proportional to their atomic number (Z) and inversely proportional to ions velocity (v) according to the

  19. {sup 14} C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator; Datacao por {sup 14} C utilizando espectrometria de massa com acelerador de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: paulogom@if.uff.br; Yokoyama, Y. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Science; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1999-03-01

    The different aspects concerning the {sup 14} C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of {sup 14} C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  20. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Accelerated identification of proteins by mass spectrometry by employing covalent pre-gel staining with Uniblue A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Mata-Gómez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is a standard method in biopharmaceutical quality control and biochemical research. Prior to identification by mass spectrometry, proteins are usually pre-separated by electrophoresis. However, current protein staining and de-staining protocols are tedious and time consuming, and therefore prolong the sample preparation time for mass spectrometry. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a 1-minute covalent pre-gel staining protocol for proteins, which does not require de-staining before the mass spectrometry analysis. We investigated the electrophoretic properties of derivatized proteins and peptides and studied their behavior in mass spectrometry. Further, we elucidated the preferred reaction of proteins with Uniblue A and demonstrate the integration of the peptide derivatization into typical informatics tools. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The Uniblue A staining method drastically speeds up the sample preparation for the mass spectrometry based identification of proteins. The application of this chemo-proteomic strategy will be advantageous for routine quality control of proteins and for time-critical tasks in protein analysis.

  2. Glycomics using mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an increasingly important role in structural glycomics. This review provides an overview on currently used mass spectrometric approaches such as the characterization of glycans, the analysis of glycopeptides obtained by proteolytic cleavage of proteins and the analysis of glycosphingolipids. The given examples are demonstrating the application of mass spectrometry to study glycosylation changes associated with congenital disorders of glycosylation, lysosomal storage di...

  3. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  4. Speciation analysis of 129I in seawater using coprecipitation and accelerator mass spectrometry and its applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Shan; Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala

    2017-01-01

    Speciation analysis of long-lived 129I in seawater can provide useful information on the source of water masses. This paper presents an improved method for speciation analysis of 129I based on coprecipitation of iodide as AgI with Ag2SO3 and AgCl. By adding a small amount of 127I carrier...

  5. Potential of gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) in flavor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Laurent B; Newton, Anthony; Simian, Hervé; Robert, Fabien; Douce, David; Hancock, Peter; Green, Martin; Blank, Imre

    2003-04-23

    Gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) is an emerging technique offering a straightforward access to a resolving power up to 7000. This paper deals with the use of GC-oaTOFMS to identify the flavor components of a complex seafood flavor extract and to quantify furanones formed in model Maillard reactions. A seafood extract was selected as a representative example for complex food flavors and was previously analyzed using GC-quadrupole MS, leaving several molecules unidentified. GC-oaTOFMS analysis was focused on these unknowns to evaluate its potential in flavor research, particularly for determining exact masses. N-Methyldithiodimethylamine, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and tetrahydro-2,4-dimethyl-4H-pyrrolo[2,1-d]-1,3,5-dithiazine were successfully identified on the basis of the precise mass determination of their molecular ions and their major fragments. A second set of experiments was performed to test the capabilities of the GC-oaTOFMS for quantification. Calibration curves were found to be linear over a dynamic range of 10(3) for the quantification of furanones. The quantitative data obtained using GC-oaTOFMS confirmed earlier results that the formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone was favored in the xylose/glycine model reaction and 2(or 5)-ethyl-4-hydroxy-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone in the xylose/alanine model reaction. It was concluded that GC-oaTOFMS may become a powerful analytical tool for the flavor chemist for both identification and quantification purposes, the latter in particular when combined with stable isotope dilution assay.

  6. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  7. Quality of Graphite Target for Biological/Biomedical/Environmental Applications of 14C-Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic graphitization for 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) produced various forms of elemental carbon. Our high-throughput Zn reduction method (C/Fe = 1:5, 500 °C, 3 h) produced the AMS target of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP), a mix of nongraphitic carbon and Fe3C. Crystallinity of the AMS targets of GCIP (nongraphitic carbon) was increased to turbostratic carbon by raising the C/Fe ratio from 1:5 to 1:1 and the graphitization temperature from 500 to 585 °C. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon had a large isotopic fractionation and a low AMS ion current. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon also yielded less accurate/precise 14C-AMS measurements because of the lower graphitization yield and lower thermal conductivity that were caused by the higher C/Fe ratio of 1:1. On the other hand, the AMS target of GCIP containing nongraphitic carbon had higher graphitization yield and better thermal conductivity over the AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon due to optimal surface area provided by the iron powder. Finally, graphitization yield and thermal conductivity were stronger determinants (over graphite crystallinity) for accurate/precise/high-throughput biological, biomedical, and environmental14C-AMS applications such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination (ADME), and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) of nutrients, drugs, phytochemicals, and environmental chemicals. PMID:20163100

  8. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-01

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B 12 . Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B 12 is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of 14 C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ( 14 C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B 12 in the range of normal dietary intake. The B 12 used was quantitatively labeled with 14 C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B 12 or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with 14 C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced 14 C-B 12 of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified 14 C-B 12 was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B 12 assimilation

  9. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  10. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  11. Pediatric microdose study of [(14)C]paracetamol to study drug metabolism using accelerated mass spectrometry: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; van Duijn, Esther; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Windhorst, Albert D; Hendrikse, N Harry; Vaes, Wouter H J; Spaans, Edwin; Fabriek, Babs O; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Hanff, Lidwien M; Janssen, Paul J J M; Koch, Birgit C P; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by practical, ethical, and scientific challenges. Microdosing is a promising new method to obtain pharmacokinetic data in children with minimal burden and minimal risk. The use of a labeled oral microdose offers the added benefit to study intestinal and hepatic drug disposition in children already receiving an intravenous therapeutic drug dose for clinical reasons. The objective of this study was to present pilot data of an oral [(14)C]paracetamol [acetaminophen (AAP)] microdosing study as proof of concept to study developmental pharmacokinetics in children. In an open-label microdose pharmacokinetic pilot study, infants (0-6 years of age) received a single oral [(14)C]AAP microdose (3.3 ng/kg, 60 Bq/kg) in addition to intravenous therapeutic doses of AAP (15 mg/kg intravenous every 6 h). Blood samples were taken from an indwelling catheter. AAP blood concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and [(14)C]AAP and metabolites ([(14)C]AAP-Glu and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Ten infants (aged 0.1-83.1 months) were included; one was excluded as he vomited shortly after administration. In nine patients, [(14)C]AAP and metabolites in blood samples were detectable at expected concentrations: median (range) maximum concentration (C max) [(14)C]AAP 1.68 (0.75-4.76) ng/L, [(14)C]AAP-Glu 0.88 (0.34-1.55) ng/L, and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul 0.81 (0.29-2.10) ng/L. Dose-normalized oral [(14)C]AAP C max approached median intravenous average concentrations (C av): 8.41 mg/L (3.75-23.78 mg/L) and 8.87 mg/L (3.45-12.9 mg/L), respectively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a [(14)C]labeled microdose to study AAP pharmacokinetics, including metabolite disposition, in young children.

  12. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  13. A comparative study of 129I content in environmental standard materials IAEA-375, NIST SRM 4354 and NIST SRM 4357 by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, John; Adamic, Mary; Snyder, Darin; Brookhart, Jacob; Hahn, Paula; Watrous, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Iodine environmental measurements have consistently been backed up in the literature by standard materials like IAEA-375, Chernobyl Soil. There are not many other sources of a certified reference material for 129I content for mass spectrometry measurements. Some that have been found in the literature include NIST-4354 and NIST-4357. They are still available at the time of this writing. They don’t have certified content or isotopic values. There has been some work in the literature to show that iodine is present, but there hasn’t been enough to establish a consensus value. These materials have been analyzed at INL through two separate mass spectrometry techniques. They involve a combustion method of the starting material in oxygen, followed by TIMS analysis and a leaching preparation analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry. Combustion/TIMS preparation of NIST SRM-4354 resulted in a 129I/127I ratio of 1.92 x 10-6 which agrees with AMS measurements which measured the 129I/127I ratio to be 1.93 x 10-6.

  14. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (4). 7. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry for drug development. Human mass balance studies at discovery stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, Teiji

    2005-01-01

    Following the recent trend of Position Paper issued from European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products on the non-clinical safety studies to support clinical trials with a single micro dose, human mass balance studies at discovery stages were made with special interest in using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) with a small amount of hot (radioisotope-labeled) drug. This method was found to be effective for the purpose of screening in the clinical study for pharmaceutical development. To show an example of the test, 5, 50, 500μg/body of C14-ARA (α1A adrenoreceptor antagonist, 50 nCi or 1.85 kBq/body/dose) were given (cross over) to several persons to be inspected and C14-quantity in the blood plasma or urine was determined with AMS until after 168 hours or so. The results of the present experiment demonstrate that human mass balance study at discovery stages is possible with ultra high sensitive measuring systems such as AMS and PET (positron emission tomography). (S. Ohno)

  15. 26Al tracer experiment by accelerator mass spectrometry and its application to the studies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Hosoyama, Yoshiyuki; Imamura, Mineo; Masuzawa, Shin-ichirou; Koizumi, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for 26 Al tracer experiment to study the aluminum toxicity and metabolism in rats. To investigate the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease, the aluminum incorporation into the brain (cerebrum) was studied by AMS using 26 Al as a tracer. When 26 Al was intraperitoneally injected into rats, a considerable amount of 26 Al was incorporated into the cerebrum after 5-35 days of the injection. (author)

  16. Tracing discharges of plutonium and technetium from nuclear processing plants by ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.; Hausladen, P.A.; Cresswell, R.G.; Di Tada, M.L.; Day, J.P.; Carling, R.S.; Oughton, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Historical discharges of plutonium from the Russian nuclear processing plant at Mayak in the Urals have been traced in sediments, soils and river water using ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium isotopes by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Significant advantages of AMS over other techniques are its very high sensitivity. which is presently ∼10 6 atoms (1 μBq), and its ability to determine the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio. The latter is a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium, being very low (1-2%) for weapons grade plutonium, and higher (∼ 20%) for plutonium from civil reactors or fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Since this ratio has changed significantly over the years of discharges from Mayak, a measurement can provide important information about the source of plutonium at a particular location. Similar measurements have been performed on samples from the Kara Sea which contains a graveyard of nuclear submarines from the former Soviet Union. AMS techniques have also been developed for detection of 99 Tc down to levels of a few femtograms. This isotope is one of the most prolific fission products and has a very long half-life of 220 ka. Hundreds of kg have been discharged from the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield in the UK. While there may be public health issues associated with these discharges which can be addressed with AMS, these discharges may also constitute a valuable oceanographic tracer experiment in this climatically-important region of the world's oceans. Applications to date have included a human uptake study to assess long-term retention of 99 Tc in the body, and a survey of seaweeds from northern Europe to establish a baseline for a future oceanographic study

  17. Long-lived radionuclides as chronometers and tracers of environmental processes at the Xi'an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Hou, X.; Du, Y.; Kong, X.; Cheng, P.; Zhang, L.; Fan, Y.; Zhang, L.; Niu, Z.; Dong, G.; Chen, N.; Li, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides with half-lives ranging from 103 to 108 years have wide applications in geochronology and environmental tracer studies. A wide range of climatic, geologic, and environmental records preserved in diverse natural archives can be characterized by measuring their concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Relying on the operation of the Xi'an 3 MV multi-element AMS since 2006, multi-radionuclides such as 14C, 10Be, 26Al, and 129I have been widely used for the above studies. Here some representative works on the four radionuclides can be briefly summarized as (1) we have successfully obtained temporal and spatial distribution of fossil fuel CO2 in certain cities in China by analyzing Δ14C from atmospheric CO2 and one year growth plants respectively, providing direct scientific data for government's emission cutting policy; (2) we have mathematically disentangled geomagnetic field and precipitation signals in Chinese loess 10Be, and firstly confirmed that the timing of Brunhes-Matuyama (B/M) reversal in loess was synchronous with that of marine sediments; (3) we have explored the paired in situ 10Be and 26Al double dating methodology for exposure dating, which has been successfully applied in fluvial terraces investigations in Tibet and glacial evolution tracing in East Antarctica; and (4) we have evaluated the radiation risk after Fukushima nuclear accident based on the 129I observation. All the above mentioned progress has opened up the new directions in AMS applications and we hope to show more new results in the near future.

  18. Kinetics of carboplatin-DNA binding in genomic DNA and bladder cancer cells as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, S S; Stivers, K M; Vere White, R; Henderson, P T

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum-based drugs that are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The cytotoxicity of these drugs is mediated by platinum-DNA monoadducts and intra- and interstrand diadducts, which are formed following uptake of the drug into the nucleus of cells. The pharmacodynamics of carboplatin display fewer side effects than for cisplatin, albeit with less potency, which may be due to differences in rates of DNA adduct formation. We report the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a sensitive detection method often used for radiocarbon quantitation, to measure both the kinetics of [ 14 C]carboplatin-DNA adduct formation with genomic DNA and drug uptake and DNA binding in T24 human bladder cancer cells. Only carboplatin-DNA monoadducts contain radiocarbon in the platinated DNA, which allowed for calculation of kinetic rates and concentrations within the system. The percent of radiocarbon bound to salmon sperm DNA in the form of monoadducts was measured by AMS over 24 h. Knowledge of both the starting concentration of the parent carboplatin and the concentration of radiocarbon in the DNA at a variety of time points allowed calculation of the rates of Pt-DNA monoadduct formation and conversion to toxic cross-links. Importantly, the rate of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation was approximately 100-fold slower than that reported for the more potent cisplatin analogue, which may explain the lower toxicity of carboplatin. T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological dose of [ 14 C]carboplatin, and the rate of accumulation of radiocarbon in the cells and nuclear DNA was measured by AMS. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1 amol/10 (micro)g of DNA. This sensitivity may allow the method to be used for clinical applications

  19. Kinetics of carboplatin-DNA binding in genomic DNA and bladder cancer cells as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hah, S S; Stivers, K M; Vere White, R; Henderson, P T

    2005-12-29

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum-based drugs that are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The cytotoxicity of these drugs is mediated by platinum-DNA monoadducts and intra- and interstrand diadducts, which are formed following uptake of the drug into the nucleus of cells. The pharmacodynamics of carboplatin display fewer side effects than for cisplatin, albeit with less potency, which may be due to differences in rates of DNA adduct formation. We report the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a sensitive detection method often used for radiocarbon quantitation, to measure both the kinetics of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin-DNA adduct formation with genomic DNA and drug uptake and DNA binding in T24 human bladder cancer cells. Only carboplatin-DNA monoadducts contain radiocarbon in the platinated DNA, which allowed for calculation of kinetic rates and concentrations within the system. The percent of radiocarbon bound to salmon sperm DNA in the form of monoadducts was measured by AMS over 24 h. Knowledge of both the starting concentration of the parent carboplatin and the concentration of radiocarbon in the DNA at a variety of time points allowed calculation of the rates of Pt-DNA monoadduct formation and conversion to toxic cross-links. Importantly, the rate of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation was approximately 100-fold slower than that reported for the more potent cisplatin analogue, which may explain the lower toxicity of carboplatin. T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological dose of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin, and the rate of accumulation of radiocarbon in the cells and nuclear DNA was measured by AMS. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1 amol/10 {micro}g of DNA. This sensitivity may allow the method to be used for clinical applications.

  20. Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Industrial partner projects focus on big, complex challenges and opportunities like smart grid, weather forecasting for renewable energy sources, alternative energy...

  1. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2000-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  2. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, A T

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references

  3. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-07

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value 2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, S.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2009-01-01

    With this book we want to illustrate how two quickly growing fields of instrumentation and technology, both applied to life sciences, mass spectrometry and microfluidics (or microfabrication) naturally came to meet at the end of the last century and how this marriage impacts on several types of

  5. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  6. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  7. Observational infant exploratory [14C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Colin R; Park, Kevin B; French, Neil S; Earnshaw, Caroline; Schipani, Alessandro; Selby, Andrew M; Byrne, Lindsay; Siner, Sarah; Crawley, Francis P; Vaes, Wouter H J; van Duijn, Esther; deLigt, Rianne; Varendi, Heili; Lass, Jane; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Maruszak, Wioletta; Turner, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to compare [14C]-paracetamol ([14C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0–2 year old age group. Methods [14C]-PARA concentrations in 10–15 µl plasma samples were measured after enteral or i.v. administration of a single [14C]-PARA microdose or mixed in with therapeutic dose in infants receiving PARA as part of their therapeutic regimen. Results Thirty-four infants were included in the PARA PK analysis for this study: oral microdose (n = 4), i.v. microdose (n = 6), oral therapeutic (n = 6) and i.v. therapeutic (n = 18). The respective mean clearance (CL) values (SDs in parentheses) for these dosed groups were 1.46 (1.00) l h–1, 1.76 (1.07) l h–1, 2.93 (2.08) l h–1 and 2.72 (3.10) l h–1, t1/2 values 2.65 h, 2.55 h, 8.36 h and 7.16 h and dose normalized AUC(0-t) (mg l–1 h) values were 0.90 (0.43), 0.84 (0.57), 0.7 (0.79) and 0.54 (0.26). Conclusions All necessary ethical, scientific, clinical and regulatory procedures were put in place to conduct PK studies using enteral and systemic microdosing in two European centres. The pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose (mg kg–1) and a microdose (ng kg–1) in babies between 35 to 127 weeks post-menstrual age. [14C]-PARA pharmacokinetic parameters were within a two-fold range after a therapeutic dose or a microdose. Exploratory studies using doses significantly less than therapeutic doses may offer ethical and safety advantages with increased bionalytical sensitivity in selected exploratory paediatric pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:25619398

  8. Observational infant exploratory [(14)C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Colin R; Park, Kevin B; French, Neil S; Earnshaw, Caroline; Schipani, Alessandro; Selby, Andrew M; Byrne, Lindsay; Siner, Sarah; Crawley, Francis P; Vaes, Wouter H J; van Duijn, Esther; deLigt, Rianne; Varendi, Heili; Lass, Jane; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Maruszak, Wioletta; Turner, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    The aims of the study were to compare [(14)C]-paracetamol ([(14)C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0-2 year old age group. [(14)C]-PARA concentrations in 10-15 µl plasma samples were measured after enteral or i.v. administration of a single [(14)C]-PARA microdose or mixed in with therapeutic dose in infants receiving PARA as part of their therapeutic regimen. Thirty-four infants were included in the PARA PK analysis for this study: oral microdose (n = 4), i.v. microdose (n = 6), oral therapeutic (n = 6) and i.v. therapeutic (n = 18). The respective mean clearance (CL) values (SDs in parentheses) for these dosed groups were 1.46 (1.00) l h(-1), 1.76 (1.07) l h(-1), 2.93 (2.08) l h(-1) and 2.72 (3.10) l h(-1), t(1/2) values 2.65 h, 2.55 h, 8.36 h and 7.16 h and dose normalized AUC(0-t) (mg l(-1) h) values were 0.90 (0.43), 0.84 (0.57), 0.7 (0.79) and 0.54 (0.26). All necessary ethical, scientific, clinical and regulatory procedures were put in place to conduct PK studies using enteral and systemic microdosing in two European centres. The pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose (mg kg(-1)) and a microdose (ng kg(-1)) in babies between 35 to 127 weeks post-menstrual age. [(14)C]-PARA pharmacokinetic parameters were within a two-fold range after a therapeutic dose or a microdose. Exploratory studies using doses significantly less than therapeutic doses may offer ethical and safety advantages with increased bionalytical sensitivity in selected exploratory paediatric pharmacokinetic studies. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Analysis of 14C-bearing compounds released by the corrosion of irradiated steel using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, B Z; Salazar, G; Kunz, D; Szidat, S; Wieland, E

    2018-06-25

    The combination of ion chromatography (IC) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed to determine the speciation of 14C-(radiocarbon) bearing organic compounds in the femto to pico molar concentration range. The development of this compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of carboxylic acids is reported and the application of the method on a leaching solution from neutron-irradiated steel is demonstrated. The background and the dynamic range of the AMS-based method were quantified. On using 14C-labelled standards, the measurements demonstrate the repeatability of the analytical method and the reproducible recovery of the main target carboxylic acids (i.e., acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate). The detection limit was determined to be in the mid fmol 14C per L level while the dynamic range of the analytical method covers three orders of magnitude from the low fmol to the mid pmol 14C per L level. Cross contamination was found to be negligible during IC fractionation and was accounted for during eluate processing and 14C detection by AMS. The 14C-bearing carboxylates released from an irradiated steel nut into an alkaline leaching solution were analysed using the CSRA-based analytical method with the aim to check the applicability of the approach and develop appropriate sample preparation. The concentrations of 14C-bearing formate and acetate, the main organic corrosion products, were at a low pmol 14C per L level for convenient dimensions of the alkaline leaching experiment which demonstrates that compound-specific 14C AMS is an extremely sensitive analytical method for analysing 14C-bearing compounds. The content of total organic 14C in solution (TO14C) determined by the direct measurement of an aliquot of the leaching solution agrees well with the sum of the 14C concentrations of the individual carboxylates within the uncertainty of the data. Furthermore, the TO14C content is in good agreement with the calculated value using the corrosion rate

  10. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B V; Clarke, M; Hu, H; Betz, [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  13. Analysis of vitamin K-1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K-1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass...... spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot...

  14. sup 26 Al tracer experiment by accelerator mass spectrometry and its application to the studies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Koichi (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology); Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Hosoyama, Yoshiyuki; Imamura, Mineo; Masuzawa, Shin-ichirou; Koizumi, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    1990-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for {sup 26}Al tracer experiment to study the aluminum toxicity and metabolism in rats. To investigate the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease, the aluminum incorporation into the brain (cerebrum) was studied by AMS using {sup 26}Al as a tracer. When {sup 26}Al was intraperitoneally injected into rats, a considerable amount of {sup 26}Al was incorporated into the cerebrum after 5-35 days of the injection. (author).

  15. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is given of the functional elements of a mass spectrometer and of some currently employed mass spectrometric techniques, such as combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, mass chromatography, and selected ion monitoring. Various areas of application of mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry are discussed, such as inborn errors of metabolism and other metabolic disorders, intoxications, quantitative determinations of drugs, hormones, gases, and trace elements, and the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a definitive method for the establishment of true values for concentrations of various compounds in reference sera. It is concluded that mass spectrometry is of great value in clinical chemistry. (Auth.)

  16. Verification of the sputter-generated {sup 32}SF{sub n}{sup −} (n = 1–6) anions by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, R.G.; Surendran, P. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Sanjay [Physics Department, Agra College Agra, Agra 282002 (India); Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hemalatha, M. [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098 (India); Thomas, R.G.; Mahata, K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kailas, S. [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098 (India); Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gupta, A.K., E-mail: anit@tifr.res.in [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have performed systematic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements at our ion source test set up and have demonstrated that gas phase {sup 32}SF{sub n}{sup −} (n = 1–6) anions for all size ‘n’ can be readily generated from a variety of surfaces undergoing Cs{sup +} ion sputtering in the presence of high purity SF{sub 6} gas by employing the gas spray-cesium sputter technique. In our SIMS measurements, the isotopic yield ratio {sup 34}SF{sub n}{sup −}/{sup 32}SF{sub n}{sup −} (n = 1–6) was found to be close to its natural abundance but not for all size ‘n’. In order to gain further insight into the constituents of these molecular anions, ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were conducted with the most abundant {sup 32}SF{sub n}{sup −} (n = 1–6) anions, at BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron accelerator. The results from these measurements are discussed in this paper.

  17. Tandem mass spectrometry at low kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooks, R.G.; Hand, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in mass spectrometry, as applied to molecular analysis, is reviewed with emphasis on tandem mass spectrometry. Tandem instruments use multiple analyzers (sector magnets, quadrupole mass filters and time-of-flight devices) to select particular molecules in ionic form, react them in the gas-phase and then record the mass, momenta or kinetic energies of their products. The capabilities of tandem mass spectrometry for identification of individual molecules or particular classes of compounds in complex mixtures are illustrated. Several different types of experiments can be run using a tandem mass spectrometer; all share the feature of sifting the molecular mixture being analyzed on the basis of chemical properties expressed in terms of ionic mass, kinetic energy or charge state. Applications of mass spectrometry to biological problems often depend upon desorption methods of ionization in which samples are bombarded with particle beams. Evaporation of preformed charged species from the condensed phase into the vacuum is a particularly effective method of ionization. It is suggested that the use of accelerator mass spectrometers be extended to include problems of molecular analysis. In such experiments, low energy tandem mass spectrometry conducted in the eV or keV range of energies, would be followed by further characterization of the production ion beam using high selective MeV collision processes

  18. Mass spectrometry of long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine.

    2003-01-01

    spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry for the determination of long-lived radionuclides in quite different materials

  19. Preface Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; le Gac, Severine; le Gac, S.; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry illustrates this trend and focuses on one particular analysis technique, mass spectrometry whose popularity has "dramatically" increased in the last two decades with the explosion of the field of biological analysis and the development of two "soft" ionization

  20. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, A.L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes some aspects of Negative Chemical Ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The reasons for the growing interest in NCI are: (i) to extend the basic knowledge of negative ions and their reactions in the gas phase; (ii) to investigate whether or not this knowledge of negative ions can be used successfully to elucidate the structure of molecules by mass spectrometry. (Auth.)

  1. Geomagnetic reversals, polar ice and cosmic spherules: some recent measurements with a small dedicated accelerator mass-spectrometry facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed techniques for measuring the cosmogenic isotopes 10 Be (half-life 1.5 Ma) and 26 Al (716 ka) by using a small (ca. 2.2 MV) dedicated accelerator mass spectrometer facility. Three recent applications of such measurements are as follows. 1. 10 Be has been measured in marine-sediment cores at levels corresponding to three recent geomagnetic reversals. We observe an increase in 10 Be production at each of these times. The results give information on the form and length of the geomagnetic intensity changes during a reversal, and the level at which magnetic remanence is acquired in the sediments. 2. 10 Be has been measured over a 2083 m ice core, corresponding to the last climatic cycle, recovered from Vostok, Antarctica. The results suggest that the precipitation rate during the last Ice Age was about half of its present rate. There are also some indications of fairly rapid 10 Be production changes. 3. 10 Be and 26 Al have been measured in 'cosmic spherules' (small round objects, ca. 500 μm diameter) recovered in deep-sea sediments and in melt lakes on Greenland ice. The results confirm an extraterrestrial origin for such objects, as well as indicating that the parent bodies of most of them were irradiated in space as small (less than 1 cm) objects. These spherules thus very probably represent cometary debris. (author)

  2. Accurate determination of 129I, 41Ca and 10Be long-lived radionuclides concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli-Lepage, E.

    2013-01-01

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste is essential for the management of storage sites. More particularly, determining the concentration of Long-Lived Radionuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long term management. This study focuses on the determination of three LLRN concentrations, i.e. 129 I (T 1/2 = 15.7*10 6 a), 41 Ca (T 1/2 = 9.94*10 4 a) and 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.387*10 6 a), in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). To benefit from the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique allowing to measure extremely low levels of nuclide concentrations, analytical procedures including: 1) sample dissolution; 2) selective and quantitative extraction of the analyte; and, 3) analyte conditioning for AMS measurements, were developed. Applied on spent resin samples collected at a 900 MW PWR, the procedures developed for each studied LLRN allowed their quantitative recovery and their selective extraction from β-γ emitters and isobars. The concentration measurements of the LLRN of interest were then performed on the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry national facility ASTER housed by the Centre Europeen de Recherche et d'Enseignement des Geosciences de l'Environnement (CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence). 129 I, 41 Ca and 10 Be concentrations in spent resins were measured to be about 10 ng/g, 20 pg/g and 4 ng/g of dry resin, respectively. Considering 129 I and 41 Ca, the measured concentrations agree with those assessed from scaling factors established relatively to easily measured gamma emitters ( 137 Cs and 60 Co). For 10 Be, the presented results are significantly different from expected values but are in agreement with previous ICP-MS results. (author) [fr

  3. Ultra-sensitive radionuclide spectrometry. Radiometrics and mass spectrometry synergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in radiometrics and mass spectrometry techniques for ultra-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment are reviewed. In the radiometrics sector the dominant development has been the utilization of large HPGe detectors in underground laboratories with anti-cosmic or anti-Compton shielding for the analysis of short and medium-lived radionuclides in the environment. In the mass spectrometry sector, applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the analysis of long-lived radionuclides in the environment are the most important recent achievements. The recent developments do not only considerably decrease the detection limits for several radionuclides (up to several orders of magnitude), but they also enable to decrease sample volumes so that sampling, e.g., of the water column can be much easier and more effective. A comparison of radiometrics and mass spectrometry results for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment shows a reasonable agreement - within quoted uncertainties, for wide range of activities and different sample matrices analyzed. (author)

  4. Imaging mass spectrometry statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emrys A; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Deelder, André M; McDonnell, Liam A

    2012-08-30

    Imaging mass spectrometry is increasingly used to identify new candidate biomarkers. This clinical application of imaging mass spectrometry is highly multidisciplinary: expertise in mass spectrometry is necessary to acquire high quality data, histology is required to accurately label the origin of each pixel's mass spectrum, disease biology is necessary to understand the potential meaning of the imaging mass spectrometry results, and statistics to assess the confidence of any findings. Imaging mass spectrometry data analysis is further complicated because of the unique nature of the data (within the mass spectrometry field); several of the assumptions implicit in the analysis of LC-MS/profiling datasets are not applicable to imaging. The very large size of imaging datasets and the reporting of many data analysis routines, combined with inadequate training and accessible reviews, have exacerbated this problem. In this paper we provide an accessible review of the nature of imaging data and the different strategies by which the data may be analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the assumptions of the data analysis routines to ensure that the reader is apprised of their correct usage in imaging mass spectrometry research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a method to measure the concentration of 14C in the stack air of nuclear power plants by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, K.; Erlandsson, B.; Hellborg, R.; Haakansson, K.; Wiebert, A.; Skog, G.

    1993-04-01

    C-14, a pure low-energetic beta-emitter, is produced through various nuclear reactions in nuclear power plants. Some of this C-14 is air-borne and is transported via the ventilation system through the stack of the power station and is integrated in living matter in the surroundings of the plant. The long half-life of the isotope (T1/2=5730 years) and the biological importance of carbon may lead to a not negligible contribution of the radiation dose for those living in the neighbourhood of nuclear power plants. C-14 has earlier been measured radiometrically with mainly two different methods, using proportional counters or liquid scintillators. In this report a new method is described, using an accelerator based technique. accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This technique has at least three advantages over the radiometrical methods. It requires only a few litres of gas per sample, which is 100-1000 times less compared to the radiometrical methods. It is insensitive to the beta and gamma rays from other radioactive isotopes in the stack air. The measuring time with AMS, about 20 minutes per sample, is considerably shorter compared to the radiometrical methods, which demand several hours per sample. The integrity of the AMS method is high and it might be convenient for regulatory supervision. (22 refs.)

  6. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  7. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (4). VI. Use of Accelerator mass spectrometry in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Non-clinical and clinical uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are described mainly on studies of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics from a view of new drug development. AMS is applicable as a highly sensitive method to measure plasma drug concentrations. Measurement of 14 C-labeled compounds less than 1 dpm/sample or of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), in combination of AMS and radioimmunoassay without radioactive waste release is described as an example. Cases of measuring DNA-adduct are also described involving human studies using 14 C-mutagen (a quinoxaline derivative derived from burned amino acid, given in a microdose of 304 ng/kg, 4.3 μCi/body). Plasma concentration measurement, mass balance study and metabolite identification of 14 C-GI1817771 (a drug candidate) are a typical AMS application for a pharmacokinetic study in human in a microdose (121 Bq/body). Metabolites of 14 C-compound A in rat platelet are identified by the author. As above, AMS makes it possible to conduct the pharmacokinetic study in human at a microdose with no significant radiation exposure, which will promote the efficient new drug development. (N.I.)

  8. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  10. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  11. An effective method of UV-oxidation of dissolved organic carbon in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuejun; Ge, Tiantian; Wang, Xuchen

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a very powerful tool to study the sources, transformation and cycling of carbon in the ocean. The technique, however, remains great challenges for complete and successful oxidation of sufficient DOC with low blanks for high precision carbon isotopic ratio analysis, largely due to the overwhelming proportion of salts and low DOC concentrations in the ocean. In this paper, we report an effective UV-Oxidation method for oxidizing DOC in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The UV-oxidation system and method show 95%±4% oxidation efficiency and high reproducibility for DOC in both river and seawater samples. The blanks associated with the method was also low (about 3 µg C) that is critical for 14C analysis. As a great advantage of the method, multiple water samples can be oxidized at the same time so it reduces the sample processing time substantially compared with other UV-oxidation method currently being used in other laboratories. We have used the system and method for 14C studies of DOC in rivers, estuaries, and oceanic environments and have received promise results.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of "1"4C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and "1"4C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the "1"4C concentration in "1"4C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) – AMS system. The calibration curves of "1"4C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a "1"4C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. "1"4C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean "1"4C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of "1"4C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, "1"4C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. "1"4C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; "1"4C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of {sup 14}C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and {sup 14}C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko, E-mail: tteiko@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Yamagata University Hospital, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata-shi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi [Department of Pharmacy, Yamagata University Hospital, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata-shi, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa-machi, Yamagata-shi, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the {sup 14}C concentration in {sup 14}C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) – AMS system. The calibration curves of {sup 14}C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a {sup 14}C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. {sup 14}C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean {sup 14}C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of {sup 14}C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, {sup 14}C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. {sup 14}C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; {sup 14}C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  15. Early Upper Paleolithic chronology in the Levant: new ABOx-SC accelerator mass spectrometry results from the Mughr el-Hamamah Site, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Aaron Jonas; Shea, John J; Rech, Jason A; Pigati, Jeffrey S; Wilson, Jim; Belmaker, Miriam; Albert, Rosa Maria; Arpin, Trina; Cabanes, Dan; Clark, Jamie L; Hartman, Gideon; Hourani, Fuad; White, Chantel E; Nilsson Stutz, Liv

    2015-08-01

    Methodological developments and new paleoanthropological data remain jointly central to clarifying the timing and systemic interrelationships between the Middle-Upper Paleolithic (MP-UP) archaeological transition and the broadly contemporaneous anatomically modern human-archaic biological turnover. In the recently discovered cave site of Mughr el-Hamamah, Jordan, in situ flint artifacts comprise a diagnostic early Upper Paleolithic (EUP) assemblage. Unusually well-preserved charcoal from hearths and other anthropogenic features associated with the lithic material were subjected to acid-base-wet oxidation-stepped combustion (ABOx-SC) pretreatment. This article presents the ABOx-SC accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates on nine charcoal specimens from a single palimpsest occupation layer. Date calibration was carried out using the INTCAL13 radiocarbon calibration dataset. With the bulk of the material dating to 45-39 ka cal BP (thousands of years calibrated before present), the Mughr el-Hamamah lithic artifacts reveal important differences from penecontemporaneous sites in the region, documenting greater technological variability than previously known for this time frame in the Levant. The radiocarbon data from this EUP archaeological context highlight remaining challenges for increasing chronological precision in documenting the MP-UP transition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrologic and geochemical controls on the transport of radionuclides in natural undisturbed arid environments as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry measurements. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffee, M.W.; Finkel, R.C.; McAninch, J.E.; Nimz, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    'During FY97 this study has developed unique accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analytical techniques for measurement of 99 Tc and 129 I, which compliments an improved capability for measurement of 36 Cl. The ability to measure these nuclides in natural soil samples has been demonstrated through analytical results obtained during FY97. Methods to determine the distribution of these nuclides in their natural setting, which will vary depending on site-specific chemical conditions, have also been developed. Spatially well-characterized soil samples have been collected from the vadose zone to a depth of -5 meters at the Nevada Test Site. To do this, a deep trench has been excavated and the geological setting for the soils has been well documented. Physical, chemical, and isotopic analysis of these soil samples during the course of this research project will result in a numerical computer model for moisture and radionuclide migration in arid soils that is valuable to nuclear waste storage, site remediation, and groundwater recharge concerns.'

  17. Hints of supernova debris deposition on the lunar surface: {sup 60}Fe and {sup 53}Mn measurements by means of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fimiani, Leticia; Faestermann, Thomas; Gomez Guzman, Jose Manuel; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Herzog, Gregory; Ligon, Bret; Park, Jisun [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Rugel, Georg [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The enhanced concentration of {sup 60}Fe in a deep ocean ferro-manganese crust about (2.1±0.4) Myr old (Fitoussi et al., PRL 101, 121101 (2008)), suggests that one or more supernova (SN) explosions occurred in the vicinity of the Solar System. That observation was only possible with the ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Munich, where we are able to measure concentrations of {sup 60}Fe/Fe down to a level of 10{sup -16}. Because of its lacking atmosphere and negligible sedimentation rate, the Lunar surface is an excellent quantitative reservoir for SN debris. We searched for live {sup 60}Fe and {sup 53}Mn in samples from 3 Apollo missions. {sup 53}Mn is, similar as {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe, a tool to trace nucleosynthesis activities. It is formed primarily during the explosive silicon-burning of the inner shells of SNe via {sup 53}Fe which β-decays to {sup 53}Mn with an 8.51 min half-life. Samples where we found an enhanced {sup 60}Fe concentration showed also an enhancement of {sup 53}Mn. If confirmed, this could be the first detection of live {sup 53}Mn originating from nucleosynthesis.

  18. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  19. Eleventh ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.

    2004-10-01

    This volume deals with the latest developments in this field, exposing the innumerable applications of mass spectrometry. The topics covered include basic fundamentals of mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative aspects and data interpretation, maintenance of mass spectrometers, selection of a mass spectrometer, its applications in various branches of science as well as recent advances in mass spectrometry. Emphasis is also laid on the practical aspects of mass spectrometry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  20. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downard, K.M.; de Laeter, J.R. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. It focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important contributions to the field.

  1. Mass spectrometry in epigenetic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    cancers has gained tremendous interest in recent years, and many of these inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials. Despite intense research, however, the exact molecular mechanisms of action of these molecules remain, to a wide extent, unclear. The recent application of mass spectrometry...

  2. Mass spectrometry of large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchetti, S.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures in this volume were given at a course on mass spectrometry of large molecules, organized within the framework of the Training and Education programme of the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities. Although first presented in 1983, most of the lectures have since been updated by their authors. (orig.)

  3. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  4. Calculation of Transactinide Homolog Isotope Production Reactions Possible with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, K J; Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-29

    The LLNL heavy element group has been investigating the chemical properties of the heaviest elements over the past several years. The properties of the transactinides (elements with Z > 103) are often unknown due to their low production rates and short half-lives, which require lengthy cyclotron irradiations in order to make enough atoms for statistically significant evaluations of their chemistry. In addition, automated chemical methods are often required to perform consistent and rapid chemical separations on the order of minutes for the duration of the experiment, which can last from weeks to months. Separation methods can include extraction chromatography, liquid-liquid extraction, or gas-phase chromatography. Before a lengthy transactinide experiment can be performed at an accelerator, a large amount of preparatory work must be done both to ensure the successful application of the chosen chemical system to the transactinide chemistry problem being addressed, and to evaluate the behavior of the lighter elemental homologs in the same chemical system. Since transactinide chemistry is literally performed on one single atom, its chemical properties cannot be determined from bulk chemical matrices, but instead must be inferred from the behavior of the lighter elements that occur in its chemical group and in those of its neighboring elements. By first studying the lighter group homologs in a particular chemical system, when the same system is applied to the transactinide element under investigation, its decay properties can be directly compared to those of the homologues, thereby allowing an inference of its own chemistry. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes a 1 MV Tandem accelerator, capable of accelerating light ions such as protons to energies of roughly 15 MeV. By using the CAMS beamline, tracers of transactinide homolog elements can be produced both for development of chemical systems and

  5. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 14C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    14 C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used 14 C-breath tests: 14 C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low 14 C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform 14 C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of 14 C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: 14 C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, 14 C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, 14 C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and 14 C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the 14 C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  6. Validation of an accelerated solvent extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for Pacific ciguatoxin-1 in fish flesh and comparison with the mouse neuroblastoma assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia Jun; Mak, Yim Ling; Murphy, Margaret B; Lam, James C W; Chan, Wing Hei; Wang, Mingfu; Chan, Leo L; Lam, Paul K S

    2011-07-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a global foodborne illness caused by consumption of seafood containing ciguatoxins (CTXs) originating from dinoflagellates such as Gambierdiscus toxicus. P-CTX-1 has been suggested to be the most toxic CTX, causing ciguatera at 0.1 μg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. CTXs are structurally complex and difficult to quantify, but there is a need for analytical methods for CFP toxins in coral reef fishes to protect human health. In this paper, we describe a sensitive and rapid extraction method using accelerated solvent extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for the detection and quantification of P-CTX-1 in fish flesh. By the use of a more sensitive MS system (5500 QTRAP), the validated method has a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.01 μg/kg, linearity correlation coefficients above 0.99 for both solvent- and matrix-based standard solutions as well as matrix spike recoveries ranging from 49% to 85% in 17 coral reef fish species. Compared with previous methods, this method has better overall recovery, extraction efficiency and LOQ. Fish flesh from 12 blue-spotted groupers (Cephalopholis argus) was assessed for the presence of CTXs using HPLC-MS/MS analysis and the commonly used mouse neuroblastoma assay, and the results of the two methods were strongly correlated. This method is capable of detecting low concentrations of P-CTX-1 in fish at levels that are relevant to human health, making it suitable for monitoring of suspected ciguateric fish both in the environment and in the marketplace.

  7. Accelerated benzene polycarboxylic acid analysis by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry for the determination of petrogenic and pyrogenic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindersmann, Benjamin; Achten, Christine

    2017-08-11

    Pyrogenic carbon species are of particular interest due to their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment and their high sorption capacities for nonpolar organic compounds. It has recently been shown that the analysis of the molecular markers for complex aromatic carbon structures, benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), has a high potential for aid in the identification of different carbon sources. In this study, the first LC method using mass spectrometry (MS) for reliable and accelerated (carbon by BPCA analysis has been developed. The main advantage of LC-MS compared to previous methods is the higher sensitivity, which is important if only small sample amounts are available. Sample pre-treatment could be reduced to a minimum. Deuterated phthalic acid was introduced as internal standard due to its structural similarity to BPCA and its lack of occurrence in the environment. Linear quantification with r 2 ≥0997 was accomplished for all BPCA. Method validation showed an excellent quantification reproducibility (mean CVcarbon, large amounts of petrogenic carbon species can also be present in urban soils and river sediments, especially in mining regions. They also to a large degree consist of aromatic carbon structures and therefore have an impact on source identification by BPCA analysis. Comparison of petrogenic and pyrogenic carbon samples shows similarities in the BPCA concentrations and patterns, in their aromaticity and degree of aromatic condensation. Thus, a differentiation between petrogenic and pyrogenic carbon only by BPCA analysis of samples with unknown carbon sources is not possible. For reliable source identification of the carbon species, the combination with other methods, such as e. g. analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may be successful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aklamati, E.K.; Mulenga, M.; Dueker, S.R.; Buchholz, B.A.; Peerson, J.M.; Kafwembe, E.; Brown, K.H.; Haskell, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children 14 C 2 )-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of 14 C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting 14 C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 ± 7.1%, 76.3 ± 6.7%, and 1.9 ± 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 ± 9.5%, 71.1 ± 9.4%, and 1.8 ± 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  9. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  10. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  11. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.; Langman, Loralie J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used i...

  12. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  13. Functional genomics by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the function of genes can take place at the oligonucleotide or protein level. The latter has the advantage of being closest to function, since it is proteins that perform most of the reactions necessary for the cell. For most protein based ('proteomic') approaches to gene f...... numbers of intact proteins by mass spectrometry directly. Examples from this laboratory illustrate biological problem solving by modern mass spectrometric techniques. These include the analysis of the structure and function of the nucleolus and the analysis of signaling complexes....

  14. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R.; Blais, Jules M.; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, 7dm LR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (K d ) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g −1 dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g −1 dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL −1 in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K d

  15. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastepa, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.zastepa@gmail.com; Pick, Frances R.; Blais, Jules M.; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, {sup 7dm}LR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (K{sub d}) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g{sup −1} dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g{sup −1} dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL{sup −1} in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water

  16. The effect of different acid-treatments on the age spectrum of organic matter in sediments determined by Ramped PyrOx/accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, A. P.; Bao, R.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopes of organic matter (OM) in sediments have become common and are an effective way to understand the fate of sedimentary OM burial in the aquatic environment. In practice, obtaining the radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopic composition in sediments requires first removing inorganic carbon by acid treatment. Two common treatments are acid rinsing and fumigation. The radiocarbon ages and stable carbon isotopic values obtained using the different acid-treatments can differ significantly, but the details of the change of organic components have received much less attention. A new approach was recently developed for radiocarbon dating of carbonate -poor and/or rich sediments using a so-called ramped pyrolysis/oxidation ("Ramped PyrOx") method in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopic analysis of the CO2 that evolves under a linear temperature program allows separation of OC components in sediments based on their thermochemical stability (Rosenheim et al., 2008). In this preliminary study, we explore the utility of the Ramped PyrOx method for determining the effect of different acid-treatments on radiocarbon ages and carbon isotopic compositions of OM in sediments. The observations indicate that the HCl rinsing method alters OM more than fumigation in lower carbonate samples while the opposite occurs in the high carbonate samples. This result has implications for studies of the transfer of carbon from the terrestrial to the marine environment because these are samples that contain low amounts of carbonate material. Recommendations for the most appropriate way to treat these samples will be made. The loss of organic matter during the HCl rinsing in the marine carbonate poor sediments could be one of the reasons that radiocarbon ages in the labile thermal fractions were older than that processed by fumigation, whereas younger in the resistant thermal fractions. The distinct

  17. Determination of the Tissue Distribution and Excretion by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of the Nonadecapeptide 14C-Moli1901 in Beagle dogs after Intratracheal Instillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickert, D E; Dingley, K H; Ubick, E; Dix, K J; Molina, L

    2004-07-02

    Administration of {sup 14}C-Moli1901 (duramycin, 2622U90), a 19 amino acid polycyclic peptide by intratracheal instillation (approximately 100 {micro}g) into the left cranial lobe of the lung of beagle dogs resulted in retention of 64% of the dose in the left cranial lobe for up to 28 days. In this study, we used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify Moli901 following administration of only 0.045 {micro}Ci of {sup 14}C-Moli901 per dog. Limits of quantitation of AMS were 0.03 (urine) to 0.3 (feces) ng equiv. Moli1901/g. Whole blood and plasma concentrations of {sup 14}C were <5ng/ml at all times after the dose. Concentrations of {sup 14}C in whole blood and plasma declined over the first day after the dose and rose thereafter, with the rise in plasma concentrations lagging behind those in whole blood. During the first 3 days after the dose, plasma accounted for the majority of {sup 14}C in whole blood, but after that time, plasma accounted for only 25-30% of the {sup 14}C in whole blood. Tissue (left and right caudal lung lobe, liver, kidney, spleen, brain) and bile concentrations were low, always less than 0.25% the concentrations found in the left cranial lung lobe. Approximately 13% of the dose was eliminated in urine and feces in 28 days, with fecal elimination accounting for about 10% of the dose. The data presented here are consistent with that obtained in other species. Moli1901 is slowly absorbed and excreted from the lung, and it does not accumulate in other tissues. Moli1901 is currently in the clinic and has proven to be safe in single dose studies in human volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients by the inhalation route. No information on the disposition of the compound in humans is available. This study in dogs demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining that information using {sup 14}C-Moli1901 and AMS.

  18. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R; Blais, Jules M; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g(-1) dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL(-1) in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K(d)), MC-RR had the highest affinity for sediment particles (log K(d)=1.3) while MC-LA had the lowest affinity (log K(d)=-0.4), partitioning mainly into pore waters. Our findings confirm that sediments serve as a reservoir for microcystins but suggest that some variants may diffuse into overlying water thereby constituting a new route of exposure following the dissipation of toxic blooms. The method is well suited to determine the fate and persistence of different

  19. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  20. Detection, concentrations and distribution of paxilline, an animal neurotoxin, in mouse brain: an application of ultra-high sensitivity detection of 14C by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.; Kim, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Paxilline is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of lolitrem neurotoxins that cause the disorder rye grass staggers in livestock grazing on pastures infected with certain fungi. Paxilline itself produces similar symptoms and the 14 C-labelled compound has been produced bio-synthetically at low specific activity. Using conventional liquid scintillation counting it was not possible to detect the labelled compound in the brain of mice sacrificed at the time they displayed physiological symptoms. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) counts 14 C atoms, not decays, and provides sensitivity 10,000-100,000 times greater than conventional scintillation counting of radioactive decays. Measurements are easily obtained at the level of the natural abundance of 14 C in living tissue of 6fCi or 10 -16 moles 14 C per mg total carbon. Extraction of the labelled compound from the tissue is unnecessary and sample size can be 0.01-10mg. Paxilline (8mg/kg ip) was given to 25g mice. The total activity injected was 11,000 dpm though the results showed that 1,000dpm would have been sufficient. The concentration of paxilline in homogenised whole brain was determined to be 985 pg or 0.0075 dpm mg dry tissue. The concentration in the major brain segments ranged from 893-1137 pgmg dry tissue. The spinal cord contained 719 pg/mg dry tissue. Our results suggest that toxicologists and pharmacologists should consider what new information may be obtained by combining tracer studies with the power of AMS detection. The AMS method makes possible great reductions in the amount of label and sample sizes, plus wider ranges in concentration/time course studies. In particular, it opens up new possibilities such as: studies at true dietary or environmental levels; tracer studies in large animal or plant systems; field trials; human studies where radiation dose must be considered; and studies with compounds that can only be synthesised with low specific activity. Copyright (1999) Australasian

  1. Ninth ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2000-12-01

    Mass spectrometry has wide-ranging applications in such diverse areas as nuclear industry, agriculture, drugs, environment, petroleum and lentils. There is an urgent need to absorb and assimilate state-of-the-art technological developments in the field. Emerging trends in atomic mass spectrometry, advances in organic mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in oceanography are some of the areas that need to be expeditiously examined and are covered in this volume. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  2. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  3. The French accelerator mass spectrometry facility ASTER after 4 years: Status and recent developments on {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourles, Didier L.; Keddadouche, Karim [ASTER-Team, CNRS-IRD Aix-Marseille Universite, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); CEREGE, CNRS-IRD Aix-Marseille,Universite, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Braucher, Regis [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD Aix-Marseille,Universite, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Finkel, Robert C. [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD Aix-Marseille,Universite, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Earth and Planetary Science Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States); Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Benedetti, Lucilla [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD Aix-Marseille,Universite, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Merchel, Silke, E-mail: s.merchel@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yearly sample throughput as high as over 3300 unknowns for {sup 10}Be in 2010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl samples proved time dependent mass fractionation and/or source memory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Need for improvement in measurement strategies, data evaluation and ion sources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-calibration of secondary in-house {sup 129}I standards vs. NIST 3231. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-contamination for iodine {approx}0.5% within first 20 h of source running. - Abstract: Since the acceptance tests of the French 5 MV accelerator mass spectrometry facility ASTER in 2007, routine measurement conditions for the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al have been established. Yearly sample throughput as high as over 3300 unknowns has been reached for {sup 10}Be in 2010. Cross-contamination for volatile elements has been largely solved by an ion source upgrade allowing {sup 36}Cl measurements at ASTER. However, recent long-term tests using {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl samples with strongly varying ratios have shown that identical targets lead to different {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl results at the 2-4% level when being measured after a time gap of 24 h while the source is running other samples. Besides time dependent mass fractionation, another likely reason for this effect might be source memory, thus, asking for sophisticated measurement strategies and improved data evaluation and eventually further ion source improvement. Finally, after establishing quality assurance by cross-calibration of secondary in-house {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca standards and taking part in round-robin exercises of {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl, a two-step cross-calibration of secondary in-house {sup 129}I standards has been performed. The NIST 3231 standard containing {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I at (0.981 {+-} 0.012) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} has been used for step-wise dilution with NaI to produce

  4. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  5. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  6. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS n ) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  8. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Shanks, Richard P.; Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  9. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Shanks, Richard P. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel [Pantechnik S.A., 13 Rue de la Résistance, 14400 Bayeux (France)

    2015-10-15

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  10. A combined accelerator mass spectrometry-positron emission tomography human microdose study with 14C- and 11C-labelled verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Simpson, Marie; Zeitlinger, Markus; Bauer, Martin; Karch, Rudolf; Abrahim, Aiman; Feurstein, Thomas; Schütz, Matthias; Kletter, Kurt; Müller, Markus; Lappin, Graham; Langer, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    In microdose studies, the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug in blood after administration of a dose up to 100 μg is measured with sensitive analytical techniques, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). As most drugs exert their effect in tissue rather than blood, methodology is needed for extending pharmacokinetic analysis to different tissue compartments. In the present study, we combined, for the first time, AMS analysis with positron emission tomography (PET) in order to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of the model drug verapamil in plasma and brain of humans. In order to assess pharmacokinetic dose linearity of verapamil, data were acquired and compared after administration of an intravenous microdose and after an intravenous microdose administered concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose. Six healthy male subjects received an intravenous microdose [0.05 mg] (period 1) and an intravenous microdose administered concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose [80 mg] of verapamil (period 2) in a randomized, crossover, two-period study design. The intravenous dose was a mixture of (R/S)-[14C]verapamil and (R)-[11C]verapamil and the oral dose was unlabelled racaemic verapamil. Brain distribution of radioactivity was measured with PET whereas plasma pharmacokinetics of (R)- and (S)-verapamil were determined with AMS. PET data were analysed by pharmacokinetic modelling to estimate the rate constants for transfer (k) of radioactivity across the blood-brain barrier. Most pharmacokinetic parameters of (R)- and (S)-verapamil as well as parameters describing exchange of radioactivity between plasma and brain (influx rate constant [K(1)] = 0.030 ± 0.003 and 0.031 ± 0.005 mL/mL/min and efflux rate constant [k(2)] = 0.099 ± 0.006 and 0.095 ± 0.008 min-1 for period 1 and 2, respectively) were not statistically different between the two periods although there was a trend for nonlinear pharmacokinetics for the (R)-enantiomer. On the other hand, all

  11. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Acter, Thamina; Zherebker, Alexander; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-03-30

    The isotopic exchange approach is in use since the first observation of such reactions in 1933 by Lewis. This approach allows the investigation of the pathways of chemical and biochemical reactions, determination of structure, composition, and conformation of molecules. Mass spectrometry has now become one of the most important analytical tools for the monitoring of the isotopic exchange reactions. Investigation of conformational dynamics of proteins, quantitative measurements, obtaining chemical, and structural information about individual compounds of the complex natural mixtures are mainly based on the use of isotope exchange in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. The most important reaction is the Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange, which is mainly performed in the solution. Recently we have developed the approach allowing performing of the Hydrogen/Deuterium reaction on-line directly in the ionization source under atmospheric pressure. Such approach simplifies the sample preparation and can accelerate the exchange reaction so that certain hydrogens that are considered as non-labile will also participate in the exchange. The use of in-ionization source H/D exchange in modern mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of molecules serves as the basic theme in this review. We will focus on the mechanisms of the isotopic exchange reactions and on the application of in-ESI, in-APCI, and in-APPI source Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange for the investigation of petroleum, natural organic matter, oligosaccharides, and proteins including protein-protein complexes. The simple scenario for adaptation of H/D exchange reactions into mass spectrometric method is also highlighted along with a couple of examples collected from previous studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Role of Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketha, Siva S; Singh, Ravinder J; Ketha, Hemamalini

    2017-09-01

    The advent of mass spectrometry into the clinical laboratory has led to an improvement in clinical management of several endocrine diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry found some of its first clinical applications in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, in quantitative steroid analysis, and in drug analysis laboratories. Mass spectrometry assays offer analytical sensitivity and specificity that is superior to immunoassays for many analytes. This article highlights several areas of clinical endocrinology that have witnessed the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A REVIEW ON MASS SPECTROMETRY DETECTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri Neetu; Gupta Ankit; Taneja Ruchi; Bilandi Ajay; Beniwal Prashant

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for "weighing" molecules. Obviously, this is not done with a conventional scale or balance. Instead, mass spectrometry is based upon the principle of the motion of a charged particle that is called an ion, in an electric or magnetic field. The mass to charge ratio (m/z) of the ion affects particles motion. Since the charge of an electron is known, the mass to charge ratio (m/z) is a measurement of mass of an ion. Mass spectrometry research focuses ...

  14. Alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana; Kuruc, Jozef; Galanda, Dusan; Matel, Lubomir; Velic, Dusan; Aranyosiova, Monika

    2009-01-01

    A sample of thorium content on steel discs was prepared by electrodeposition with a view to determining the natural thorium isotope. Thorium was determined by alpha spectrometry and by secondary ion mass spectrometry and the results of the two methods were compared

  15. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  16. NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility was created under the auspices of the Office of the Scientific Director to provide high-end mass-spectrometric...

  17. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    -phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  18. Inorganic mass spectrometry of solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Vertes, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this review some recent developments in the field of inorganic mass spectrometry of solids are described with special emphasis on the actual state of understanding of the ionization processes. It concentrates on the common characteristics of methods such as spark source-, laser-, secondary ion-, inductively coupled plasma- and glow discharge mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  19. Surface analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidová, Veronika; Volný, Michael; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, 7-8 (2009), s. 1101-1116 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : secondary ion mass spectrometry * matrix assisted laser desorption ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  20. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive informati...

  1. Hydrologic and geochemical controls on the transport of radionuclides in natural undisturbed arid environments as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimz, G; Caffee, M W; McAninch, J

    2000-01-01

    This project developed techniques for measuring globally distributed radionuclides that occur today in extremely low abundances (''fallout'' from the era of atmospheric nuclear testing), and then applied these techniques to better understand the mechanisms by which radionuclides migrate. The techniques employ accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a relatively new analytical tool that permits this work to be conducted for the first time. The goal in this project was to develop AMS analytical techniques for 129 I (fallout concentration: ∼ 10 6 atoms/g) 99 Tc (∼ 10 9 atoms/g), 90 Sr (∼10 7 atoms/gram soil), and 93 Zr (∼ 10 9 atoms/g), and improved methods for 36 Cl (∼ 10 9 atoms/g). As a demonstration of the analytical techniques, and as an investigation of identified problems associated with characterizing moisture and radionuclide movement in unsaturated desert soils, we developed a vadose zone research site at the Nevada Test Site. Our findings can be summarized as follows: (1) The distribution of chloride and 36 Cl at the research site indicates that the widely-used ''chloride accumulation'' method for estimating moisture flux is erroneous; some mechanism for attenuation of chloride exists, violating an assumption of the accumulation method; (2) 129 I is fractionated into several soil compartments that have varying migration abilities; the two most mobile can be tentatively identified as Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and organic acids based on our sequential leaching techniques; (3) These most mobile constituents are capable of migrating at a rate greater than that of 36 Cl, usually considered the most mobile solute in hydrologic systems; these constituents may be colloidal in character, of neutral surface charge, and therefore conservative in aqueous migration; (4) 99 Tc is readily measurable by AMS, as we demonstrate by the first AMS 99 Tc measurements of contaminated waters; extraction of 99 Tc from silicate soils is difficult, but can be done using the extended

  2. Determination of Ultralow Level 129I/127I in Natural Samples by Separation of Microgram Carrier Free Iodine and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Chen, Ning

    2010-01-01

    of 129I/127I, and a detection limit of this method for 129I is calculated to be 105 atoms. This will allow us to accurately determine 129I in prenuclear geological samples of low iodine concentration with 129I/127I of 10−12, such as loess, soil, coral, rock, sediment, and groundwater. Some samples......Separation of carrier free iodine from low iodine level samples and accurate measurement of ultralow level 129I in micrograms of iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geological dating of terrestrial system and tracer research using naturally produced 129I. In this work, we present...... a carrier free method using coprecipitation of AgI with AgCl for preparing micrograms of iodine target, associated with combustion using a tube furnace for separating iodine from solid samples and anion exchange chromatography for preconcentrating iodine from a large volume of water. An accelerator mass...

  3. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  4. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, H.; Yllera de Ll, A.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of 239 Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of 239 Pu). (author)

  5. Mass spectrometry at the Pittsburgh conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borman, S.

    1987-01-01

    Each year analytical chemists flock to the Pittsburgh Conference to learn about the latest trends in analytical instrumentation. In this Focus, a number of prominent mass spectroscopists who attended this year's meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, discuss their perceptions of current developments in the field of mass spectrometry (MS). In the June 1 issue of Analytical Chemistry, the authors coverage of the Pittsburgh Conferences continues with a follow-up article on specific developments in hyphenated mass spectrometry - primarily liquid chromatography - MS (LC/MS) and gas chromatography - infrared spectrometry MS (GC/IR/MS)

  6. Chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buryak, Alexey K; Serduk, T M

    2013-01-01

    The applications of chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry are considered. The primary attention is devoted to the development of physicochemical grounds of the use of various chromatography–mass spectrometry procedures to solve topical problems of this industry. Various methods for investigation of the composition of rocket fuels, surfaces of structural materials and environmental media affected by aerospace activities are compared. The application of chromatography–mass spectrometry for the development and evaluation of processes for decontaminations of equipment, industrial wastes and soils from rocket fuel components is substantiated. The bibliography includes 135 references.

  7. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  8. Radiocarbon mass spectrometry for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Schulze-Konig Tim

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radiocarbon has a huge potential as a tracer for metabolism studies in humans. By using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for its detection, a unique sensitivity is reached reducing required radiation doses to a negligible level. Until recently, a widespread use of AMS in biomedical research was impeded by the high complexity of the instrument, time-consuming sample preparation, and a limited availability of measurement capacity. Over the last few years, tremendous progress has been achieved in the reduction of size and complexity of AMS instruments. It allowed designing a compact AMS system, dubbed BioMICADAS to address the needs of biomedical users. For more than two years, this system is in successful operation at a commercial service provider for the pharmaceutical industry. A further drastic simplification of radiocarbon mass spectrometers seems possible and could establish a regular usage of this technology in drug development. However, to reach this goal a better integration of AMS into the workflow of bioanalytical laboratories will be necessary. For this purpose, CO 2 accepting ion sources may be a key, since they enable an almost automated sample preparation. The status of radiocarbon AMS in biomedical research and its perspective will be discussed

  9. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  10. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Longo, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of candidate biomarkers within the entire proteome is one of the most important and challenging goals in proteomic research. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a modern and promising technology for semiquantitative and qualitative assessment of proteins, enabling protein sequencing and identification with exquisite accuracy and sensitivity. For mass spectrometry analysis, protein extractions from tissues or body fluids and subsequent protein fractionation represent an important and unavoidable step in the workflow for biomarker discovery. Following extraction of proteins, the protein mixture must be digested, reduced, alkylated, and cleaned up prior to mass spectrometry. The aim of our chapter is to provide comprehensible and practical lab procedures for sample digestion, protein fractionation, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis.

  12. Radiation Biomarker Research Using Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, Stephan B; Hubert, Walter

    2007-01-01

    .... This review is intended to give an overview of mass spectrometry and its application to biological systems and biomarker discovery and how that might relate to relevant radiation dosimetry studies...

  13. Mass Spectrometry Analyses of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Mitchell; Mittal, Parul; Lokman, Noor A; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are a powerful biological in vitro model, which closely mimics the 3D structure of primary avascularized tumors. Mass spectrometry (MS) has established itself as a powerful analytical tool, not only to better understand and describe the complex structure of MCTS, but also to monitor their response to cancer therapeutics. The first part of this review focuses on traditional mass spectrometry approaches with an emphasis on elucidating the molecular characteristics of these structures. Then the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches used to obtain spatially defined information from MCTS is described. Finally the analysis of primary spheroids, such as those present in ovarian cancer, and the great potential that mass spectrometry analysis of these structures has for improved understanding of cancer progression and for personalized in vitro therapeutic testing is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mass spectrometry in life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Stefan; Markgraf, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Investigating complex signatures of biomolecules by mass spectrometry approaches has become indispensable in molecular life science research. Nowadays, various mass spectrometry-based omics technologies are available to monitor qualitative and quantitative changes within hundreds or thousands of biological active components, including proteins/peptides, lipids and metabolites. These comprehensive investigations have the potential to decipher the pathophysiology of disease development at a molecular level and to monitor the individual response of pharmacological treatment or lifestyle intervention.

  15. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  16. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  17. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  18. Mass spectrometry in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Takuji

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used and playing a very important role in the field of nuclear science and technology. A major reason for this is that not only the types of element but also its isotopes have to be identified and measured in this field. Thus, some applications of this analytical method are reviewed and discussed in this article. Its application to analytical chemistry is described in the second section following an introductory section, which includes subsections for isotropic dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and isotopic correlation technique. The isotopic ratio measurement for hydrogen, uranium and plutonium as well as nuclear material control and safeguards are also reviewed in this section. In the third section, mass spectrometry is discussed in relation to nuclear reactors, with subsections on natural uranium reactor and neutron flux observation. Some techniques for measuring the burnup fraction, including the heavy isotopic ratio method and fission product monitoring, are also described. In the fourth section, application of mass spectrometry to measurement of nuclear constants, such as ratio of effective cross-sectional area for 235 U, half-life and fission yield is reviewed. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Microdose pharmacogenetic study of ¹⁴C-tolbutamide in healthy subjects with accelerator mass spectrometry to examine the effects of CYP2C9∗3 on its pharmacokinetics and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Toshihiko; Aoyama, Shinsuke; Tozuka, Zenzaburo; Nozawa, Kohei; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Matsui, Takao; Kainuma, Michiko; Hasegawa, Setsuo; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2013-07-16

    Microdose study enables us to understand the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs in humans prior to the conventional clinical trials. The advantage of microdose study is that the unexpected pharmacological/toxicological effects of drugs caused by drug interactions or genetic polymorphisms of metabolic enzymes/transporters can be avoided due to the limited dose. With a combination use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and (14)C-labaled compounds, the pharmacokinetics of both parent drug and its metabolites can be sensitively monitored. Thus, to demonstrate the usability of microdose study with AMS for the prediction of the impact of genetic polymorphisms of CYP enzyme on the pharmacokinetics of unchanged drugs and metabolites, we performed microdose pharmacogenetic study using tolbutamide as a CYP2C9 probe drug. A microdose of (14)C-tolbutamide (100 μg) was administered orally to healthy volunteers with the CYP2C9(∗)1/(∗)1 or CYP2C9(∗)1/(∗)3 diplotype. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve for the (14)C-radioactivity, determined by AMS, or that for the parent drug, determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, was about 1.6 times or 1.7 times greater in the CYP2C9(∗)1/(∗)3 than in the CYP2C9(∗)1/(∗)1 group, which was comparable to the previous reports at therapeutic dose. In the plasma and urine, tolbutamide, carboxytolbutamide, and 4-hydroxytolbutamide were detected and practically no other metabolites could be found in both diplotype groups. The fraction of metabolites in plasma radioactivity was slightly lower in the CYP2C9(∗)1/(∗)3 group. Microdose study can be used for the prediction of the effects of genetic polymorphisms of enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of drugs with minimal care of their pharmacological/toxicological effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry characterization of the steroidal saponins of Dioscorea panthaica Prain et Burkill and its application for accelerating the isolation and structural elucidation of steroidal saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihao; Zhao, Ye; Jing, Wenguang; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Hui; Zha, Qin; Liu, An

    2015-03-01

    Dioscorea panthaica is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used in the treatment of various physiological conditions, including cardiovascular disease, gastropathy and hypertension. Steroidal saponins (SS) are the main active ingredients of this herb and have effects on myocardial ischemia and cancer. The phytochemical evaluation of SS is both time-consuming and laborious, and the isolation and structural determination steps can be especially demanding. For this reason, the development of new methods to accelerate the processes involved in the identification, isolation and structural elucidation of SS is highly desirable. In this study, a new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IT/MS(n)) method has been developed for the identification of the SS in D. panthaica Prain et Burkill. Notably, the current method can distinguish between spirostanol and furostanol-type compounds based on the fragmentation patterns observed by electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-IT/MS(n)) analysis. UHPLC-IT/MS(n) was used to conduct a detailed investigation of the number, structural class and order of the sugar moieties in the sugar chains of the SS present in D. panthaica. The established fragmentation features were used to analyze the compounds found in the 65% ethanol fraction of the water extracts of D. panthaica. Twenty-three SS were identified, including 11 potential new compounds and six groups of isomers. Two of these newly identified SS were selected as representative examples, and their chemical structures were confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR analyses. This newly developed UHPLC-IT/MS(n) method therefore allowed for the efficient identification, isolation and structural determination of the SS in D. panthaica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Histopathologic Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Seto, Mitsutoshi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables visualization of the distribution of a range of biomolecules by integrating biochemical information from mass spectrometry with positional information from microscopy. IMS identifies a target molecule. In addition, IMS enables global analysis of biomolecules containing unknown molecules by detecting the ratio of the molecular weight to electric charge without any target, which makes it possible to identify novel molecules. IMS generates data on the distribution of lipids and small molecules in tissues, which is difficult to visualize with either conventional counter-staining or immunohistochemistry. In this review, we firstly introduce the principle of imaging mass spectrometry and recent advances in the sample preparation method. Secondly, we present findings regarding biological samples, especially pathological ones. Finally, we discuss the limitations and problems of the IMS technique and clinical application, such as in drug development.

  2. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  3. Parsimonious Charge Deconvolution for Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Charge deconvolution infers the mass from mass over charge (m/z) measurements in electrospray ionization mass spectra. When applied over a wide input m/z or broad target mass range, charge-deconvolution algorithms can produce artifacts, such as false masses at one-half or one-third of the correct mass. Indeed, a maximum entropy term in the objective function of MaxEnt, the most commonly used charge deconvolution algorithm, favors a deconvolved spectrum with many peaks over one with fewer peaks. Here we describe a new “parsimonious” charge deconvolution algorithm that produces fewer artifacts. The algorithm is especially well-suited to high-resolution native mass spectrometry of intact glycoproteins and protein complexes. Deconvolution of native mass spectra poses special challenges due to salt and small molecule adducts, multimers, wide mass ranges, and fewer and lower charge states. We demonstrate the performance of the new deconvolution algorithm on a range of samples. On the heavily glycosylated plasma properdin glycoprotein, the new algorithm could deconvolve monomer and dimer simultaneously and, when focused on the m/z range of the monomer, gave accurate and interpretable masses for glycoforms that had previously been analyzed manually using m/z peaks rather than deconvolved masses. On therapeutic antibodies, the new algorithm facilitated the analysis of extensions, truncations, and Fab glycosylation. The algorithm facilitates the use of native mass spectrometry for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of protein and protein assemblies. PMID:29376659

  4. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  5. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  6. Laser-induced mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polanyi, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the spectroscopic analysis of gas. The gas molecules are internally excited by irradiation with laser light having a wavelength which is absorbed by the sample. The gas is then ionized and passed through a mass spectrometer and the amount of the ionized species in the irradiated and ionized sample is compared with that in a similar ionized but not irradiated sample

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis Using Protein Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shiyong; Downard, Kevin M; Wong, Jason W H

    2017-01-01

    Through advances in molecular biology, comparative analysis of DNA sequences is currently the cornerstone in the study of molecular evolution and phylogenetics. Nevertheless, protein mass spectrometry offers some unique opportunities to enable phylogenetic analyses in organisms where DNA may be difficult or costly to obtain. To date, the methods of phylogenetic analysis using protein mass spectrometry can be classified into three categories: (1) de novo protein sequencing followed by classical phylogenetic reconstruction, (2) direct phylogenetic reconstruction using proteolytic peptide mass maps, and (3) mapping of mass spectral data onto classical phylogenetic trees. In this chapter, we provide a brief description of the three methods and the protocol for each method along with relevant tools and algorithms.

  8. Identification of bacteria using mass spectrometry techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Lukáš; Hynek, R.; Hochel, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 353, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 67-79 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/0664 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Bacteria * Identification Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  9. Four decades of joy in mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibbering, N.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Tremendous developments in mass spectrometry have taken place in the last 40 years. This holds for both the science and the instrumental revolutions in this field. In chemistry the research was heavily focused on organic molecules that upon electron ionization fragmented via complex mechanistic

  10. Inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry. Chapter 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a new technique for elemental and isotopic analysis which is currently attracting a great deal of interest. This relatively new technique has found wide applications in different fields of research viz., nuclear, geological, biological and environmental sciences

  11. Characterization of synthetic peptides by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI......-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides....

  12. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  13. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, D.; Milde, D.; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2016), s. 35-47 ISSN 0277-7037 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13038; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : iron * siderophores * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.373, year: 2016

  14. Applications of mass spectrometry in the trace element analysis of biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moens, L.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of biological material is illustrated by reviewing the different mass spectrometric methods applied and describing some typical applications published recently. Though atomic absorption spectrometry is used in the majority of analyses of biological material, most mass spectrometric methods have been used to some extent for trace element determination in biomedical research. The relative importance of the different methods is estimated by reviewing recent research papers. It is striking that especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being applied, partly because the method can be used on-line after chromatographic separation, in speciation studies. Mass spectrometric methods prove to offer unique possibilities in stable isotope tracer studies and for this purpose also experimentally demanding methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry are frequently used. (orig.)

  15. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled with quadrupole/orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry for protein discovery, identification, and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, M A; Medzihradszky, K F; Lock, C M; Fisher, B; Settineri, T A; Burlingame, A L

    2001-04-15

    The design and operation of a novel UV-MALDI ionization source on a commercial QqoaTOF mass spectrometer (Applied Biosystem/MDS Sciex QSTAR Pulsar) is described. Samples are loaded on a 96-well target plate, the movement of which is under software control and can be readily automated. Unlike conventional high-energy MALDI-TOF, the ions are produced with low energies (5-10 eV) in a region of relatively low vacuum (8 mTorr). Thus, they are cooled by extensive low-energy collisions before selection in the quadrupole mass analyzer (Q1), potentially giving a quasi-continuous ion beam ideally suited to the oaTOF used for mass analysis of the fragment ions, although ion yields from individual laser shots may vary widely. Ion dissociation is induced by collisions with argon in an rf-only quadrupole cell, giving typical low-energy CID spectra for protonated peptide ions. Ions separated in the oaTOF are registered by a four-anode detector and time-to-digital converter and accumulated in "bins" that are 625 ps wide. Peak shapes depend upon the number of ion counts in adjacent bins. As expected, the accuracy of mass measurement is shown to be dependent upon the number of ions recorded for a particular peak. With internal calibration, mass accuracy better than 10 ppm is attainable for peaks that contain sufficient ions to give well-defined Gaussian profiles. By virtue of its high resolution, capability for accurate mass measurements, and sensitivity in the low-femotomole range, this instrument is ideally suited to protein identification for proteomic applications by generation of peptide tags, manual sequence interpretation, identification of modifications such as phosphorylation, and protein structural elucidation. Unlike the multiply charged ions typical of electrospray ionization, the singly charged MALDI-generated peptide ions show a linear dependence of optimal collision energy upon molecular mass, which is advantageous for automated operation. It is shown that the novel

  16. Polymer and Additive Mass Spectrometry Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The use of mass spectrometry in fields related to polymers has increased significantly over the past three decades and will be explored in this literature review. The importance of this technique is highlighted when exploring how polymers degrade, verifying purchased materials, and as internal requirements change. The primary focus will be on four ionization techniques and the triple quadrupole and quadrupole / time-of-flight mass spectrometers. The advantages and limitations of each will also be explored.

  17. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  18. Influence of atmospheric 14CO2 on determination of the ratio of biogenic carbon to fossil one in exhaust gases using accelerator mass spectrometry. Experimental evaluation for industrial flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki; Nagakawa, Yoshiyasu

    2012-01-01

    The influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 was evaluated on the determination of biogenic carbon ratios in industrial flue gases using accelerated mass spectrometry(AMS). Bioethanol, n-hexane, and their mixtures were combusted with a four-stroke engine, and 14 CO 2 in exhaust gases was analyzed by AMS. The experimental biogenic carbon ratio determined by ASTM D6866 method was 1.2 times higher than the theoretical value of mixed fuel containing 3.18% biogenic carbons. In general, the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 taken in combustion gases is neglected. It seems that the error cannot be neglected under international trading of emission allowances, where a large amount of carbons in the fuel were evaluated. The experimental value became to be the theoretical value by subtracting the amount of atmospheric 14 C from that of the samples. As the contents of biofuel increased, the experimental biogenic carbon ratios reached the theoretical values and the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 decreased. We recommend that the influence of atmospheric 14 CO 2 should be corrected when fuel samples contain low amounts of 14 C. (author)

  19. Determination of 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber using accelerated solvent extraction with in-cell clean-up coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minghua; Zhao, Hongxia; Xia, Deming; Du, Juan; Xie, Huaijun; Chen, Jingwen

    2018-08-30

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with in-cell clean-up method coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed to determine 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber. The analytes include 10 sulfonamides, 4 fluoroquinolones, 3 amphenicols, 2 beta-lactams, 1 lincosamide and trimethoprim. Optimal parameters of ASE method were obtained at 80 °C, 1 static cycle of 5 min with methanol/acetonitrile (1/1, v/v) using 2 g of C18 as adsorbent. Recoveries at 50.1-129.2% were achieved with RSD under 20%. Method detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 2.9 μg kg -1 . Compared to the reported ultrasound-assisted extraction method, the proposed method offered comparable extraction efficiency for sulfonamides from sea cucumber, but higher for other categories of antibiotics. This validated method was then successfully applied to sea cucumber samples and 9 antibiotics were detected with the highest concentration up to 57.7 μg kg -1 for norfloxacin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass Spectrometry-Based N-Glycomics of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manveen K. Sethi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. An increased molecular understanding of the CRC pathology is warranted to gain insights into the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the disease. Altered protein glycosylation patterns are associated with most diseases including malignant transformation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics have accelerated glycomics research and present a new paradigm for cancer biomarker discovery. Mass spectrometry (MS-based glycoproteomics and glycomics, therefore, hold considerable promise to improve the discovery of novel biomarkers with utility in disease diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the emerging field of glycomics to present a comprehensive review of advances in technologies and their application in studies aimed at discovering novel glycan-based biomarkers. We will also discuss some of the challenges associated with using glycans as biomarkers.

  1. Guideline on Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Amy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is used to determine the concentration of an element of interest in a bulk sample. It is a destructive analysis technique that is applicable to a wide range of analytes and bulk sample types. With this method, a known amount of a rare isotope, or ‘spike’, of the element of interest is added to a known amount of sample. The element of interest is chemically purified from the bulk sample, the isotope ratio of the spiked sample is measured by mass spectrometry, and the concentration of the element of interest is calculated from this result. This method is widely used, although a mass spectrometer required for this analysis may be fairly expensive.

  2. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  3. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS): what, how and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is one of the oldest mass spectrometric techniques, which has been used for determining the isotopic composition and concentration of different elements using isotope dilution. In spite of the introduction of many other inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the TIMS technique plays the role of a definitive analytical methodology and still occupies a unique position in terms of its capabilities with respect to precision and accuracy as well as sensitivity

  4. Alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, J.; Kuruc, J.; Galanda, D.; Matel, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this master thesis was preparation of samples with thorium content on the steel discs by electrodeposition for determination of natural thorium isotope by alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry and finding out their possible linear correlation between these methods. The samples with electrolytically excluded isotope of 232 Th were prepared by electrodeposition from solution Th(NO 3 ) 4 ·12 H2 O on steel discs in electrodeposition cell with use of solutions Na 2 SO 4 , NaHSO 4 , KOH and (NH 4 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) by electric current 0.75 A. Discs were measured by alpha spectrometer. Activity was calculated from the registered impulses for 232 Th and surface's weight. After alpha spectrometry measurements discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV which is installed in the International Laser Centre in Bratislava. Intensities of isotope of 232 Th and ions of ThO + , ThOH + , ThO 2 H + , Th 2 O 4 H + , ThO 2 - , ThO 3 H - , ThH 3 O 3 - and ThN 2 O 5 H - were identified. The linear correlation is between surface's weights of Th and intensities of ions of Th + from SIMS, however the correlation coefficient has relatively low value. We found out with SIMS method that oxidized and hydride forms of thorium are significantly represented in samples with electroplated thorium. (authors)

  5. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  6. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lössl, Philip|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371559693; Snijder, Joost|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338018328; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even

  7. Burnup determination of mass spectrometry for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunhua.

    1987-01-01

    The various methods currently being used in burnup determination of nuclear fuels are studied and reviewed. The mass spectrometry method of destructive testing is discussed emphatically. The burnup determination of mass spectrometry includes heavy isotopic abundance ratio method and isotope dilution mass spectrometry used as burnup indicator for the fission products. The former is applied to high burnup level, but the later to various burnup level. According to experiences, some problems which should be noticed in burnup determination of mass spectrometry are presented

  8. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  9. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  10. A mass spectrometry proteomics data management platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K; Maccoss, Michael J; Riffle, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are "organically" distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/.

  11. Determination of four major saponins in the seeds of Aesculus chinensis Bunge using accelerated solvent extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhui; Li, Wenlong; Yang, Baijuan; Guo, Xiuchun; Lee, Frank Sen-Chun; Wang, Xiaoru

    2007-07-23

    A new method based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by a reliable high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and positive ion electrospray-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF/MS) analysis has been developed for the characterization and quantification of four major saponins in extracts of the seeds of Aesculus chinensis Bunge (semen aesculi). The saponins escin Ia, escin Ib, isoescin Ia and isoescin Ib were extracted from seeds of A. chinesis Bunge via ASE, and the operational parameters of ASE were optimized, such as extraction solvent, extraction temperature, static extraction time and extraction cycles. The optimized procedure employed 70% MeOH as extraction solvent, 120 degrees C of extraction temperature, 7 min of static extraction time, 60% flush volume and the extraction recoveries of the four compounds were nearly to 100% for two cycles. The HPLC conditions are as follows: SinoChrom ODS BP C18 (4.6 mm x 200 mm, 5 microm) column, acetonitrile and 0.10% phosphoric acid solution as mobile phase, flow rate is 1.0 mL min(-1), detection length of UV is 203 nm, injection volume is 10 microL. The results indicated that the developed HPLC method is simple, sensitive and reliable for the determination of four major saponins in seeds of A. chinesis Bunge with a good linearity (r2 > 0.9994), precision (relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) < 1.5%) and the recovery ranges of 95.2-97.3%. The limits of detection (LOD) of the four compounds were in the range of 0.40-0.75 microg mL(-1). This assay can be readily utilized as a quality control method for semen aesculi and other related medicinal plants.

  12. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of {sup 14}C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    {sup 14}C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used {sup 14}C-breath tests: {sup 14}C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low {sup 14}C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform {sup 14}C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of {sup 14}C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and {sup 14}C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the {sup 14}C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry - accomplishments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, David

    2002-01-01

    Full text: AMS techniques and applications have advanced significantly since the first radiocarbon measurements in 1977. The list of nuclides in routine use includes 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, and 129 I. Cosmogenic radionuclides now have important applications in the study of earth surface processes and events. Recent biomedical studies include tracing aluminum as a toxic element and as an adjuvant in vaccines, radiocarbon as a tracer for tissue implants, and calcium loss from bones. Improvements in AMS performance for these and new nuclides result from automation, better ion sources, higher energies, and better isobar separation techniques

  14. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards a lipid microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging techniques are the most efficient way to locally measure the variation of different parameters on tissue sections. These analyses are gaining increasing interest since 20 years and allow observing extremely complex biological phenomena at lower and lower time and resolution scale. Nevertheless, most of them only target very few compounds of interest, which are chosen a priori, due to their low resolution power and sensitivity. New chemical imaging technique has to be introduced in order to overcome these limitations, leading to more informative and sensitive analyses for biologists and physicians. Two major mass spectrometry methods can be efficiently used to generate the distribution of biological compounds over a tissue section. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) needs the co-crystallization of the sample with a matrix before to be irradiated by a laser, whereas the analyte is directly desorbed by a primary ion bombardment for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. In both cases, energy used for desorption/ionization is locally deposited -some tens of microns for the laser and some hundreds of nanometers for the ion beam- meaning that small areas over the surface sample can be separately analyzed. Step by step analysis allows spectrum acquisitions over the tissue sections and the data are treated by modern informatics software in order to create ion density maps, i.e., the intensity plot of one specific ion versus the (x,y) position. Main advantages of SIMS and MALDI compared to other chemical imaging techniques lie in the simultaneous acquisition of a large number of biological compounds in mixture with an excellent sensitivity obtained by Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass analyzer. Moreover, data treatment is done a posteriori, due to the fact that no compound is selectively marked, and let us access to the localization of different lipid classes in only one complete acquisition. Copyright © 2010

  15. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  16. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging.

  17. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful...

  18. Depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the solid body discreteness in the direction of the normal to the sample surface on the depth resolution of the secondary ion mass spectrometry method is analyzed. It is shown that for this case the dependence of the width at the semi-height of the delta profiles of the studied elements depth distribution on the energy and angle of incidence of the initial ions should have the form of the stepwise function. This is experimentally proved by the silicon-germanium delta-layers in the silicon samples [ru

  19. Mass spectrometry investigation of magnetron sputtering discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Petr; Musil, Jindřich; Lančok, Ján; Fitl, Přemysl; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Vlček, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 143, č. 6 (2017), s. 438-443 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010490; GA ČR GA17-13427S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mass spectrometry * atoms * radicals and ions * RF discharge * contamination * metallic films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.530, year: 2016

  20. Mass Determination of Entire Amyloid Fibrils by Using Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussineau, Tristan; Mathevon, Carole; Altamura, Lucie; Vendrely, Charlotte; Dugourd, Philippe; Forge, Vincent; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2016-02-12

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled protein structures with important roles in biology (either pathogenic or physiological), and are attracting increasing interest in nanotechnology. However, because of their high aspect ratio and the presence of some polymorphism, that is, the possibility to adopt various structures, their characterization is challenging and basic information such as their mass is unknown. Here we show that charge-detection mass spectrometry, recently developed for large self-assembled systems such as viruses, provides such information in a straightforward manner. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Simultaneous mass detection for direct inlet mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of analytical techniques for application in trace analysis has led to interest in practical methods for real-time monitoring. Direct inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS) has been the subject of considerable activity in recent years. A DIMS instrument is described which consists of an inlet system designed to permit particles entrained in the inlet air stream to strike a hot, oxidized rhenium filament which serves as a surface ionization source. A mass analyzer and detection system then permits identification of the elemental composition of particulates which strike the filament

  2. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, D.T.

    2009-07-01

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of E act , of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10 -11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  3. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lössl, Philip; Snijder, Joost; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-06-01

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even virus assembly. In native MS, ions attain high m/z values, requiring special mass analyzers for their detection. Depending on the particular mass analyzer used, instrumental mass resolution does often decrease at higher m/z but can still be above a couple of thousand at m/z 5000. However, the mass resolving power obtained on charge states of protein complexes in this m/z region is experimentally found to remain well below the inherent instrument resolution of the mass analyzers employed. Here, we inquire into reasons for this discrepancy and ask how native MS would benefit from higher instrumental mass resolution. To answer this question, we discuss advantages and shortcomings of mass analyzers used to study intact biomolecules and biomolecular complexes in their native state, and we review which other factors determine mass resolving power in native MS analyses. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the current status and limitations.

  4. Recent development in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzner, I.

    1992-01-01

    Within the limited of this review the following topics will be briefly discussed: a) Accuracy, precision, internal relative standard deviation (RISD) and external relative standard deviation (RESD) of isotope ratio measurements. With advanced instrumentation and use of standard reference materials, high accuracy and RESD = 0.002% (or better) may be achieved; b) The advantages of modern automatic isotope ratio mass spectrometer are briefly described. Computer controlled operation and data acquisition, and multiple ion collection are the recent important improvement; c) The isotopic fractionation during the course of isotope ratio measurement is considered as a major source of errors in thermal ionization of metallic elements. The phenomenon in strontium, neodymium, uranium, lead and calcium and methods to correct the measured data are discussed; d) Applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations, the isotope dilution technique, isotope geology, and isotope effects in biological systems are described together with specific applications in various research and technology area. (author)

  5. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  6. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  7. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Martró Català, Elisa; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases are still a cause of high mortality and morbidity rates. Current microbiological diagnostic methods are based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolated microorganisms, which can be obtained in about 24-48 h. Given that the microbiological identification is of major importance for patient management, new diagnostic methods are needed in order to detect and identify microorganisms in a timely and accurate manner. Over the last few years, several molecular techniques based on the amplification of microbial nucleic acids have been developed with the aim of reducing the time needed for the identification of the microorganisms involved in different infectious processes. On the other hand, mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and consistent alternative to conventional methods for microorganism identification. This review describes the most widely used mass spectrometry technologies -matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF)-, both for protein and nucleic acid analysis, as well as the commercial platforms available. Related publications of most interest in clinical microbiology are also reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Negative ion–gas reaction studies using ion guides and accelerator mass spectrometry II: S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and Cl{sup −} with NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliades, J.A., E-mail: j.eliades@alum.utoronto.ca [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, X.-L. [University of Ottawa, Department of Physics and Lalonde AMS Laboratory, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Litherland, A.E. [University of Toronto, Department of Physics, 60 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Kieser, W.E. [University of Ottawa, Department of Physics and Lalonde AMS Laboratory, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Currently analysis of {sup 36}Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) requires large facilities for separation of the isobar {sup 36}S. Previously, it has been shown possible to suppress S{sup −} by >6 orders of magnitude at low energies in a prototype radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) instrument by ion reactions in NO{sub 2} gas in the injection line of an AMS system. Reaction products for the negative ions S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and Cl{sup −} with NO{sub 2}, and S{sup −} with N{sub 2}O, have been surveyed in order to understand isobar attenuation plateaus and the losses of analyte ions. Ion energies were at eV levels, but had a large initial energy spread of at least several eV. Under these conditions, the aggregate total S{sup −} and SO{sup −} cross sections in NO{sub 2} were estimated to be 6.6 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2} and 7.1 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2} respectively and the major reaction channel observed was electron transfer producing NO{sub 2}{sup −}. Other reaction products observed for S{sup −} were SO{sup −}, SO{sub 2}{sup −}, NS{sup −}, and NSO{sub 2}{sup −}. On the other hand, S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and NS{sup −} were found to be largely unreactive with N{sub 2}O despite the existence of some highly exothermic reaction channels. When Cl{sup −} was injected into NO{sub 2}, reaction products such as ClO{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −} were observed only at low levels suggesting that larger Cl{sup −} transmissions should be possible with some RFQ design modifications. The ClO{sup −} reaction product had only a small attenuation under the experimental conditions, despite having near resonant electron affinity with NO{sub 2}.

  10. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[ def,p ]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeen, Erin P.; Ognibene, Ted J.; Corley, Richard A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Baird, William M.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W.; Williams, David E.

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in non-smokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a micro-dose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [14C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel “moving wire” interface between ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [14C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [14C]-DBC itself, (Cmax= 18.5 ± 15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ± 1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [14C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). [14C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax= 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). Parent [14C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first dataset to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  11. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  12. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. → We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. → The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  13. Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

    1995-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2

  14. High-efficiency thermal ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Jose A.

    1996-01-01

    A version of the thermal ionization cavity (TIC) source developed specifically for use in mass spectrometry is presented. The performance of this ion source has been characterized extensively both with the use of an isotope separator and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A detailed description of the TIC source for mass spectrometry is given along with the performance characteristics observed

  15. Cs+ ion source for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, B.L.; Weiss, H.; Liebl, H.

    1981-12-01

    Various types of cesium ionization sources currently used in secondary ion mass spectrometry are briefly reviewed, followed by a description of the design and performance of a novel, thermal surface ionization Cs + source developed in this laboratory. The source was evaluated for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications using the COALA ion microprobe mass analyzer. (orig.)

  16. The emergence of mass spectrometry in biochemical research

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The initial steps toward routinely applying mass spectrometry in the biochemical laboratory have been achieved. In the past, mass spectrometry was confined to the realm of small, relatively stable molecules; large or thermally labile molecules did not survive the desorption and ionization processes intact. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allow for the analysis of both small and large biomolecules through "mild" desorption...

  17. Accelerator mass analyses of meteorites - carbon-14 terrestrial ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Rucklidge, J.; Beukens, R.; Fireman, E.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-14 terrestrial ages of ten Antarctic meteorites have been measured by the IsoTrace accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The 14 C terrestrial age of 1 gram sample was determined from 14 C concentrations collected at melt and re-melt temperatures, compared with the 14 C concentration of the known Bruderheim chondrite. Yamato-790448 (LL3) chondrite was found to be the oldest terrestrial age of 3x10 4 years in the nine Yamato chondrites, whereas Yamato-791630 (L4) chondrite is considered to be the youngest chondrites less than thousand years. Allan Hills chondrite of ALH-77231 (L6) shows older terrestrial age than the nine Yamato chondrites. New accelerator data of the terrestrial age show higher accuracy with smaller sample than the previous counting method. (author)

  18. Mass spectrometry a versatile aid to inorganic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Rene

    1976-01-01

    Several hundred publications have appeared in the last three years that deal with applications of Mass Spectrometry to inorganic analysis. Bulk and localized trace analysis, surface and thin film characterization and microstructure examination are currently performed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Spark Source Mass Spectrometry and the newly developed Laser Probe Mass Spectrometry. Suitable experimental procedures allow insulators, biologic materials and microsamples to be analysed. In spite of the classification by techniques this review is essentially devoted to the most significant papers in analytical applications but instrumental and basic features are sometimes introduced to support the discussions

  19. Inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price Russ, G. III

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a relatively new (5 y commercial availability) technique for simultaneously determining the concentration and isotopic composition of a large number of elements at trace levels. The principle advantages of ICP-MS are the ability to measure essentially all the metallic elements at concentrations as low as 1 part in 10 12 by weight, to analyse aqueous samples directly, to determine the isotopic composition of essentially all the metallic elements, and to analyse samples rapidly (minutes). The history of the development of ICP-MS and discussions of a variety of applications have been discussed in detail in Date and Gray (1988). Koppenaal (1988, 1990) has reviewed the ICP-MS literature. In that ICP-MS is a relatively new and still evolving technique, this chapter will discuss potential capability more than proven performance. (author). 24 refs

  20. Application of Nanodiamonds in Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cheng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanodiamond (ND with biomolecular mass spectrometry (MS makes rapid, sensitive detection of biopolymers from complex biosamples feasible. Due to its chemical inertness, optical transparency and biocompatibility, the advantage of NDs in MS study is unique. Furthermore, functionalization on the surfaces of NDs expands their application in the fields of proteomics and genomics for specific requirements greatly. This review presents methods of MS analysis based on solid phase extraction and elution on NDs and different application examples including peptide, protein, DNA, glycan and others. Owing to the quick development of nanotechnology, surface chemistry, new MS methods and the intense interest in proteomics and genomics, a huge increase of their applications in biomolecular MS analysis in the near future can be predicted.

  1. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of barium by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Kaiming; Jia Baoting; Liu Xuemei

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic abundance ratios for barium at sub-microgram level are analyzed by thermal surface ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Rhenium trips used for sample preparation are firstly treated to eliminate possible barium background interference. During the preparation of barium samples phosphoric acid is added as an emitting and stabilizing reagent. The addition of phosphoric acid increases the collection efficiency and ion current strength and stability for barium. A relative standard deviation of 0.02% for the isotopic abundance ratio of 137 Ba to 138 Ba is achieved when the 138 Ba ion current is (1-3) x 10 -12 A. The experimental results also demonstrate that the isotope fractionation effect is negligibly small in the isotopic analysis of barium

  3. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mass spectrometry of hyper-velocity impacts of organic micrograins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, Ralf; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Postberg, Frank; Armes, Steven P; Fujii, Syuji; Dupin, Damien; Ormond-Prout, Jonathan; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Mocker, Anna; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-12-01

    The study of hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids is important for the calibration of dust sensors in space applications. For this purpose, submicron-sized synthetic dust grains comprising either polystyrene or poly[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulfide] were coated with an ultrathin overlayer of an electrically conductive organic polymer (either polypyrrole or polyaniline) and were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km s(-1) using the Heidelberg Dust Accelerator facility. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to analyse the resulting ionic impact plasma using a newly developed Large Area Mass Analyser (LAMA). Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 u. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. Impact velocities of between 10 and 35 km s(-1) are suitable for a principal identification of organic materials in micrometeoroids, whereas impact speeds below approximately 10 km s(-1) allow for an even more detailed analysis. Molecular ions and fragments reflect components of the parent molecule, providing determination of even complex organic molecules embedded in a dust grain. In contrast to previous measurements with the Cosmic Dust Analyser instrument, the employed LAMA instrument has a seven times higher mass resolution--approximately 200--which allowed for a detailed analysis of the complex mass spectra. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Hyperthermal surface ionization mass spectrometry of organic molecules: monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hiroshi; Fujii, Toshihiro.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on the influence of kinetic energy of fast monoterpene molecules on the surface ionization efficiency and on the mass spectral patterns, using rhenium oxide (ReO 2 ) surface. Molecular kinetic energy, given to the molecules through the acceleration in the seeded supersonic molecular beam, ranged from 1 to 10 eV. Hyperthermal surface ionization mass spectra (HSIMS) were taken for various incident kinetic energies and surface temperatures. The observed mass spectra were interpreted in a purely empirical way, by means of evidence from the previous investigations, and they were compared with conventional EI techniques and with the thermal energy surface ionization technique (SIOMS; Surface Ionization Organic Mass Spectrometry). Ionization efficiency (β) was also studied. Under hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) conditions, many kinds of fragment ions, including quite abundant odd electron ions (OE +· ) are observed. HSIMS patterns of monoterpenes are different among 6-isomers, contrary to those of SIOMS and EIMS, where very similar patterns for isomers are observed. HSIMS patterns are strongly dependent on the molecular kinetic energies. The surface temperature does not affect much the spectral patterns, but it controls the total amount of ion formation. We conclude from these mass spectral findings, HSI-mechanism contains an impulsive process of ion formation, followed by the fragmentation process as a results of the internal energies acquired through the collision processes. (author)

  6. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  7. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic quest for diabetes biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shiying; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. Early diagnosis and complication prevention of DM are helpful for disease treatment. However, currently available DM diagnostic markers fail to achieve the goals. Identification of new diabetic biomarkers assisted by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics may offer solution for the clinical challenges. Here, we review the current status of biomarker discovery in DM, and describe the pressure cycling technology (PCT)-Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical fragment-ion (SWATH) workflow for sample-processing, biomarker discovery and validation, which may accelerate the current quest for DM biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    2003-01-01

    The drugs represent mostly non-volatile and thermally labile solutes, often available only in small amounts like it is in case of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefor, the favourable separation techniques for such compounds are HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and also TLC 1. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detector (LC/MS) is especially powerful for their microanalysis. Mass spectrometry separating the ions in high vacuum was presumably used as detector for gas chromatography effluent but the on-line coupling with liquid eluant flow 0.1-1 mL/min is far more challenging. New types of ion sources were constructed for simultaneous removal of solvent and ionisation of solutes at atmospheric pressure (API). At present, a relatively wide choice of successfully designed commercial equipment is available either for small organic molecules and larger biomolecules (Perkin-Elmer, Agilent, Jeol, Bruker Daltonics, ThermoQuest, Shimadzu). The features of the LC/MS systems are presented. LC/MS as a new quality control tool for [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) radiopharmaceutical, which has became the most spread radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET), was proposed. Other applications of the LC/MS are reviewed. (author)

  9. Compressed sensing in imaging mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, Andreas; Dülk, Patrick; Trede, Dennis; Alexandrov, Theodore; Maaß, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a technique of analytical chemistry for spatially resolved, label-free and multipurpose analysis of biological samples that is able to detect the spatial distribution of hundreds of molecules in one experiment. The hyperspectral IMS data is typically generated by a mass spectrometer analyzing the surface of the sample. In this paper, we propose a compressed sensing approach to IMS which potentially allows for faster data acquisition by collecting only a part of the pixels in the hyperspectral image and reconstructing the full image from this data. We present an integrative approach to perform both peak-picking spectra and denoising m/z-images simultaneously, whereas the state of the art data analysis methods solve these problems separately. We provide a proof of the robustness of the recovery of both the spectra and individual channels of the hyperspectral image and propose an algorithm to solve our optimization problem which is based on proximal mappings. The paper concludes with the numerical reconstruction results for an IMS dataset of a rat brain coronal section. (paper)

  10. Probing the Composition, Assembly and Activity of Protein Molecular Machines using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waterbeemd, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in general, are powerful analytical tools for studying proteins and protein complexes. Native mass spectrometry may provide accurate mass measurements of large macromolecular assemblies enabling the investigation of their composition and stoichiometry.

  11. Statistical methods for mass spectrometry-based clinical proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakourou, A.

    2018-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on methods for the construction of diagnostic rules based on clinical mass spectrometry proteomic data. Mass spectrometry has become one of the key technologies for jointly measuring the expression of thousands of proteins in biological samples.

  12. Mass spectrometry for real-time quantitative breath analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Herbig, J.; Beauchamp, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2014), 027101 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : breath analysis * proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry * selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.631, year: 2014

  13. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

    2005-01-14

    The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese

  14. New Isotope Analysis Method: Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young

    2011-01-01

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Some fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of artificially produced radioactive isotopes has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10 -10 . In general, radio-chemical method has been applied to detect ultra-trace radio isotopes. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The Accelerator Mass Spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and its selectivity is affected by isobars. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) has the advantage of isobar-effect free characteristics. But the system size is still huge for high isotope selective system. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis) has been successfully applied to detect ultra-trace isotope, Kr-81 and Kr-85. ATTA is the isobar-effect free detection with high isotope selectivity and the system size is small. However, it requires steady atomic beam source during detection, and is not allowed simultaneous detection of several isotopes. In this presentation, we introduce new isotope detection method which is a coupled method of Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry (ATMS). We expect that it can overcome the disadvantage of ATTA while it has both advantages of ATTA and mass spectrometer. The basic concept and the system design will be presented. In addition, the experimental status of ATMS will also be presented

  15. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  16. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  17. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated

  18. Imaging mass spectrometry in drug development and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    During the last decades, imaging mass spectrometry has gained significant relevance in biomedical research. Recent advances in imaging mass spectrometry have paved the way for in situ studies on drug development, metabolism and toxicology. In contrast to whole-body autoradiography that images the localization of radiolabeled compounds, imaging mass spectrometry provides the possibility to simultaneously determine the discrete tissue distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. In addition, imaging mass spectrometry features high molecular specificity and allows comprehensive, multiplexed detection and localization of hundreds of proteins, peptides and lipids directly in tissues. Toxicologists traditionally screen for adverse findings by histopathological examination. However, studies of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning toxicological and pathologic findings induced by candidate drugs or toxins are important to reach a mechanistic understanding and an effective risk assessment strategy. One of IMS strengths is the ability to directly overlay the molecular information from the mass spectrometric analysis with the tissue section and allow correlative comparisons of molecular and histologic information. Imaging mass spectrometry could therefore be a powerful tool for omics profiling of pharmacological/toxicological effects of drug candidates and toxicants in discrete tissue regions. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of imaging mass spectrometry, with particular focus on MALDI imaging mass spectrometry, and its use in drug development and toxicology in general.

  19. Correcting mass shifts: A lock mass-free recalibration procedure for mass spectrometry imaging data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulkarni, P.; Kaftan, F.; Kynast, P.; Svatoš, Aleš; Böcker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 25 (2015), s. 7603-7613 ISSN 1618-2642 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mass spectrometry imaging * recalibration * mass shift correction * data processing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 3.125, year: 2015

  20. Interpretation of Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MSMS) Spectra for Peptide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to give a short introduction to peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) and interpretation of fragment mass spectra. Through examples and guidelines we demonstrate how to understand and validate search results and how to perform de novo sequencing based on the often...... very complex fragmentation pattern obtained by tandem mass spectrometry (also referred to as MSMS). The focus is on simple rules for interpretation of MSMS spectra of tryptic as well as non-tryptic peptides....

  1. Analysis of organic compounds by secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewinger, H.P.

    1993-05-01

    This study is about the use of secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as analytical techniques with depth resolution in determining organic components in environmental solid microparticles. The first application of plasma SNMS to organic compounds revealed the spectra to be composed mainly of signals from the atoms of all participating elements, such as C, H, O, N, S, P, and Cl. In addition, signals produced by multi-atomic clusters can be detected, such as CH, C 2 , CH 2 , C 2 H, and C 3 , as well as signals indicating the presence of organic compounds with hetero elements, such as OH, NH, and CN. Their intensity decreases very markedly with increasing numbers of atoms. Among the signals from bi-atomic clusters, those coming from elements with large mass differences are most intense. The use of plasma SNMS with organic compounds has shown that, except for spurious chemical reactions induced by ion bombardment and photodesorption by the photons of the plasma, it is possible to analyze with resolution in depth, elements of organic solids. A more detailed molecular characterization of organic compounds is possible by means of SIMS on the basis of multi-atomic fragments and by comparison with suitable signal patterns. (orig./BBR) [de

  2. Application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopal Abhilash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach that has the potential to accelerate biomarker discovery, both for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes. Proteomics has traditionally been synonymous with 2D gels but is increasingly shifting to the use of gel-free systems and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Quantitative proteomic approaches have already been applied to investigate various neurological disorders, especially in the context of identifying biomarkers from cerebrospinal fluid and serum. This review highlights the scope of different applications of quantitative proteomics in understanding neurological disorders with special emphasis on biomarker discovery.

  3. [Advances in mass spectrometry-based approaches for neuropeptide analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qianyue; Ma, Min; Peng, Xin; Jia, Chenxi; Ji, Qianyue

    2017-07-25

    Neuropeptides are an important class of endogenous bioactive substances involved in the function of the nervous system, and connect the brain and other neural and peripheral organs. Mass spectrometry-based neuropeptidomics are designed to study neuropeptides in a large-scale manner and obtain important molecular information to further understand the mechanism of nervous system regulation and the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. This review summarizes the basic strategies for the study of neuropeptides using mass spectrometry, including sample preparation and processing, qualitative and quantitative methods, and mass spectrometry imagining.

  4. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  5. [Latest development in mass spectrometry for clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Masahiko

    2013-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has seen enormous growth in special clinical chemistry laboratories. It significantly increases the analytic potential in clinical chemistry, especially in the field of low molecular weight biomarker analysis. This review summarizes the state of the art in mass spectrometry and related techniques for clinical application with a main focus on recent developments in LC-MS. Current trends in ionization techniques, automated online sample preparation techniques coupled with LC-MS, and ion mobility spectrometry are discussed. Emerging mass spectrometric approaches complementary to LC-MS are discussed as well.

  6. Proteomic Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Skin Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazova, Rossitza; Seeley, Erin H

    2017-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging can be successfully used for skin cancer diagnosis, particularly for the diagnosis of challenging melanocytic lesions. This method analyzes proteins within benign and malignant melanocytic tumor cells and, based on their differences, which constitute a unique molecular signature of 5 to 20 proteins, can render a diagnosis of benign nevus versus malignant melanoma. Mass spectrometry imaging may assist in the differentiation between metastases and nevi as well as between proliferative nodules in nevi and melanoma arising in a nevus. In the difficult area of atypical Spitzoid neoplasms, mass spectrometry diagnosis can predict clinical outcome better than histopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA adducts: Mass spectrometry methods and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, P.B.; Brown, K.; Tompkins, E.; Emms, V.L.; Jones, D.J.L.; Singh, R.; Phillips, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of DNA adducts is widely used for the monitoring of exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. Knowledge of the nature and amounts of DNA adducts formed in vivo also gives valuable information regarding the mutational effects that may result from particular exposures. The power of mass spectrometry (MS) to achieve qualitative and quantitative analyses of human DNA adducts has increased greatly in recent years with the development of improved chromatographic interfaces and ionisation sources. Adducts have been detected on nucleic acid bases, 2'-deoxynucleosides or 2'-deoxynucleotides, with LC-MS/MS being the favoured technique for many of these analyses. Our current applications of this technique include the determination of N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-guanine, which was postulated to be found as a DNA repair product in urine following exposure to acrylamide, and of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine, as markers of oxidative damage in human lymphocyte DNA. Higher sensitivity (with a detection limit of 1-10 adducts/10 12 nucleotides) may be achieved by the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), although this requires the presence of certain isotopes, such as [ 14 C], in the material being analysed. In order to make this technique more amenable for studies of human exposure to environmental carcinogens, new postlabelling techniques, incorporating [ 14 C] into specific DNA adducts after formation, are being developed. It is expected that combining the use of advanced MS techniques with existing 32 P-postlabelling and immunochemical methodologies will contribute greatly to the understanding of the burden of human exposure to environmental carcinogens

  8. New developments in glow discharge optical emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Volker; Dorka, Roland; Wilken, Ludger; Wetzig, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes new developments in flow discharge optical emission (GD-OES) and mass spectrometry (GD-MS) at IFW and presents corresponding new applications (analysis of microelectronic multi-layer system by radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (RF-GD-OES) and analysis of pure iron by a new Grimm-type GD-MS source)

  9. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  10. Use of mass spectrometry for study of coordination compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrbehlehu, N.V.; Indrichan, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    A review on mass-spectrometry of coordination compounds including the works published up to 1979 inclusive is provided. Mainly the products of metals with bi- and tetradentate ligands are considered using the method. Mo and Be carboxylates for which molecular ions lines are found in mass-spectra are studied. The study of mass-spectra for VO chelates with thiosemicarbazone of salicyl aldehyde is carried out. Application of the mass-spectrometry method permits to establish the mass of coordination compounds, the structure of complexes, dentate structure and the way of ligand coordination, the bond strength [ru

  11. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tőkés, László

    2017-07-01

    This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state-of-the-art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide-ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol-A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate containers, high

  12. Microbial metabolomics with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Muilwijk, B.; Werf, M.J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method was set up suitable for the analysis of microbial metabolomes, consisting of an oximation and silylation derivatization reaction and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Microbial matrixes contain many compounds that potentially interfere with

  13. Sampling and analyte enrichment strategies for ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjiang; Ma, Wen; Li, Hongmei; Ai, Wanpeng; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2018-01-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry provides great convenience for fast screening, and has showed promising potential in analytical chemistry. However, its relatively low sensitivity seriously restricts its practical utility in trace compound analysis. In this review, we summarize the sampling and analyte enrichment strategies coupled with nine modes of representative ambient mass spectrometry (desorption electrospray ionization, paper vhspray ionization, wooden-tip spray ionization, probe electrospray ionization, coated blade spray ionization, direct analysis in real time, desorption corona beam ionization, dielectric barrier discharge ionization, and atmospheric-pressure solids analysis probe) that have dramatically increased the detection sensitivity. We believe that these advances will promote routine use of ambient mass spectrometry. Graphical abstract Scheme of sampling stretagies for ambient mass spectrometry.

  14. Analytical strategies in mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenqvist, Heidi; Ye, Juanying; Jensen, Ole N

    2011-01-01

    then discuss various tandem mass spectrometry approaches for phosphopeptide sequencing and quantification, and we consider aspects of phosphoproteome data analysis and interpretation. Efficient integration of these stages of phosphoproteome analysis is highly important to ensure a successful outcome of large...

  15. Biomarker discovery in high grade sarcomas by mass spectrometry imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates a detailed biomarker discovery Mass Spectrometry Imaging workflow for histologically heterogeneous high grade sarcomas. Panels of protein and metabolite signatures were discovered either distinguishing different histological subtypes or stratifying high risk patients with poor survival.

  16. A theory of stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, J.F.; McPherson, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    In order to perform quantitative analysis using stable isotope dilution with mass spectrometry, an equation is derived which describes the relationship between the relative proportions of natural and labelled material and measured isotope ratios

  17. Chemical ionisation mass spectrometry: a survey of instrument technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, R.E.; Todd, J.F.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to survey the innovations and improvements which have been made in both instrumentation and methodology in chemical ionization mass spectrometry in the past ten years. (Auth.)

  18. 13th International Mass Spectrometry Conference. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of several hundred papers presented at the international conference on new research and development results and applications of mass spectrometry. Abstracts falling into the INIS scope were indexed separately in the INIS database. (Roboz, P.)

  19. OBT measurement of vegetation by mass spectrometry and radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamari, T.; Kakiuchi, H.; Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Baglan, N.; Uda, T.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out OBT (organically bound tritium) measurement by two different methods those are radiometry and mass spectrometry and compared the applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The dried grass sample was used for the experiments. To eliminate the exchangeable OBT, the sample was washed with tritium free water before analysis. Three times washing reduced the tritium activity in the labile sites below the detectable level. In radiometry the sample was combusted to convert the OBT as well as other hydrogen isotopes to. water and tritium activity in the water was measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). In mass spectrometry, the sample was kept in a glass container and 3 He produced by tritium decay was measured by mass spectrometry. The results were in good agreement suggesting applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The mass spectrometry is more suitable for environmental tritium research because of a lower detection limit than that of the LSC. (authors)

  20. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  1. Recent applications of mass spectrometry in forensic toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Rodger L.

    1992-09-01

    This review encompasses applications of mass spectrometry reported during the years 1989, 1990 and 1991 for the analysis of cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and their metabolites in physiological specimens.

  2. Dehydrodimerization of pterostilbene during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen; Amad, Maan H.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Pterostilbene is a member of the hydroxystilbene family of compounds commonly found in plants such as blueberry and grapes. During the analysis of this compound by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), an ion was observed

  3. 13th International Mass Spectrometry Conference. Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The collection contains abstracts of several hundred papers presented at the international conference on new research and development results and applications of mass spectrometry. Abstracts falling into the INIS scope were indexed separately in the INIS database. (Roboz, P.).

  4. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry of Quassia undulata Seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    The use of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC MS) as a sensitive and specific technique ... cold flow properties and stability of the fuel to oxidation, peroxidation and polymerization .... determinants of both the physical and chemical ...

  5. Practical aspects and trends in analytical organic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlunegger, U.P.

    1981-01-01

    Proceeding from the fundamentals of mass spectrometry (MS), some more recent developments of analytical organic MS are shown in comparison with conventional MS. Sections are headed: the vacuum, production of ions in the mass spectrometer, ions in the analyzer of a mass spectrometer, general considerations, practice of modern MS: selected examples

  6. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  7. Automated, parallel mass spectrometry imaging and structural identification of lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, Shane R.; Paine, Martin R.L.; Eijkel, Gert B.

    2018-01-01

    We report a method that enables automated data-dependent acquisition of lipid tandem mass spectrometry data in parallel with a high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging experiment. The method does not increase the total image acquisition time and is combined with automatic structural assignments....... This lipidome-per-pixel approach automatically identified and validated 104 unique molecular lipids and their spatial locations from rat cerebellar tissue....

  8. Quantification of steroid conjugates using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskell, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fast atom bombardment/mass spectrometry or liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry provides the capability for direct analysis of steroid conjugates (sulfates, glucuronides) without prior hydrolysis or derivatization. During the analysis of biologic extracts, limitations on the sensitivity of detection arise from the presence of co-extracted material which may suppress or obscure the analyte signal. A procedure is described for the quantitative determination of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum which achieved selective isolation of the analyte using immunoadsorption extraction and highly specific detection using tandem mass spectrometry. A stable isotope-labeled analog [( 2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) was used as internal standard. Fast atom bombardment of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate yielded abundant [M-H]- ions that fragmented following collisional activation to give HSO4-; m/z 97. During fast atom bombardment/tandem mass spectrometry of serum extracts, a scan of precursor ions fragmenting to give m/z 97 detected dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and the [2H2]-labeled analog with a selectivity markedly superior to that observed using conventional mass spectrometry detection. Satisfactory agreement was observed between quantitative data obtained in this way and data obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the heptafluorobutyrates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and [2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate obtained by direct derivatization. 21 refs

  9. MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED SHOTGUN LIPIDOMICS AND NOVEL STRATEGIES FOR LIPIDOMIC ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianlin; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Since our last comprehensive review on multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics (Mass Spectrom. Rev. 24 (2005), 367), many new developments in the field of lipidomics have occurred. These developments include new strategies and refinements for shotgun lipidomic approaches that use direct infusion, including novel fragmentation strategies, identification of multiple new informative dimensions for mass spectrometric interrogation, and the development of new bioinformatic approaches for enhanced identification and quantitation of the individual molecular constituents that comprise each cell’s lipidome. Concurrently, advances in liquid chromatography-based platforms and novel strategies for quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for lipidomic analyses have been developed. Through the synergistic use of this repertoire of new mass spectrometric approaches, the power and scope of lipidomics has been greatly expanded to accelerate progress toward the comprehensive understanding of the pleiotropic roles of lipids in biological systems. PMID:21755525

  10. New approaches for metabolomics by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Small molecules constitute a large part of the world around us, including fossil and some renewable energy sources. Solar energy harvested by plants and bacteria is converted into energy rich small molecules on a massive scale. Some of the worst contaminants of the environment and compounds of interest for national security also fall in the category of small molecules. The development of large scale metabolomic analysis methods lags behind the state of the art established for genomics and proteomics. This is commonly attributed to the diversity of molecular classes included in a metabolome. Unlike nucleic acids and proteins, metabolites do not have standard building blocks, and, as a result, their molecular properties exhibit a wide spectrum. This impedes the development of dedicated separation and spectroscopic methods. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a strong contender in the quest for a quantitative analytical tool with extensive metabolite coverage. Although various MS-based techniques are emerging for metabolomics, many of these approaches include extensive sample preparation that make large scale studies resource intensive and slow. New ionization methods are redefining the range of analytical problems that can be solved using MS. This project developed new approaches for the direct analysis of small molecules in unprocessed samples, as well as pushed the limits of ultratrace analysis in volume limited complex samples. The projects resulted in techniques that enabled metabolomics investigations with enhanced molecular coverage, as well as the study of cellular response to stimuli on a single cell level. Effectively individual cells became reaction vessels, where we followed the response of a complex biological system to external perturbation. We established two new analytical platforms for the direct study of metabolic changes in cells and tissues following external perturbation. For this purpose we developed a novel technique, laser ablation electrospray

  11. An introduction to the technique of combined ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowall, Mark A.; Bateman, Robert H.; Bajic, Steve; Giles, Kevin; Langridge, Jim; McKenna, Therese; Pringle, Steven D.; Wildgoose, Jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) offers several advantages compared with conventional High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as an 'inlet system' for mass spectrometry. UPLC provides improved chromatographic resolution, increased sensitivity and reduced analysis time. This is achieved through the use of sub 2μm particles (stationary phase) combined with high-pressure solvent delivery (up to 15,000 psi). When coupled with orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (oa-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), UPLC presents a means to achieve high sample throughput with reduced spectral overlap, increased sensitivity, and exact mass measurement capabilities with high mass spectral resolution (Ca 20,000 FWHM). Dispersive ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) implemented within a traveling-wave ion guide provides an orthogonal separation strategy for ions in the gas phase that can resolve isobaric ions formed by either Electrospray of MALDI ionization typically in Ca 20 mille seconds. All three techniques have the potential to be combined on-line (e.g. UPLC-IMS-MS/MS) in real time to maximize peak capacity and resolving power for the analysis of complex biological mixtures including; intact proteins, modified peptides and endogenous/exogenous metabolites

  12. MPAI (mass probes aided ionization) method for total analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Aki; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Hifumi, Hiroki; Honma, Yuya; Tanji, Noriyuki; Iwasawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized various mass probes, which enable us to effectively ionize various molecules to be detected with mass spectrometry. We call the ionization method using mass probes the "MPAI (mass probes aided ionization)" method. We aim at the sensitive detection of various biological molecules, and also the detection of bio-molecules by a single mass spectrometry serially without changing the mechanical settings. Here, we review mass probes for small molecules with various functional groups and mass probes for proteins. Further, we introduce newly developed mass probes for proteins for highly sensitive detection.

  13. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  14. Data recording and processing in mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKown, H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1978-12-15

    When a mass spectrometer is going to be obtained, it must be specified to do a particular task. It follows that the data recording system must be designed to work satisfactorily with hardware that produces the ion current or currents. The author describes two systems: the AVCO mass spectrometer and the tandem mass spectrometer.

  15. Accelerator mass analysis at tandem accelerator in Kyoto University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Tazawa, Yuji; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hirose, Masanori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Ogino, Koya; Kohno, Masuchika; Funaba, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-01

    Tandem accelerator in Science Faculty, Kyoto University was renewed from 5 MV in the highest terminal voltage of Van de Graaff to 8 MV of Peletron in 1992. And, AMS effective for cosmic ray, dating, environment measurement and so forth is determined to a column of collaborative studies by universities and institutes in Japan. On this renewal, because of using high energy beam transportation of the present tandem accelerator, super high sensitivity measurement of long half-life radioactive isotopes of heavy elements such as {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I and so forth is aimed, although having some limitations due to small magnet. The accelerator is active in characteristics of the middle size tandem accelerator, and developing {sup 14}C measurement for its standard technology, as aiming at {sup 36}Cl measurement, at first. As a result, in this tandem accelerator stable and high beam transmittance could be obtained by adding a slit at negative ion source to make emittance of incident beam smaller. {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of Modan`s sample obtained by graphitizing NBS oxalic acid and Ded`s sample consisting of mineral graphite produced in Sri Lanka are measured to confirm better reproductivity of this system. Future development of successive incident method is planned to test actual carbon samples. (G.K.)

  16. Towards airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical string resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Kurek, Maksymilian; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    airborne nanoparticle sensors. Recently, nanomechanical mass spectrometry was established. One of the biggest challenges of nanomechanical sensors is the low efficiency of diffusion-based sampling. We developed an inertial-based sampling method that enables the efficient sampling of airborne nanoparticles...... mode. Mass spectrometry of airborne nanoparticles requires the simultaneous operation in the first and second mode, which can be implemented in the transduction scheme of the resonator. The presented results lay the cornerstone for the realization of a portable airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometer....

  17. AM1 and electron impact mass spectrometry study of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, in electron impact mass spectrometry (EIMS), it has been found a good correlation between the fragmentation processes of coumarins and the electronic charges of the atoms of their skeleton. In this paper, the same analytical method has been applied to 4-acyl isochroman-1,3-diones, whose mass spectra had ...

  18. A Review of the Emerging Field of Underwater Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Chua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometers are versatile sensor systems, owing to their high sensitivity and ability to simultaneously measure multiple chemical species. Over the last two decades, traditional laboratory-based membrane inlet mass spectrometers have been adapted for underwater use. Underwater mass spectrometry has drastically improved our capability to monitor a broad suite of gaseous compounds (e.g., dissolved atmospheric gases, light hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds in the aquatic environment. Here we provide an overview of the progress made in the field of underwater mass spectrometry since its inception in the 1990s to the present. In particular, we discuss the approaches undertaken by various research groups in developing in situ mass spectrometers. We also provide examples to illustrate how underwater mass spectrometers have been used in the field. Finally, we present future trends in the field of in situ mass spectrometry. Most of these efforts are aimed at improving the quality and spatial and temporal scales of chemical measurements in the ocean. By providing up-to-date information on underwater mass spectrometry, this review offers guidance for researchers interested in adapting this technology as well as goals for future progress in the field.

  19. Paleodiet characterisation of an Etrurian population of Pontecagnano (Italy) by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS)(#).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarabino, Carla; Lubritto, Carmine; Proto, Antonio; Rubino, Mauro; Fiengo, Gilda; Marzaioli, Fabio; Passariello, Isabella; Busiello, Gaetano; Fortunato, Antonietta; Alfano, Davide; Sabbarese, Carlo; Rogalla, Detlef; De Cesare, Nicola; d'Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2006-06-01

    Human bones recovered from the archaeological site of Pontecagnano (Salerno, Italy) have been studied to reconstruct the diet of an Etrurian population. Two different areas were investigated, named Library and Sant' Antonio, with a total of 44 tombs containing human skeletal remains, ranging in age from the 8th to the 3rd century B.C. This time span was confirmed by 14C dating obtained using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) on one bone sample from each site. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) was used to extract information about the concentration of Sr, Zn, Ca elements in the bone inorganic fraction, whilst stable isotope ratio measurements (IRMS) were carried out on bone collagen to obtain the delta13C and delta15N. A reliable technique has been used to extract and separate the inorganic and organic fractions of the bone remains. Both IRMS and AAS results suggest a mixed diet including C3 plant food and herbivore animals, consistent with archaeological indications.

  20. Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Chapter 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai Baba, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric method for the determination of vapour pressures and thermodynamic properties is described. The aim of the article is to give a general introduction to the method rather than to give a critical review of the technique. The latest developments in this area of research are reviewed by the peers in the field during the triennial international mass spectrometric conferences. The Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric method is being applied for thermodynamic measurements. In recent times, laser vaporisation mass spectrometric methods have emerged as a source of determination of vapour pressures at very high temperatures and beyond the pressure regime far exceeding Knudsen effusion range

  1. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, David C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  2. Development of stereotactic mass spectrometry for brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Nathalie Y R; Golby, Alexandra J; Ligon, Keith L; Norton, Isaiah; Mohan, Vandana; Wiseman, Justin M; Tannenbaum, Allen; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery remains the first and most important treatment modality for the majority of solid tumors. Across a range of brain tumor types and grades, postoperative residual tumor has a great impact on prognosis. The principal challenge and objective of neurosurgical intervention is therefore to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the potential for neurological deficit by preserving critical tissue. To introduce the integration of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry into surgery for in vivo molecular tissue characterization and intraoperative definition of tumor boundaries without systemic injection of contrast agents. Using a frameless stereotactic sampling approach and by integrating a 3-dimensional navigation system with an ultrasonic surgical probe, we obtained image-registered surgical specimens. The samples were analyzed with ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and validated against standard histopathology. This new approach will enable neurosurgeons to detect tumor infiltration of the normal brain intraoperatively with mass spectrometry and to obtain spatially resolved molecular tissue characterization without any exogenous agent and with high sensitivity and specificity. Proof of concept is presented in using mass spectrometry intraoperatively for real-time measurement of molecular structure and using that tissue characterization method to detect tumor boundaries. Multiple sampling sites within the tumor mass were defined for a patient with a recurrent left frontal oligodendroglioma, World Health Organization grade II with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, and mass spectrometry data indicated a correlation between lipid constitution and tumor cell prevalence. The mass spectrometry measurements reflect a complex molecular structure and are integrated with frameless stereotaxy and imaging, providing 3-dimensional molecular imaging without systemic injection of any agents, which can be implemented for surgical margins delineation of

  3. Emerging mass spectrometry techniques for the direct analysis of microbial colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the emerging areas in microbiology is detecting specialized metabolites produced by microbial colonies and communities with mass spectrometry. In this review/perspective, we illustrate the emerging mass spectrometry methodologies that enable the interrogation of specialized metabolites directly from microbial colonies. Mass spectrometry techniques such as imaging mass spectrometry and real-time mass spectrometry allow two and three dimensional visualization of the distri...

  4. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drugs of Abuse in Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Bryn; Cuypers, Eva; Porta, Tiffany; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Heeren, Ron M A

    2017-01-01

    Hair testing is a powerful tool routinely used for the detection of drugs of abuse. The analysis of hair is highly advantageous as it can provide prolonged drug detectability versus that in biological fluids and chronological information about drug intake based on the average growth of hair. However, current methodology requires large amounts of hair samples and involves complex time-consuming sample preparation followed by gas or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry imaging is increasingly being used for the analysis of single hair samples, as it provides more accurate and visual chronological information in single hair samples.Here, two methods for the preparation of single hair samples for mass spectrometry imaging are presented.The first uses an in-house built cutting apparatus to prepare longitudinal sections, the second is a method for embedding and cryo-sectioning hair samples in order to prepare cross-sections all along the hair sample.

  5. Proceedings of twelfth ISMAS symposium cum workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamelu, D.; Jaison, P.G.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2007-03-01

    Mass Spectrometry is an important analytical tool and has encompassed almost all branches of science and technology including Agricultural, biology, Chemistry, Earth sciences, environment, Forensic Science, Medical Sciences, Hydrology, Nuclear Technology, Oceanography, Physics etc. Recent advancements in the instrumentation of Mass Spectrometry have further strengthened its role for various applications. It is indeed a matter of great pleasure to present this special Issue of ISMAS Bulletin which is brought out on the occasion of the 12th ISMAS Symposium cum Workshop on Mass spectrometry (12th ISMAS-WS 2007) being held at Cidade-de-Goa, Dona Paula, Goa from March 25 to 30, 2007 in association with National Institute of Oceanography, Goa. This Symposium cum Workshop is co-sponsored by Scientific Departments of Government of India. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  6. Paradigms in isotope dilution mass spectrometry for elemental speciation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meija, Juris; Mester, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry currently stands out as the method providing results with unchallenged precision and accuracy in elemental speciation. However, recent history of isotope dilution mass spectrometry has shown that the extent to which this primary ratio measurement method can deliver accurate results is still subject of active research. In this review, we will summarize the fundamental prerequisites behind isotope dilution mass spectrometry and discuss their practical limits of validity and effects on the accuracy of the obtained results. This review is not to be viewed as a critique of isotope dilution; rather its purpose is to highlight the lesser studied aspects that will ensure and elevate current supremacy of the results obtained from this method

  7. High efficiency nebulization for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; McCormick, Ryan; Levine, Jonathan A.; Liu Huiying; Nam, S.-H.; Montaser, Akbar

    2006-01-01

    A pneumatically-driven, high efficiency nebulizer is explored for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The aerosol characteristics and analyte transport efficiencies of the high efficiency nebulizer for nebulization with helium are measured and compared to the results obtained with argon. Analytical performance indices of the helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are evaluated in terms of detection limits and precision. The helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection limits obtained with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min are higher than those achieved with the ultrasonic nebulizer consuming 2 mL/min solution, however, precision is generally better with high efficiency nebulizer (1-4% vs. 3-8% with ultrasonic nebulizer). Detection limits with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min solution uptake rate approach those using ultrasonic nebulizer upon efficient desolvation with a heated spray chamber followed by a Peltier-cooled multipass condenser

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  10. Structural analyses of sucrose laurate regioisomers by mass spectrometry techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Aleksander; Stensballe, Allan; Pedersen, Lars Haastrup

    2015-01-01

    6- And 6′-O-lauroyl sucrose were isolated and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), Orbitrap high-resolution (HR) MS, and electrospray-ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The analyses aimed to explore the physic......6- And 6′-O-lauroyl sucrose were isolated and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), Orbitrap high-resolution (HR) MS, and electrospray-ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The analyses aimed to explore.......8, respectively, and Orbitrap HRMS confirmed the mass of [M+Na]+ (m/z 547.2712). ESI-MS/MS on the precursor ion [M+Na]+ resulted in product ion mass spectra showing two high-intensity signals for each sample. 6-O-Lauroyl sucrose produced signals located at m/z 547.27 and m/z 385.21, corresponding to the 6-O...

  11. Radiogas chromatography mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfler, D.L.; Rosenblum, E.R.; Malloy, J.M.; Naworal, J.D.; McManus, I.R.; Campbell, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The value of selected ion monitoring in analyzing biological radio isotope incorporation experiments by radiogas chromatography mass spectrometry is illustrated with reference to the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin mycophenolic acid in Penicillium brevicompactum and the mode of action of the anticholesterolemic drug 20,25-diazacholesterol. Both examples used 1-[ 14 C]acetate precursors. It is shown that the increased sensitivity and specificity of the selected ion monitoring mode detector permits straightforward detection and identification of the relatively small cellular pools associated with metabolic intermediates. The computer program RADSIM is described. Problems that still exist in using radiogas gas chromatography mass spectrometry technology to analyse isotope incorporation experiments are discussed. (author)

  12. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  13. Native Mass Spectrometry in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Liliana; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-07-28

    The advent of native mass spectrometry (MS) in 1990 led to the development of new mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies for the analysis of noncovalent protein-ligand complexes. Native MS has matured to become a fast, simple, highly sensitive and automatable technique with well-established utility for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). Native MS has the capability to directly detect weak ligand binding to proteins, to determine stoichiometry, relative or absolute binding affinities and specificities. Native MS can be used to delineate ligand-binding sites, to elucidate mechanisms of cooperativity and to study the thermodynamics of binding. This review highlights key attributes of native MS for FBDD campaigns.

  14. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter 1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution 3,4 . Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division ch...

  15. Major roles for minor bacterial lipids identified by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry of lipids, especially those isolated from bacteria, has ballooned over the past two decades, affirming in the process the complexity of the lipidome. With this has come the identification of new and interesting lipid structures. Here is an overview of several novel lipids, from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with roles in health and disease, whose structural identification was facilitated using mass spectrometry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying modifications in RNA by MALDI mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, Stephen; Kirpekar, Finn

    2007-01-01

    as RNA modifications added in cell-free in vitro systems. MALDI-MS is particularly useful in cases in which other techniques such as those involving primer extension or chromatographic analyses are not practicable. To date, MALDI-MS has been used to localize rRNA modifications that are involved......Posttranscriptional modifications on the base or sugar of ribonucleosides generally result in mass increases that can be measured by mass spectrometry. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a direct and accurate means of determining the masses of RNAs. Mass...... spectra produced by MALDI are relatively straightforward to interpret, because they are dominated by singly charged ions, making it possible to analyze complex mixtures of RNA oligonucleotides ranging from trinucleotides up to 20-mers. Analysis of modifications within much longer RNAs, such as ribosomal...

  17. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  18. Mass spectrometry imaging, an emerging technology in neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience.

  19. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugova, Ariana [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria); Puschenreiter, Markus [Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Rhizosphere Ecology and Biogeochemistry Group, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria); Koellensperger, Gunda [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hann, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.hann@boku.ac.at [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences-BOKU, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-03-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. - Highlights: • State-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods developed and applied in rhizosphere research are reviewed. • Elemental and molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques (GC, LC or CE) are discussed. • Case studies on metal detoxification

  20. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugova, Ariana; Puschenreiter, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. - Highlights: • State-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods developed and applied in rhizosphere research are reviewed. • Elemental and molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques (GC, LC or CE) are discussed. • Case studies on metal detoxification and

  1. Surface mass balance contributions to acceleration of Antarctic ice mass loss during 2003-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.; Scambos, Ted; Kim, Baek-Min; Waliser, Duane E.; Tian, Baijun; Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent observations from satellite gravimetry (the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission) suggest an acceleration of ice mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). The contribution of surface mass balance changes (due to variable precipitation) is compared with GRACE?derived mass loss acceleration by assessing the estimated contribution of snow mass from meteorological reanalysis data. We find that over much of the continent, the acceleration can be explained by ...

  2. Principles of isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of magnetic sector field mass spectrometers in isotopic analysis, especially for nitrogen gas, is outlined. Two measuring methods are pointed out: the scanning mode for significantly enriched samples and the double collector method for samples near the natural abundance of 15 N. The calculation formulas are derived and advice is given for corrections. (author)

  3. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  4. An ultra-sensitive instrument for collision activated dissociation mass spectrometry with high mass resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louter, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    During the last decade Collision Activated Dissociation Mass Spectrometry (CAD-MS) has developed into an important and sometimes unique technique for the structure elucidation of ions. An extensive description of the double stage MS is given, which has been especially devloped for CAD-MS. A high mass resolution and a very high sensitivity are obtained by application of special techniques like post-acceleration of fragment ions, quadrupole (Q-pole) lenses and an electro-optical, simultaneous ion detection system. The operation of the rather complex ion-optics is demonstrated by application of a computer simulation of the tandem MS. Special attention is given to the action of the four Q-pole lenses and the second sector magnet upon curvature and position of the mass focal plane. Two mass calibration methods are described for the fragment spectra. The so-called polynomial-method applies a fifth-order polynomial approximation of the functional relation between position on the detector and corresponding relative momentum of fragment ions. The second method uses the matrix model of the instrument. The detector consists of two channelplates (CEMA), a fibre optics slab, coated with a phosphor layer, a camera objective and a 1024-channels photodiode-array. A bio-chemical and an organic-chemical application of the instrument are given. As bio-chemical application the peak m/z 59 in the pyrolysis mass spectrum of complete mycobacteria is identified. As an example of organic-chemical application the fragmentation process of 2,3-butadienoic acid has been investigated. (Auth.)

  5. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-12-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development of pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. In this perspective, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.

  6. Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurz, P.; Whitby, J. A.; Managadze, G. G.

    2009-01-01

    Knowing the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary objects allows the study of their origin and evolution within the context of our solar system. Exploration plans in planetary research of several space agencies consider landing spacecraft for future missions. Although there have been successful landers in the past, more landers are foreseen for Mars and its moons, Venus, the jovian moons, and asteroids. Furthermore, a mass spectrometer on a landed spacecraft can assist in the sample selection in a sample-return mission and provide mineralogical context, or identify possible toxic soils on Mars for manned Mars exploration. Given the resources available on landed spacecraft mass spectrometers, as well as any other instrument, have to be highly miniaturised.

  7. Trace amount analysis using spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Rene

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of spark mass spectrometers (ion source, properties of the ion beam, ion optics, and performance) and their use in qualitative and quantitative analysis are described. This technique is very interesting for the semi-quantitative analysis of trace amounts, down to 10 -8 atoms. Examples of applications such as the analysis of high purity materials and non-conducting mineral samples, and determination of carbon and gas trace amounts are presented. (50 references) [fr

  8. Hydrogen isotope analysis by quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellefson, R.E.; Moddeman, W.E.; Dylla, H.F.

    1981-03-01

    The analysis of isotopes of hydrogen (H, D, T) and helium ( 3 He, 4 He) and selected impurities using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) has been investigated as a method of measuring the purity of tritium gas for injection into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A QMS was used at low resolution, m/Δm 3 He, and 4 He in HT/D 2

  9. Total evaporation in thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, E.L.; Cappis, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of impurities on the total evaporation method for mass spectrometric measurement of the isotope ratio of uranium. Standard samples were spiked with Na, Ca, Fe, Zr and Ba. The results indicated that only Fe, and possible Na, displayed any interference, and then only at high concentrations. One problem limiting the accuracy of the method is the determination of the relative efficiency of the collectors in the multicollector system. 3 refs., 1 tab

  10. Inorganic trace analysis by laser ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Among the different spectrometric techniques for trace analysis Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) is well established as a trace analytic method with a wide coverage. In the LIMS the sample material is evaporated and ionized by means of a focused pulsed laser beam in a laser microplasma, which is formed in the spot area of the irradiated sample. All chemical elements in the sample materials are evaporated and ionized in the laser plasma. The formed ions are separated according to mass and energy by a time-of-flight, quadrupole or double focusing mass spectrometer. In this review the characteristics and analytical features, some recent developments, and applications of laser ionization mass spectrometry in inorganic trace analysis are described. (orig.)

  11. Laser ionization mass spectrometry in inorganic trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Among the different spectrometric techniques for trace analysis Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) is well established as a trace analytical method. With the LIMS technique the sample material is evaporated and ionized by means of a focused pulsed laser in a laser microplasma, which is formed in the spot area of the irradiated sample. All chemical elements in the sample materials are evaporated and ionized in the laser plasma. The ions formed are separated according to their mass and energy by a time-of-flight, quadrupole or double focusing mass spectrometer. In this review the characteristics and analytical features, some recent developments and applications of laser ionization mass spectrometry in inorganic trace analysis are described. (orig.)

  12. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  13. Statistical design of mass spectrometry calibration procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.

    1996-11-01

    The main objective of this task was to agree on calibration procedures to estimate the system parameters (i.e., dead-time correction, ion-counting conversion efficiency, and detector efficiency factors) for SAL's new Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer. SAL will use this mass spectrometer in a clean-laboratory which was opened in December 1995 to measure uranium and plutonium isotopes on environmental samples. The Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer has a multi-detector system with seven Faraday cup detectors and one ion- counter for the measurement of very small signals (e.g. 10 -17 Ampere range). ORNL has made preliminary estimates of the system parameters based on SAL's experimental data measured in late 1994 when the Finnigan instrument was relatively new. SAL generated additional data in 1995 to verify the calibration procedures for estimating the dead-time correction factor, the ion-counting conversion factor and the Faraday cup detector efficiency factors. The system parameters estimated on the present data will have to be reestablished when the Finnigan MAT-262 is moved-to the new clean- laboratory. Different methods will be used to analyzed environmental samples than the current measurement methods being used. For example, the environmental samples will be electroplated on a single filament rather than using the current two filament system. An outline of the calibration standard operating procedure (SOP) is included

  14. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O' Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  15. The combined measurement of uranium by alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvan, D.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of thesis was to found the dependence between radiometric method - alpha spectrometry and surface sensitive method - Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Uranium or naturally occurring uranium isotopes were studied. Samples (high polished stainless steel discs) with uranium isotopes were prepared by electrodeposition. Samples were measured by alpha spectrometry after electrodeposition and treatment. It gives surface activities. Weights, as well as surface's weights of uranium isotopes were calculated from their activities, After alpha spectrometry samples were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV instrument in International Laser Centre in Bratislava. By the SIMS analysis intensities of uranium-238 were obtained. The interpretation of SIMS intensities vs. surface activity, or surface's weights of uranium isotopes indicates the possibility to use SIMS in quantitative analysis of surface contamination by uranium isotopes, especially 238 U. (author)

  16. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  17. Role of mass spectrometry in nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Sivaraman, N.

    2016-01-01

    The present talk will focus on the role of mass spectrometry in NFS in general; besides that, the various chromatographic methods developed towards separation of actinides and lanthanide fission products and characterization of dissolver solutions of nuclear reactor fuels using TIMS and some applications of using ICP-MS as well

  18. Identification of Secreted Candida Proteins Using Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez-Molero, E.; Dekker, H.L.; de Boer, A.D.; de Groot, P.W.; Calderone, R.; Cihlar, R.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fungal secretomes using mass spectrometry is a useful technique in cell biology. Knowledge of the secretome of a human fungal pathogen may yield important information of host-pathogen interactions and may be useful for identifying vaccines candidates or diagnostic markers for antifungal

  19. Biomedical applications of mass spectrometry. Clinical uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahmer, U.I.; McCloskey, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The review covers typical or important examples of stable isotope usage in clinical fields during the period since the last triennial mass spectrometry conference in 1973. Items are included which involve uses of stable isotopes in human or clinically oriented studies, including measurements carried out on materials of human origin. 163 references. (U.K.)

  20. Recent research and progress of laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinying; Wang Fan; Zhao Yonggang; Xiao Guoping; Guo Dongfa; Cui Haiping

    2012-01-01

    The progress of laser mass spectrometry (LMS) was introduced. Its history and principle characteristics were reviewed. The research and applications of LMS in geology, mining, organics, biochemistry, environment and nuclear industry were given. The trend of LMS in the future was outlined, and the main issue and the available solutions were discussed. (authors)

  1. Advances in characterizing ubiquitylation sites by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, K.B.; Young, C.; Nielsen, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    of ubiquitylation is a two-fold challenge that involves the mapping of ubiquitylation sites and the determination of ubiquitin chain topology. This review focuses on the technical advances in the mass spectrometry-based characterization of ubiquitylation sites, which have recently involved the large...

  2. The use of mass spectrometry in peptide chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.A.; White, P.A.; Hägele, K.; Desiderio, D.M.; Meienhofer, J.

    1972-01-01

    A review with 16 refs. Methods are detailed for derivatizing peptides (mg quantities) in order to provide sufficient volatility for mass spectrometry (at least 10-5 mm vapor pressure at 300 Deg is required). Three steps are used in producing the desired derivs.: (a) arginine side chains are

  3. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry : key technology in metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, Maud Marijtje

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics involves the unbiased quantitative and qualitative analysis of the complete set of metabolites present in cells, body fluids and tissues. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is very suitable for metabolomics analysis, as it combines high separation power with

  4. Fusion of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Age K.; van der Werf, Mariët J.; Bijlsma, Sabina; van der Werff-van der Vat, Bianca J. C.; Jellema, Renger H.

    2005-01-01

    A general method is presented for combining mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data. Such data are becoming more and more abundant, and proper tools for fusing these types of data sets are needed. Fusion of metabolomics data leads to a comprehensive view on the metabolome of an organism or

  5. Discovery based and targeted Mass Spectrometry in farm animal proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke

    2013-01-01

    for investigating farm animal biology. SRM is particularly important for validation biomarker candidates This talk will introduce the use of different mass spectrometry approaches through examples related to food quality and animal welfare, including studies of gut health in pigs, host pathogen interactions...

  6. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry: recent developments and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the current state of art of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) instrumentation and highlights some of the recent applications of TIMS in geological, biological and nuclear sciences with special emphasis on some of the recent work undertaken in the area of nuclear science and technology. A few examples from the published literature are also discussed here

  7. Yeast expression proteomics by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Tobias C; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Mann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    -translational controls contribute majorly to regulation of protein abundance, for example in heat shock stress response. The development of new sample preparation methods, high-resolution mass spectrometry and novel bioinfomatic tools close this gap and allow the global quantitation of the yeast proteome under different...

  8. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews techniques for online coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, emphasizing those suitable for application to nonvolatile samples. Also summarizes the present status, strengths, and weaknesses of various techniques and discusses potential applications of recently developed techniques for combined liquid…

  9. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an

  10. Biomedical mass spectrometry in today's and tomorrow's clinical microbiology laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); M. Welker (Martin); M. Erhard (Marcel); S. Chatellier (Sonia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractClinical microbiology is a conservative laboratory exercise where base technologies introduced in the 19th century remained essentially unaltered. High-tech mass spectrometry (MS) has changed that. Within a few years following its adaptation to microbiological diagnostics, MS has been

  11. Capillary filling of miniaturized sources for electrospray mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arscott, Steve; Gaudet, Matthieu; Brinkmann, Martin; Ashcroft, Alison E; Blossey, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Capillary slot-based emitter tips are a novel tool for use in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of large biomolecules. We have performed a combined theoretical and experimental study of capillary filling in micron-sized slots with the aim of developing a rational design procedure for miniaturized electrospray sources, ultimately enabling the integration of ESI into laboratory-on-a-chip devices

  12. Mass spectrometry. Environment, biology, oenology, medicine, geology, chemistry, archaeology, mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the papers (communications and posters) presented at the 16. French days of mass spectrometry, held September 6-9, 1999 in Nancy, France. 5 papers are interesting for the INIS database and are analyzed separately. (O.M.)

  13. Automatic Compound Annotation from Mass Spectrometry Data Using MAGMa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.O.; Hooft, van der J.J.J.; Verhoeven, S.

    2014-01-01

    The MAGMa software for automatic annotation of mass spectrometry based fragmentation data was applied to 16 MS/MS datasets of the CASMI 2013 contest. Eight solutions were submitted in category 1 (molecular formula assignments) and twelve in category 2 (molecular structure assignment). The MS/MS

  14. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Karchesy; L.Y. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway; E. Barofsky; D.F. Barofsky

    1989-01-01

    Condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) to assess the feasibility of using this technique for determining molecular weight and structural information about these compounds. Both positive- and negative-ion spectra provided useful data with regard to molecular weight, cation species present, and presence of...

  15. Molecular mass spectrometry imaging in biomedical and life science research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 5 (2010), s. 423-443 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GPP206/10/P018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Chemical imaging * Molecular imaging Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.727, year: 2010

  16. Dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) uses a continuous, focused beam of primary ions to remove material from the surface of a sample by sputtering. The fraction of sputtered material that is ionized is extracted Identifies all elements or isotopes present in a material, from hydrogen to uranium. Different primary-ion

  17. Traveling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salbo, Rune; Bush, Matthew F; Naver, Helle

    2012-01-01

    The collision cross-section (Ω) of a protein or protein complex ion can be measured using traveling-wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS) via calibration with compounds of known Ω. The T-wave Ω-values depend strongly on instrument parameters and calibrant selection. Optimization ...

  18. Mass spectrometry with ionization induced by 252Cf fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sysoev, A.A.; Artaev, V.B.

    1991-01-01

    The review deals with mass-spectrometry with ionization induced by 252 Cf fission fragments. Equipment and technique of the analysis, analytic possibilities of the method are considered. The method permits to determine molecular masses of large nonvolatile biological molecules. The method is practically nondestructive, it possesses a high resolution over the depth and surface, which permits to use it for the analysis of surface of semiconductors, dielectrics, catalysts, for the study of formation kinetics of complex unstable molecules on the surface

  19. Mass spectrometry of submicrogram quantities of lead and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Noemia M.P. de; Kakazu, M.H.; Iyer, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope analyses of submicrogram quantities of lead and cadmium are carried out by single filament solid source mass spectrometry. Thermionic emission of Pb and Cd is enhanced using silica gel as an emitter. Details of the chemical and mass spectrometric techniques are described. The low blank levels are maintained by extra purification of the reagents. The applications of isotope ratios of Pb and Cd in environmental sciences and geochemistry are discussed. (Author) [pt

  20. High Resolution Mass Spectrometry of Polyfluorinated Polyether-Based Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimzon, Ian Ken; Trier, Xenia; Frömel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was successfully applied to elucidate the structure of a polyfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based formulation. The mass spectrum generated from direct injection into the MS was examined by identifying the different repeating units manually and with the aid o......-fluorinated polymers. The information from MS is essential in studying the physico-chemical properties of PFPEs and can help in assessing the risks they pose to the environment and to human health. Graphical Abstract ᅟ....

  1. Focusing procedures in time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioanoviciu, D.

    2002-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a fast growing field due to its ability to handle very fast processes and due to its theoretically unlimited mass range. The performances of the time-of-flight mass analysers are heavily dependent on the progress in ion optics, a periodically reviewed field. In this presentation the various focusing procedures in time-of-flight mass spectrometry are reviewed. For ions of the same charge and mass flight time differences result from different potentials at the location of formation and from the initial velocity spread. There is no simultaneous space and velocity focusing in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Space focusing of first and second order can be reached in time-of-flight mass analysers having two homogeneous electric field ion sources followed by a field free space in front of the detector. Single and double stage homogeneous electric field mirrors can focus in time ions of different energies. These different energies result when ions leaving different initial sites and arriving simultaneously to an intermediate space focus. Convenient mass dispersion can be obtained by including a mirror. Initial velocity focusing is obtained by the delayed extraction procedure in drift space and mirror time-of-flight mass analysers. Post source pulse focusing aims at the same purpose. Ion source electrodes of hyperbolic shape, operated by high voltage pulses can bring major improvements of the resolution, especially at high masses. For each focusing procedure the geometric and/or electric conditions are given as well as the aberrations allowing the mass resolution determination. The various focusing procedures are compared and a prediction of their future performances was tempted. (author)

  2. Automated mass correction and data interpretation for protein open-access liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Craig D; Hall, John T; White, Wendy L; Miller, Luke A D; Williams, Jon D

    2007-02-01

    Characterization of recombinant protein purification fractions and final products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) are requested more frequently each year. A protein open-access (OA) LC/MS system was developed in our laboratory to meet this demand. This paper compares the system that we originally implemented in our facilities in 2003 to the one now in use, and discusses, in more detail, recent enhancements that have improved its robustness, reliability, and data reporting capabilities. The system utilizes instruments equipped with reversed-phase chromatography and an orthogonal accelerated time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an electrospray source. Sample analysis requests are accomplished using a simple form on a web-enabled laboratory information management system (LIMS). This distributed form is accessible from any intranet-connected company desktop computer. Automated data acquisition and processing are performed using a combination of in-house (OA-Self Service, OA-Monitor, and OA-Analysis Engine) and vendor-supplied programs (AutoLynx, and OpenLynx) located on acquisition computers and off-line processing workstations. Analysis results are then reported via the same web-based LIMS. Also presented are solutions to problems not addressed on commercially available, small-molecule OA-LC/MS systems. These include automated transforming of mass-to-charge (m/z) spectra to mass spectra and automated data interpretation that considers minor variants to the protein sequence-such as common post-translational modifications (PTMs). Currently, our protein OA-LC/MS platform runs on five LC/MS instruments located in three separate GlaxoSmithKline R&D sites in the US and UK. To date, more than 8000 protein OA-LC/MS samples have been analyzed. With these user friendly and highly automated OA systems in place, mass spectrometry plays a key role in assessing the quality of recombinant proteins, either produced at our facilities or bought from external

  3. Mass spectrometry of fluorocarbon-labeled glycosphingolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Arigi, Emma; Eichert, Heather

    2010-01-01

    ceramide N-deacylase (SCDase) is used to remove the fatty acid from the ceramide moiety, after which a fluorocarbon-rich substituent (F-Tag) is incorporated at the free amine of the sphingoid. In initial trials, a neutral GSL, globotriaosylceramide (Gb(3)Cer), three purified bovine brain gangliosides...... with subsequent per-N,O-methylation was established for the F-tagged Gb(3) Cer and purified gangliosides, and extensive mass spectra (MS(1) and MS(2)) consistent with all of the expected products were acquired. The potential use of F-tagged derivatives for a comprehensive MS based profiling application...

  4. Automated Intelligent Assistant for mass spectrometry operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filby, E.E.; Rankin, R.A.; Yoshida, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Automated Intelligent Assistant is designed to insure that our mass spectrometers produce timely, high-quality measurement data. The design combines instrument interfacing and expert system technology to automate an adaptable set-point damage prevention strategy. When shutdowns occur, the Assistant can help guide troubleshooting efforts. Stored real-time data will help our development program upgrade and improve the system, and also make it possible to re-run previously-observed instrument problems as ''live'' training exercises for the instrument operators. Initial work has focused on implementing the Assistant for the instrument ultra-high vacuum components. 14 refs., 5 figs

  5. Mass spectrometry applied to high temperature chemistry, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Mitsuru; Kato, Eiichi; Sata, Toshiyuki.

    1980-01-01

    The application of mass spectrometry to high temperature chemistry is reviewed. As a blanket material for fusion reactors, the behavior of lithium has been investigated by using mass analysers. The enthalpies of the chemical reactions of metallic lithium were obtained. The enthalpies of isomolecular exchange reactions and the derived atomization energies of LiD, Li 2 D and Li 2 D 2 were also obtained by mass spectrometry. The thermomechanical character of lithium oxide was studied. The vaporization behaviors of LiCrO 2 and Li 5 FeO 4 were studied with a quadrupole mass analyser. The vaporization of cobalt from nickel alloy was studied. The evaporated ions were analysed with a mass analyser. The measurement of the vaporized molecules of metals and fused silicate was made by mass spectrometry. The activities of Fe-V system were determined by measuring the ion current ratio. The activities of Fe-V-Cr system were also obtained. The vapor pressure of phosphor from Fe-P alloys can be measured. The activity coefficients and interaction parameters for the dilute solutions of elements, such as Mn, Al, Cu, Cr, Co, Ni, Si, Ti, V, B, Zr, Mo, C, S, and P, dissolved in liquid iron are shown in a table. The activities of NaCl-KCl system were derived by measuring the ion current ratio and by monomer-dimer method. (Kato, T.)

  6. Application of Laser Mass Spectrometry to Art and Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulian, Lase Lisa E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Muliadi, Sarah; Owens, Shawn; McGovern, Patrick E.; Schmidt, Catherine M.; Trentelman, Karen A.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    REMPI laser mass spectrometry is a combination of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and time of flight mass spectrometry, This technique enables the collection of mass specific optical spectra as well as of optically selected mass spectra. Analytes are jet-cooled by entrainment in a molecular beam, and this low temperature gas phase analysis has the benefit of excellent vibronic resolution. Utilizing this method, mass spectrometric analysis of historically relevant samples can be simplified and improved; Optical selection of targets eliminates the need for chromatography while knowledge of a target's gas phase spectroscopy allows for facile differentiation of molecules that are in the aqueous phase considered spectroscopically indistinguishable. These two factors allow smaller sample sizes than commercial MS instruments, which in turn will require less damage to objects of antiquity. We have explored methods to optimize REMPI laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool to archaeology using theobromine and caffeine as molecular markers in Mesoamerican pottery, and are expanding this approach to the field of art to examine laccaic acid in shellacs.

  7. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bocxlaer, J F; Clauwaert, K M; Lambert, W E; Deforce, D L; Van den Eeckhout, E G; De Leenheer, A P

    2000-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has evolved from a topic of mainly research interest into a routinely usable tool in various application fields. With the advent of new ionization approaches, especially atmospheric pressure, the technique has established itself firmly in many areas of research. Although many applications prove that LC-MS is a valuable complementary analytical tool to GC-MS and has the potential to largely extend the application field of mass spectrometry to hitherto "MS-phobic" molecules, we must recognize that the use of LC-MS in forensic toxicology remains relatively rare. This rarity is all the more surprising because forensic toxicologists find themselves often confronted with the daunting task of actually searching for evidence materials on a scientific basis without any indication of the direction in which to search. Through the years, mass spectrometry, mainly in the GC-MS form, has gained a leading role in the way such quandaries are tackled. The advent of robust, bioanalytically compatible combinations of liquid chromatographic separation with mass spectrometric detection really opens new perspectives in terms of mass spectrometric identification of difficult molecules (e.g., polar metabolites) or biopolymers with toxicological relevance, high throughput, and versatility. Of course, analytical toxicologists are generally mass spectrometry users rather than mass spectrometrists, and this difference certainly explains the slow start of LC-MS in this field. Nevertheless, some valuable applications have been published, and it seems that the introduction of the more universal atmospheric pressure ionization interfaces really has boosted interests. This review presents an overview of what has been realized in forensic toxicological LC-MS. After a short introduction into LC-MS interfacing operational characteristics (or limitations), it covers applications that range from illicit drugs to often abused prescription medicines and some

  8. Photoionization mass spectrometry of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, J.

    1979-01-01

    The photoionization mass spectrum of 238 UF 6 was obtained. At 600 A = 20.66 eV, the relative ionic abundances were as follows: UF 6 + , 1.4; UF 5 + , 100; UF + , 17; UF 3 + , approx. 0.7; UF 2 + , very weak; UF + , very weak; U + , essentially zero. The adiabatic ionization potential for UF 6 was 13.897 +- 0.005 eV. The production of UF 5 + begins at approx. 887 A = 13.98 eV, at which energy the UF 6 + partial cross section abruptly declines and then levels off. This behavior suggests the vague possibility of an isotope effect. The UF 4 + signal begins at approx. 725 A = 17.10 eV, at which energy the UF 5 + signal reaches a plateau value. The UF 5 + photoionization yield curve displays some autoionization structure from its threshold to approx. 750 A

  9. Complete Hexose Isomer Identification with Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabe; Pohl, Nicola L. B.

    2015-04-01

    The first analytical method is presented for the identification and absolute configuration determination of all 24 aldohexose and 2-ketohexose isomers, including the D and L enantiomers for allose, altrose, galactose, glucose, gulose, idose, mannose, talose, fructose, psicose, sorbose, and tagatose. Two unique fixed ligand kinetic method combinations were discovered to create significant enough energetic differences to achieve chiral discrimination among all 24 hexoses. Each of these 24 hexoses yields unique ratios of a specific pair of fragment ions that allows for simultaneous determination of identification and absolute configuration. This mass spectrometric-based methodology can be readily employed for accurate identification of any isolated monosaccharide from an unknown biological source. This work provides a key step towards the goal of complete de novo carbohydrate analysis.

  10. Intact glycopeptide characterization using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wang, Zhe; Prytkova, Iya; Wu, Si

    2016-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most prominent and extensively studied protein post-translational modifications. However, traditional proteomic studies at the peptide level (bottom-up) rarely characterize intact glycopeptides (glycosylated peptides without removing glycans), so no glycoprotein heterogeneity information is retained. Intact glycopeptide characterization, on the other hand, provides opportunities to simultaneously elucidate the glycan structure and the glycosylation site needed to reveal the actual biological function of protein glycosylation. Recently, significant improvements have been made in the characterization of intact glycopeptides, ranging from enrichment and separation, mass spectroscopy (MS) detection, to bioinformatics analysis. In this review, we recapitulated currently available intact glycopeptide characterization methods with respect to their advantages and limitations as well as their potential applications.

  11. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, R C

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 sup 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  12. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  13. Meet interesting abbreviations in clinical mass spectrometry: from compound classification by REIMS to multimodal and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Dominika; Pluháček, Tomáš; Palyzová, Andrea; Přichystal, Jakub; Balogh, J.; Lemr, Karel; Juránek, I.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 353-360 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : REIMS * multimodal * mass spectrometry imaging Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  14. T cells recognizing a peptide contaminant undetectable by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Østerbye, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used in immunological research as epitopes to stimulate their cognate T cells. These preparations are never completely pure, but trace contaminants are commonly revealed by mass spectrometry quality controls. In an effort to characterize novel major histocompatibility...... complex (MHC) Class I-restricted ß-cell epitopes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, we identified islet-infiltrating CD8+ T cells recognizing a contaminating peptide. The amount of this contaminant was so small to be undetectable by direct mass spectrometry. Only after concentration by liquid...... chromatography, we observed a mass peak corresponding to an immunodominant islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214) epitope described in the literature. Generation of CD8+ T-cell clones recognizing IGRP(206-214) using a novel method confirmed the identity...

  15. Analytical applications of resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassett, J.D.; Travis, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    A perspective on the role of resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) in the field of analytical chemistry is presented. RIMS provides new, powerful, and complementary capabilities relative to traditional methods of inorganic mass spectrometry. Much of the initial work in RIMS has been to illustrate these capabilities and define the potential of RIMS in the generalized field of chemical analysis. Three areas of application are reviewed here: (1) noble gas measurements; (2) materials analysis using isotope dilution (IDMS); and, (3) solids analysis using direct sampling. The role of RIMS is discussed relative to the more traditional mass spectrometric methods of analysis in these areas. The applications are meant to illustrate the present state-of-the-art as well as point to the future state-of-the-art of RIMS in chemical analysis. (author)

  16. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, Frauke; Lintzel, Julia; Nussberger, Stephan; Sokolova, Lucie; Brutschy, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  17. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  18. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry system for measurement of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pibida, L.; McMahon, C.A.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Bushaw, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) system has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for sensitive and selective determination of radio-cesium in the environment. The overall efficiency was determined to be 4x10-7 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of 108 for both 135Cs and 137Cs with respect to 133Cs. RIMS isotopic ratio measurements of 135Cs/ 137Cs were performed on a nuclear fuel burn-up sample and compared to measurements on a similar system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results of preliminary RIMS investigations on a freshwater lake sediment sample are also discussed

  19. Mass spectrometry of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-07-01

    Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are an emerging class of drugs for treatment of various diseases including osteoporosis and muscle wasting as well as the correction of age-related functional decline such as muscle strength and power. Several SARMs, which have advanced to preclinical and clinical trials, are composed of diverse chemical structures including arylpropionamide-, bicyclic hydantoin-, quinoline-, and tetrahydroquinoline-derived nuclei. Since January 2008, SARMs have been categorized as anabolic agents and prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Suitable detection methods for these low-molecular weight drugs were based on mass spectrometric approaches, which necessitated the elucidation of dissociation pathways in order to characterize and identify the target analytes in doping control samples as well as potential metabolic products and synthetic analogs. Fragmentation patterns of representatives of each category of SARMs after electrospray ionization (ESI) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) as well as electron ionization (EI) are summarized. The complexity and structural heterogeneity of these drugs is a daunting challenge for detection methods. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A GPU Accelerated Spring Mass System for Surgical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for surgical simulators to dofast and precise calculations of tissue deformation to simulateincreasingly complex morphology in real-time. Unfortunately, evenfast spring-mass based systems have slow convergence rates for largemodels. This paper presents a method to accele...... to accelerate computation of aspring-mass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as theheart. This acceleration is achieved by taking advantage of moderngraphics processing units (GPU)....