WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerator fusion research

  1. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  2. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators

  3. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on heavy-ion fusion accelerator research: MBE-4: the induction-linac approach; transverse beam dynamics and current amplification; scaling up the results; through ILSE to a driver; ion-source and injector development; and accelerator component research and development

  4. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  6. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  7. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  8. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations

  9. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  10. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately

  11. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density C s + sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac

  12. Heavy-ion accelerator research for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers a most attractive long-term solution to the problem of future energy supplies: The fuel is virtually inexhaustible and the fusion reaction is notably free of long-lived radioactive by-products. Also, because the fuel is in the form of a plasma, there is no solid fuel core that could melt down. The DOE supports two major fusion research programs to exploit these virtues, one based on magnetic confinement and a second on inertial confinement. One part of the program aimed at inertial fusion is known as Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, or HIFAR. In this booklet, the aim is to place this effort in the context of fusion research generally, to review the brief history of heavy-ion fusion, and to describe the current status of the HIFAR program

  13. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation

  14. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The National Energy Strategy calls for a demonstration IFE power plant by the year 2025. The cornerstone of the plan to meet this ambitious goal is research and development for heavy-ion driver technology. A series of successes indicates that the technology being studied by the HIFAR Group -- the induction accelerator -- is a prime candidate for further technology development toward this long-range goal. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions; the understanding of the scaling laws that apply in this hitherto little-explored physics regime; and the validation of new, potentially more economical accelerator strategies. Key specific elements to be addressed include: fundamental physical limits of transverse and longitudinal beam quality; development of induction modules for accelerators, along with multiple-beam hardware, at reasonable cost; acceleration of multiple beams, merging of the beams, and amplification of current without significant dilution of beam quality; final bunching, transport, and focusing onto a small target. In 1992, the HIFAR Program was concerned principally with the next step toward a driver: the design of ILSE, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments. ILSE will address most of the remaining beam-control and beam-manipulation issues at partial driver scale. A few parameters -- most importantly, the line charge density and consequently the size of the ILSE beams -- will be at full driver scale. A theory group closely integrated with the experimental groups continues supporting present-day work and looking ahead toward larger experiments and the eventual driver. Highlights of this long-range, driver-oriented research included continued investigations of longitudinal instability and some new insights into scaled experiments with which the authors might examine hard-to-calculate beam-dynamics phenomena

  15. New heavy-ion-fusion accelerator research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1983-05-01

    This paper will briefly summarize the concepts of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), especially those aspects that are important to its potential for generating electrical power. It will also note highlights of the various HIF programs throughout the world. Especially significant is that the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans a program, beginning in 1984, aimed at determining the feasibility of using heavy ion accelerators as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The new program concentrates on the aspects of accelerator design that are important to ICF, and for this reason is called HIF Accelerator Research

  16. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, J.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book

  17. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, J.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book.

  18. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    A plan for exploring the physics and technology of induction linac development is discussed which involves a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments. The first is the single-beam transport experiment, which has explored the physics of a single space-charge-dominated beam. Second is the multiple-beam experiment in which four independent beams will be transported and accelerated through a multigap accelerating structure. The single-beam transport experiment is described, and some results are given of stability studies and instrumentation studies. The design and fabrication of the multi-beam experiment are described, as well as results of a first round of experiments in which beam-current amplification was observed. Concurrent theoretical work, resulting in a variety of acce-leration schedules and sets of associated voltage waveforms required to implement the experiments, is also reported

  19. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  20. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics

  1. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics: MBE-4: The Induction-Linac Approach; Current Amplification and Acceleration Schedules; Emittance and Current Amplification; Scaling Up the Results; Progress on the Carbon-Arc Source; Injector Development; Progress Towards an ILSE Design; Beam Combination; and Focusing-System Alignment Tolerances

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1977--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    Research is reported for the combined groups consisting of the Accelerator Division and the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group. Major topics reported include accelerator operations, magnetic fusion energy, and advanced accelerator development. (GHT)

  3. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Godlove, T.D.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Keefe, D.

    1985-01-01

    In October 1983, a Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research programme (HIFAR) was established under the Office of Energy Research of the United States Department of Energy. The programme goal over the next several years is to establish a data base in accelerator physics and technology that can allow the potential of heavy ion fusion to be accurately assessed. Three new developments have taken place in the HIFAR programme. First, a decision has been made to concentrate the experimental programme on the development of multiple-beam induction linacs. Second, new beam transport experiments over a large number of quadrupole elements show that stable beam propagation occurs for significantly higher beam currents than had been believed possible a few years ago. Third, design calculations now show that a test accelerator of modest size and cost can come within a factor of three of testing almost all of the physics and technical issues appropriate to a power plant driver. (author)

  4. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, fiscal year 1980, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    Research during October 1979 to September 1980 is summarized. Areas covered include: accelerator operations; positron-electron project; stochastic beam cooling; high-field superconducting magnets; accelerator theory; neutral beam sources; and heavy ion fusion

  6. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, induction acceleration, is being studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: (1) beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; (2) development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; (3) acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; (4) final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  7. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, October 1, 1987--March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification -- both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  9. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Keefe, D.

    1984-09-01

    Three new development have taken place in the HIFAR program. First, a decision has been made to concentrate the experimental program on the development of multiple-beam induction linacs. Second, new beam transport experiments over a large number of quadrupole elements show that stable beam propagation occurs for significantly higher beam currents than had been believed possible a few years ago. Third, design calculations now show that a test accelerator of modest size and cost can come within a factor of three of testing almost all of the physics and technical issues appropriate to a power-plant driver

  10. Resolving key heavy-ion fusion target issues with relativistic heavy-ion research accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators designed for relativistic nuclear research experiments can also be adapted for target research in heavy-ion driver inertial fusion. Needle-shaped plasmas can be created that are adequate for studying basic properties of matter at high energy density. Although the ion range is very long, the specific deposited power nevertheless increases with kinetic energy, as the focus spot can be made smaller and more ions can be accumulated in larger rings

  11. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  12. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U. S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alex

    2002-12-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed.

  13. Overview of heavy ion fusion accelerator research in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed

  14. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed

  15. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy

  16. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to access the suitabilty of heavy ion accelerators as iginiters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accerelator techonolgy, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawerence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the vadidation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. The papers in this report that address these goals are: MBE-4 mechanical progress, alignment of MBE-4, a compact energy analyzer for MBE-4, Cs + injector modeling with the EGUN code, an improved emittance scanning system for HIFAR, 2-MV injector, carbon arc source development, beam combining in ILSE, emittance growth due to transverse beam combining in ILSE - particle simulation results, achromatic beam combiner for ILSE, additional elements for beam merging, quadrupole magnet design for ILSE, and waveforms and longitudinal beam-parameters for ILSE

  17. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  18. Pulsed power ion accelerators for inertially confined fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Current research is described on pulsed power ion accelerators for inertial fusion, i.e., ion diodes and collective accelerators. Particle beam energy and power requirements for fusion, and basic deposition characteristics of charged particle beams are discussed. Ion diodes and collective accelerators for fusion are compared with existing conventional accelerators

  19. Charged particle accelerators for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The long history of successful commercial applications of charged-particle accelerators is largely a result of initiative by private industry. The Department of Energy views accelerators mainly as support equipment for particle physicists rather than components of an energy generation program. In FY 91, the DOE spent over 850 M$ on building and supporting accelerators for physics research versus 5 M$ on induction accelerators for fusion energy. The author believes this emphasis is skewed. One must address problems of long-term energy sources to preserve the possibility of basic research by future generations. In this paper, the author reviews the rationale for accelerators as inertial fusion drivers, emphasizing that these devices provide a viable path of fusion energy from viewpoints of both physics and engineering. In this paper, he covered the full range of accelerator fusion applications. Because of space limitations, this paper concentrates on induction linacs for ICF, an approach singled out in recent reports by the National Academy of Sciences and the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee as a promising path to long-term fusion power production. Review papers by Cook, Leung, Franzke, Hofmann and Reiser in these proceedings give details on light ion fusion and RF accelerator studies

  20. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A.

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser

  1. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project

  3. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1989--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This report contains the following topics on heavy ion fusion: MBE-4 drifting beam quadrupole operating range; transverse emittance growth in MBE-4; an improved ion source for MBE-4; drifting beam studies on MBE-4; 2-MV injector; improvements in lifetime of the C + source; injector control system; Maxwell spark gap test update; ILSE cosine 2θ quadrupole magnet development; electrostatic quadrupole prototype development activity; induction accelerator cell development; effect of a spread in beamlet currents on longitudinal stability; and heavy ion linac driver analysis

  4. Reducing risk and accelerating delivery of a neutron source for fusion materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrey, E., E-mail: Elizabeth.Surrey@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Porton, M. [EURATOM/CCFE, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Davenne, T.; Findlay, D.; Letchford, A.; Thomason, J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Roberts, S.G.; Marrow, J.; Seryi, A. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3DP (United Kingdom); Connolly, B. [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Owen, H. [University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Proposed neutron source for fusion materials – FAFNIR – n(d,C) stripping source. • Near term technology, reduces risk compared with IFMIF, timely data production. • Technical, economic and programme needs assessed, compatible with EU Roadmap proposals. • Safety case impacts regulatory role for source, now mainly stakeholder insurance. - Abstract: The materials engineering database relevant to fusion irradiation is poorly populated and it has long been recognized that a fusion spectrum neutron source will be required, the facility IFMIF being the present proposal. Re-evaluation of the regulatory approach for the EU proposed DEMO device shows that the purpose of the source can be changed from lifetime equivalent irradiation exposure to data generation at lower levels of exposure by adopting a defence in depth strategy and regular component surveillance. This reduces the specification of the source with respect to IFMIF allowing lower risk technology solutions to be considered. A description of such a source, the Facility for Fusion Neutron Irradiation Research, FAFNIR, is presented here along with project timescales and costs.

  5. SABRE (Sandia Accelerator and Beam Research Experiment): A test bed for the light ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuneo, M.E.; Hanson, D.L.; McKay, P.F.; Maenchen, J.E.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Nash, T.; Bernard, M.; Boney, C.; Chavez, J.R.; Fowler, W.F.; Ruscetti, J.; Stearns, W.F.; Noack, D.; Wenger, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    Extraction applied-B ion diode experiments are underway on the recently completed SABRE positive polarity linear induction accelerator (6 MV, 220 kA). The authors are performing these experiments in direct support of the light ion fusion program on PBFAII at Sandia. SABRE provides a test bed with a higher shot rate and improved diagnostic access for ion source development and ion beam divergence control experiments. These experiments will also address the coupling of an ion diode to the turbulent, wide spectrum feed electrons which occur on these inductive adders in positive polarity. This work continues previous work on the HELIA accelerator. The diode is a uniformly magnetically insulated, extraction ion diode, with a 5-cm mean anode surface radius. The uniform insulation field profiles are generated by four individual 60 kJ capacitor banks. Field-exclusion profiles are also anticipated. They have developed a wide array of electrical, ion beam, and plasma diagnostics to accomplish their objectives. MITL (magnetically insulated transmission line) and diode voltages are being measured with a magnetic spectrometer, a range-filtered-scintillator (RFS) fiber optic/PMT system, and a range-filtered CR-39 nuclear track film based system. Beam energy can be determined by these diagnostics as well as a filtered Faraday cup array. MITL and ion currents are being measured with an array of Rogowski coils, common-mode rejection and single turn Bs, and resistive shunts. The ion source experiments will investigate thin-film lithium ion sources, particularly the active LEVIS (Laser EVaporation Ion Source) and the passive LiF source. LEVIS uses two pulsed lasers to evaporate and then ionize lithium from a lithium bearing thin-film on the anode. A ruby laser (20 ns, 12 J) for evaporation, and a dye laser for resonant lithium ionization have been developed. The performance of LEVIS with an array of active and passive surface cleaning techniques will be studied

  6. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy

  7. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) half-year report: October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    For this report we have collected the papers presented by the HIFAR group at the IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference held in Washington, DC, on March 16-19, 1987, which essentially coincides with the end of the reporting period. In addition, we report on research to determine the cause of the failures of Re-X insulator that are used as the high-voltage feed-through for the electrostatic quadrupoles on MBE-4. This report contains papers on the following topics: LBL multiple beam experiments, pulsers for the induction linac experiment (MBE-4), HIF insulator failure, experimental measurement of emittance growth in mismatched space-charge dominated beams, the effect of nonlinear forces on coherently oscillating space-charge dominated beams, space-charge effects in a bending magnet system, transverse combining of nonrelativistic beams in a multiple beam induction linac, comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF driver. Eight individual papers have been indexed separately

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: (1) beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; (2) development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple beam hardware, at affordable costs; (3) acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification - both new features in a linac - without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; (4) fianl bunching, transport, and accurate focussing on a small target

  9. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1985-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The heavy ion accelerator is profiled. Energy losses, currents, kinetic energy, beam optics, pulse models and mechanical tolerances are included in the discussion. In addition, computational efforts and an energy analyzer are described. 37 refs., 27 figs

  10. Heavy ion accelerators for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbia, C.

    1992-01-01

    Particle accelerators are used for accelerating the elementary, stable and separable constituents of matters to relativistic speed. These beams are of fundamental interest in the study on the ultimate constituents of matters and their interaction. Particle accelerators are the most promising driver for the fusion power reactors based on inertial confinement. The principle of inertial confinement fusion, radiation driven indirect drive, the accelerator complex and so on are described. (K.I.)

  11. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator

  12. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator

  13. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1986-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Activities are reported on MBE-4, the four-beam proof-of-principle ion induction linear accelerator with the capability of beam-current amplification. Mechanical aspects of MBE-4, quadrupole insulator performance, and pulsers are discussed. The computer code, SLID, has been used to help understand the longitudinal beam dynamics in MBE-4. A computer-controlled emittance scanning system is in use in MBE-4. A systematic effort is under way to discover and correct all the defects peculiar to the low energy part of the linac design code

  14. Economics of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics

  15. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  16. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  17. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  18. International fusion research council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  19. Accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Sawyer, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Accelerator technology development is presented for heavy ion drivers used in inertial confinement fusion. The program includes construction of low-velocity ''test bed'' accelerator facilities, development of analytical and experimental techniques to characterize ion beam behavior, and the study of ion beam energy deposition

  20. Fusion research in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Hungarian fusion research started in the 1970s, when the idea of installing a small tokamak experiment emerged. In return to computer equipment a soviet tokamak was indeed sent to Hungary and started to operate as MT-1 at the Central Research Institute for Physics (KFKI) in 1979. Major research topics included diagnostic development, edge plasma studies and investigation of disruptions. Following a major upgrade in 1992 (new vacuum vessel, active position control and PC network based data acquisition system) the MT-1M tokamak was used for the study of transport processes with trace impurity injection, micropellet ablation studies, X-ray tomography and laser blow-off diagnostic development. Although funding ceased in the middle of the 90's the group was held alive by collaborations with EU fusion labs: FZ -Juelich, IPP-Garching and CRPP-EPFL Lausanne. In 1998 the machine was dismantled due to reorganization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. New horizons opened to fusion research from 1999, when Hungary joined EURATOM and a fusion Association was formed. Since then fusion physics studies are done in collaboration with major EU fusion laboratories, Hungarian researchers also play an active role in JET diagnostics upgrade and ITER design. Major topics are pellet ablation studies, plasma turbulence diagnosis using Beam Emission Spectroscopy and other techniques, tomography and plasma diagnostics using various neutral beams. In fusion relevant technology R and D Hungary has less records. Before joining EURATOM some materials irradiation studies were done at the Budapest Research Reactor at KFKI-AEKI. The present day fusion technology programme focuses still on irradiation studies, nuclear material database and electromagnetic testing techniques. Increasing the fusion technology research activities is a difficult task, as the competition in Hungarian industry is very strong and the interest of organizations in long-term investments into R and D is rather weak and

  1. Japanese fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, T.

    1987-01-01

    The Japan experience during thirty years in nuclear fusion research is reported, after attending the 1st Geneva Conference in 1955, Osaka University, immedeately began linear pinch study using capacitor bank discharge. Subsequently to his trial several groups were organized to ward fusion R and D at universities in Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto, Sendai and son on. Based upon the recommendation of Japan Science Council, Institut of Plasma Physics (IPP) was established at Nagoya University in 1961 When the 1st International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research was held in Saltzburg. The gloomy Bohm barrier had stood in front of many of experiments at that time. (author) [pt

  2. Accelerated plan to develop magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, despite funding delays since the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980, fusion development could still be carried to the point of a demonstration plant by the year 2000 as called for in the Act if funding, now about $365 million per year, were increased to the $1 billion range over the next few years (see Table I). We have also suggested that there may be an economic incentive for the private sector to become in accelerating fusion development on account of the greater stability of energy production costs from fusion. Namely, whereas fossil fuel prices will surely escalate in the course of time, fusion fuel will always be abundantly available at low cost; and fusion technology poses less future risk to the public and the investor compared to conventional nuclear power. In short, once a fusion plant is built, the cost of generating electricity mainly the amortization of the plant capital cost - would be relatively fixed for the life of the plant. In Sec. V, we found that the projected capital cost of fusion plants ($2000 to $4000 per KW/sub e/) would probably be acceptable if fusion plants were available today

  3. Bringing together fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiser, M.

    1982-01-01

    The increasing involvement of the IAEA in fusion, together with the growing efforts devoted to this area, are described. The author puts forward the idea that one of the most important aspects of this involvement is in providing a world-wide forum for scientists. The functions of the IFRC (International Fusion Research Council) as an advisory group are outlined, and the role played by IFRC in the definition and objectives of INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) are briefly described

  4. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed

  5. Recirculating induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Deadrick, F.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently completed a two-year study of recirculating induction heavy-ion accelerators (recirculators) as low-cost drivers for inertial-fusion-energy power plants. We present here a summary of that study and other recent work on recirculators

  6. Conference on Norwegian fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of instituting a systematic research programme in Norway on aspects of thermonuclear and plasma physics has been raised. The conference here reported was intended to provide basic information on the status of fusion research internationally and to discuss a possible Norwegian programme. The main contributions covered the present status of fusion research, international cooperation, fusion research in small countries and minor laboratories, fusion research in Denmark and Sweden, and a proposed fusion experiment in Bergen. (JIW)

  7. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  8. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  9. High temperature experiment for accelerator inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    The High Temperature Experiment (HTE) is intended to produce temperatures of 50-100 eV in solid density targets driven by heavy ion beams from a multiple beam induction linac. The fundamental variables (particle species, energy number of beamlets, current and pulse length) must be fixed to achieve the temperature at minimum cost, subject to criteria of technical feasibility and relevance to the development of a Fusion Driver. The conceptual design begins with an assumed (radiation-limited) target temperature and uses limitations due to particle range, beamlet perveance, and target disassembly to bound the allowable values of mass number (A) and energy (E). An accelerator model is then applied to determine the minimum length accelerator, which is a guide to total cost. The accelerator model takes into account limits on transportable charge, maximum gradient, core mass per linear meter, and head-to-tail momentum variation within a pulse

  10. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an RF linac/storage ring combination as an intertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL

  11. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1985-05-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an rf linac/storage ring combination as an inertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL. 28 refs., 4 figs

  12. First-year progress on research and development of a mass accelerator (MAID) as a driver for impact fusion, May 6, 1981-May 5, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this program is to construct a small scale mass accelerator consisting of 10 plasma discharge modules, and perform experiments and analysis with the system so that reliable scaling laws can be obtained for the device. The effort is directed to determining whether a large scale version of such a plasma driven mass accelerator could be used as a driver for inertial fusion, or other energy-related applications

  13. Illinois Accelerator Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Cooper, Charlie A.

    The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) hosts a new accelerator development program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC provides access to Fermi's state-of-the-art facilities and technologies for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology. In addition to facilitating access to available existing Fermi infrastructure, the IARC Campus has a dedicated 36,000 ft2 Heavy Assembly Building (HAB) with all the infrastructure needed to develop, commission and operate new accelerators. Connected to the HAB is a 47,000 ft2 Office, Technology and Engineering (OTE) building, paid for by the state, that has office, meeting, and light technical space. The OTE building, which contains the Accelerator Physics Center, and nearby Accelerator and Technical divisions provide IARC collaborators with unique access to world class expertise in a wide array of accelerator technologies. At IARC scientists and engineers from Fermilab and academia work side by side with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security.

  14. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  15. Fusion research activities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xiwen

    1998-01-01

    The fusion program in China has been executed in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion for more than 30 years. Basing on the situation of the power supply requirements of China, the fusion program is becoming an important and vital component of the nuclear power program in China. This paper reviews the status of fusion research and next step plans in China. The motivation and goal of the Chinese fusion program is explained. Research and development on tokamak physics and engineering in the southwestern institute of physics (SWIP) and the institute of plasma physics of Academic Sinica (ASIPP) are introduced. A fusion breeder program and a pure fusion reactor design program have been supported by the state science and technology commission (SSTC) and the China national nuclear corporation (CNNC), respectively. Some features and progress of fusion reactor R and D activities are reviewed. Non fusion applications of plasma science are an important part of China fusion research; a brief introduction about this area is given. Finally, an introductional collaboration network on fusion research activities in China is reported. (orig.)

  16. Construction of ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kenziro; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Yamada, Rayji; Abe, Tetsuya; Sone, Kazuho

    1977-09-01

    A Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator for ion-surface interaction research was installed at Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI, in March 1977. Its maximum accelerating voltage is 400 kV. The accelerator has some outstanding features compared with the conventional type. Described are setup of the accelerator specification of the major components, safety system and performance. (auth.)

  17. 50 years of fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Fusion energy research began in the early 1950s as scientists worked to harness the awesome power of the atom for peaceful purposes. There was early optimism for a quick solution for fusion energy as there had been for fission. However, this was soon tempered by reality as the difficulty of producing and confining fusion fuel at temperatures of 100 million °C in the laboratory was appreciated. Fusion research has followed two main paths—inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion. Over the past 50 years, there has been remarkable progress with both approaches, and now each has a solid technical foundation that has led to the construction of major facilities that are aimed at demonstrating fusion energy producing plasmas.

  18. Accelerators for atomic energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    1999-01-01

    The research and educational activities accomplished using accelerators for atomic energy research were studied. The studied items are research subjects, facility operation, the number of master theses and doctor theses on atomic energy research using accelerators and the future role of accelerators in atomic energy research. The strategy for promotion of the accelerator facility for atomic energy research is discussed. (author)

  19. Controlled thermonuclear fusion: research on magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, P.J.

    1988-12-01

    Recent progress in thermonuclear fusion research indicates that the scientists' schedule for the demonstration of the scientific feasibility will be kept and that break-even will be attained in the course of the next decade. To see the implementation of ignition, however, the generation of future experiments must be awaited. These projects are currently under study. With technological research going on in parallel, they should at the same time contribute to the design of a reactor. Fusion reactors will be quite different from the fission nuclear reactors we know, and the waste of the plants will also be of a different nature. It is still too early to define the precise design of a fusion reactor. On the basis of a toric machine concept like that of the tokamak, we can, however, envisage that the problems with which we are confronted will be solved one after the other. As we have just seen, these will be the objectives of the future experimental installations where ignition will be possible and where the flux of fast neutrons will be so strong that they will allow the study of low-activation materials which will be used in the structure of the reactor. But this is also a task in which from now onwards numerous laboratories in Europe and in the world participate. The works are in fact punctiform, and often the mutual incidences can only be determined by an approach simulated by numerical codes. (author) 19 figs., 6 tabs., 8 refs

  20. New approaches to the economic evaluation of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazelrigg, G.A.; Lietzke, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The economic evaluation of fusion research to date has focussed on the benefits of essentially unlimited energy for future generations. In this paper it is shown that energy research in general, and fusion research in particular, also provides benefits in the short term, benefitting us today as well as future generations. Short-term benefits are the result of two distinct aspects of fusion research. First, fusion research provides information for decision making on both the continuing fusion research efforts and on other energy research programs. Second, fusion research provides an expectation of a future energy source thereby promoting accelerated consumption of existing fossil fuels today. Both short-term benefits can be quantitatively evaluated and both are quite substantial. Together, these short-term benefits form the primary economic rationale for fusion research

  1. Fusion research at Culham site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolonen, P.; Toppila, T.

    1998-01-01

    One of the many targets on the Finnish Nuclear Society (ATS) excursion to England was the Culham fusion research site. The site has divided into two parts. One of them is UKAEA Fusion with small scale fusion reactors and 200 employees. UKAEA has 3 fusion reactors at Culham site. One of is the START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) which was operational since 1991 but is today already out of operation. UKAEA has been operating a JET-like tokamak fusion reactor COMPASS-D since 1989. The latest of three reactors is MAST (Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak), which is still under construction. The first plasma will take place in the end of 1998. Another part of Culham site is JET (Joint European Torus), an all-European fusion undertaking with 350 employees. 150 of them are from various European countries and the rest 200 are employed by UKAEA. JET is the biggest fusion reactor ever and it represents the latest step in world wide fusion programme. In October 1997 JET achieved a world record in fusion power and energy. JET produced 16,1 MW power for 1 s and totally 21,7 MJ energy. This is the closest attempt to achieve break-even conditions. The next step in world wide fusion programme will be international ITER-reactor. This undertaking has some financial problems, since United States has taken distance to magnetic fusion research and moved closer to inertial fusion with funding of US Department of Defence. The planned reactor, however, is physically twice as big as JET. The step after this phase will be DEMO, which is purposed to produce fusion energy. According to our hosts in Culham this phase is 40 years ahead. (author)

  2. Fusion research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress

  3. Accelerator and fusion research division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transverse and longitudinal phase volumes are evaluated and dilution factors defined. A new and simpler expression for the effect of third-order geometric aberrations is given. Constraints on the final quadrupole bore radius are discussed. Parameters of the example design are given and the preceding analysis is applied to it. The available dilution factor allows a comparison between the present induction linac example design and the rf linac designs available in 1978. The last sections contain a discussion of phase-space limitation on attaining high power density for spot heating experiments, and a brief discussion and summary.

  4. Fusion research at Imperial College

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The historical roots of fusion research at Imperial College can be traced back to 1946 with the pioneering work of G.P. Thomson. At present research in fusion is carried out in several research groups with interdisciplinary work managed by the Centre for Fusion Studies. The principal research activity will be centred on a newly funded 5 TW pulsed power facility allowing an experimental and theoretical study of radiation collapse and fusion conditions in the dense Z-pinch. Laser-plasma studies relevant to inertial confinement are carried out using the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory's Central Laser Facility and the new ultra-short pulse (300 fs) laser facility at Imperial College. There is a significant collaboration on the Joint European Torus and the Next European Torus together with a continuation of a long association with Culham Laboratory. Several European collaborations funded by the Comission of the European Communities and other world-wide collaborations form an integral part of this university programme, which is by far the largest in the UK. After a sketch of the historical development of fusion activities, the current and future programme of fusion research at Imperial College is presented in each of the three broad areas: the Z-pinch, laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and tokamak and other conventional magnetic confinement schemes. A summary of the funding and collaborations is outlined. (author)

  5. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This progress report for the Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland covers the second year (June 1, 1989 to May 31, 1990) of the current three-year contract period from June 1, 1988 to May 31, 1991, funded by the Department of Energy under Contract No. AC05-85ER40216. The research program is divided into three separate tasks, as follows: the study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams; the study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pulse-Powered Plasma Focus; the study of Microwave Sources and Parameter Scaling for High-Frequency Linacs. This report consists of three sections in which the progress for each task is documented separately. An introduction and synopsis is presented at the beginning of the progress report for each task

  6. Research into thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, U.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies carried out in close international cooperation in the field of thermonuclear fusion by magnetic plasma confinement have achieved such progress towards higher plasma temperatures and densities, longer confinement times and, thus, increased fusion product, that emphasis now begins to be shifted from problems of physics to those of technology as a next major step is being prepared towards a large international project (ITER) to achieve thermonuclear burning. The generation and maintenance of a burning fusion plasma in an experimental physics phase will be followed by a phase of technical materials studies at high fluxes of fusion neutrons. These goals have been pursued since 1983 by an international study group at Garching working on the design of a Next European Torus (NET). Since May 1988, an international study group comprising ten experts each from the USSR, USA, Japan, and the European Community has begun to work on a design draft of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Garching under the auspices of IAEA. (orig.) [de

  7. Fusion research program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    Fusion research in Korea is still premature, but it is a fast growing program. Groups in several universities and research institutes were working either in small experiments or in theoretical areas. Recently, couple of institutes who have small fusion-related experiments, proposed medium-size tokamak programs to jump into fusion research at the level of international recognition. Last year, Korean government finally approved to construct 'Superconducting Tokamak' as a national fusion program, and industries such as Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO) and Samsung joined to support this program. Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has organized national project teams including universities, research institutes and companies. National project teams are performing design works since this March. (author)

  8. Future directions in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his analysis to quantify the priority of fusion R and D in the United States. The conclusion is that this priority has been essentially constant for 35 years with only two exceptions. He identifies four basic problems that must be solved. These problems are: to improve the scientific understanding of confinement concepts if we are going to have an energy source that can be utilized some day; to understand the physics of burning plasmas; to develop the materials for fusion use to realize the environmental potential of fusion; and to develop fusion nuclear technology. A response to these problems is given, based on the author's argument for international collaboration in fusion research

  9. Recirculating induction accelerators for inertial fusion: Prospects and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US is developing the physics and technology of induction accelerators for heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion. The recirculating induction accelerator repeatedly passes beams through the same set of accelerating and focusing elements, thereby reducing both the length and gradient of the accelerator structure. This promises an attractive driver cost, if the technical challenges associated with recirculation can be met. Point designs for recirculator drivers were developed in a multi-year study by LLNL, LBNL, and FM Technologies, and that work is briefly reviewed here. To validate major elements of the recirculator concept, we are developing a small (4-5-m diameter) prototype recirculator which will accelerate a space-charge-dominated beam of K + ions through 15 laps, from 80 to 320 keV and from 2 to 8 mA. Transverse beam confinement is effected via permanent-magnet quadrupoles; bending is via electric dipoles. This ''Small Recirculator'' is being developed in a build-and-test sequence of experiments. An injector, matching section, and linear magnetic channel using seven half-lattice periods of permanent-magnet quadrupole lenses are operational. A prototype recirculator half-lattice period is being fabricated. This paper outlines the research program, and presents initial experimental results

  10. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ''Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ''Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ''Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  11. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  12. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  13. [Fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  14. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Marino, S.A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hall, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which can be used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology and radiological physics. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL), and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy. RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, with priorities based on the recommendations of a Scientific Advisory Committee. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This chapter presents a brief description of current experiments being carried out at RARAF and of the operation of the Facility from January through June, 1986. Operation of the Facility for all of 1985 was described in the 1985 Progress Report for RARAF. The experiments described here were supported by various Grants and Contracts from NIH and DOE and by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut of Sweden

  15. Status report on fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, Werner

    2005-01-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century mankind is faced with the serious problem of meeting the energy demands of a rapidly industrializing population around the globe. This, against the backdrop of fast diminishing fossil fuel resources (which have been the main source of energy of the last century) and the increasing realization that the use of fossil fuels has started to adversely affect our environment, has greatly intensified the quest for alternative energy sources. In this quest, fusion has the potential to play a very important role and we are today at the threshold of realizing net energy production from controlled fusion experiments. Fusion is, today, one of the most promising of all alternative energy sources because of the vast reserves of fuel, potentially lasting several thousands of years and the possibility of a relatively 'clean' form of energy, as required for use in concentrated urban industrial settings, with minimal long term environmental implications. The last decade and a half has seen unprecedented advances in controlled fusion experiments with the discovery of new regimes of operations in experiments, production of 16 MW of fusion power and operations close to and above the so-called 'break-even' conditions. A great deal of research has also been carried out in analysing various socio-economic aspects of fusion energy. This paper briefly reviews the various aspects and achievements of fusion research all over the world during this period

  16. Linear induction accelerators for fusion and neutron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA

    1993-08-01

    Linear induction accelerators (LIA) with pulsed power drives can produce high energy, intense beams or electrons, protons, or heavy ions with megawatts of average power. The continuing development of highly reliable LIA components permits the use such accelerators as cost-effective beam sources to drive fusion pellets with heavy ions, to produce intense neutron fluxes using proton beams, and to generate with electrons microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf-linacs

  17. New trends in fusion research

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to ignition or to sustained burn using additional heating and a control of plasma-wall interaction and energy and particle exhaust. These lectures address recent advances in plasma science and technology that are relevant to the development of fusion energy. Mention will be made of the inertial confinement line of research, but...

  18. Nuclear fusion research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the recently formed National Plasma Fusion Research Facility centred around the H-1NF Heliac, located at the Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies is described in the context of the international Stellarator program and the national collaboration with the Australian Fusion Research Group. The objectives of the facility and the planned physics research program over the next five years are discussed and some recent results will be presented. The facility will support investigations in the following research areas: finite pressure equilibrium and stability, transport in high temperature plasmas, plasma heating and formation, instabilities and turbulence, edge plasma physics and advanced diagnostic development

  19. Collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.; Davis, S.; Roney, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental collaborative efforts in the fusion community and extrapolates to operational scenarios for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current requirements, available technologies and tools, and problems, issues and concerns are discussed. This paper specifically focuses on the issues that apply to experimental operational collaborations. Special requirements for other types of collaborations, such as theoretical or design and construction efforts, will not be addressed. Our current collaborative efforts have been highly successful, even though the tools in use will be viewed as primitive by tomorrow's standards. An overview of the tools and technologies in today's collaborations can be found in the first section of this paper. The next generation of fusion devices will not be primarily institutionally based, but will be national (TPX) and international (ITER) in funding, management, operation and in ownership of scientific results. The TPX will present the initial challenge of real-time remotely distributed experimental data analysis for a steady state device. The ITER will present new challenges with the possibility of several remote control rooms all participating in the real-time operation of the experimental device. A view to the future of remote collaborations is provided in the second section of this paper

  20. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Avery, R.T.; Brady, V.; Bisognano, J.; Celata, C.; Chupp, W.W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Laslett, L.J.; Lee, E.P.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.

    1984-01-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams. (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to proportional70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units. (orig.)

  1. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  2. Progress of laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1988-01-01

    The history of the research on nuclear fusion utilizing laser is described. It started in USSR in 1968, but the full scale start of laser implosion nuclear fusion was in 1972. In Osaka University, nuclear fusion neutrons were detected with a solid deuterium target and the phenomenon of parametric abnormal absorption in laser plasma was found in 1971. The new type target for implosion nuclear fusion ''Canon ball'' was devised in 1975. The phenomenon of the abnormal transmission of laser beam through a thin metal film in a multiple film target was found in 1976, and named ''Osaka effect''. Also the development of lasers has been advanced, and in 1983, a largest glass laser in the world, Gekko 12, with 12 beams, 30 kJ output, 55 TW, was completed. The new target LHART was devised, which enabled the generation of 10 trillion D-T reaction neutrons. Due to the development of high power laser technology, the realization of the new design of fuel pellets, the evaluation of the data by computer simulation, and the realization of new plasma diagnostic method, the research on laser nuclear fusion has developed rapidly, and the attainment of break-even is expected in 1990s. The features of inertial nuclear fusion are enumerated. (Kako, I.)

  3. Fusion program research materials inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, T.K.; Wiffen, F.W.; Davis, J.W.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a central inventory of research materials to provide a common supply of materials for the Fusion Reactor Materials Program. This will minimize unintended material variations and provide for economy in procurement and for centralized record keeping. Initially this inventory is to focus on materials related to first-wall and structural applications and related research, but various special purpose materials may be added in the future. The use of materials from this inventory for research that is coordinated with or otherwise related technically to the Fusion Reactor Materials Program of DOE is encouraged

  4. Inertial confinement fusion systems using heavy ion accelerators as drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Godlove, T.F.; Keefe, D.

    1980-03-01

    Heavy ion accelerators are the most recent entrants in the effort to identify a practical driver for inertial confinement fusion. They are of interest because of the expected efficient coupling of ion kinetic energy to the thermal energy needed to implode the pellet and because of the good electrical efficiency of high intensity particle accelerators. The beam intensities required, while formidable, lie within the range that can be studied by extensions of the theories and the technology of modern high energy accelerators

  5. Magnetic linear accelerator (MAGLAC) for hypervelocity acceleration in impact fusion (IF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents considerations on the design of a magnetic linear accelerator suitable as driver for impact fusion. We argue that the proposed approach offers an attractive option to accelerate macroscopic matter to centiluminal velocity suitable for fusion applications. The design goal is to attain a velocity approaching 200 km/sec. Recent results in suitable target design suggest that a velocity in the range of 40-100 km/sec might be sufficient to include fusion. An accelerator in this velocity range can be constructed with current-day technology. We present both design and practical engineering considerations. Future work are outlined and recommended. (orig.)

  6. Focus on nuclear fusion research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenek, Petr; Mlynář, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2011), s. 62-63 ISSN 0375-8842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : ITER * COMPASS * fusion energy * tokamak * EURATOM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.ipp.cas.cz/Tokamak/clanky/energetika_COMPASS.pdf

  7. RF accelerators for fusion and strategic defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    RF linacs have a place in fusion, either in an auxiliary role for materials testing or for direct drivers in heavy-ion fusion. For SDI, the particle-beam technology is an attractive candidate for discrimination missions and also for lethality missions. The free-electron laser is also a forerunner among the laser candidates. in many ways, there is less physics development required for these devices and there is an existing high-power technology. But in all of these technologies, in order to scale them up and then space-base them, there is an enormous amount of work yet to be done

  8. Design study of an accelerator for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, T.; Noda, A.; Tokuda, N.; Hirao, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Design of a demonstration accelerator for heavy ion fusion based on a synchrotron system is briefly described. The proposed complex system of injector linac, rapid cycling synchrotron and five accumulation rings can produce a peak current 1.6 kA, peak power 32 TW and total energy 0.3 MJ. Investigations of the intrabeam scattering give a lifetime of the beam longer than the fusion cycle time of 1 sec

  9. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the last few years, there have also appeared in the Heavy-Ion Fusion literature several studies of targets which have outer tampers. One-dimensional simulations indicate higher target gains with a judicious amount of tamping. But for these targets, a full investigation has not been carried through in regards to conservative criteria for fluid instabilities as well as reasonable imperfections in target fabrication and illumination symmetry which all affect target ignition and burn. Comparisons of these results with the gain survey of Part I would have to be performed with care. These calculations suggest that experiments relating to high temperature disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics

  10. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  11. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2005-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy. (author)

  12. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P; Covo, Kireeff M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.; Prost, L.

    2004-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy

  13. Accelerator aspects of heavy ion induced inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, D

    1983-01-01

    Besides the possibilities of the magnetic fusion those of inertial fusion have increasingly found interest. Bundled photon and corpuscular beams shall be symetrically focussed from the outside on a pellet with the fusion fuel being compressed far beyond the density of the ordinary solids. Laser, light ion and heavy ion beams can be used as driver beams. The GSI took over the project leadership for a five years' research programme with formulated questions on heavy ion fusion. The project is promoted by the BMFT. During the international symposium the opportunity of intensive discussions on research work in this field in different countries was made use of.

  14. Limitations of heavy ion synchrotron acceleration for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berley, D.; Danby, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    The potential benefits from heavy ion inertial fusion motivate the rapid development of a program to test the principle. To define the program, accelerator parameters which have not hitherto been commonly considered must be studied interactively with basic questions of space charge limitations and charge exchange. Beam lifetime and power output efficiency may ultimately lead to a linear accelerator as the choice for an ignition device. For proof of principle, however, at power levels way beyond present inertial fusion experience, synchrotrons may have applicability at lower cost. The power and energy which can be delivered by the accelerating system to the reaction chamber are limited by space charge defocussing and intra beam charge exchange scattering, both of which are beam density dependent. These put constraints on linac injector energy, synchrotron aperture, synchrotron magnetic rigidity, acceleration time, ion species and charge to mass ratio. The accelerator system considered is classical. A linear accelerator injects into a synchrotron which accelerates the ion beam to the full energy delivered to the target. The maximum energy deliverable by a synchrotron is treated in section I. The targetting parameters and the energy gained through synchrotron acceleration completely determine the synchrotron aperture. These are discussed in sections II and III. The ion range in material is treated in section IV. The problem of intrabeam scattering is considered in section V. Finally, in section VI is a discussion of examples to meet specified goals

  15. Inertial confinement fusion systems using heavy ion accelerators as drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Godlove, T.F.; Keefe, D.

    1980-01-01

    Heavy ion accelerators are the most recent entrants in the effort to identify a practical driver for inertial confinement fusion. They are of interest because of the expected efficient coupling of ion kinetic energy to the thermal energy needed to implode the pellet and because of the good electrical efficiency of high intensity particle accelerators. The beam intensities required, while formidable, lie within the range that can be studied by extensions of the theories and the technology of modern high energy accelerators. (orig.) [de

  16. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1990-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Inertial fusion research: Annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research activities undertaken at KMS Fusion (KMSF) during 1985. It is organized into three main technical sections; the first covers fusion experiments and theoretical physics, the second is devoted to progress in materials development and target fabrication, and the third describes laser technology research. These three individual sections have been cataloged separately

  18. Magnetic fusion research in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1990-01-01

    This article is a presentation prepared by the Third World Academy of Sciences on magnetic fusion research activity in the developing countries and its connection with the IAEA's own fusion programme. 6 figs, 1 tab

  19. Accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs

  20. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  1. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  2. Accelerator research studies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The major goal of this project is to study the effects that lead to emittance growth and limitation of beam current and brightness in periodic focusing systems (including linear accelerators). This problem is of great importance for all accelerator applications requiring high intensity beams with small emittance such as heavy ion fusion, spallation neutron sources and high energy physics. In the latter case, future machines must not only provide higher energies (in the range of 10 to 100 TeV), but also higher luminosities than the existing facilities. This implies considerably higher phase-space density of the particle beam produced by the injector linac, i.e., the detrimental emittance growth and concurrent beam loss observed in existing linacs must be avoided

  3. Accelerator-driven neutron sources for materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Particle accelerators are important tools for materials research and production. Advances in high-intensity linear accelerator technology make it possible to consider enhanced neutron sources for fusion material studies or as a source of spallation neutrons. Energy variability, uniformity of target dose distribution, target bombardment from multiple directions, time-scheduled dose patterns, and other features can be provided, opening new experimental opportunities. New designs have also been used to ensure hands-on maintenance on the accelerator in these factory-type facilities. Designs suitable for proposals such as the Japanese Energy-Selective Intense Neutron Source, and the international Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are discussed

  4. Muon-catalyzed fusion: A new direction in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    In four years of intensive research, muon-catalyzed fusion has been raised from the level of a scientific curiosity to a potential means of achieving clean fusion energy. This novel approach to fusion is based on the fact that a sub-atomic particle known as a ''muon'' can induce numerous energy-releasing fusion reactions without the need for high temperatures or plasmas. Thus, the muon serves as a catalyst to facilitate production for fusion energy. The success of the research effort stems from the recent discovery of resonances in the reaction cycle which make the muon-induced fusion process extremely efficient. Prior estimates were pessimistic in that only one fusion per muon was expected. In that case energy balance would be impossible since energy must be invested to generate the muons. However, recent work has gone approximately half-way to energy balance and further improvements are being worked on. There has been little time to assess the full implications of these discoveries. However, various ways to use muon-catalyzed fusion for electrical power production are now being explored

  5. Muon-catalyzed fusion: a new direction in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    In four years of intensive research, muon-catalyzed fusion has been raised from the level of a scientific curiosity to a potential means of achieving clean fusion energy. This novel approach to fusion is based on the fact that a sub-atomic particle known as a ''muon'' can induce numerous energy-releasing fusion reactions without the need for high temperatures or plasmas. Thus, the muon serves as a catalyst to facilitate production for fusion energy. The success of the research effort stems from the recent discovery of resonances in the reaction cycle which make the muon-induced fusion process extremely efficient. Prior estimates were pessimistic in that only one fusion per muon was expected. In that case energy balance would be impossible since energy must be invested to generate the muons. However, recent work has gone approximately half-way to energy balance and further improvements are being worked on. There has been little time to assess the full implications of these discoveries. However, various ways to use muon-catalyzed fusion for electrical power production are now being explored

  6. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Intense Neutron Source Lab.; Jameson, R.A.; Blind, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Teplyakov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States); Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fur Angewandte Phys.; Ferdinand, R.; Lagniel, J.-M. [CEA Saclay LNS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miyahara, A. [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Olivier, M. [CEA DSM, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Piechowiak, E. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States); Tanabe, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.) 8 refs.

  7. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M.; Teplyakov, V.; Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J.; Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K.; Miyahara, A.; Olivier, M.; Piechowiak, E.; Tanabe, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.)

  8. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  9. Fusion plasma research and education in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.

    1995-01-01

    Japanese fusion plasma research and education is reviewed by focusing on the activities promoted by the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture, and Sports (MOE). University fusion research is pursued by the academic interest and student education. A hierarchical structure of budget and manpower arrangement is observed. The small research groups of universities play the role of recruiting young students into the fusion and plasma society. After graduating the master course, most students are engaged by industries

  10. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Hogan, J.T.; Porkolab, M.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  11. Fusion energy research for ITER and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Francesco; Laxaaback, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The achievement in the last two decades of controlled fusion in the laboratory environment is opening the way to the realization of fusion as a source of sustainable, safe and environmentally responsible energy. The next step towards this goal is the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which aims to demonstrate net fusion energy production on the reactor scale. This paper reviews the current status of magnetic confinement fusion research in view of the ITER project and provides an overview of the main remaining challenges on the way towards the realization of commercial fusion energy production in the second half of this century. (orig.)

  12. Beam dynamics studies of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.

    1995-04-01

    A driver-scale injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (> 2 MV), high current (> 0.8 A of K + ) and low normalized emittance (< 1 π mm-mr). The injector consists of a 750 keV diode pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. The fully 3-D PIC code WARP together with EGUN and POISSON were used to design the machine and analyze measurements of voltage, current and phase space distributions. A comparison between beam dynamics characteristics as measured for the injector and corresponding computer calculations will be presented

  13. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  14. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hutch

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear fusion — the process that powers the sun — offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITER fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world’s population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW’s task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.)

  15. High current pulsed linear ion accelerators for inertial fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Yonas, G.; Poukey, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed ion beams have a number of advantages for use as inertial fusion drivers. Among these are classical interaction with targets and good efficiency of production. As has been pointed out by members of the accelerator community, multistage accelerators are attractive in this context because of lower current requirements, low power flow per energy conversion stage and low beam divergence at higher ion energies. On the other hand, current transport limits in conventional accelerators constrain them to the use of heavy ions at energies much higher than those needed to meet the divergence requirements, resulting in large, costly systems. We have studied methods of neutralizing ion beams with electrons within the accelerator volume to achieve higher currents. The aim is to arrive at an inexpensive accelerator that can advantageously use existing pulsed voltage technology while being conservative enough to achieve a high repetition rate. Typical output parameters for reactor applications would be an 0 + beam of 30 kA at 300 MeV. We will describe reactor scaling studies and the physics of neutralized linear accelerators using magnetic fields to control the electron dynamics. Recent results are discussed from PULSELAC, a five stage multikiloampere device being tested at Sandia Laboratories

  16. Cold fusion research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaramuzzi, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes cold fusion (CF) research in Italy. In Italy, many Agencies and Universities are moderately funding research in CF, and the scientists have made a few attempts to coordinate each other, organizing meetings and conferences. However, the activity has been mostly the fruit of the scientists' initiative, and never a coordinated proposal of Agencies and Universities. No position on the scientific validity of the subject has been officially taken and the funds for CF have been rather modest. The investments in Italy on CF, the figure referring to 1992 amounts to about 0.5 million dollars, not including expenses for personnel. A number of about 70 scientists, mostly working part-time, is committed all around the Country in research on CF. The lack of offical commitment and effective support by the Research Agencies and the Universities has not prevented scientists from being quite active in performing research. On the other side, it has to be acknowledged that no formal vetoes have been interposed to the free initiative of scientists in this field: on the contrary, some of the Agencies and Universities have moderately funded such an effort. The quality of the experiments in Italy has been increasingly good, and the results obtained are rather out standing in the general panorama of CF. But it is time to perform a more coordinated effort, keeping in mind that material science aspects, such as the characteristics of the materials used, play a very important role in the development of this topic. Thus, a much more intense effort is required to obtain a more substantial progress in the field. The increasingly convincing results obtained by the whole CF community, and the example of the Japanese Government and Industry, which appear to be determined to promoting CF research, have changed the panorama of CF. These are now signs that also the Italian scientific authorities could consider favouring research in this field in the near future. (J.P.N.)

  17. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described

  18. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993

  19. Spin-off produced by the fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Koichi; Konishi, T.; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear fusion devices are constructed by the integration of many frontier technologies and fusion science based on a wide area of science such as physics, electromagnetics, thermodynamics, mechanics, electrical engineering, electronics, material engineering, heat transfer and heat flow, thermal engineering, neutronics, cryogenics, chemical engineering, control engineering, instrumentation engineering, vacuum engineering. For this, the research and development of elementary technology for fusion devices contributes to advance the technology level of each basic field. In addition, the mutual stimulus among various research fields contributes to increase the potential level of whole 'science and technology'. The spin-offs produced by the fusion technology development give much contribution not only to the general industrial technologies such as semiconductor technology, precision machining of large component, but also contribute to the progress of the accelerator technology, application technology of superconductivity, instrumentation and diagnostics, plasma application technology, heat-resistant and heavy radiation-resistant material technology, vacuum technology, and computer simulation technology. The spin-off produced by the fusion technology development expedite the development of frontier technology of other field and give much contribution to the progress of basic science on physics, space science, material science, medical science, communication, and environment. This report describes the current status of the spin-off effects of fusion research and development by focusing on the contribution of technology development for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) to industrial technology. The possibilities of future application in the future are also included in this report from the view point of researchers working for nuclear fusion development. Although the nuclear fusion research has a characteristic to integrate the frontier technologies of

  20. Advanced accelerator research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Research and development on the Positron-Electron Project (PEP), the electron rings, the superconducting accelerator (ESCAR), and the superconductivity program are reported. Efforts relating to the proposed PEP include work on: (1) the injection system; (2) the rf system; (3) the main-ring bend magnets; (4) the magnet power supplies and controls; (5) alignment; (6) radiation and shielding; (7) the vacuum system; and (8) conventional facilities (utilities, etc.). Experimental and theoretical work continued on the development of suitably intense electron rings as vehicles for the collective acceleration of ions. The most difficult problem was found to be the longitudinal (negative mass) instability. Design work was begun for ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerating Ring), a small proton synchrotron and storage ring using superconducting magnets, which should aid in the design of future large superconducting facilities. Magnet development was largely directed toward the detailed design of the dipole units. A superconducting beam transport line was installed at the Bevatron. (PMA)

  1. UCLA accelerator research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the φ Factory

  2. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-03-22

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected.

  3. Accelerator research studies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    Progress is reported in both experimental studies as well as theoretical understanding of the beam transport problem. Major highlights are: (a) the completion of the first channel section with 12 periods and two matching solenoids, (b) measurements of beam transmission and emittance in this 12-lens channel, (c) extensive analytical and numerical studies of the beam transport problem in collaboration with GSI (W. Germany), (d) detailed measurements and calculations of beam propagation through one lens with spherical aberration and space charge, and (e) completion of the emittance grids at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory. Our main objectives in Task B of our research program are: (a) study of collective acceleration of positive ions from a localized plasma source by an intense relativistic electron beam (IREB), (b) external control of the IREB beam front by a slow-wave structure to achieve higher ion energies - the Beam Front Accelerator (BFA) concept, (c) study of ion and electron acceleration and other applications of a plasma focus device, and (d) theoretical studies in support of (a) and (b). Our research in these areas has been oriented towards obtaining an improved understanding of the physical processes at work in these experiments and, subsequently, achieving improved performance for specific potential applications

  4. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Goldhagen, P.

    1988-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generated a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the RRL are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and put back into operation. Data obtained from experiment using RARAF have been of pragmatic value to radiation protection and to neutron therapy. At a more fundamental level, the research at RARAF has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and especially its relation to energy distribution in the cell. High-LET radiations are an agent of special importance because they can cause measurable cellular effects by single particles, eliminating some of the complexities of multievent action and more clearly disclosing basic features. This applies particularly to radiation carcinogenesis. Facilities are available at RARAF for exposing objects to different radiations having a wide range of linear energy transfers (LETs)

  5. Accelerators for condensed matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for high energy, high luminosity beams has stimulated the science and engineering of accelerators to a point where they open up opportunities for new areas of scientific application to benefit from the advances driven by particle physics. One area of great importance is the use of electron or positron storage rings as a source of intense VUV or X-ray synchrotron radiation. An accelerator application that has grown in prominence over the last 10 years has been spallation neutron sources. Neutrons offer an advantage over X-rays as a condensed matter probe because the neutron energy is usually of the same order as the room temperature thermal energy fluctuations in the sample being studied. Another area in which accelerators are playing an increasingly important role in condensed matter research concerns the use of Mu mesons, Muons, as a probe. This paper also presents a description of the ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. The design and status of the facility are described, and examples are given of its application to the study of condensed matter. (N.K.)

  6. The development of laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki

    1998-01-01

    Laser fusion research started soon after the invention of laser. In 1972, the research was declassified and nuclear fusion by laser inplosion was proposed by J. Nuckolls. Since then, 26 years has passed and laser implosion experiments demonstrated 1000 times solid density compression. By the demonstration of 1000 times solid density, the mission of the laser fusion research shifted from 'implosion physics' to 'ignition and high gain', namely demonstration of fusion output of 100 times input laser energy. By the recent developments of laser technology, ultra intense laser became available and opened up a new ignition scheme which is called 'Fast Ignition'. The technology for the diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) is developed toward a laser driver for reactor. U.S. and France are constructing MJ lasers for demonstrating ignition and burn and Osaka University is investigating the fast ignition and the equivalent plasma of confinement (EPOC) toward high gain. (author)

  7. The development of laser fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Laser fusion research started soon after the invention of laser. In 1972, the research was declassified and nuclear fusion by laser inplosion was proposed by J. Nuckolls. Since then, 26 years has passed and laser implosion experiments demonstrated 1000 times solid density compression. By the demonstration of 1000 times solid density, the mission of the laser fusion research shifted from `implosion physics` to `ignition and high gain`, namely demonstration of fusion output of 100 times input laser energy. By the recent developments of laser technology, ultra intense laser became available and opened up a new ignition scheme which is called `Fast Ignition`. The technology for the diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) is developed toward a laser driver for reactor. U.S. and France are constructing MJ lasers for demonstrating ignition and burn and Osaka University is investigating the fast ignition and the equivalent plasma of confinement (EPOC) toward high gain. (author)

  8. The growth of European fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Euratom initial research programme with fusion as a modest element was constituted in 1958. Progress in fusion research mainly in the USA, USSR and UK was reported at the Geneva Conference held in September 1958. A network of national laboratories cooperating in fusion research was constituted under Association Contracts rather than founding a single Euratom laboratory. Emergence of the Tokamak became evident in 1968, and in 1969 a team from Culham travelled to Moscow to measure the electron plasma temperature and confirmed the previous Russian results. Collaboration between Culham and the European Fusion programme developed before the entrance of the UK into the European Community. The JET design team began its work in 1973. The site selected was at Culham and construction of JET commenced in 1978. Subsequent international discussions including the USA and USSR resulted in detailed design studies for a large device known as the INTOR Tokamak which will probably lead to further international cooperation. (U.K.)

  9. Research needs of the new accelerator technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-08-01

    A review is given of some of the new accelerator technologies with a special eye to the requirements which they generate for research and development. Some remarks are made concerning the organizational needs of accelerator research

  10. UCLA accelerator research ampersand development. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report discusses work on advanced accelerators and beam dynamics at ANL, BNL, SLAC, UCLA and Pulse Sciences Incorporated. Discussed in this report are the following concepts: Wakefield acceleration studies; plasma lens research; high gradient rf cavities and beam dynamics studies at the Brookhaven accelerator test facility; rf pulse compression development; and buncher systems for high gradient accelerator and relativistic klystron applications

  11. Stellarator fusion neutronics research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.; Cross, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    The new status of the H-INF Heliac Stellaralor as a National Facility and the signed international Implementing Agreement on 'Collaboration in the Development of the Stellarator Concept' represents a significant encouragement for further fusion research in Australia. In this report the future of fusion research in Australia is discussed with special attention being paid to the importance of Stellarator power plant studies and in particular stellarator fusion neutronics. The main differences between tokamak and stellarator neutronics analyses are identified, namely the neutron wall loading, geometrical modelling and total heating in in-vessel reactor components including toroidal field (TF) coils. Due to the more complicated nature of stellarator neutronics analyses, simplified approaches to fusion neutronics already developed for tokamaks are expected to be even more important and widely used for designing a Conceptual Stellarator Power Plant

  12. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  13. Iodine laser for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, B.

    1988-01-01

    The most powerful iodine laser in the world, known as Asterix IV, is being prepared for operation at The Max Plank-Institut fuer Quantenoptik at Garching, near Munich, in West Germany. It is expected to produce 2kJ pulses of 1ns duration. Shorter pulses of about 200 ps duration should be obtainable at power levels of over 5 TW. Pulses of maximum power will be available every 20 minutes; this frequency is expected to be adequate for fusion experiments, although the short rate could be raised if necessary by greater gas circulation and cooling. (Author)

  14. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Successful ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet is calculated to require that several megajoules of energy be deposited in the pellet's centimeter-sized shell within 10 ns. This implies a driver power of several hundreds of terawatts and power density around 100 TW/cm 2 . The Sandia ICF approach is to deposit the energy with beams of 30 MV lithium ions. The first accelerator capable of producing these beams (PBFA II, 100 TW) will be used to study beam formation and target physics on a single pulse basis. To utilize this technology for power production, repetitive pulsing at rates that may be as high as 10 Hz will be required. This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  15. The heavy ion fusion research program in West Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study on the feasibility of heavy ion beam for inertial confinement fusion was started four years ago, setting the main goal to identify and investigate the key issues of heavy ion fusion concept. The fund for this program has been provided by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. In this paper, the outline of the present research is shown, and some recent achievement is summarized. Moreover, the idea about the goal and the new direction of the future program are discussed. In the present program, two activities are distinguished, that is, the expermental and theoretical studies on accelerators, target physics and atomic physics, and the conceptual design study for a heavy ion-driven power plant. A RF linac with storage rings was chosen as the driver concept. In the accelerator research, ion source studies, RFQ development and beam transport measurement have been considered. Two beam transport experiments were carried out. In the conceptual design study, the HIBALL driver concept, the reactor chamber having the first wall protection using Pb-Li eutectic and so on have been studied. An accelerator facility of modest size has been suggested for basic accelerator physics studies. (Kako, I.)

  16. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-02-01

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators

  17. Utilization of a Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011–2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The IAEA actively promotes the development of controlled fusion as a source of energy. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA helps Member States to exchange and establish scientific and technical knowledge required for the design, construction and operation of a fusion reactor. Due to their compactness, flexibility and low operation costs, small fusion devices are a great resource for supporting and accelerating the development of mainstream fusion research on large fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. They play an important role in investigating the physics of controlled fusion, developing innovative technologies and diagnostics, testing new materials, training highly qualified personnel for larger fusion facilities, and supporting educational programmes for young scientists. This publication reports on the research work accomplished within the framework of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Utilization of the Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research, organized and conducted by the IAEA in 2011–2016. The CRP has contributed to the coordination of a network of research institutions, thereby enhancing international collaboration through scientific visits, joint experiments and the exchange of information and equipment. A total of 16 institutions and 14 devices from 13 Member States participated in this CRP (Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United Kingdom).

  18. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  19. Magnetic confinement fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, H.

    1977-03-01

    Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion offers probably the only relatively clean energy solution with completely inexhaustible fuel and unlimited power capacity. The scientific and technological problem consists in magnetically confining a hot, dense plasma (pressure several to hundreds of atmospheres, temperature 10 8 degrees or more) for an appreciable fraction of a second. The scientific and mathematical problem is to describe the behavior, such as confinement, stability, flow, compression, heating, energy transfer and diffusion of this medium in the presence of electromagnetic fields just as we now can for air or steam. Some of the extant theory consists of applications, routine or ingenious, of known mathematical structures in the theory of differential equations and in traditional analysis. Other applications of known mathematical structures offer surprises and new insights: the coordination between sub-supersonic and elliptic-hyperbolic is fractured; supersonic propagation goes upstream; etc. Other completely nonstandard mathematical structures with significant theory are being rapidly uncovered (and somewhat less rapidly understood) such as non-elliptic variational equations and new types of weak solutions. It is these new mathematical structures which one should expect to supply the foundation for the next generation's pure mathematics, if history is a guide. Despite the substantial effort over a period of some twenty years, there are still basic and important scintific and mathematical discoveries to be made, lying just beneath the surface

  20. Computer applications in controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1975-02-01

    The role of Nuclear Engineering Education in the application of computers to controlled fusion research can be a very important one. In the near future the use of computers in the numerical modelling of fusion systems should increase substantially. A recent study group has identified five categories of computational models to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are called for. The development and application of computer codes to implement these models is a vital step in reaching the goal of fusion power. In order to meet the needs of the fusion program the National CTR Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computing centers at each of the major CTR laboratories by a communications network. The crucial element that is needed for success is trained personnel. The number of people with knowledge of plasma science and engineering that are trained in numerical methods and computer science is quite small, and must be increased substantially in the next few years. Nuclear Engineering departments should encourage students to enter this field and provide the necessary courses and research programs in fusion computing. (U.S.)

  1. Progress of laser nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and features of nuclear fusion using laser, as well as its basic concepts such as high-temperature / high-density implosion system and fast ignition of fuel. At present, researches aiming at nuclear fusion ignition have been developing. As the current state of researches, this paper reviews the situations of FIREX (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) project of Japan focusing on direct irradiation implosion and fast ignition system, as well as NIF (National Ignition Facility) project of the U.S. aiming at ignition combustion based on indirect irradiation implosion and central ignition system. In collaboration with the National Institute for Fusion Science, Osaka University started FIREX-1 project in 2003. It built a heating laser LFEX of 10 kJ/1 to 10ps, and started an implosion/heating integration experiment in 2009. Currently, it is developing experiment to achieve heating to 5 keV. At NIF, the self-heating of central sparks via energy of α particles generated in the nuclear fusion reaction has been realized. This paper also overviews R and D issues surrounding the lasers for reactors for use in laser nuclear fusion power generators. (A.O.)

  2. Study of recirculating induction accelerator as drivers for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, H.D.; Barnard, J.J.; Brooks, A.L.; Coffield, F.; Deadrick, F.; Griffith, L.V.; Kirbie, H.C.; Neil, V.K.; Newton, M.A.; Paul, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Two years ago, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a study of the viability and relative utility of recirculating induction accelerators as drivers for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF). The final draft of the report detailing the results in 284 pages was completed in September, 1991. As well as broadly involving the collaboration of many researchers from several groups at LLNL, it also benefited from contributions from several individuals in the HIF program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and from others in the HIF community nationwide. This presentation summarizes the key findings given in that report

  3. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  4. Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion is presented. The experimental activity associated with the tokamak ISTTOK as well as the work carried out in the frame of international collaboration are summarized. The main technological features of ISTTOK are described along with studies on microwave reflectometry. Future plans are briefly described

  5. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  6. Maryland controlled fusion research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.; Liu, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of microturbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash

  7. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  8. Current state of nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past quarter century, plasma physics and nuclear fusion research have gone through impressive development. Tokamak, is realized to be the number one candidate for nuclear fusion reactor. Two large experiments, one called Joint European Torus (JET) at Culham, England, and the other JT-60 project in Japan have been completed and have reported preliminary results. In JET an average electron density of 4x10 13 pcls/ cm 3 , ion temperatures of 3Kev and energy confinement of 0.8 sec have been achieved. However, the Zeff has been even equal to 10 which unfortunately is a source of plasma energy loss. JT-60 has not offered any appreciable results yet, however, the objectives and initial tests promise long pulse duration, with very high ion and plasma densities. Both experiments have promised to achieve conditions approaching those needed in a fusion reactor. Other important experiments will be discussed and the role of third world countries will be emphasized. (Author)

  9. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Mallants, D.; Sillen, X.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  10. [International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1991-01-01

    Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials

  11. Development of heavy-ion accelerators as drivers for inertially confined fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1979-06-01

    The commercialization of inertial confinement fusion is discussed in terms of power costs. A chapter on heavy ion accelerators covers the prinicpal components, beam loss mechanisms, and theoretical considerations. Other tyopics discussed include the following: (1) heavy ion fusion implementation plan, (2) driver with accumulator rings fed by an rf LINAC, (3) single pass driver with an induction LINAC, and (4) implementation scenarios

  12. Heavy ion inertial fusion: interface between target gain, accelerator phase space and reactor beam transport revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Fawley, W.M.; Judd, D.L.; Mark, J.W.K.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Recently revised estimates of target gain have added additional optimistic inputs to the interface between targets, accelerators and fusion chamber beam transport. But it remains valid that neutralization of the beams in the fusion chamber is useful if ion charge state Z > 1 or if > 1 kA per beamlet is to be propagated. Some engineering and economic considerations favor higher currents

  13. Academic Training: New Trends in Fusion Research

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    11, 12 and 13 October 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 11 October from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs, 12 and 13 October from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - 11 and 12 October in the Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 13 October in the TH Amphitheatre New Trends in Fusion Research A. FASOLI / EPFL, Lausanne, CH The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to ignition or to su...

  14. Academic Training: New Trends in Fusion Research

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    11, 12 and 13 October 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 11 October from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs, 12 and 13 October from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - 11 and 12 October in the Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 13 October in the Theory Conference Room, bldg. 4 New Trends in Fusion Research A. FASOLI / EPFL, Lausanne, CH The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to i...

  15. Computer applications in controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1975-01-01

    The application of computers to controlled thermonuclear research (CTR) is essential. In the near future the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems should increase substantially. A recent panel has identified five categories of computational models to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies is called for. The development and application of computer codes to implement these models is a vital step in reaching the goal of fusion power. To meet the needs of the fusion program the National CTR Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computing centers at each of the major CTR Laboratories by a communication network. The crucial element needed for success is trained personnel. The number of people with knowledge of plasma science and engineering trained in numerical methods and computer science must be increased substantially in the next few years. Nuclear engineering departments should encourage students to enter this field and provide the necessary courses and research programs in fusion computing

  16. Applications of Fusion Energy Sciences Research - Scientific Discoveries and New Technologies Beyond Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, Amy; Callis, Richard; Efthimion, Philip; Foster, John; Keane, Christopher; Onsager, Terry; O'Shea, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the U.S. and around the world have worked hard to make an elusive goal to be achieved on Earth: harnessing the reaction that fuels the stars, namely fusion. Practical fusion would be a source of energy that is unlimited, safe, environmentally benign, available to all nations and not dependent on climate or the whims of the weather. Significant resources, most notably from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), have been devoted to pursuing that dream, and significant progress is being made in turning it into a reality. However, that is only part of the story. The process of creating a fusion-based energy supply on Earth has led to technological and scientific achievements of far-reaching impact that touch every aspect of our lives. Those largely unanticipated advances, spanning a wide variety of fields in science and technology, are the focus of this report. There are many synergies between research in plasma physics (the study of charged particles and fluids interacting with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields), high-energy physics, and condensed matter physics dating back many decades. For instance, the formulation of a mathematical theory of solitons, solitary waves which are seen in everything from plasmas to water waves to Bose-Einstein Condensates, has led to an equal span of applications, including the fields of optics, fluid mechanics and biophysics. Another example, the development of a precise criterion for transition to chaos in Hamiltonian systems, has offered insights into a range of phenomena including planetary orbits, two-person games and changes in the weather. Seven distinct areas of fusion energy sciences were identified and reviewed which have had a recent impact on fields of science, technology and engineering not directly associated with fusion energy: Basic plasma science; Low temperature plasmas; Space and astrophysical plasmas; High energy density

  17. Applications of Fusion Energy Sciences Research - Scientific Discoveries and New Technologies Beyond Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Amy [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Callis, Richard [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Efthimion, Philip [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Foster, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Keane, Christopher [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Onsager, Terry [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); O' Shea, Patrick [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the U.S. and around the world have worked hard to make an elusive goal to be achieved on Earth: harnessing the reaction that fuels the stars, namely fusion. Practical fusion would be a source of energy that is unlimited, safe, environmentally benign, available to all nations and not dependent on climate or the whims of the weather. Significant resources, most notably from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), have been devoted to pursuing that dream, and significant progress is being made in turning it into a reality. However, that is only part of the story. The process of creating a fusion-based energy supply on Earth has led to technological and scientific achievements of far-reaching impact that touch every aspect of our lives. Those largely unanticipated advances, spanning a wide variety of fields in science and technology, are the focus of this report. There are many synergies between research in plasma physics (the study of charged particles and fluids interacting with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields), high-energy physics, and condensed matter physics dating back many decades. For instance, the formulation of a mathematical theory of solitons, solitary waves which are seen in everything from plasmas to water waves to Bose-Einstein Condensates, has led to an equal span of applications, including the fields of optics, fluid mechanics and biophysics. Another example, the development of a precise criterion for transition to chaos in Hamiltonian systems, has offered insights into a range of phenomena including planetary orbits, two-person games and changes in the weather. Seven distinct areas of fusion energy sciences were identified and reviewed which have had a recent impact on fields of science, technology and engineering not directly associated with fusion energy: Basic plasma science; Low temperature plasmas; Space and astrophysical plasmas; High energy density

  18. The JET project and the European fusion research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuester, H.-O.

    1984-01-01

    The paper concerns the Joint European Torus (JET) project and the European Fusion Research Programme. Fusion as an energy source and commercial fusion power are briefly discussed. The main features of the JET apparatus and the tokamak magnetic field configuration are given. Also described are the specific aims of JET, and the proposed future fusion reactor programme. (U.K.)

  19. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as open-quotes driversclose quotes for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a open-quotes taxonomyclose quotes of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area

  20. Overview of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Gasparotto, M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Materials research for fusion reactors is overviewed from Japanese, EU and US perspectives. Emphasis is placed on programs and strategies for developing blanket structural materials, and recent highlights in research and development for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites, and in mechanistic experimental and modeling studies. The common critical issue for the candidate materials is the effect of irradiation with helium production. For the qualification of materials up to the full lifetime of a DEMO and Power Plant reactors, an intense neutron source with relevant fusion neutron spectra is crucial. Elaborate use of the presently available irradiation devices will facilitate efficient and sound materials development within the required time scale

  1. The history of controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1980-01-01

    The idea of using nuclear reaction between light elements to produce energy for peaceful objectives originated towards the mid-forties. In this work, the author traces the various stages of reserach undertaken in this field from the first fusion experiments to the projects now in course of production. Research scientists have travelled a long, hard road to reach a new development phase during which technological problems will play a prominent part [fr

  2. Use of heavy ion accelerators in fusion reactor-related radiation-damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.; Dobson, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    The heavy-ion accelerator has become an important tool in the study of the fundamentals of radiation damage in fission- and fusion-reactor materials. Present facilities for such studies within the Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory are provided by two complementary accelerator systems. Examples of the work carried out are discussed

  3. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  4. Fusion reactor materials research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiapu

    1994-10-01

    The fusion materials research in China is introduced. Many kinds of structural materials (such as Ti-modified stainless steel, ferritic steel, HT-9, HT-7, oxide dispersion strengthening ferritic steel), tritium breeders (lithium, Li 2 O, γ-LiAlO 2 ) and plasma facing materials (PFMs) (graphite with TiC and SiC coatings) have been developed or being developed. A systematic research activities on irradiation effects, compatibility, plasma materials interaction, thermal shock during disruption, tritium production, release and permeation, neutron multiplication in Be and Pb, etc. have been performed. The research activities are summarized and some experimental results are also given

  5. Research in accelerator physics (theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Shoroku.

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss the present status, expected effort during the remainder of the project, and some of the results of their activities since the beginning of the project. Some of the areas covered are: (1) effects of helical insertial devices on beam dynamics; (2) coupling impedance of apertures in accelerator beam pipes; (3) new calculation of diffusion rate; (4) integrable polynomial factorization for symplectic map tracking; and (5) physics of magnet sorting in superconducting rings

  6. Research in accelerator physics (theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Shoroku.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beam-beam interaction in colliders with momentum oscillation; isolated difference resonance and evolution of the particle distribution; study of magnet sorting for the SSC High Energy Booster; development of a discrete HESQ; beam dynamics in compact synchrotrons; theoretical problems in multi-stage FEL for two-beam acceleration; operation of Tevatron near integer tunes; and detailed examination of coupling impedance of various devices in storage rings; impact on beams from the insertion devices

  7. American research programs on controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    At a time when the site of the European JET project has been decided, this study proposes to highlight the American effort in this field over the last five years. The Federal Civil Research and Development budget assigned to Energy has been multiplied by 6.3 and inside this budget the portion allocated to fusion has been multiplied by a factor of 6, in value. Two avenues have been explored; magnetic confinement and inertial confinement but one reaction only has been considered, namely D + T fusion. In magnetic confinement, the first operational reactor is being contemplated for around the year 2012. Three technologies have been explored in inertial confinement: by laser beams, electron beams and ion beams [fr

  8. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This renewal proposal describes the University of Maryland research program on Magnetic Fusion Energy for a three-year period beginning January 1, 1986. This program consists of five tasks: (I) Plasma Theory; (II) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics for Mirror Machines; (III) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on TFTR; (IV) Atomic Physics; and (V) Magnetic Field Measurement by Ion Beams. The four separate tasks of continuing research (Tasks I to IV) and the new experimental task (Task V) are described in detail. The task descriptions contain estimated budgets for CY 86, 87, and 88

  9. Review of fusion research program: historical summary and program projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.S.

    1976-09-01

    This report provides a brief review of the history and current status of fusion research in the United States. It also describes the Federally funded program aimed at the development of fusion reactors for electric power generation.

  10. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  12. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  13. LLL magnetic fusion research: the first 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    From its inception, the Laboratory has supported research directed at tapping controlled fusion. Our magnetic fusion energy program--now one of the major elements of the national fusion energy research effort--dates back to the Laboratory's founding in 1952. This article reviews the program's beginnings, progress, and present status in terms of its ultimate goal: to demonstrate a practical and economical means of generating power from controlled fusion reactions

  14. PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II: The pulsed power characterization phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Turman, B.N.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, PBFA II, is now the largest pulsed power device in operation. This paper summarizes its first year and a half of operation for the Department of Energy (DOE) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. Thirty-six separate modules provide 72 output pulses that combine to form a 100 TW output pulse at the accelerator center. PBFA II was successfully test fired for the first time on December 11, 1985. This test completed the construction phase (Phase 1) within the expected schedule and budget. The accelerator checkout phase then started (Phase 2). The first priority during checkout was to bring the Phase 1 subsystems into full operation. The accelerator was first tested to determine overall system performance. Next, subsystems that were not performing adequately were modified. The accelerator is now being used for ion diode studies. 32 refs

  15. State of controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The development of a commercial fusion reactor requires an adequate solution to the problems of heating and confinement of the nuclear fuel, as well as a considerable effort in materials technology and reactor engineering. A general discussion is presented of the status of the research connected with the most advanced concepts, indicating in each case the present situation and the main problems that must be solved to meet the requeriments estimated for power reactors. In particular, the laser-inertial concept is reviewed in detail. (author) [es

  16. An accelerated beam-plasma neutron/proton source and early application of a fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hoshino, C.; Masuda, K.; Miley, G.; Jurczyk, B.; Stubbers, R.; Gu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    We measured the number of the neutrons and protons produced by D-D reactions in an accelerated beam-plasma fusion and curried out the numerical simulations. The linear dependence of the neutron yield on a discharge current indicates that the fusion reactions occur between the background gas and the fast particles. i.e. charge exchanged neutrals and accelerated ions. The neutron yield divided by (fusion cross section x ion current x neutral gas pressure) still possesses the dependence of the 1.2 power of discharge voltage. which shows the fusion reactions are affected by the electrostatic potential built-up in the center. The measured proton birth profiles suggest the existence of a double potential well, which is supported by the numerical simulations. (author)

  17. Virtual laboratory for fusion research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Horiuchi, R.; Ishiguro, S.; Takami, S.

    2008-01-01

    A virtual laboratory system for nuclear fusion research in Japan has been developed using SuperSINET, which is a super high-speed network operated by National Institute of Informatics. Sixteen sites including major Japanese universities, Japan Atomic Energy Agency and National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) are mutually connected to SuperSINET with the speed of 1 Gbps by the end of 2006 fiscal year. Collaboration categories in this virtual laboratory are as follows: the large helical device (LHD) remote participation; the remote use of supercomputer system; and the all Japan ST (Spherical Tokamak) research program. This virtual laboratory is a closed network system, and is connected to the Internet through the NIFS firewall in order to keep higher security. Collaborators in a remote station can control their diagnostic devices at LHD and analyze the LHD data as they were at the LHD control room. Researchers in a remote station can use the supercomputer of NIFS in the same environment as NIFS. In this paper, we will describe detail of technologies and the present status of the virtual laboratory. Furthermore, the items that should be developed in the near future are also described

  18. Trends of researches for fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasutomo; Enoto, Takeaki

    1975-01-01

    The role of a fusion neutron radiation test facility in the development of a scientific feasibility experimental reactor or demonstration fusion power reactor plant would be analogous to the role of the materials testing and experimental reactors in the development of fission power reactor. While the material testing fission reactor has been developed after successful operation of fission reactors, in the case of fusion reactor development it is desirable to realize the fusion engineering research facility (FERF) in-phase to the development of SFX and/or demonstration fusion power reactor plants. Here so called FERF in near future is the Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor which provides the high-intensity and high-energy neutron and plasma source whether the net power output is produced or not. From the point of direct attainment to SFX, we would like to emphasize that FEFE is the royal road leading to the goal of successful achievement of CTR program and could be useful for the experiment on impurity effects caused by neutron and plasma irradiations onto the wall material for SFX. Further, we rather suppose that hybrid FERF-fission assembly could be fairly and easily realizable in near future. (auth.)

  19. Customizable scientific web portal for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abla, G.; Kim, E.N.; Schissel, D.P.; Flanagan, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Web browsers have become a major application interface for participating in scientific experiments such as those in magnetic fusion. The recent advances in web technologies motivated the deployment of interactive web applications with rich features. In the scientific world, web applications have been deployed in portal environments. When used in a scientific research environment, such as fusion experiments, web portals can present diverse sources of information in a unified interface. However, the design and development of a scientific web portal has its own challenges. One such challenge is that a web portal needs to be fast and interactive despite the high volume of information and number of tools it presents. Another challenge is that the visual output of the web portal must not be overwhelming to the end users, despite the high volume of data generated by fusion experiments. Therefore, the applications and information should be customizable depending on the needs of end users. In order to meet these challenges, the design and implementation of a web portal needs to support high interactivity and user customization. A web portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide by providing multiple services, such as real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access and interactive data visualization. The web portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing a collaborative logbook, shared visualization and online instant messaging services. The portal's design utilizes the multi-tier software architecture and has been implemented utilizing web 2.0 technologies, such as AJAX, Django, and Memcached, to develop a highly interactive and customizable user interface. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services, which allows users to create a unique, personalized working environment to fit their own needs and interests. This paper describes the software

  20. Customizable scientific web portal for fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G., E-mail: abla@fusion.gat.co [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, E.N.; Schissel, D.P.; Flanagan, S.M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Web browsers have become a major application interface for participating in scientific experiments such as those in magnetic fusion. The recent advances in web technologies motivated the deployment of interactive web applications with rich features. In the scientific world, web applications have been deployed in portal environments. When used in a scientific research environment, such as fusion experiments, web portals can present diverse sources of information in a unified interface. However, the design and development of a scientific web portal has its own challenges. One such challenge is that a web portal needs to be fast and interactive despite the high volume of information and number of tools it presents. Another challenge is that the visual output of the web portal must not be overwhelming to the end users, despite the high volume of data generated by fusion experiments. Therefore, the applications and information should be customizable depending on the needs of end users. In order to meet these challenges, the design and implementation of a web portal needs to support high interactivity and user customization. A web portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide by providing multiple services, such as real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access and interactive data visualization. The web portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing a collaborative logbook, shared visualization and online instant messaging services. The portal's design utilizes the multi-tier software architecture and has been implemented utilizing web 2.0 technologies, such as AJAX, Django, and Memcached, to develop a highly interactive and customizable user interface. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services, which allows users to create a unique, personalized working environment to fit their own needs and interests. This paper describes the software

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  3. Low energy accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle accelerators are instruments for producing a variety of radiations under controlled conditions for basic and applied research as well as applications. They have helped enormously to study the matter, atoms, nuclei, sub-nuclear particles and their constituents, forces involved in the related phenomena etc. No other man-made instrument has been so effective in such studies as the accelerator. The large accelerator constructed so far is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) housed in a tunnel of 27 km circumference, while a small accelerator can fit inside a room. Small accelerators accelerate charged particles such as electrons, protons, deuterons, alphas and, in general ions to low energy, generally, below several MeV. These particle beams are used for studies in nuclear astrophysics, atomic physics, material science, surface physics, bio sciences etc. They are used for ion beam analysis such as RBS, PIXE, NRA, AMS, CPAA etc. More importantly, the ion beams have important industrial applications like ion implantation, surface modification, isotope production etc. while electron beams are used for material processing, material modification, sterilization, food preservation, non destructive testing etc. In this talk, role of low energy accelerators in research and industry as well as medicine will be discussed. (author)

  4. FMIT: an accelerator-based neutron factory for fusion materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Hagan, J.W.; Trego, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special-purpose materials in support of fusion-power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high-energy neutrons to ensure materials damage characteristic of the deuterium-tritium power system. The facility, its testing role, the status, and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described. Emphasis is given to programmatic elements and features incorporated in the accelerator and other systems to assure that the FMIT runs as a highly reliable fusion materials testing installation

  5. Fusion research in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    Centering around the European joint project Joint European Torus (JET), in the framework of which hot fusion plasmas are already brought close to thermonuclear ignition, the individual research centres in Europe have taken over different special tasks. In Germany research concentrates above all on the development of super-conductive magnets, the stage of plasma-physical fundamentals or the investigation of the interaction between the plasma boundary layer and the material of the vessel wall. On this basis the development stage following JET, the Next European Torus (NET), is planned, with its main aim being the production and maintenance of a thermonuclear burning plasma, i.e. a plasma which maintains its active state from the gain of energy of its own fusion reactions. In the framework of a contractually agreed cooperation between the European Community, Japan, the USSR and the USA, the establishment of an international study group (with seat in Garching) was decided upon, which is to develop the concept of an 'International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)' jointly supported by these countries. The results of the studies presented show that the differences in the design data of ITER and NET are negligible. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Development of heavy ion induction linear accelerators as drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, A.I.; Celata, C.; Faltens, A.; Fessenden, T.J.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Laslett, L.J.; Lee, E.P.; Meuth, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on a continuing study in the USA of the feasibility of an induction linac fusion driver, which would accelerate multiple heavy-ion beams through a sequence of pulsed transformers and amplify the beam current during acceleration. The driver cost could be $200/Joule or less and the cost of electricity in the range of .050-.055$/kWhr. As a next stage of development to assess the feasibility of this approach the authors propose an Induction Linac Systems Experiment. This will test some of the technology and multiple-beam manipulations necessary for a fusion driver

  7. Development of heavy ion induction linear accelerators as drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, A.I.; Celata, C.; Faltens, A.

    1988-06-01

    There is a continuing study in the USA of the feasibility of an induction linac fusion driver, which would accelerate multiple heavy-ion beams through a sequence of pulsed transformers and amplify the beam current during acceleration. The driver cost could be $200/Joule or less and the cost of electricity in the range of .050-.055$/kWhr. As a next stage of development to assess the feasibility of this approach we propose an ''Induction Linac Systems Experiment''. This will test some of the technology and multiple-beam manipulations necessary for a fusion driver. 7 refs., 1 fig

  8. IAEA and IEA roles in international fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the IAEA's and the IEA's complementary roles in facilitating international fusion research cooperation. These roles represent highly desirable contributions to fusion research through pooling of limited human and financial resources. The two Agencies both coordinate research and organize technical meeting, but in different ways. They each have unique strengths and different modes of operation. In order to deal with potential overlaps and serve the fusion research community optimally, they are coordinating their activities

  9. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  10. Preliminary results from MBE-4: A four beam induction linac for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.I.; Warwick, P.b.A.I.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a scaled experimental multiple beam induction linac. This experiment is part of a program of accelerator research for heavy ion fusion. It is shown that multiple beams can be accelerated without significant mutual interaction. Measurements of the longitudinal dynamics of a current-amplifying induction linac are presented and compared to calculations. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal dynamics is discussed

  11. Preliminary results from MBE-4: a four beam induction linac for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.I.

    1986-05-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a scaled experimental multiple beam induction linac. This experiment is part of a program of accelerator research for heavy ion fusion. It is shown that multiple beams can be accelerated without significant mutual interaction. Measurements of the longitudinal dynamics of a current-amplifying induction linac are presented and compared to calculations. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal dynamics is discussed

  12. Accelerating Geothermal Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-05-01

    Geothermal research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is advancing geothermal technologies to increase renewable power production. Continuous and not dependent on weather, the geothermal resource has the potential to jump to more than 500 gigawatts in electricity production, which is equivalent to roughly half of the current U.S. capacity. Enhanced geothermal systems have a broad regional distribution in the United States, allowing the potential for development in many locations across the country.

  13. Ion accelerators as drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.; Rosenblum, S.S.

    1980-11-01

    During the past few years the possibility of using intense ion beams to ignite a pellet of fusion fuel has looked increasingly promising. Ion beams ranging in mass from protons up to uranium have been investigated and several machines have been built at different laboratories to investigate the required technology. Light ion drivers are based on the use of high current, high voltage diodes arranged around a central target. These devices have the necessary power and energy to initiate fusion burn but suffer from the inability to transport stably the necessary huge beam currents over long distances to a small target. Heavy ion drivers are based either on the radio-frequency linac or the induction linac. Because heavy ions have a much shorter range than light ions of the same energy, one is able to raise the beam voltage by a factor of one-thousand and lower the current correspondingly. The expected parameters for a fusion driver will be delineated and the present state of development of the technology for the candidate ion beam drivers will be described in light of these desiderata

  14. Accelerator research studies: Progress report, Task B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The main objectives in Task B of the research program are summarized as follows: (1) studies of the collective acceleration of positive ions from a localized plasma source by an intense relativistic electron beam (IREB), (2) studies of ways in which external control may be achieved over the electron beam front in order to achieve higher ion energies - the Beam Front Accelerator (BFA) concept, and (3) study of electron and ion beam generation in a new kind of compact pulsed accelerator in which energy is stored inductively and switched using a plasma focus opening switch. During the past year, substantial progress was made in each of these areas. Our exploratory research on the collective acceleration of laser-produced ions has confirmed the acceleration of C, Al, and Fe ions to peak energies in excess of 10 MeV/amu. In addition, studies of the relation between collective ion acceleration and electron beam propagation in vacuum have shed new light on the experimental processes that lead to energy transfer from electrons to ions. Meanwhile, extensive progress has been made in our attempts to use analytical theory and numerical simulation to model ion acceleration in these systems. Our resultant improved understanding of the processes that limit the peak ion energy has had a profound impact on our plans for further research in this area. Studies of the Compact Pulsed Accelerator have included both ion and electron beam extraction from the device. Its potential to reduce the volume of pulse power sources by an order of magnitude has already been demonstrated, and plans are currently underway to scale the experiment up to voltages in the 1 MV range

  15. Research on an Agricultural Knowledge Fusion Method for Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengfu Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of our research is to develop an ontology-based agricultural knowledge fusion method that can be used as a comprehensive basis on which to solve agricultural information inconsistencies, analyze data, and discover new knowledge. A recent survey has provided a detailed comparison of various fusion methods used with Deep Web data (Li, 2013. In this paper, we propose an effective agricultural ontology-based knowledge fusion method by leveraging recent advances in data fusion, such as the semantic web and big data technologies, that will enhance the identification and fusion of new and existing data sets to make big data analytics more possible. We provide a detailed fusion method that includes agricultural ontology building, fusion rule construction, an evaluation module, etc. Empirical results show that this knowledge fusion method is useful for knowledge discovery.

  16. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  17. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-01-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. The authors emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities

  18. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Data management, code deployment, and scientific visualization to enhance scientific discovery in fusion research through advanced computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Finkelstein, A.; Foster, I.T.; Fredian, T.W.; Greenwald, M.J.; Hansen, C.D.; Johnson, C.R.; Keahey, K.; Klasky, S.A.; Li, K.; McCune, D.C.; Peng, Q.; Stevens, R.; Thompson, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The long-term vision of the Fusion Collaboratory described in this paper is to transform fusion research and accelerate scientific understanding and innovation so as to revolutionize the design of a fusion energy source. The Collaboratory will create and deploy collaborative software tools that will enable more efficient utilization of existing experimental facilities and more effective integration of experiment, theory, and modeling. The computer science research necessary to create the Collaboratory is centered on three activities: security, remote and distributed computing, and scientific visualization. It is anticipated that the presently envisioned Fusion Collaboratory software tools will require 3 years to complete

  20. Software problems in magnetic fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, R.

    1982-01-01

    The main world effort in magnetic fusion research involves studying the plasma in a Tokamak device. Four large Tokamaks are under construction (TFTR in USA, JET in Europe, T15 in USSR and JT60 in Japan). To understand the physical phenomena that occur in these costly devices, it is generally necessary to carry out extensive numerical calculations. These computer simulations make use of sophisticated numerical methods and demand high power computers. As a consequence they represent a substantial investment. To reduce software costs, the computer codes are more and more often exhanged among scientists. Standardization (STANDARD FORTRAN, OLYMPUS system) and good documentation (CPC program library) are proposed to make codes exportable. Centralized computing centers would also help in the exchange of codes and ease communication between the staff at different laboratories. (orig.)

  1. Major achievements and challenges of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ITER project is truly at the frontier of knowledge, a collective effort to explore the tantalizing future of free, clean and inexhaustible energy offered by nuclear fusion. Where the Large Hadron Collider at CERN pushes the boundaries of physics to find the origins of matter, the ITER Project seeks to give humans an endless stream of power which could have potentially game-changing consequences for the entire planet. Seminal contributions to the general physics knowledge accomplished by the plasma physics research for the benefit of the ITER project will be brought to light. The legacy of Professor H Alfvén within the framework of the ITER project will be described. (invited comment)

  2. Development and testing of the improved focusing quadrupole for heavy ion fusion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R R; Martovetsky, N N; Meinke, R B; Chiesa, L; Lietzke, A F; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A

    2003-10-23

    An improved version of the focusing magnet for a Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerator was designed, built and tested in 2002-2003. This quadrupole has higher focusing power and lower error field than the previous version of the focusing quadrupoles successfully built and tested in 2001. We discuss the features of the new design, selected fabrication issues and test results.

  3. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. (authors)

  4. Research on high beam-current accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1981-01-01

    In this review of research being undertaken at present in the US on accelerating devices and concepts of a novel nature, both non-collective systems, including high-current rf linacs and a variety of induction linacs, and also collective systems are considered. (U.K.)

  5. Comparative assessment of world research efforts on magnetic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1990-02-01

    This report presents a comparative assessment of the world's four major research efforts on magnetic confinement fusion, including a comparison of the capabilities in the Soviet Union, the European Community (Western Europe), Japan, and the United States. A comparative evaluation is provided in six areas: tokamak confinement; alternate confinement approaches; plasma technology and engineering; and fusion computations. The panel members are involved actively in fusion-related research, and have extensive experience in previous assessments and reviews of the world's four major fusion programs. Although the world's four major fusion efforts are roughly comparable in overall capabilities, two conclusions of this report are inescapable. First, the Soviet fusion effort is presently the weakest of the four programs in most areas of the assessment. Second, if present trends continue, the United States, once unambiguously the world leader in fusion research, will soon lose its position of leadership to the West European and Japanese fusion programs. Indeed, before the middle 1990s, the upgraded large-tokamak facilities, JT-60U (Japan) and JET (Western Europe), are likely to explore plasma conditions and operating regimes well beyond the capabilities of the TFTR tokamak (United States). In addition, if present trends continue in the areas of fusion nuclear technology and materials, and plasma technology and materials, and plasma technology development, the capabilities of Japan and Western Europe in these areas (both with regard to test facilities and fusion-specific industrial capabilities) will surpass those of the United States by a substantial margin before the middle 1990s

  6. Socio-Economic research on fusion SERF 3(2001-2003) External Costs of Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechon, Y.; Saez, R.; Cabal, H.

    2003-01-01

    Based on SEAFP project (Raeder et al, 1995) findings a preliminary assessment of environmental external costs associated to fusion power was performed under the framework of the first phase of the SERF (Socioeconomic Research on Fusion) project (Saez et al, 1999). This study showed very low external costs of fusion power compared with other traditional and new energy generating technologies. In order to update the assessment of externalities of fusion power, SERF2 project a new plant was included and an analysis of the key variables influencing the external cost was carried out. In the new phase of the SERF project, SERF3, three new additional plant models have been introduced with the aim of assessing the possibilities of silicon carbide to be used as structural material for fusion power plants. Furthermore, comparison of fusion external costs with those of other generation technologies in the state of technology development expected for 2050 has been also performed. (Author)

  7. RF-Based Accelerators for HEDP Research

    CERN Document Server

    Staples, John W; Keller, Roderich; Ostroumov, Peter; Sessler, Andrew M

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator-driven High-Energy Density Physics experiments require typically 1 nanosecond, 1 microcoulomb pulses of mass 20 ions accelerated to several MeV to produce eV-level excitations in thin targets, the "warm dense matter" regime. Traditionally the province of induction linacs, RF-based acceleration may be a viable alternative with recent breakthroughs in accelerating structures and high-field superconducting solenoids. A reference design for an RF-based accelerator for HEDP research is presented using 15 T solenoids and multiple-gap RF structures configured with either multiple parallel beams (combined at the target) or a single beam and a small stacking ring that accumulates 1 microcoulomb of charge. In either case, the beam is ballistically compressed with an induction linac core providing the necessary energy sweep and injected into a plasma-neutralized drift compression channel resulting in a 1 mm radius beam spot 1 nanosecond long at a thin foil or low-density target.

  8. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  9. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  10. Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator LIBRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    LIBRA is a concept to place a light-ion, charged-particle facility in a hospital environment, and to dedicate it to applications in biology and medicine. There are two aspects of the program envisaged for LIBRA: a basic research effort coupled with a program in clinical applications of accelerated charged particles. The operational environment to be provided for LIBRA is one in which both of these components can coexist and flourish, and one that will promote the transfer of technology and knowledge from one to the other. In order to further investigate the prospects for a Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator (LIBRA), discussions are underway with the Merritt Peralta Medical Center MPMC) in Oakland CA, and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). In this paper, a brief discussion of the technical requirements for such a facility is given, together with an outline of the accelerator technology required. While still in a preliminary stage, it is possible nevertheless to develop an adequate working description of the type, size, performance and cost of the accelerator facilities required to meet the preliminary goals for LIBRA

  11. The Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator (LIBRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    LIBRA is a concept to place a light-ion, charged-particle facility in a hospital environment, and to dedicate it to applications in biology and medicine. There are two aspects of the program envisaged for LIBRA: a basic research effort coupled with a program in clinical applications of accelerated charged particles. The operational environment to be provided for LIBRA is one in which both of these components can coexist and flourish, and one that will promote the transfer of technology and knowledge from one to the other. In order to further investigate the prospects for a Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator (LIBRA), discussions are underway with the Merritt Peralta Medical Center (MPMC) in Oakland, California, and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). In this paper, a brief discussion of the technical requirements for such a facility is given, together with an outline of the accelerator technology required. While still in a preliminary stage, it is possible nevertheless to develop an adequate working description of the type, size, performance and cost of the accelerator facilities required to meet the preliminary goals for LIBRA

  12. An acceleration system for Laplacian image fusion based on SoC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liwen; Zhao, Hongtu; Qu, Xiujie; Wei, Tianbo; Du, Peng

    2018-04-01

    Based on the analysis of Laplacian image fusion algorithm, this paper proposes a partial pipelining and modular processing architecture, and a SoC based acceleration system is implemented accordingly. Full pipelining method is used for the design of each module, and modules in series form the partial pipelining with unified data formation, which is easy for management and reuse. Integrated with ARM processor, DMA and embedded bare-mental program, this system achieves 4 layers of Laplacian pyramid on the Zynq-7000 board. Experiments show that, with small resources consumption, a couple of 256×256 images can be fused within 1ms, maintaining a fine fusion effect at the same time.

  13. Comparative study of energy accounting for heavy ion fusion with various driver accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Miyahara, A.

    1980-04-01

    Typical designs of driver heavy ion accelerator systems are referred and compared with regard to the assessment of the energy payback problem involved in their applications to the inertial fusion. Detailed analyses show that the energy investment for the construction of the HIF power station is fairly smaller than the energy produced by the station in its lifetime, in spite of the large scale of its hardware. The situation could be more favourable than, or at least comparable with, the case of the magnetically confined fusion. (author)

  14. Correction of longitudinal errors in accelerators for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Langdon, A.B.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Longitudinal space-charge waves develop on a heavy-ion inertial-fusion pulse from initial mismatches or from inappropriately timed or shaped accelerating voltages. Without correction, waves moving backward along the beam can grow due to the interaction with their resistivity retarded image fields, eventually degrading the longitudinal emittance. A simple correction algorithm is presented here that uses a time-dependent axial electric field to reverse the direction of backward-moving waves. The image fields then damp these forward-moving waves. The method is demonstrated by fluid simulations of an idealized inertial-fusion driver, and practical problems in implementing the algorithm are discussed

  15. International information exchange in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed

  16. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: During the last decade, growing efforts have been devoted to studying the possible forms an electricity-producing thermonuclear reactor might take and the various technical problems that will have to be overcome. Previous IAEA Conferences took place in Salzburg (1961), Culham (1965), Novosibirsk (1968), Madison (1971), Tokyo (1974), Berchtesgaden (1976) and Innsbruck (1978) The exchange of information that has characterized this series of meetings is an important example of international co-operation and has contributed substantially to progress in controlled fusion research. The results of experiments in major research establishments, as well as the growing scientific insights in the field of plasma physics, give hope that the realization of nuclear fusion will be made possible on a larger scale and beyond the laboratory stage by the end of this century. The increase of the duration of existing tokamak discharges requires solution of the impurity control problem. First results from the new big machines equipped with the poloidal divertor recently came into operation. PDX (USA) and ASDEX (F.R. of Germany) show that various divertor configurations can be established and maintained and that the divertors function in the predicted manner. The reduction of high-Z impurities on these machines by a factor 10 was achieved. As a result of extensive research on radio-frequency (RF) plasma heating on tokamaks: PLT (USA), TFR (France), JFT-2 (Japan), the efficiency of this attractive method of plasma heating comparable to neutral beam heating was demonstrated. It was shown that the density of the input power of about 5-10 kW/cm 2 is achievable and this limit is high enough for application to reactor-like machines. One of the inspiring results reported at the conference was the achievement of value (the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure) of ∼ 3% on tokamaks T-11 (USSR) and ISX-B (USA). It is important to note that this value exceeds the

  17. Large power supply facilities for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Yamamoto, Mitsuyoshi.

    1976-01-01

    The authors had opportunities to manufacture and to operate two power supply facilities, that is, 125MVA computer controlled AC generator with a fly wheel for JIPP-T-2 stellerator in Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University and 3MW trial superconductive homopolar DC generator to the Japan Society for Promotion of Machine Industry. The 125MVA fly-wheel generator can feed both 60MW (6kV x 10kA) DC power for toroidal coils and 20MW (0.5kV x 40kA) DC power for helical coils. The characteristic features are possibility of Bung-Bung control based on Pontrjagin's maximum principle, constant current control or constant voltage control for load coils, and cpu control for routine operation. The 3MW (150V-20000A) homopolar generator is the largest in the world as superconductive one, however, this capacity is not enough for nuclear fusion research. The problems of power supply facilities for large Tokamak devices are discussed

  18. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed

  19. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment System Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment) configuration has been designed to meet the physics objectives and subsystem requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in-vessel components and hands-on maintenance of components outside the TF (toroidal-field) boundary. The general arrangement consists of sixteen wedged-shaped TF coils that surround a free-standing central solenoid (CS), a double-wall vacuum vessel and internal plasma-facing components. A center tie rod is used to help support the vertical magnetic loads and a compression ring is used to maintain wedge pressure in the inboard corners of the TF coils. The magnets are liquid nitrogen cooled and the entire device is surrounded by a thermal enclosure. The double-wall vacuum vessel integrates cooling and shielding in a shape that maximizes shielding of ex-vessel components. The FIRE configuration development and integration process has evolved from an early stage of concept selection to a higher level of machine definition and component details. This paper describes the status of the configuration development and the integration of the major subsystem components

  20. CARE07 Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Annual Meeting, at CERN, 29-31 October 2007 The CARE project started on 1st January 2004 and will end on 31st December 2008. At the end of each year, the progress and status of its activities are reported in a general meeting. This year, the meeting takes place at CERN. The CARE objective is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The programme includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for particle physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe’s ability to produce intense and high-energy particle beams (electrons and positrons, muons and neutrinos, protons and ions, respectively). The Joint Activities, SRF, PHIN, HIPPI and NED, aim at technical developments on s...

  1. CARE07 Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Annual Meeting, at CERN, 29-31 October 2007 The CARE project started on 1st January 2004 and will end on 31st December 2008. At the end of each year, the progress and status of its activities are reported in a general meeting. This year, the meeting is taking place at CERN. The CARE objective is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The programme includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for particle physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe’s ability to produce intense and high-energy particle beams (electrons and positrons, muons and neutrinos, protons and ions, respectively). The Joint Activities, SRF, PHIN, HIPPI and NED, aim at technical developments ...

  2. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose, D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  3. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  4. Evaluation of laser-driven ion energies for fusion fast-ignition research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosaki, S.; Yogo, A.; Koga, K.; Okamoto, K.; Shokita, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Nishimura, H.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate laser-driven ion acceleration using kJ-class picosecond (ps) laser pulses as a fundamental study for ion-assisted fusion fast ignition, using a newly developed Thomson-parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS). The TPIS has a space- and weight-saving design, considering its use in an laser-irradiation chamber in which 12 beams of fuel implosion laser are incident, and, at the same time, demonstrates sufficient performance with its detectable range and resolution of the ion energy required for fast-ignition research. As a fundamental study on laser-ion acceleration using a ps pulse laser, we show proton acceleration up to 40 MeV at 1 × 10^{19} W cm^{-2}. The energy conversion efficiency from the incident laser into protons higher than 6 MeV is 4.6%, which encourages the realization of fusion fast ignition by laser-driven ions.

  5. Some implications for mirror research of the coupling between fusion economics and fusion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The thesis is made that physics understanding and innovation represent two of the most important ingredients of any program to develop fusion power. In this context the coupling between these and the econmics of yet-to-be realized fusion power plants is explored. The coupling is two-way: realistic evaluations of the economic (and environmental) requirements for fusion power systems can influence the physics objectives of present-day fusion research programs; physics understanding and innovative ideas can favorably impact the future economics of fusion power systems. Of equal importance is the role that physics/innovation can have on the time scale for the first practical demonstration of fusion power. Given the growing worldwide need for long-term solutions to the problem of energy it is claimed to be crucial that fusion research be carried out on a broad base and in a spirit that both facilitates the growth of physics understanding and fosters innovation. Developing this theme, some examples of mirror-based fusion system concepts are given that illustrate the coupling here described

  6. Radiological safety design considerations for fusion research experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crase, K.W.; Singh, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    A wide variety of fusion research experiments are in the planning or construction stages. Two such experiments, the Nova Laser Fusion Facility and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), are currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Although the plasma chamber vault for MFTF and the Nova target room will have thick concrete walls and roofs, the radiation safety problems are made complex by the numerous requirements for shield wall penetrations. This paper addresses radiation safety considerations for the MFTF and Nova experiments, and the need for integrated safety considerations and safety technology development during the planning stages of fusion experiments

  7. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II accelerator shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes

  8. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  9. Role of supercomputers in magnetic fusion and energy research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1985-06-01

    The importance of computer modeling in magnetic fusion (MFE) and energy research (ER) programs is discussed. The need for the most advanced supercomputers is described, and the role of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in meeting these needs is explained

  10. Advanced laser fusion target fabrication research and development proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, D.M.; Fries, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    A research and development program is described that will enable the fabrication of 10 6 targets/day for a laser fusion prototype power reactor in 2007. We give personnel and cost estimates for a generalized laser fusion target that requires the development of several new technologies. The total cost of the program between 1979 and 2007 is $362 million in today's dollars

  11. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas

  12. Recirculating induction accelerator as a low-cost driver for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Newton, M.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-09-01

    As a fusion driver, a heavy ion accelerator offers the advantages of efficient target coupling, high reliability, and long stand-off focusing. While the projected cost of conventional heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers based on multiple beam induction linacs are quite competitive with other inertial driver options, a driver solution which reduces the cost by a factor of two or more will make the case for HIF truly compelling. The recirculating induction accelerator has the potential of large cost reductions. For this reason, an intensive study of the recirculator concept was performed by a team from LLNL and LBL over the past year. We have constructed a concrete point design example of a 4 MJ driver with a projected efficiency of 35% and projected cost of less than 500 million dollars. A detailed report of our findings during this year of intensive studies has been recently completed. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Spectrum shaping assessment of accelerator-based fusion neutron sources to be used in BNCT treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Daquino, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of an irradiation facility, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application, using a set of advanced type, accelerator based, 3H(d,n) 4He (D-T) fusion neutron source device is presented. Some general issues concerning the design of a proper irradiation beam shaping assembly, based on very hard energy neutron source spectrum, are reviewed. The facility here proposed, which represents an interesting solution compared to the much more investigated Li or Be based accelerator driven neutron source could fulfil all the medical and safety requirements to be used by an hospital environment.

  14. Short fusion

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    French and UK researchers are perfecting a particle accelerator technique that could aid the quest for fusion energy or make X-rays that are safer and produce higher-resolution images. Led by Dr Victor Malka from the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees in Paris, the team has developed a better way of accelerating electrons over short distances (1 page).

  15. Customizable Scientific Web Portal for Fusion Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G; Kim, E; Schissel, D; Flannagan, S [General Atomics, San Diego (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Web browser has become one of the major application interfaces for remotely participating in magnetic fusion experiments. Recently in other areas, web portals have begun to be deployed. These portals are used to present very diverse sources of information in a unified way. While a web portal has several benefits over other software interfaces, such as providing single point of access for multiple computational services, and eliminating the need for client software installation, the design and development of a web portal has unique challenges. One of the challenges is that a web portal needs to be fast and interactive despite a high volume of tools and information that it presents. Another challenge is the visual output on the web portal often is overwhelming due to the high volume of data generated by complex scientific instruments and experiments; therefore the applications and information should be customizable depending on the needs of users. An appropriate software architecture and web technologies can meet these problems. A web-portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide. It utilizes a multi-tier software architecture, and web 2.0 technologies, such as AJAX, Django, and Memcached, to develop a highly interactive and customizable user interface. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services for users to select. The users can create a unique personalized working environment to fit their own needs and interests. Customizable services are: real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access, interactive data visualization. The web-portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing collaborative logbook, shared visualization and online instant message services. Furthermore, the web portal will provide a mechanism to allow users to create their own applications on the web portal as well as bridging capabilities to external applications such as

  16. Customisable Scientific Web Portal for Fusion Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G; Kim, E; Schissel, D; Flannagan, S [General Atomics, San Diego (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Web browser has become one of the major application interfaces for remotely participating in magnetic fusion. Web portals are used to present very diverse sources of information in a unified way. While a web portal has several benefits over other software interfaces, such as providing single point of access for multiple computational services, and eliminating the need for client software installation, the design and development of a web portal has unique challenges. One of the challenges is that a web portal needs to be fast and interactive despite a high volume of tools and information that it presents. Another challenge is the visual output on the web portal often is overwhelming due to the high volume of data generated by complex scientific instruments and experiments; therefore the applications and information should be customizable depending on the needs of users. An appropriate software architecture and web technologies can meet these problems. A web-portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide. It utilizes a multi-tier software architecture, and web 2.0 technologies, such as AJAX, Django, and Memcached, to develop a highly interactive and customizable user interface. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services for users to select. Customizable services are: real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access, interactive data visualization. The web-portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing collaborative logbook, shared visualization and online instant message services. Furthermore, the web portal will provide a mechanism to allow users to create their own applications on the web portal as well as bridging capabilities to external applications such as Twitter and other social networks. In this series of slides, we describe the software architecture of this scientific web portal and our experiences in utilizing web 2.0 technologies. A

  17. Finnish Fusion Research Programme Yearbook 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.; Paettikangas, T.

    1995-05-01

    Finnish Fusion Research Programme (FFUSION) is one of the national energy research programmes funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry and from 1995 by TEKES. National organization for fusion research is necessary for efficient and successful participation in international fusion programmes. FFUSION programme serves well for this purpose and it made possible to establish relations and the dialogue with the European Fusion Programme. The process led to the Finnish Association Euratom-TEKES in early 1995. The first period of the FFUSION programme (1993-1994) was preparation for the association to the Community Programme. The strategy was to emphasize fusion technology parallel with the basic fusion and plasma physics and to activate the related Finnish industry to collaborate and participate in the FFUSION programme and later in the European Fusion Programme. The key element in the strategy is the focusing our fairly small R and D effort to a few topics, which increases possibilities to be competitive in Europe. The physics programme in FFUSION deals mainly with theoretical and computational studies of radio-frequency heating in tokamak plasmas. Technology programme started with prestudies in 1993 and it concentrates into two areas: fusion reactor materials and remote handling systems. (8 figs., 3 tabs.)

  18. SINP MSU accelerator facility and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechenin, N.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Novikov, L.S.; Pokhil, G.P.; Romanovskii, E.A.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Spasskii, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: SINP accelerator facility includes 120 cm cyclotron, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 3.0 MeV, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 2.5 MeV, Cocroft -Walton generator with the upper voltage 500 keV, 150 keV accelerator for solid microparticles. A new generation of electron beam accelerators has been developed during the last decade. The SINP accelerator facility will be shortly described in the report. A wide range of basic research in nuclear and atomic physics, physics of ion-beam interactions with condensed matter is currently carried out. SINP activity in the applied research is concentrated in the following areas of materials science: - Materials diagnostics with the Rutherford backscattering techniques (RBS) and channeling of ions (RBS/C). A large number of surface ad-layers and multilayer systems for advanced micro- and nano-electronic technology have been investigated. A selected series of examples will be illustrated. - Concentration depth profiles of hydrogen by the elastic recoils detection techniques (ERD). Primarily, the hydrogen depth profiles in perspective materials for thermonuclear reactors have been investigated. - Lattice site locations of hydrogen by a combination of ERD and channeling techniques. This is a new technique which was successfully applied for investigation of hydrogen and hydrogen-defect complexes in silicon for the smart-cut technology. - Light element diagnostics by RBS and nuclear backscattering techniques (NBS). The technique is illustrated by applications for nitrogen concentration profiling in steels. Nitrogen take-up and release, nitrides precipitate formation will be illustrated. - New medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility and applications. Ultra-high vacuum and superior energy resolution electrostatic toroidal analyzer is designed to be applied for characterization of composition and structure of several upper atomic layers of materials

  19. Heavy accelerated nuclei in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerated atomic nuclei in physics accelerators have been used in basic biological research and in applied medical diagnostic and therapeutic studies for the past 50 years. The passage of single heavy particles through the cell nucleus is capable of producing multiple DNA double-strand scission and chromatin breaks. According to the Repair-Misrepair model, the high biological effectiveness of high-LET particles is due to misrepair and misrejoining of the breaks. The Bragg depth ionization effect allows heavy particles to deposit considerably more energy deep in tissue than at the surface, and this property has been used for great improvements in the radiation therapy of localized tumors. Recent advances in producing radioactive beams will allow verification of therapeutic administration of such beams. The radioactive beams also open a new field of Nuclear Medicine. There is increasing interest in building special biomedical light and heavy-ion accelerators. These will be used not only for therapy but also for diagnosis, for the study of radiation hazards in space flight, and for basic molecular and cellular understanding of the mechanisms of radiation effect

  20. New era for fusion research centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2003-01-01

    The former director general of CERN, Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith, takes over as director of the Culham fusion laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK. Plans for the laboratory include continuing the success of the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) (1 page)

  1. SUPER-FMIT, an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Holmes, J.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Mann, F.M.; Miles, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The SUPER-FMIT facility is proposed as an advanced accelerator based neutron source for high flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. There, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1 ampere beam of 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high flux (> 10 14 n/cm 2 -s) testing in SUPER-FMIT would be 14 liters, about a factor of 30 larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35 MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1.0 amperes or more. Such a large increase can be accomplished by acceleration of multiple beams of molecular deuterium ions (D 2 +) to 70 MeV in a common accelerator sructure. The availability of multiple beams and large total current allows great variety in the testing that can be done. For example, fluxes greater than 10 16 n/cm 2 -s, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring of spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved

  2. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  3. Fusion research and technology records in INIS database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    This article is a summary of a survey study ''''A survey on publications in Fusion Research and Technology. Science and Technology Indicators in Fusion R and T'''' by the same author on Fusion R and T records in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) bibliographic database. In that study, for the first time, all scientometric and bibliometric information contained in a bibliographic database, using INIS records, is analyzed and quantified, specific to a selected field of science and technology. A variety of new science and technology indicators which can be used for evaluating research and development activities is also presented in that study that study

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9 ) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13--15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14 C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3 H, 41 Ca and 26 Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications

  5. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Sandia's recent results in particle beam fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    Sandia's latest achievements in the particle beam fusion program are enumerated and pulse power accelerators offering a route to an experimental reactor ignition system are discussed. Four interdependent elements of the program are investigated: 1) power concentration and dielectric breakdown, 2) beam focusing and transport, 3) beam target interaction, and 4) implosion hydrodynamics. Results of the spherical target irradiation experiment on the 1 TW Proto I accelerator and the successful neutron production experiment using the 0.25 TW electron beam from the Rehyd generator are reported. Beam propagation in plasma discharge channels and magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines have been tested as alternative ways of the power transport. The first-time operation of the Proto II accelerator at 6 TW level is the first step in scaling of intense particle accelerators to higher power levels. (J.U.)

  7. Research on Kalman-filter based multisensor data fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Multisensor data fusion has played a significant role in diverse areas ranging from local robot guidance to global military theatre defense etc.Various multisensor data fusion methods have been extensively investigated by researchers,of which Klaman filtering is one of the most important.Kalman filtering is the best-known recursive least mean-square algorithm to optimally estimate the unknown.states of a dynamic system,which has found widespread application in many areas.The scope of the work is restricted to investigate the various data fusion and track fusion techniques based on the Kalman Filter methods.then a new method of state fusion is proposed.Finally the simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the introduced method.

  8. Automatic calibration and signal switching system for the particle beam fusion research data acquisition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1979-09-01

    This report describes both the hardware and software components of an automatic calibration and signal system (Autocal) for the data acquisition system for the Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators Hydra, Proto I, and Proto II. The Autocal hardware consists of off-the-shelf commercial equipment. The various hardware components, special modifications and overall system configuration are described. Special software has been developed to support the Autocal hardware. Software operation and maintenance are described.

  9. Automatic calibration and signal switching system for the particle beam fusion research data acquisition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1979-09-01

    This report describes both the hardware and software components of an automatic calibration and signal system (Autocal) for the data acquisition system for the Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators Hydra, Proto I, and Proto II. The Autocal hardware consists of off-the-shelf commercial equipment. The various hardware components, special modifications and overall system configuration are described. Special software has been developed to support the Autocal hardware. Software operation and maintenance are described

  10. The European Fusion Energy Research Programme towards the realization of a fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, M.; Laesser, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception, the European Fusion Programme has been orientated towards the establishment of the knowledge base needed for the definition of a reactor to be used for power production. Its ultimate goal is then to demonstrate the scientific and the technological feasibility of fusion power while incorporating the assessment of the safety, environmental, social and economic features of this type of energy source. At present, the JET device, the largest tokamak in the world, and the other medium-sized experimental machines are contributing essentially to the basic scientific phase of this development path. Their successful operation greatly contributed to support the design basis of ITER, the next step in fusion, which will aim to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power production by achieving extended D-T burning plasma operation. Following ITER, the conception and construction of the DEMO device is planned. DEMO will be a demonstration power plant which will be the first fusion device to generate a significant amount of electrical power from fusion. This paper describes the status of fusion research and the European strategy for achievement of the ultimate goal of construction of a prototype reactor. (author)

  11. Research programme on controlled thermonuclear fusion - Synthesis report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaucher, C.; Tran, M. Q.; Villard, L.; Marot, L.

    2011-01-01

    Technology Materials group studies the consequences of irradiation damages in the materials to be used in the structure of future fusion reactor plants. Irradiation experiments were carried out with protons and neutrons in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), with ions in the Joint Accelerator for Nanoscience and Nuclear Simulations (JANNUS) in Orsay-Saclay and with fission neutrons in fission reactors in Belgium, Hungary and the Netherlands. The plasticity and brittleness induced by the irradiation defects have been simulated in numerical models. At PSI, research projects were also conducted on high-temperature superconductivity. The new facility EDIPO for the test of superconductive coils was mounted, with main steps consisting in the installation of the vacuum chamber and in the test of the current and helium supplies at 75 o K. At CRPP a prototype of a hyper-frequency source for ITER was developed. The CRPP design of the microwave launcher for ITER was accepted by a panel of international experts. Comprehensive numerical simulations of ITER went on. Internal relaxation phenomena, so-called 'saw teeth', can be induced by fast ions; experiments to control such phenomena were successfully carried out at JET using radiofrequency wave injection. Thanks CRPP works, such instabilities can be detected and measured in JET, particularly at wave lengths potentially dangerous for ITER. The Basel University developed mirrors which were irradiated in the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich. Only minor changes in the optical properties of a mirror with a molybdenum coating were observed, while the reflectivity of a second mirror with a rhodium coating decreased by 25% in the ultraviolet range

  12. CARE05 coordinated accelerator research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Annual Meeting at CERN, 23-25 November 2005 CARE started on 1st January 2004 and will last for five years. At the end of each year it holds a general meeting to report on the progress and status of its activities. This year, the CARE annual meeting is taking place at CERN The objective of the CARE project is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The program includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for Particle Physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe's ability to evaluate and develop methods of producing intense and high energy beams of electrons, protons, muons and neutrinos. These activities are embedded in world-wide efforts towards future e+e- linear colliders, superior neutrino beam fa...

  13. 1981 inertial fusion research annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.; Wei, J.L.; Greacen, N.T.

    1981-01-01

    This annual report consists of the following two topics: (1) target fabrication technology, and (2) fusion experiments. The first section is reported by the following seven areas: (1) characterization, (2) fuel shell technology, (3) polymer technology, (4) lithium foil development, (5) precision etch technology, (6) analytical instrumentation, and (7) target fabrication. The second area is reported by the following topics: (1) experiments, (2) plasma theory, (3) code development and simulation, and (4) lasers and optics

  14. Magnetic fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report on the Department of Energy's Magnetic Fusion Program was requested by the Secretary of Energy. The Panel finds that substantial progress has been made in the three years since the previous ERAB review, although budget constraints have precluded the engineering initiatives recommended in that review and authorized in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 (the Act). Recognizing that the goals of the Act cannot now be met, the Panel recommends that the engineering phase be further postponed in favor of a strong base program in physics and technology, including immediate commitment to a major new tokamak-based device for the investigation of an ignited long-pulse plasma designated in this report as the Burning Core Experiment or BCX. Resources to design such a device could be obtained from within the existing program by redirecting work toward to BCX. At this time it is not possible to assess accurately the potential economic viability of fusion power in the future. The Panel strongly recommends expansion of international collaboration, particularly the joint construction and operation of major new unique facilities, such as the proposed BCX

  15. Particle beam fusion progress report January 1979 through June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) fusion target studies, (2) target experiments, (3) particle beam source development, (4) particle beam experiments, (5) pulsed power research and development, (6) pulsed fusion applications, and (7) electron beam fusion accelerator project

  16. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this and previous efforts ECON has provided economic assessment of a fusion research program. This phase of study focused on two tasks, the first concerned with the economics of fusion in an economy that relies heavily upon synthetic fuels, and the second concerned with the overall economic effects of pursuing soft energy technologies instead of hard technologies. This report is organized in two parts, the first entitled An Economic Analysis of Coproduction of Fusion-Electric Energy and Other Products, and the second entitled Arguments Associated with the Choice of Potential Energy Futures

  17. Institute for Fusion Research and Large Helical Device program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo

    1989-01-01

    In the research on nuclear fusion, the final objective is to materialize nuclear fusion reactors, and for the purpose, it is necessary to cause nuclear combustion by making the plasma of higher than 100 million deg and confine it for a certain time. So far in various universities, the researches on diversified fusion processes have been advanced, but in February, 1986, the Science Council issued the report 'Nuclear fusion research in universities hereafter'. As the next large scale device, an external conductor system helical device was decided, and it is desirable to found the organization for joint utilization by national universities to promote the project. The researches on the other processes are continued by utilizing the existing facilitie. The reason of selecting a helical device is the data base of the researches carried out so far can be utilized sufficiently, it is sufficiently novel even after 10 years from now, and many researchers can be collected. The place of the research is Toki City, Gifu Prefecture, where the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, is to be moved. The basic concept of the superconducting helical device project, the trend of nuclear fusion development in the world, the physical research using a helical system and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Accelerated rogue waves generated by soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum formation in photonic-crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driben, Rodislav; Babushkin, Ihar

    2012-12-15

    Soliton fusion is a fascinating and delicate phenomenon that manifests itself in optical fibers in case of interaction between copropagating solitons with small temporal and wavelength separation. We show that the mechanism of acceleration of a trailing soliton by dispersive waves radiated from the preceding one provides necessary conditions for soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic-crystal fibers. As a result of fusion, large-intensity robust light structures arise and propagate over significant distances. In the presence of small random noise the delicate condition for the effective fusion between solitons can easily be broken, making the fusion-induced giant waves a rare statistical event. Thus oblong-shaped giant accelerated waves become excellent candidates for optical rogue waves.

  19. Progress of research and development of nuclear fusion and development of large nuclear fusion device technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the last several years, the results of tokamak experiments were conspicuous, and the progress of plasma confinement performance, transport mechanism, divertors and impurities, helium transport and exhaust, electric current drive, magnetic field ripple effect and high speed particle transport and DT experiment are reported. The other confinement methods than tokamak, the related theories and reactor technology are described. The conceptual design of ITER was carried out by the cooperation of Japan, USA, EC and the former USSR. The projects of developing nuclear fusion in various countries, the design and the required research and development of ITER, the reconstruction and the required research and development of JT-60, JET and TFTR, the design and the required research and development of large helical device, the state of research and development of laser nuclear fusion and inversion magnetic field pinch nuclear fusion, the activities and roles of industrial circles in large nuclear fusion device technology, and the long term perspective of the technical development of nuclear fusion are described. (K.I.)

  20. Acceleration techniques for the direct use of CAD-based geometry in fusion neutronics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Paul P.H.; Tautges, Timothy J.; Kraftcheck, Jason A.; Smith, Brandon M.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2010-01-01

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library offers a unique approach to performing neutronics analysis on CAD-based geometries of fusion systems. By employing a number of acceleration techniques, the ray-tracing operations that are fundamental to Monte Carlo radiation transport are implemented efficiently for direct use on the CAD-based solid model, eliminating the need to translate to the native Monte Carlo input language. By forming hierarchical trees of oriented bounding boxes, one for each facet that results from a high-fidelity tessellation of the model, the ray-tracing performance is adequate to permit detailed analysis of large complex systems. In addition to the reduction in human effort and improvement in quality assurance that is found in the translation approaches, the DAGMC approach also permits the analysis of geometries with higher order surfaces that cannot be represented by many native Monte Carlo radiation transport tools. The paper describes the various acceleration techniques and demonstrates the resulting capability in a real fusion neutronics analysis.

  1. The scientific benefits of inertially confined fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M

    1999-01-01

    A striking feature of 25 years of research into inertially confined fusion (ICF) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been its significant impact in other fields of science. Most ICF facilities worldwide are now being used in part to support a wider portfolio of research than simply ICF. Reasons for this trend include the high intrinsic interest of the new science coupled with the relative ease and low marginal cost of adapting the facilities particularly lasers, to carry out experiments with goals other than ICF. The availability at ICF laboratories of sophisticated theory and modeling capability and advanced diagnostics has given added impetus. The expertise of ICF specialists has also triggered more lateral scientific spin-offs leading for example to new types of lasers and to related developments in basic science. In a generic sense, the facilities developed for ICF have made possible study of new regimes of the properties of matter at extremely high-energy density and the interaction of ultraintense light with matter. This general opportunity has been exploited in numerous and diverse specific lines of research. Examples elaborated below include laboratory simulation of astrophysical phenomena; studies of the equation of state (EOS) of matter under conditions relevant to the interior of planets and stars; development of uniquely intense sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard x-ray emission, notably the x-ray laser; understanding of the physics of strong field interaction of light and matter; and related new phenomena such as laser-induced nuclear processes and high-field-electron accelerators. Some of these developments have potential themselves for further scientific exploitation such as the scientific use of advanced light sources. There are also avenues for commercial exploitation, for example the use of laser plasma sources in EUV lithography. Past scientific progress is summarized here and projections are made for new science that may flow from the

  2. Development of the rf linear accelerator test bed for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of absorbed energy required by high gain deuterium-tritium targets for inertial confinement fusion reactors is now projected to be greater than 1 Megajoule. It has become apparent that a heavy ion fusion driver is the preferred choice in this scenario. To demonstrate this accelerator-based option, the national program has established two test beds: one at Argonne for the rf linac/storage ring approach, and one at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory developing an induction linac. The Argonne Beam Development Facility (BDF) would consist of a 40 mA rf linac for Xe + 8 , a storage ring, and a 10 GeV synchrotron. The design and status of the BDF is described as well as future program options to demonstrate as many solutions as possible of the issues involved in this approach

  3. The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.

    1999-01-01

    The development and demonstration of inertial fusion is incredibly challenging because it requires simultaneously controlling and precisely measuring parameters at extreme values in energy, space, and time. The challenges range from building megajoule (10 6 J) drivers that perform with percent-level precision to fabricating targets with submicron specifications to measuring target performance at micron scale (10 -6 m) with picosecond (10 -12 s) time resolution. Over the past 30 years in attempting to meet this challenge, the inertial fusion community around the world has invented new technologies in lasers, particle beams, pulse power drivers, diagnostics, target fabrication, and other areas. These technologies have found applications in diverse fields of industry and science. Moreover, simply assembling the teams with the background, experience, and personal drive to meet the challenging requirements of inertial fusion has led to spin-offs in unexpected directions, for example, in laser isotope separation, extreme ultraviolet lithography for microelectronics, compact and inexpensive radars, advanced laser materials processing, and medical technology. The experience of inertial fusion research and development of spinning off technologies has not been unique to any one laboratory or country but has been similar in main research centers in the US, Europe, and Japan. Strengthening and broadening the inertial fusion effort to focus on creating a new source of electrical power (inertial fusion energy [IFE]) that is economically competitive and environmentally benign will yield rich rewards in technology spin-offs. The additional challenges presented by IFE are to make drivers affordable, efficient, and long-lived while operating at a repetition rate of a few Hertz; to make fusion targets that perform consistently at high-fusion yield; and to create target chambers that can repetitively handle greater than 100-MJ yields while producing minimal radioactive by

  4. Fusion plasma physics research on the H-1 national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Australia has a highly leveraged fusion plasma research program centred on the H-1 National Facility device at the ANU. H-1 is a heliac, a novel helical axis stellarator that was experimentally pioneered in Australia, but has a close correlation with the worldwide research program on toroidal confinement of fusion grade plasma. Experiments are conducted on H-1 by university researchers from the Australian Fusion Research Group (comprising groups from the ANU, the Universities of Sydney, Western Sydney, Canberra, New England, and Central Queensland University) under the aegis of AINSE; the scientists also collaborate with fusion researchers from Japan and the US. Recent experiments on H-1 have focused on improved confinement modes that can be accessed at very low powers in H-1, but allow the study of fundamental physics effects seen on much larger machines at higher powers. H-1 is now being upgraded in magnetic field and heating power, and will be able to confine hotter plasmas beginning in 1999, offering greatly enhanced research opportunities for Australian plasma scientists and engineers, with substantial spillover of ideas from fusion research into other areas of applied physics and engineering

  5. Engineering research and development for the Elise Heavy Ion Induction Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.; Peters, C.

    1995-08-01

    The Fusion Energy Research engineering team has been conducting Research and Development Associated with the Construction (RDAC) of the Elise accelerator since the approval of Key Decision one (KD1 is start of construction). The engineering design effort has worked in close cooperation with the physics design staff to achieve all parameters of the Elise accelerator. The design included the 2 MV injector, matching section, combiner, induction cells, electric/magnetic quadrupoles, alignment system and controls. All major designs and some hardware testing will be discussed

  6. Engineering research and development for the Elise heavy ion induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.; Peters, C.

    1996-01-01

    The fusion energy research engineering team has been conducting research and development associated with the construction of the Elise accelerator since the approval of key decision 1 (this is the start of construction). The engineering design effort has worked in close cooperation with the physics design staff to achieve all parameters of the Elise accelerator. The design included the 2 MV injector, matching section, combiner, induction cells, electric-magnetic quadrupoles, alignment system and controls. All major designs and some hardware testing will be discussed. (orig.)

  7. Membrane support of accelerated fuel capsules for inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.; Moir, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin membrane to suspend an (inertial fusion energy) fuel capsule in a holder for injection into a reactor chamber is investigated. Capsule displacement and membrane deformation angle are calculated for an axisymmetric geometry for a range of membrane strain and capsule size. This information is used to calculate maximum target accelerations. Membranes must be thin (perhaps of order one micron) to minimize their effect on capsule implosion symmetry. For example, a 5 μm thick cryogenic mylar membrane is calculated to allow 1,000 m/s 2 acceleration of a 3 mm radius, 100 mg capsule. Vibration analysis (for a single membrane support) shows that if membrane vibration is not deliberately minimized, allowed acceleration may be reduced by a factor of four. A two membrane alternative geometry would allow several times greater acceleration. Therefore, alternative membrane geometry's should be used to provide greater target acceleration potential and reduce capsule displacement within the holder (for a given membrane thickness)

  8. Fusion Research Center, theory program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Texas FRC theory program is directed primarily toward understanding the initiation, heating, and confinement of tokamak plasmas. It supports and complements the experimental programs on the TEXT and PRETEXT devices, as well as providing information generally applicable to the national tokamak program. A significant fraction of the Center's work has been carried out in collaboration with, or as a part of, the program of the Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS). During the past twelve months, 14 FRC theory reports and 12 IFS reports with partial FRC support have been issued

  9. Progress in light ion beam fusion research on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Allshouse, G.O.; Bailey, J.

    1986-01-01

    PBFA II is a 100 TW pulsed power accelerator constructed at Sandia National Laboratories for use in the Light Ion Fusion Program. The objective of PBFA II is to accelerate and focus upon an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target a lithium beam with sufficient energy, power, and power density to perform ignition scaling experiments. The technologies used in PBFA II include: (1) primary energy storage and compression with 6 MV, low-inductance Marx generators, (2) pulse forming in water-insulated, water-dielectric lines with self-closing water switches, (4) voltage addition in vacuum using self-magnetically-insulated biconic transmission lines, (5) inductive energy storage and pulse compression using a fast-opening plasma erosion switch, (6) beam formation using a magnetically-insulated ion diode, and (7) space-charge and current-neutralized beam propagation to the target in a gas-filled cell. The first multimodule shot was on December 11, 1985. The plans for PBFA II include development and demonstration of the pulse-shaping techniques which are necessary for high-gain target compressions. Following a modification of the accelerator which will probably include an ''extraction'' ion diode, a 4- to 5-meter plasma channel for beam bunching during propagation, and a target chamber located beneath the accelerator, temporally-shaped ion beam pulses will be available for pulse-shaped target experiments. (author)

  10. Heavy-ion fusion driver research at Berkeley and Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.; Bangerter, R.; Celata, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    The Department of Energy is restructuring the U.S. fusion program to place a greater emphasis on science. As a result, we will not build the ILSE or Elise heavy ion fusion (HIF) facilities described in 1992 and 1994 conferences. Instead we are performing smaller experiments to address important scientific questions. Accelerator technology for HIF is similar to that for other applications such as high energy physics and nuclear physics. The beam physics, however, differs from the physics encountered in most accelerators, where the pressure arising from the beam temperature (emittance) is the dominant factor determining beam size and focusing system design. In HIF, space charge is the dominant feature, leading us into a parameter regime where.the beam plasma frequency becomes comparable to the betatron frequency. Our experiments address the physics of non-neutral plasmas in this novel regime. Because the beam plasma frequency is low, Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provide a good description of most of our experiments. Accelerators for HIF consist of several subsystems: ion sources, injectors, matching sections, combiners, acceleration sections with electric and magnetic focusing, beam compression and bending sections, and a system to focus the beams onto the target. We are currently assembling or performing experiments to address the physics of all these subsystems. This paper will discuss experiments in injection, combining, and bending

  11. Panel discussion: Progress and plans for magnetic fusion: Summary of comments on recent progress in fusion research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in fusion research is marked not so much by a few giant steps as by a continual number of small steps, which yield a steady advance toward the goal of producing a fusion reactor. During the past year, there have been two such steps in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program: the experimental demonstration of access to the second stable region of beta in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF); and the acceleration of a frozen hydrogen pellet by an intense electron beam. This paper discusses these steps

  12. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  13. Mechanical design of recirculating accelerator experiments for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.

    1995-01-01

    Recirculating induction accelerators have been studied as a potential low cost driver for inertial fusion energy. At LLNL, we are developing a small (4.5-m diameter), scaled, experimental machine which will demonstrate many of the engineering solutions of a full scale driver. The small recirculator will accelerate singly ionized potassium ions from 80 to 320 keV and 2 to 8 mA, using electric dipoles for bending and permanent magnet quadrupoles for focusing in a compact periodic lattice. While very compact, and low cost, this design allows the investigation of most of the critical physics issues associated with space-charge-dominated beams in future IFE power plant drivers. This report describes the recirculator, its mechanical design, its vacuum design, and the process for aligning it. Additionally, a straight magnetic transport experiment is being carried out to test diagnostics and magnetic transport in preparation for the recirculator

  14. Pulsed power particle beam fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1979-01-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in the last few years in developing the technology of intense particle beam drivers, there are still several unanswered questions which will determine their ultimate feasibility as fusion ignition systems. The questions of efficiency, cost, and single pulse scalability appear to have been answered affirmatively but repetitive pulse technology is still in its infancy. The allowable relatively low pellet gains and high available beam energies should greatly ease questions of pellet implosion physics. Insofar as beam-target coupling is concerned, ion deposition is thought to be understood and our measurements of enhanced electron deposition agree with theory. With the development of plasma discharges for intense beam transport and concentration it appears that light ion beams will be the preferred approach for reactors

  15. Pulsed power for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1976-01-01

    A review which traces the development of high power pulsed accelerators from the original inception at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston, England, for Bremsstrahlung output, through the low impedance accelerators, to the double-sided accelerators for fusion will be given. Proto II is presently being assembled at Sandia and preliminary testing on the Marx has been completed. Examples of various techniques will be shown from Sandia accelerators. Requirements for accelerators capable of achieving fusion levels will be developed and problem areas outlined. The diode insulator flashover problem presently limits the maximum current available from the accelerators

  16. Development and verification of remote research environment based on 'Fusion research grid'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iba, Katsuyuki; Ozeki, Takahisa; Totsuka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Oshima, Takayuki; Sakata, Shinya; Sato, Minoru; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Kiyono, Kimihiro

    2008-01-01

    'Fusion research grid' is a concept that unites scientists and let them collaborate effectively against their difference in time zone and location in a nuclear fusion research. Fundamental technologies of 'Fusion research grid' have been developed at JAEA in the VizGrid project under the e-Japan project at the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). We are conscious of needs to create new systems that assist researchers with their research activities because remote collaborations have been increasing in international projects. Therefore we have developed prototype remote research environments for experiments, diagnostics, analyses and communications based on 'Fusion research grid'. All users can access these environments from anywhere because 'Fusion research grid' does not require a closed network like Super SINET to maintain security. The prototype systems were verified in experiments at JT-60U and their availability was confirmed

  17. Outline of research project on nuclear fusion, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1985-08-01

    When the advance of nuclear fusion research during 10 years hereafter is predicted, the next project should start the research toward nuclear burning, adopt the diversified ways, and develop the research in wide related fields. The central subject such as the containment of plasma is studies with large experimental facilities, but in the related fields, the research subsidies must be utilized positively. The organization to perform the research compries 6 groups, 1) reactor materials and plasma-wall interactions 2) science and engineering of tritium, and influence on living things, 4) development of superconducting magnets, 5) fusion blanket engineering, and 6) design and assessment of thermonuclear reactors. The distribution and management of the scientific research subsidy are explained. All of the subjects of planned and publicly invited research a listed, and the researchers concerned, the amount of subsidy, the objective and the plan of execution in fiscal year 1984 of each research are outlined. (J.P.N.)

  18. Outline of research project on nuclear fusion, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1984-08-01

    When the advance of nuclear fusion research during 10 years hereafter is predicted, the next project should start the research toward nuclear burning, adopt the diversified ways, a nd develop the research in wide related fields. The central subject such as the containment of plasma is studies with large experimental facilities, but in the related fields, the research subsidies must be utilized positively. The organization to perform the research compries 6 groups, 1) reactor materials and plasma-wall interaction, 2) science and engineering of tritium and influence on living things, 3) fundamentals of core control, 4) development of superconducting magnets, 5) fusion blanket engineering, and 6) design and assessment of thermonuclear reactors. The distribution and management of the scientific research subsidy are explained. All of the subjects of planned and publicly invited research a listed, and the researchers concerned, the amount of subsidy, the objective and the plan of execution in fiscal 1983 of each research are outlined. (J.P.N.)

  19. Summaries of special research project on nuclear fusion 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1981-09-01

    This is a report of the research project entitled ''Nuclear fusion'', supported by the grant in aid for fusion research from the Ministry of Education in the fiscal year 1980. The research project was started in April, 1980, and comprises the following seventeen subjects of nuclear fusion research. 1) Heavy irradiation effects, 2) plasma-wall interaction, 3) neutronics, 4) welding engineering, 5) science and technology of tritium, 6) biological effects of tritium, 7) diagnostics of high temperature plasma, 8) new lasers, 9) fundamentals of plasma heating, 10) high efficiency energy conversion, 11) theory and computer simulation, 12) superconducting materials, 13) fundamental phenomena of superconductivity, 14) magnet technology, 15) heat transfer and structural engineering, 16) system design, and 17) resources and assessment of fusion energy. 43 summaries concerning reactor materials and plasma-wall interaction, 29 summaries concerning the science, technology and biological effects of tritium, 41 summaries concerning the fundamentals of reactor plasma control, 15 summaries concerning the technology of superconducting magnets, and 14 summaries concerning the design of fusion reactors and its evaluation are collected in this report, and their results and progress can be known. (Kako, I.)

  20. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilski, P.; Blomgren, J.; d´Errico, F.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Fernández, F.; Fuchs, A.; Golnik, N.; Lacoste, V.; Leuschner, A.; Sandri, S.; Silari, M.; Spurný, František; Wiegel, B.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 126, 1-4 (2007), s. 491-496 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC032 Grant - others:ES(XE) Contract no FI6R-012684 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiation fields * european high-energy accelerators * thermonuclear fusion facilities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  1. Recent progress on laser acceleration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Dewa, Hideki; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Kando, Masaki; Kondoh, Shuji; Kotaki, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    Recently there has been a tremendous experimental progress in ultrahigh field particle acceleration driven by ultraintense laser pulses in plasmas. A design of the laser wakefield accelerators aiming at GeV energy gains is discussed by presenting our recent progress on the laser wakefield acceleration experiments, the developments of high quality electron beam injectors and the capillary plasma waveguide for optical guiding of ultrashort intense laser pulses. (author)

  2. Electron accelerator technology research in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianqiao; Ye Mingyang; Zhang Yue; Yang Bin; Xu Tao; Kong Xiangshan

    2014-01-01

    Electronic accelerator was applied to instead of cobalt sources for food irradiation, to keep food quality and to improve the effect of the treatment. Appropriate accelerator parameters lead to optimal technique. The irradiation effect is associated with the relationship between uniformity and irradiating speed, the effect of cargo size on radiation penetration, as well as other factors that affect the irradiation effects. Industrialization of electron accelerator irradiation will be looked to the future. (authors)

  3. First phase plan for experimental study of heavy-ion inertial fusion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki; Okamura, Masahiro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Aida, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Kouichi; Sasa, Kimikazu; Itoh, Takashi; Okada, Masashi; Takahashi, Yousuke; Ishii, Yasuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    We propose the basic experiment plan of driver for heavy-ion inertial fusion by heavy-ion linac [1-3] system and the heavy-ion cooler synchrotron. As the first phase of planning, we will improve old heavy-ion accelerator system that accelerate small intensity around Cl ion with charge to mass ratio of 1/4 up to 2.4 MeV/amu. The injector of the system will exchange from the 1.6 MV Peletron Tandem accelerator to an RFQ type linac with an ECR heavy-ion source. According to building up the power sources of RF and focusing magnet, then it is able to accelerate intense around Xe ion with charge to mass ratio of 1/6 up to 2.4 MeV/amu. At the next stage of it, we will construct a heavy-ion cooler synchrotron having magneticrigidity of 3 or 6 Tm and begin to study about HIF driver. (author)

  4. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparatory phase) is an European infrastructural project run by this Consortium and realized inside EU-FP7. The paper presents a general overview of TIARA activities, with an introduction containing a portrait of contemporary accelerator technology and a digest of its applications in modern society.

  5. Annual progress report 1993. Work in controlled thermonuclear fusion research performed in the fusion research unit under the contract of association between Euratom and Risoe National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom-Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within (a) studies of nonlinear dynamical processes in magnetized plasmas, (b) development of pellet injectors for fusion experiments, and (c) development of diagnostics for fusion plasmas. The activities in technology cover radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. A summary of the activities in 1993 is presented. (au) (4 tabs., 21 ills., 64 refs.)

  6. Essay of accelerator R and D in a small laboratory of an university. Head ion IH linac for fusion material. 1983-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    The linear accelerator of Inter-Digital H type (IH linac) is known to have a high shunt impedance. Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology introduced an IH linac for fusion materials irradiation test in 1983. The beam injector was a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The IH linac was designed and fabricated based on the developmental work at Institute for Nuclear Study of University of Tokyo. The processes of component alignment, cold test and start-up operation are described. Educational aspect of the project is also reviewed. (K.Y.)

  7. Centralized supercomputer support for magnetic fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, D.; Tull, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    High-speed computers with large memories are vital to magnetic fusion energy research. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), transport, equilibrium, Vlasov, particle, and Fokker-Planck codes that model plasma behavior play an important role in designing experimental hardware and interpreting the resulting data, as well as in advancing plasma theory itself. The size, architecture, and software of supercomputers to run these codes are often the crucial constraints on the benefits such computational modeling can provide. Hence, vector computers such as the CRAY-1 offer a valuable research resource. To meet the computational needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) was established in 1974 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Supercomputers at the central computing facility are linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major fusion laboratories by a satellite communication network. In addition to providing large-scale computing, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes and data among the many fusion researchers in a cost-effective manner

  8. NIFS symposium: toward the research of fusion burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae

    1993-07-01

    NIFS symposium, entitled 'Toward the research of Fusion Burning Plasmas - Present status and Future Strategy' was held at NIFS on July 15th 1992. This NIFS symposium covers various topics related to burning plasma, e.g., JET DT experiment, Plan for DT experiment on TFTR as well as the future trends among researchers. To study the critical issues and trends of future research, a questionnaire was sent to about 100 researchers. This report presents such activities in the NIFS symposium. (author)

  9. Research of Virtual Accelerator Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongJinmei; YuanYoujin; ZhengJianhua

    2003-01-01

    A Virtual Accelerator is a computer process which simulates behavior of beam in an accelerator and responds to the accelerator control program under development in a same way as an actual accelerator. To realize Virtual Accelerator, control system should provide the same program interface to top layer Application Control Program, it can make 'Real Accelerator' and 'Virtual Accelerator'use the same GUI, so control system should have a layer to hide hardware details, Application Control Program access control devices through logical name but not through coded hardware address. Without this layer, it is difficult to develop application program which can access both 'Virtual' and 'Real' Accelerators using same program interfaces. For this reason, we can create CSR Runtime Database which allows application program to access hardware devices and data on a simulation process in a unified way. A device 'is represented as a collection of records in CSR Runtime Database. A control program on host computer can access devices in the system only through names of record fields, called channel.

  10. Progress in heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, G.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.; Sharp, W.M.; Westenskow, G.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program has recently commissioned several new experiments. In the High Current Experiment [P. A. Seidl et al., Laser Part. Beams 20, 435 (2003)], a single low-energy beam with driver-scale charge-per-unit-length and space-charge potential is being used to study the limits to transportable current posed by nonlinear fields and secondary atoms, ions, and electrons. The Neutralized Transport Experiment similarly employs a low-energy beam with driver-scale perveance to study final focus of high perveance beams and neutralization for transport in the target chamber. Other scaled experiments--the University of Maryland Electron Ring [P. G. O'Shea et al., accepted for publication in Laser Part. Beams] and the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment [R. C. Davidson, H. Qin, and G. Shvets, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1020 (2000)]--will provide fundamental physics results on processes with longer scale lengths. An experiment to test a new injector concept is also in the design stage. This paper will describe the goals and status of these experiments, as well as progress in theory and simulation. A proposed future proof-of-principle experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment, will also be described

  11. Accelerating complex for basic researches in the nuclear physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Guk, I.S.; Kononenko, S.G.; Peev, F.A.; Tarasenko, A.S.; Botman, J.I.M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2003 in NSC KIPT was begun the work on development the project of accelerator, base facility IHEPNP NSC KIPT electron recirculator SALO. The accelerator will be disposed in target hall of accelerator LU 2000 complex. It is projected first of all as facility for basic researches in the field of

  12. Accelerator research on MBE-4, an experimental multi-beam induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuth, H.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    The multiple beam accelerator MBE-4 is a device for research toward a heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion, based on the induction linac concept. Its main goal is proof of the principle of current amplification by acceleration and controlled self-similar beam pulse compression. Into the 16-m long device four beams, each with an initial current of 10 mA are injected from a Marx-driven diode at 200 keV. The current amplification is up to nine-fold, with a final beam energy of about 800 keV in the middle of the bunch. Now that all the apparatus' accelerator sections have been completed, installed and aligned, and its unaccelerated transport properties have been studied, our experimental research has reached the crucial phase of implementing appropriate accelerator schedules that approximate self-similar current-pulse compression. These schedules are established through a close interplay of computations using a one-dimensional simulation code and a manual empirical tuning procedure. In a first approach, with a rather vigorous schedule that uses most of the accelerator modules to their voltage limits, we have determined the limits of our capability for controlled pulse compression, mainly due to waveform shaping of the driving pulse-forming networks. We shall report on these results. In the future, we will also aim for gentler schedules that would model more closely an inertial confinement fusion scenario. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. Physics Regimes in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. Meade; S.C.Jardin; C.E. Kessel; M.A. Ulrickson; J.H. Schultz; P.H. Rutherford; J.A. Schmidt; J.C. Wesley; K.M. Young; N.A.Uckan; R.J. Thome; P. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; and C.C.Baker

    2001-01-01

    Burning plasma science is recognized widely as the next frontier in fusion research. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is a design study of a next-step burning plasma experiment with the goal of developing a concept for an experimental facility to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) self-heating, stability, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. This will require plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q greater than or equal to 5) that are sustained for a duration comparable to characteristic plasma timescales (greater than or equal to 10) tau(subscript ''E''), approximately 4 tau(subscript ''He''), approximately 2 tau(subscript ''skin''). The work reported here has been undertaken with the objective of finding the minimum size (cost) device to achieve these physics goals

  14. Status and development plan of nuclear fusion research in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Weihong

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the background of nuclear fusion research and current status of major devices with accomplishments in the US, as well as the national fusion plans and budgets for fusion energy development by the US government. As a fusion power in the world, the US has made significant contributions to the development of international fusion research. The strategy of fusion research developments and the accomplishments may exert a subtle influence on international fusion development situation. Withdrawing from the ITER partnership for 2 times, the US rejoined it subsequently. This paper gives a brief introduction of changes in the US fusion research policy, summarizes the implementation of ITER procurement packages undertaken by the US, and the overview of the US inertial confinement fusion re- search. The US future energy development plan is the development of magnetic confinement fusion approach in parallel with inertial confinement fusion approach. (author)

  15. ITER implementation and fusion energy research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Feng, Zhaoliang; Yang, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    ITER Project is jointly implemented by China, EU, India, Japan, Korea, Russian Federation and USA, under the coordination of Center Team of ITER International Fusion Energy Organization (IO-CT). Chinese fusion research related institutes and industrial enterprises are fully involved in the implementation of China contribution to the project under the leadership of ITER China Domestic Agency (CN-DA), together with IO-CT. The progresses of Procurement Packages (PA) allocated to China and the technical issues, especially on key technology development and schedule, QA/QC issues, are highlighted in this report. The specific enterprises carrying out different PAs are identified in order to make the increasing international manufactures and producers to ITER PAs know each other well for the successful implementation of ITER project. The participation of China to the management of IO-CT is also included, mainly from the governmental aspect and staff recruited from China. On the other hand, the domestic fusion researches, including upgrade of EAST, HL-2A Tokamaks in China, TBM program, the next step design activities for fusion energy power plant, namely, CFETR and training in this area, are also introduced for global cooperation for international fusion community. (author)

  16. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry: accelerated kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2017-01-01

    Kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was recorded in microdroplets by fusing a stream of microdroplets containing 40 µM chlorophyll a or b dissolved in methanol with a stream of aqueous microdroplets containing 35 mM hydrochloric acid (pH = 1·46). The kinetics of the demetallation of chlorophyll in the fused microdroplets (14 ± 6 µm diameter; 84 ± 18 m s-1 velocity) was recorded by controlling the traveling distance of the fused microdroplets between the fusion region and the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The rate of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was about 960 ± 120 times faster in the charged microdroplets compared with that reported in bulk solution. If no voltage was applied to the sprayed microdroplets, then the acceleration factor was about 580 ± 90, suggesting that the applied voltage is not a major factor determining the acceleration. Chlorophyll a was more rapidly demetallated than chlorophyll b by a factor of ~26 in bulk solution and ~5 in charged microdroplets. The demetallation kinetics was second order in the H+ concentration, but the acceleration factor of microdroplets compared with bulk solution appeared to be unchanged in going from pH = 1·3 to 7·0. The water:methanol ratio of the fused microdroplets was varied from 7:3 to 3:7 causing an increase in the reaction rate of chlorophyll a demetallation by 20%. This observation demonstrates that the solvent composition, which has different evaporation rates, does not significantly affect the acceleration. We believe that a major portion of the acceleration can be attributed to confinement effects involving surface reactions rather than either to evaporation of solvents or to the introduction of charges to the microdroplets.

  17. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs

  18. Accelerated ion beam research at ATOMKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, A.Z.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the studies on accelerated ion beams at ATOMKI and their technical background, their use from chemical analysis to biological, medical, geological, archaeological applications, their advance from material science to micromachining. (TRA)

  19. Developments on the RF system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Riggin, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The rf system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator is currently in the design phase at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The 35-MeV, 100-mA deuteron beam will require approximately 6 MW of rf power at 80 MHz. The EIMAC 8973 power tetrode, capable of a 600-kW cw output, has been chosen as the final amplifier tube for each of 15 amplifier chains. The final power stage of each chain is designed to perform as a linear Class B amplifier. Each low-power rf system (less than or equal to 100W) is to be phase, amplitude, and frequency controlled to provide a drive signal for each high-power amplifier. Beam dynamics for particle acceleration and for minimal beam spill require each rf amplifier output to be phase controlled to +-1 0 . The amplitude of the accelerating field must be held to +-1%. A varactor-tuned electronic phase shifter and a linear phase detector are under development for use in this system. To complement hardware development, analog computer simulations are being performed to optimize the closed-loop control characteristics of the system

  20. Pellet acceleration studies relating to the refuelling of a steady-state fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimock, D.; Jensen, K.; Jensen, V.O.; Joergensen, L.W.; Pecseli, H.L.; Soerensen, H.; Oester, F.

    1975-11-01

    Several methods for refuelling a steady state-fusion reactor have been proposed, and the pellet method seems advantageous if the pellet can be accelerated to the necessary velocity. A study group was formed to analyze this acceleration problem. Two pellet velocity values were considered: 10 4 m/s and 300 m/s. A pellet velocity of 10 4 m/s may be suitable in the case of a reactor, whereas 300 m/s is believed to be a reasonable velocity at which to perform realistic ablation experiments in the near future. A pneumatic acceleration method was found promising. The pressure is either supplied separately or by evaporation of a part of the pellet. In the latter case, a spark behind the pellet should provide the evoporation and the necessary heating of the driving gas. A preliminary test at room temperature with pellets made of beeswax (the density being ten times that of solid hydrogen, and plastic properties similar to those of solid hydrogen) resulted in a pellet velocity of 100 m/s at a modest value of the energy supplied to the spark. (Auth.)

  1. Achievements and challenges in particle beam fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1978-01-01

    Recent developments in particle beam fusion research, as well as critical issues which remain to be solved are summarized. Until now primary emphasis has been on driver development, but as sources have increased in energy output and intensity and diagnostic techniques have improved, implosion studies have been initiated

  2. Fusion research as a subject of parliamentary technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, R.; Grunwald, A.; Oertel, D.

    2004-01-01

    Fusion research is an internationally interlaced precautionary activity in the public interest and with public support. Parliamentary technology assessment serves to consult parliament in upcoming opinion- and decision-making processes.The task in this case is to give a comprehensible account of the status of development, to consider the different impacts and consequences of fusion, and to provide options for actions by parliament. The major methodological challenge consists in dealing with the uncertainty of knowledge in view of the long time scales involved. (orig.)

  3. Remote operations in a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    The proposed Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) has been designed for the test and evaluation of materials that will be exposed to the hostile radiation environment created by fusion reactors. Because the FERF itself must create a very hostile radiation environment, extensive remote handling procedures will be required as part of its routine operations as well as for both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. This report analyzes the remote-handling implications of a vertical- rather than horizontal-orientation of the FERF magnet, describes the specific remote-handling facilities of the proposed FERF installation and compares the FERF remote-handling system with several other existing and proposed facilities. (U.S.)

  4. Fusion research and third world countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Nadi, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Egypt experience in the plasma researches, asking the technology transfer between advanced and third world countries is presented. The role of cooperation agreements between developing countries is also discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hirotaka; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Isei, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sato, Satoshi; Shimada, Katsuhiro; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008, including those performed in collaboration with other directorates of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. The JT-60U operation regime was extended toward the long sustainment of high normalized beta (β N ) with good confinement (β N =2.6 x 28 s). Effectiveness of real-time control of current profile was demonstrated in high β plasmas. Toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity were systematically clarified for the first time, and intrinsic rotation due to pressure gradient was discovered. Effects of toroidal rotation and magnetic field ripple on type 1 ELM size and pedestal performance were clarified, and type I ELM control was demonstrated by toroidal rotation control. Variety of inter-machine experiments, such as JT-60U and JET, and domestic collaborations were performed. In theoretical and analytical researches, for the NEXT (Numerical Experiment of Tokamak) project, numerical simulations of a tokamak plasma turbulence progressed and a zonal field generation was investigated. Also, nonlinear MHD simulations found the Alfven resonance effects on the evolution of magnetic islands driven by externally applied perturbations. Integrations of several kinds of element codes progressed in the integrated transport/MHD model, the integrated edge/pedestal model and the integrated SOL/divertor model. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 800 s with 1 MW was demonstrated. Also extracted beam current of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 320 mA at 796 keV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds on Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs were progressed. For

  6. EU socio-economic research on fusion: findings and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosato, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission launched a Socio-Economic Research program to study under which conditions future fusion power plants may become competitive, compatible with the energy supply system and acceptable for the public. The program is developed by independent experts making use of well established international methodologies. It has been shown, among others, that: 1) local communities are ready to support the construction of an experimental fusion facility, if appropriate communication and awareness campaigns are carried out; 2) since the externalities are much lower than for competitors, fusion power plants may become the major producer of base load electricity at the end of the century in Europe, if climate changes have to be mitigated, if the construction of new nuclear fission power plants continues to be constrained and if nuclear fusion power plants become commercially available in 2050. Cooperating with major international organizations, the program for next year aims to demonstrate that the potential global benefits of fusion power plants in the second half of the century largely outdo the RD and D costs borne in the first half to make it available. (author)

  7. EU socio-economic research on fusion: Findings and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosato, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission launched a Socio-Economic Research program to study under which conditions future fusion power plants may become competitive, compatible with the energy supply system and acceptable for the public. It has been shown, among others, that: 1) local communities are ready to support the construction of an experimental fusion facility, if appropriate communication and awareness campaigns are carried out; 2) since the externalities are much lower than for competitors, fusion power plants may become the major producer of base load electricity at the end of the century in Europe, if climate changes have to be mitigated, if the construction of new nuclear fission power plants continues to be constrained and if nuclear fusion power plants become commercially available in 2050. Cooperating with major international organizations, the program for next year aims to demonstrating, through technical economic programming models and global multi-regional energy environmental scenarios, that the potential global benefits of fusion power plants in the second half of the century largely outdo the RD and D costs borne in the first half to make it available. Making the public aware of such benefits through field experiences will be part of the program. (author)

  8. Present status of fusion researches in USA, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi; Okabayashi, Michio

    1983-01-01

    25 years have elapsed since nuclear fusion was published at the second Geneva conference in 1958. During this period, the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University has achieved the central role in the research on toroidal system nuclear fusion devices. Also the experiment of the large tokamak TFTR started from December, 1982, recorded the longest containment time of 200 ms as the initial data, and toroidal devices look to approach one step close to the scientific verification experiment (Q = 1) of reactors. In the PPPL, in order to perfect the basis required for the realization of nuclear fusion reactors, the experimental and theoretical developments have been carried out. Plasma containment experiment has been advanced successively from stellarater through internal conductor type to tokamak, and in plasma heating, ion cyclotron heating, fast neutral particle injection heating and low region hybrid heating were successfully carried out. As the experimental apparatuses, that for poloidal divertor experiment, Princeton large torus, tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) and S-1 spheromak are described. From the theories developed recently, bean type tokamak, heliac-stellarator and nuclear fusion reaction utilizing μ-mesons and nuclear spin are explained. (Kako, I.)

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas

  10. Interfacing between concrete and steel construction and fusion research devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoughby, E.

    1981-01-01

    In 1976 Giffels Associates, Inc. an architect/engineer organization, was retained by the United States Department of Energy to provide Title I and Title II design services and Title III construction inspection services for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor now being installed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey. Construction of the complex required to house and serve the reactor itself, designed by others, now commencing. During building construction several problems occurred with respect to the interface between the building design, construction and the fusion device (reactor). A brief description of some of these problems and related factors is presented, which may be of benefit to those persons active in continuing fusion research and experimental work

  11. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  12. Intelligible seminar on fusion reactors. (12) Next step toward the realization of fusion reactors. Future vision of fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Kenichi; Tobita, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In the last session of this seminar the progress of research and development for the realization of fusion reactors and future vision of fusion energy research and development are summarized. The some problems to be solved when the commercial fusion reactors would be realized, (1) production of deuterium as the fuel, (2) why need the thermonuclear reactors, (3) environmental problems, and (4) ITER project, are described. (H. Mase)

  13. Research into controlled fusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.

    1992-01-01

    During the thirty years of tokamak research, physicists have been approaching step by step the reactor breakeven condition defined by the Lawson criterion. JET, the European Community tokamak is probably the first candidate among the world largest tokamaks to reach the ignition threshold and thus to demonstrate the physical feasibility of thermonuclear reaction. The record plasma parameters achieved in JET at H plasma modes due to powerful additional plasma heating and due to substantial reduction of plasma impurities, opened the door to the first experiment with a deuterium-tritium plasma. In the paper, the conditions and results of these tritium experiments are described in detail. The prospects of the world tokamak research and of the participation of Czechoslovak physicists are also discussed. (J.U.) 3 figs., 6 refs

  14. Inertial fusion research. Annual technical report, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1985-03-01

    This report contains research progress during this period on each of the following 5 areas: (1) parametric instabilities, (2) cryogenic implosion experiments, (3) x-ray laser experiments, (4) XCALIBR, an effective soft x-ray calibration facility, and (5) DELPHI- a new hydrodynamics code, (6) polymer technology, (7) glass shell technology, (8) shell production facility, (9) cryogenic technology, (10) characterization and quality assurance, and (11) coating technology

  15. Inertial fusion energy power plant design using the Compact Torus Accelerator: HYLIFE-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Leber, R.L.; Logan, B.G.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Tabak, M.; Tobin, M.T.; Bieri, R.L.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, offers the promise of a low-cost, high-efficiency, high energy, high-power-density driver for ICF and MICF (Magnetically Insulated ICF) type fusion systems. A CTA with 100 MJ driver capacitor bank energy is predicted to deliver ∼30 MJ CT kinetic energy to a 1 cm 2 target in several nanoseconds for a power density of ∼10 16 watts/cm 2 . The estimated cost of delivered energy is ∼3$/Joule, or $100M for 30 MJ. This driver appears to be cost-effective and, in this regard, is virtually alone among IFE drivers. We discuss indirect-drive ICF with a DT fusion energy gain Q = 70 for a total yield of 2 GJ. The CT can be guided to the target inside a several-meter-long disposable cone made of frozen Li 2 BeF 4 , the same material as the coolant. We have designed a power plant including CT injection, target emplacement, containment, energy recovery, and tritium breeding. The cost of electricity is predicted to be 4.8 cents/kWh, which is competitive with future coal and nuclear costs

  16. The Swedish fusion research programme on magnetic confinement 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1978-02-01

    A review is given on the activities and plans for research on plasma physics and controlled fusion at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, with descriptions and motivations of the research lines being conducted. These activities include investigations on plasma-neutral gas interaction, development of special principles for plasma stabilization, magnetic confinement schemes being based mainly on poloidal fields, as well as the generation, heating, and diagnostics of plasmas being ''impermeable'' to neutral gas. (author)

  17. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios

  18. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Hoon, M.J.L. de; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents (∼100's Amperes/beam) and ion energies (∼1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions, and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned. The step which bridges the gap between the IBX and an engineering test facility for fusion has been designated the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE (like the IBX) will provide an

  19. Electromagnetic waves for thermonuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucato, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The science of magnetically confined plasmas covers the entire spectrum of physics from classical and relativistic electrodynamics to quantum mechanics. During the last sixty years of research, our initial primitive understanding of plasma physics has made impressive progress thanks to a variety of experiments - from tabletop devices with plasma temperatures of a few thousands of degrees and confinement times of less than 100 microseconds, to large tokamaks with plasma temperatures of up to five hundred million degrees and confinement times approaching one second. We discovered that plasma con

  20. Atomic data for controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Ray, J.A.; Ricci, E.; Wilker, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Gilbody, H.B.

    1977-02-01

    Presented is an evaluated graphical and tabular compilation of atomic and molecular cross sections of interest to controlled thermonuclear research. The cross sections are tabulated and graphed as a function of energy for collision processes involving heavy particles, electrons, and photons with atoms and ions. Also included are sections on data for particle penetration through macroscopic matter, particle transport properties, particle interactions with surfaces, and pertinent charged particle nuclear cross sections and reaction rates. In most cases estimates have been made of the data accuracy

  1. Status of cold fusion research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the Condensed Matter Nuclear Science (CMNS) works have been centering around the Japan CF-Research Society (JCFRS) established in 1999. Recently, about 10 research groups were actively working in the CMNS field, and have been exchanging information mainly in the annual meetings of JCFRS in addition to the International ICCF conferences. For many years efforts have been exclusively devoted to clarification of the underlying physics of excess heat phenomenon and isotopic composition change. Recently, however, an entrepreneur group, Clean Planet Inc., has entered into the CMNS field in Japan, and joined Mizuno to form the above-mentioned group and made a presentation at the LANR/CF Colloquium, at MIT in March 2014. In their work they used glow discharge to form surface nanostructures on nickel mesh wires that are to be subjected to deuterium exposure. They claimed excess power on the order of kilowatts with a coefficient of performance of 1.9. Confirmation of their claim by third parties is highly expected

  2. 1978 annual report on laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.R.

    1978-01-01

    Progress during this period is reported for each of the following topics: (1) spherical shell fuel containers, (2) polymer research, (3) cryogenic technology, (4) fabrication technology, (5) implosion physics, (6) fast ion measurements of laser-produced spherical plasmas, (7) absorbed energy measurements, (8) diagnostics, (9) fast ion energy loss in dense plasmas, (10) electron transport, (11) ionization equation of state, (12) profile modification by pondermotive forces, (13) pondermotive potential effects on Ohm's law, (14) effect of flux-limited thermal transport on critical surface jump conditions, (15) spherical rarefaction shocks, (16) explosively heated Gaussian objects, (17) bandwidth broadening, (18) frequency doubling experiments, (19) advanced laser candidates, (20) glass laser operation, and (21) 2TW laser upgrade

  3. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  4. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Fifth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this and previous efforts, ECON has provided economic assessment of a fusion research program. This phase of study has focused on the future markets for fusion energy and the economics of fusion in those markets. These tasks were performed: (1) fusion market growth, (2) inflation vs. capital investment decisions, and (3) economics of cogeneration

  5. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  6. Maryland magnetic fusion research program: MS speromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSilva, A.W.; Goldenbaum, G.C.; Griem, H.R.

    1989-07-01

    The main theme of our present experimentation on MS is to prolong the spheromak lifetime. This research has been concerned with such topics as passive MHD stabilization coils, impurity control and increased energy storage. At the present time the longest lived plasmas appear to be line tied to the liner or reversal coils. The natural consequence of having net flux outside the separatrix and a resistive plasma is that the plasma shrinks in time. At some point in time the plasma is far enough from the liner, or stabilization coils, that it becomes unstable. If we increase the bias field so as to move the separatrix further inside the liner, the plasma becomes unstable earlier as the separatrix moves to a smaller radius in a shorter time than if it starts out outside the liner. We have tried to circumvent this behavior with various configurations of passive conductors used as stabilizing elements. In this paper, we detail some of the machine modifications that have been tried in attempts to produce a stable, long-lived plasma

  7. Development of FET-switched induction accelerator cells for heavy-ion fusion recirculators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.A.; Cravey, W.R.; Hawkins, S.A.; Kirbie, H.C.; Ollis, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The ''recirculator,'' a recirculating heavy-ion induction accelerator, has been identified as a promising approach for an inertial fusion driver. One of the technical challenges to building a recirculator is the requirement for a modulator that can drive the induction accelerator cells at repetition rates ≥ 100 kHz with variable pulse width and pulse repetition rate capability. A high repetition rate modulator and cell is presently being developed for use on a proposed heavy-ion recirculator. The goal is to develop an array of field-effect transistors to switch 5 kV, 1 μs pulses onto a Metglas induction core at pulse rates exceeding 100 kHz. Each transistor in the array is driven by a fiber-optic isolated gate signal that is powered by a dc/dc converter. The circuit architecture provides for core reset between pulses and produces bursts of pulses that are variable in pulse width and prf. The transistor switching array, energy storage capacitors, reset circuit and cell core are all combined into a single compact, low-impedance package. Progress of this development work will be presented with supporting data

  8. Computing for magnetic fusion energy research: An updated vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henline, P.; Giarrusso, J.; Davis, S.; Casper, T.

    1993-01-01

    This Fusion Computing Council perspective is written to present the primary of the fusion computing community at the time of publication of the report necessarily as a summary of the information contained in the individual sections. These concerns reflect FCC discussions during final review of contributions from the various working groups and portray our latest information. This report itself should be considered as dynamic, requiring periodic updating in an attempt to track rapid evolution of the computer industry relevant to requirements for magnetic fusion research. The most significant common concern among the Fusion Computing Council working groups is networking capability. All groups see an increasing need for network services due to the use of workstations, distributed computing environments, increased use of graphic services, X-window usage, remote experimental collaborations, remote data access for specific projects and other collaborations. Other areas of concern include support for workstations, enhanced infrastructure to support collaborations, the User Service Centers, NERSC and future massively parallel computers, and FCC sponsored workshops

  9. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  10. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Alex, E-mail: af@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion Science (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, each of which has a unique arrival time and may have a unique kinetic energy. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of “main-pulse” beams relative to “foot-pulse” beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying “differential acceleration” to individual beams or sets of beams at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams “sooner” and others “later,” it is possible to simplify the beam line configuration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use differential acceleration to effect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams (e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model configurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.

  11. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, each of which has a unique arrival time and may have a unique kinetic energy. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of “main-pulse” beams relative to “foot-pulse” beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying “differential acceleration” to individual beams or sets of beams at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams “sooner” and others “later,” it is possible to simplify the beam line configuration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use differential acceleration to effect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams (e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model configurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy

  12. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards

  13. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  14. Overview of FAR-TECH's magnetic fusion energy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Spencer, J. Andrew; Svidzinski, V. A.; Zhao, L.

    2017-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. has been working on magnetic fusion energy research over two-decades. During the years, we have developed unique approaches to help understanding the physics, and resolving issues in magnetic fusion energy. The specific areas of work have been in modeling RF waves in plasmas, MHD modeling and mode-identification, and nano-particle plasma jet and its application to disruption mitigation. Our research highlights in recent years will be presented with examples, specifically, developments of FullWave (Full Wave RF code), PMARS (Parallelized MARS code), and HEM (Hybrid ElectroMagnetic code). In addition, nano-particle plasma-jet (NPPJ) and its application for disruption mitigation will be presented. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  15. Development of laser technology in Research Center of Laser Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wanguo; Deng Ying; Zhou Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress in the construction of SG-Ⅲ laser facility, integrated Testbed and XG-Ⅲ laser facility and that in the upgrade of the prototype of SG-Ⅲ, and the development in assembling and installing technology, and the achievements in maintaining cleanliness project and metrology in Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics in China in 2012. (authors)

  16. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research contains papers given in two of the sessions: A and E. Session A contains the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture and papers on tokamaks; session E papers on plasma heating and current drive. The titles and authors of each paper are listed in the Contents. Abstracts accompany each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Trends of plasma physics and nuclear fusion research life cycle and research effort curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Takeru; Kanada, Yasumasa; Momota, Hiromu; Ichikawa, Y.H.

    1979-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis of research trends in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. This analysis is based on information retrieval from available data bases such as INSPEC tapes. The results indicate that plasma physics research is now in the maturation phase of its life cycle, and that nuclear fusion research is in its growth phase. This paper indicates that there is a correlation between the number of accumulated papers in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion and the experimentally attained values of the plasma ignition parameter ntT. Using this correlation ''research effort curve'', we forecast that the scientific feasibility of controlled fusion using magnetic confinement systems will be proved around 1983. (author)

  18. Plasma opening switch development for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinnett, R.W.; McDaniel, D.H.; Rochau, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conducted plasma opening switch (POS) experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' new Particle Beam Fusin Accelerator II (PBFA II) (12 MV, 100 TW, 50 ns), on the Supermite accelerator (2 MV, 2 TW, 50 ns) and on the Naval Research Laboratory's Gamble II accelerator (1.8 MV, 1.6 TW, 70 ns). The POS systems on the PBFA II and Supermite accelerators use a newly developed flashboard plasma source to provide the plasma necessary to conduct the large (> 1 MA) currents produced byu these accelerators. In the Supermite experiments, the plasma opening switch conducted currents up to 1 MA before opening in less than 10 ns into an electron beam load. These experiments achieved significant voltage gain relative to the voltage across a matched load. In experiments on Gamble II, power gains of up to 1.7 were achieved using a POS in a strongly coaxial geometry (r/sub outer//r/sub inner/ = 2) with a large magnetic field at the cathode. The POS system on PBFA II is unique because of its size and voltage. This POS system is designed to conduct over 6 MA before opening. In present experiments it has conducted currents of 4-5 MA for over 50 ns

  19. Nuclear fusion research and plasma application technologies in SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, X.W.

    1990-01-01

    A brief introduction of nuclear fusion research and plasma application technologies in SWIP is reported in this paper. The SWIP focuses its fusion efforts mainly on Tokamak with mirror as the supplemental experiments and fusion reactor conceptual design as preparation for future application of fusion energy. SWIP is making great efforts on fusion technology spin-off to make contribution towards national economic construction. (Author)

  20. Be Bold : An Alternative Plan for Fusion Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, Glen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Government sponsored magnetic fusion energy research in the USA has been on downward trajectory since the early 1990’s. The present path is unsustainable. Indeed, our research community and national research facilities are withering from old-age and lack of investment. The present product (tokamak-centric production of electricity) does not yet work, will not be economic, and is clearly not valued or needed by our society. Even if a prototype existed at any cost, DT-based fusion energy would come too late to significantly impact the reduction of CO2 emissions in this century. This white paper outlines what “being bold” could mean with respect to the invention and application of nuclear fusion technologies, and how the USA could once again set a visionary example for the world. I present the discussion in two parts, reflecting on the NAS panel two-part assignment of a plan “with” and “without” ITER.

  1. Fusion research in the UK 1945-1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.; Lawson, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Two workers, involved in the research programmes themselves, document the developments in fusion research in the United Kingdom from 1945 until 1960. Started as part of the official history of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the text is drawn from work by various teams of scientists at laboratories around the United Kingdom. This previewing of the research programmes lead to an inevitable evaluation of their worth, an assessment of their political implications and speculation on whether certain changes might have advanced scientific progress more readily. (U.K.)

  2. Mission and design of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments are needed to test and extend present understanding of confinement, macroscopic stability, alpha-driven instabilities, and particle/power exhaust in plasmas dominated by alpha heating. A key issue is to what extent pressure profile evolution driven by strong alpha heating will act to self-organize advanced configurations with large bootstrap current fractions and internal transport barriers. A design study of a Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is underway to assess near term opportunities for advancing the scientific understanding of self-heated fusion plasmas. The emphasis is on understanding the behavior of fusion plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q≥5) that are sustained for durations comparable to the characteristic plasma time scales (≥20 τ E and ∼τ skin , where τ skin is the time for the plasma current profile to redistribute at fixed current). The programmatic mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize alpha-dominated plasmas to provide knowledge for the design of attractive magnetic fusion energy systems. The programmatic strategy is to access the alpha-heating-dominated regime with confidence using the present advanced tokamak data base (e.g., Elmy-H-mode, ≤0.75 Greenwald density) while maintaining the flexibility for accessing and exploring other advanced tokamak modes (e. g., reversed shear, pellet enhanced performance) at lower magnetic fields and fusion power for longer durations in later stages of the experimental program. A major goal is to develop a design concept that could meet these physics objectives with a construction cost in the range of $1B. (author)

  3. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  4. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  5. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA for FY2008 and FY2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isei, Nobuaki

    2011-03-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for FY2008 (from April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009) and FY2009 (from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010), including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. Concerning the ITER project, JAEA was nominated as the domestic agency by the Japanese government after the ITER Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations. In the development of superconducting conductors, JAEA constructed a technical platform for the fabrication of superconducting conductors for toroidal field (TF) coils ahead of other countries. JAEA immediately started and completed the construction of a plant to fabricate superconducting conductors, and started their fabrication ahead of other countries. In the development of gyrotron high-frequency heating equipment, since only the JAEA satisfies the ITER's procurement specifications among supplier countries, the ITER Organization requested JAEA to conduct confidence tests, and achieved results such as data acquisition that could contribute to the development of the ITER's operational scenario. For the development of neutral beam injectors, advantages of the multi-stage acceleration system developed by JAEA was recognized as a result of comparative experiments with single-stage acceleration systems developed in Europe for the particle acceleration system, and was adopted in the ITER's technical specifications. For the Broader Approach (BA) activities, JAEA was designated as the implementing agency by the Japanese government after the BA Agreement took effect, and has fulfilled the obligations and promoted three projects in the BA activities steadily through domestic cooperation and coordination with Europe. Concerning activities related to the International Fusion Energy

  6. Research programme on controlled thermonuclear fusion - Synthesis report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werthmueller, A.

    2009-06-01

    Switzerland is associated to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project carried out in the framework of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The current stage includes on-site civil engineering works. The Variable Configuration Tokamak (TCV) of the 'Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas' (CRPP) of the EPFL will remain an important recognized research facility until the start of the ITER operation foreseen in 2018. At the European level, the whole fusion research is coordinated and partly financed by the Joint Undertaking Fusion for Energy (JU F4E). The large flexibility of the TCV design and operation modus allow the creation and control of plasmas of various shapes, what is a very useful option to verify the results of numerical simulations. Besides, the hyper-frequency power density injected into the plasma is the highest ever recorded in the world. Research topics studied with the TCV include the stationary regimes in the tokamaks; a plasma current of more than 70 kA could be maintained, what represents an improvement by a factor of 3 to 4 of the confinement quality. For the first time in the world a configuration of the 'snowflake' type could be created and the power density on the wall of the vacuum chamber could be reduced accordingly. Numerical models allowed the analysis of turbulence and heat transport, of the magneto-hydrodynamic stability of the tokamaks and stellarators as well as the optimization of the magnetic confinement. Results concerning the so-called 'saw teeth' instability were experimentally confirmed on the Joint European Torus (JET). Theoretical researches were carried out on the fluctuations, turbulence and transport phenomena in the magnetized toric plasmas. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) the effect of the fast neutrons emitted by the fusion reactions on the walls of the fusion reactors was investigated. Irradiation simulations were carried out by means of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source

  7. Surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira.

    1980-04-01

    The surface studies for nuclear fusion research consist of the studies on the surface process and the surface damage. The problems with the surface study are different at different research stages. The plasma-wall interaction in the ignition stage is mainly concerned with heating. The impurity control becomes important in the breakeven stage. In the longer burn experiment, the problems of plasma contamination and ash accumulation are serious, and the blistering is also a problem. From the reactor aspect, the reduction of life of wall due to the irradiation of high fluence must be considered. The surface damage due to plasma disruption is a very big problem. The activities concerning the surface studies in university-linked organizations are the surface characterization for fusion reactor materials by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, the high power ion irradiation test for CTR first wall, data compilation on plasma-wall interaction, the studies of sputtering process and surface coating, and the study on hydrogen isotope permeation through metals for fusion reactors. Other activities such as the sample characterization at many universities using the SUS 304 samples from the same lot, and the collaboration works on JIPP-T-2 plasma wall experiments are introduced. Concerning the surface study, US-Japan or international collaboration are strongly expected. (Kato, T.)

  8. Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program, Professional Development Program: FY 1987 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In FY 1986, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) initiated two programs for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fusion Energy (OFE): the Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program and the Fusion Energy Professional Development Program. These programs provide opportunities to conduct collaborative research in magnetic fusion energy research and development programs at DOE laboratories and contractor sites. Participants become trained in advanced fusion energy research, interact with outstanding professionals, and become familiar with energy-related national issues while making personal contributions to the search for solutions to scientific problems. Both programs enhance the national fusion energy research and development effort by providing channels for the exchange of scientists and engineers, the diffusion of ideas and knowledge, and the transfer of relevant technologies. These programs, along with the Magnetic Fusion Energy Science and Technology Fellowship Programs, compose the fusion energy manpower development programs administered by ORAU for DOE/OFE

  9. KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) annual report, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes research activities of KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) in the fiscal year 2005. Two years have passed since the KEK was reorganized as an inter-university research institute corporation, and KEK continue to facilitate a wide range of research programs based on high-energy accelerators for users from universities. KEK consists of two research institutes, the Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS) and the Institute of Materials Science (IMSS); and two laboratories, the Accelerator Laboratory and the Applied Research Laboratory. KEK has been operating four major accelerator facilities in Tsukuba: the 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS), the KEK B-factory (KEKB), the Photon Factory (PF), and the Electron/Positron Injector Linac. We are now engaged in the construction of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) in Tokai in cooperation with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The J-PARC Center was established in February 2006 to take full responsibility for the operation of J-PARC. With the progress of construction, the PS ceased operation at the end of March 2006 after a history of 26 years. The task of KEK is to play a key role in the fields of elementary particle, nuclei, materials and life science as one of leading research facilities of the world. The fiscal year 2005 activities of both KEK employees and visiting researchers yielded excellent outcomes in these research fields. (J.P.N.)

  10. Research and Application of Autodesk Fusion360 in Industrial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, P. P.; Qi, Y. M.; Cai, D. C.

    2018-05-01

    In 2016, Fusion 360, a productintroduced byAutodesk and integrating industrial design, structural design, mechanical simulation, and CAM, turns out a design platform supportingcollaboration and sharing both cross-platform and via the cloud. In previous products, design and manufacturing use to be isolated. In the course of design, research and development, the communication between designers and engineers used to go on through different software products, tool commands, and even industry terms. Moreover, difficulty also lies with the communication between design thoughts and machining strategies. Naturally, a difficult product design and R & D process would trigger a noticeable gap between the design model and the actual product. A complete product development process tends to cover several major areas, such as industrial design, mechanical design, rendering and animation, computer aided emulation (CAE), and computer aided manufacturing (CAM). Fusion 360, a perfect design solving the technical problems of cross-platform data exchange, realizes the effective control of cross-regional collaboration and presents an overview of collaboration and breaks the barriers between art and manufacturing, andblocks between design and processing. The “Eco-development of Fusion360 Industrial Chain” is both a significant means to and an inevitable trend forthe manufacturers and industrial designers to carry out innovation in China.

  11. Conceptual design of compact heavy-ion inertial fusion driver with an r.f. LINAC with high acceleration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, T.; Sasa, K.; Okamura, M.; Ito, T.; Tomizawa, H.; Katayose, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Yoshida, T.; Isokawa, K.; Aoki, M.; Fujita, N.; Okada, M.

    1996-01-01

    The interdigital-H-type (IH) linear accelerator (LINAC) is well known for its high shunt impedance at low and medium particle velocities. Therefore, it can be used to operate efficiently with a high acceleration gradient. The IH LINAC cavity is able to generate 10 MV m -1 (average acceleration gradient) with focusing of the particles by a superconducting solenoid and quadrupole. The LINAC can accelerate particles with a charge to mass ratio (q/A) greater than 1/250 from 0.3 MeV a.m.u. -1 . In a compact heavy-ion inertial fusion driver design, the total effective length of the IH LINAC cavities is about 1250 m. (orig.)

  12. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  13. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER's tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER's and Office of Energy Research's (OER's) commitment to supporting DOE's environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE's environmental problems

  14. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee report on program strategy for US magnetic fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Culler, F.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dreyfus, D.A.; Holdren, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; Parker, R.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Siemon, R.E.; Staudhammer, P.; Weitzner, H.

    1992-09-01

    The Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) was charged by the Department of Energy (DOE) with developing recommendations on how best to pursue the goal of a practical magnetic fusion reactor in the context of several budget scenarios covering the period FY 1994-FY 1998. Four budget scenarios were examined, each anchored to the FY 1993 figure of $337.9 million for fusion energy (less $9 million for inertial fusion energy which is not examined here)

  15. International topical meeting on nuclear research applications and utilization of accelerators. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Applications of particle accelerators cover a number of areas, from strategic and applied research, safety and security, environmental applications, materials research and analytical sciences, to radioisotope production and radiation processing. Accelerator based techniques and pulsed neutron sources are expected to lead to new initiatives in materials research of relevance for both the nuclear and non-nuclear fields. Material science studies with the use of accelerators, neutron beams and other nuclear analytical methods are relevant to the development of advanced reactors, nuclear fuel cycle needs and fusion research. In this regard, a better understanding of the irradiation effects in materials for energy and non-energy applications is needed, and is reflected in accelerator techniques for modification and analysis of materials for nuclear technologies. Accelerator applications for innovative nuclear systems aiming at rad-waste transmutation (e.g., accelerator driven systems) are being pursued in many countries. Research and development using accelerators involves a broad spectrum of skills to build a cadre of trained experts in nuclear techniques in IAEA Member States, and to generate knowledge for innovative methodologies and tools. The present conference is also being held in cooperation with the American Nuclear Society (ANS), which successfully organized the series of accelerator applications conferences known as AccApp. The ANS series of topical meetings has provided a forum for the global exchange of scientific and technical knowledge on a wide variety of related topics since the first AccApp took place in 1997 in Albuquerque, USA. The last conference which was held in 2007 in Pocatello, USA, was jointly organized by the ANS and the IAEA. The main objectives of the conference are to promote exchange of information among IAEA Member States representatives/delegates and to discuss new trends in accelerator applications including nuclear materials research

  16. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  17. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Katsumichi; Umeda, Naotaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Nagami, Masayuki

    2004-11-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities, during the period from 1 April, 2003 to 31 March, 2004. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, theoretical and analytical plasma researches, research and development of fusion reactor technologies towards ITER and fusion power demonstration plants, and activities in support of ITER design and construction. (J.P.N.)

  18. Teaching and Research with Accelerators at Tarleton State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, Daniel K.

    2009-01-01

    Tarleton State University students began performing both research and laboratory experiments using accelerators in 1998 through visitation programs at the University of North Texas, US Army Research Laboratory, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Carderock. In 2003, Tarleton outfitted its new science building with a 1 MV pelletron that was donated by the California Institution of Technology. The accelerator has been upgraded and supports a wide range of classes for both the Physics program and the ABET accredited Engineering Physics program as well as supplying undergraduate research opportunities on campus. A discussion of various laboratory activities and research projects performed by Tarleton students will be presented.

  19. Applied Physics Research at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, D. S.; Hunt, A. W.; Chouffani, K.; Wells, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Idaho Accelerator Center, founded in 1996 and based at Idaho State University, supports research, education, and high technology economic development in the United States. The research center currently has eight electron linear accelerators ranging in energy from 6 to 44 MeV with the latter linear accelerator capable of picosecond pulses, a 2 MeV positive-ion Van de Graaff, a 4 MV Nec tandem Pelletron, and a pulsed-power 8 k A, 10 MeV electron induction accelerator. Current research emphases include, accelerator physics research, accelerator based medical isotope production, active interrogation techniques for homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation applications, non destructive testing and materials science studies in support of industry as well as the development of advanced nuclear fuels, pure and applied radio-biology, and medical physics. This talk will highlight three of these areas including the production of the isotopes 99 Tc and 67 Cu for medical diagnostics and therapy, as well as two new technologies currently under development for nuclear safeguards and homeland security - namely laser Compton scattering and the polarized photofission of actinides

  20. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.; Soom, P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. In 2015 its name was changed to Swiss Plasma Centre (SPC). The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. In 1979, the Joint European Torus (JET) began its operation; today it is still the most powerful tokamak in the world, in which an energy yield Q of 0.65 could be obtained. In 2015, the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7X), the largest in the world, was set into operation. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the planning of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). ITER is designed to reach a Q-value largely above 1. The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. It should demonstrate the ability of a fusion reactor to inject permanently electricity into the grid. In 2015, SPC participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity; at the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. The large flexibility of TCV allows creating and controlling plasmas of different shapes which

  1. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the design of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. In 2013, CRPP participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity. At the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. A new improved confinement regime, called IN-mode, was discovered on TCV. The theory and numerical simulation group interprets the experimental results and foresees those of futures machines. It requires very high performance computers. The Gyrotron group develops radiofrequency sources in the mm range for heating the TCV plasma as well as for ITER and the Wendelstein-7 stellarator. Concerning superconductivity, tests are conducted at PSI on toroidal cables of ITER. The development of conductors and coils for the DEMO reactor has been pursued. In the context of international

  2. Data management in a fusion energy research experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, A.; Drobnis, D.; McHarg, B.

    1981-07-01

    Present-day fusion research requires extensive support for the large amount of scientific data generated, bringing about three distinct problems computer systems must solve: (1) the processing of large amounts of data in very small time frames; (2) the archiving, analyzing and managing of the entire data output for the project's lifetime; (3) the standardization of data for the exchange of information between laboratories. The computer system supporting General Atomic's Doublet III tokamak, a project funded by the United States Department of Energy, is the first to encounter and address these problems through a system-wide data base structure

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, A.

    1991-11-01

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  4. Research programme on controlled thermonuclear fusion - Synthesis report 2010; Programme de recherche Fusion thermonucleaire controlee. Rapport de synthese 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaucher, C. [Secretariat d' Etat a l' education et a la recherche, Berne (Switzerland); Tran, M. Q.; Villard, L. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Marot, L. [University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    superconductivity and materials. The Fusion Technology Materials group studies the consequences of irradiation damages in the materials to be used in the structure of future fusion reactor plants. Irradiation experiments were carried out with protons and neutrons in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), with ions in the Joint Accelerator for Nanoscience and Nuclear Simulations (JANNUS) in Orsay-Saclay and with fission neutrons in fission reactors in Belgium, Hungary and the Netherlands. The plasticity and brittleness induced by the irradiation defects have been simulated in numerical models. At PSI, research projects were also conducted on high-temperature superconductivity. The new facility EDIPO for the test of superconductive coils was mounted, with main steps consisting in the installation of the vacuum chamber and in the test of the current and helium supplies at 75{sup o} K. At CRPP a prototype of a hyper-frequency source for ITER was developed. The CRPP design of the microwave launcher for ITER was accepted by a panel of international experts. Comprehensive numerical simulations of ITER went on. Internal relaxation phenomena, so-called 'saw teeth', can be induced by fast ions; experiments to control such phenomena were successfully carried out at JET using radiofrequency wave injection. Thanks CRPP works, such instabilities can be detected and measured in JET, particularly at wave lengths potentially dangerous for ITER. The Basel University developed mirrors which were irradiated in the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich. Only minor changes in the optical properties of a mirror with a molybdenum coating were observed, while the reflectivity of a second mirror with a rhodium coating decreased by 25% in the ultraviolet range.

  5. The SARAF Project - Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, A.; Mardor, I.; Berkovits, D.; Piel, C.

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of particle accelerators to society, in the use of their primary and secondary beams for the analysis of physical, chemical and biological samples and for modification of properties of materials, is well recognized and documented. Nevertheless, apart of the construction of small accelerators for nuclear research in the 1960's and 70's, Israel has so far neglected this important and growing field. Furthermore, there is an urgent need in Israel for a state of the art research facility to attract and introduce students to current advanced physics techniques and technologies and to train the next generation of experimental scientists in various branches and disciplines. Therefore, Soreq NRC recently initiated the establishment of a new accelerator facility, named SARAF Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility. SARAF will be a continuous wave (CW), proton and deuteron RF superconducting linear accelerator with variable energy (5 - 40 MeV) and current (0.04 -2 mA). SARAF is designed to enable hands-on maintenance, which means that its beam loss will be below 10 -5 for the entire accelerator. These specifications will place SARAF in line with the next generation of accelerators world wide. Soreq expects that this fact will attract the Israeli and international research communities to use this facility extensively. Soreq NRC intends to use SARAF for basic, medical and biological research, and non-destructive testing (NDT). Another major activity will be the research and development of radio-isotopes production techniques. Given the availability of high current (up to 2 mA) protons and deuterons, a major activity will be research and development of high power density (up to 80 kW on a few cm 2 ) irradiation targets

  6. Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion Pulses. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    This publication presents experimental simulations of plasma-surface interaction phenomena at extreme conditions as expected in a fusion reactor, using dedicated test bed devices such as dense plasma focus, particle accelerators, plasma accelerators and plasma guns. It includes the investigation of the mechanism of material damage during transient heat loads on materials and addresses, in particular, the performance and adequacy of tungsten as plasma facing material for the next step fusion devices, such as ITER and fusion demonstration power plants. The publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project on investigations on materials under high repetition and intense fusion pulses, conducted in the period 2011-2016 and provides a practical knowledge base for scientists and engineers carrying out activities in the plasma-material surface interaction area. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA has made it possible for States that are not yet members of the ITER project to contribute to ITER relevant scientific investigations, which have led to increased capabilities of diagnostics for plasma surface interaction.

  7. Accelerating research into the Higgs boson particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Nikolaidou, Rosy

    "The only Standard Model particle yet to be observed, the search for the Higgs Boson - the so-called 'God Particle' - demands advanced facilities and physics expertise. At the Cern laboratory in Switzerland, the ARTEMIS project is well-placed to pursue research in this area" (2 pages)

  8. Synthetic report 2012. Research programme on controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaucher, C.; Tran, M. Q.; Villard, L.; Marot, L.

    2013-01-01

    Since 1961, Switzerland participates in the research on thermonuclear fusion thanks to the creation of the Research Centre in Plasma Physics. In 1979 it entered into partnership with the European programme on fusion through its adhesion to EURATOM. The thermonuclear fusion is an interesting energy source because the basic fuel is practically inexhaustible and its use does not release any significant CO 2 quantity and very little radioactive residues. But its working up faces enormous physical and technological difficulties. The International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER), presently in construction, has to demonstrate the technological feasibility of the controlled fusion. Il will be followed by DEMO, foreseen for 2040-2050, which must guarantee the economical rentability. At CRPP the research projects are partitioned onto several sites: at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, they concern the physics of the magnetic confinement with the Variable Geometry Tokamak (TCV), the development of theoretical models and the numerical simulation, the plasma heating and the generation of hyper frequency waves; the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) studies the superconductivity and the materials; the interactions between the plasma and the Tokamak walls are studied at the Basel University for the structures of ITER. Thanks to its large flexibility, TCV allows the creation and the control of plasmas of very different forms. The injection system of millimetric waves allows orienting the injected power according to specific profiles. By using the asymmetry of the flow in the toroidal sense, the plasma rotation could be measured with a much better accuracy than before. In TCV, by playing on the form of the plasma, it was possible to strongly reduce the energy quantity which is expelled by the Edge Localized Modes (ELM) onto the wall of the vacuum chamber. The ‘snowflake’ configuration created in TCV allows distributing the ELM energy onto several impact

  9. Annual report of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    The JFT-2 operating regime was extended to higher toroidal field of 18 kG. Plasma confinements were studied on impurities, instabilities, plasma-wall interaction. Properties of a plasma with a separatrix magnetic surface and plasma behaviour in the scrape-off layer were studied in JFT-2a. In the diagnostics, a grazing-incidence vacuum ultra-violet spectrometer for studies on impurities was completed and put into operation. Several minor improvement and remodelling on the JFT-2 and JFT-2a tokamaks were carried out for the convenience of operation. In the plasma heating, constructions of the JFT-2 neutral injection system and the injector test stand ITS-2 for development of the higher energy ion source were started. The design of 200 kW RF power source for the plasma heating in JFT-2 was also made. Research in surface effects in fusion devices started at April 1, 1975. Experimental apparatus was designed and constructed in this fiscal year. A group for superconducting magnet development for fusion device was set up in January, 1976. Theoretical works continued in the analyses on transport processes, plasma heating, and mhd stabilities with an increasing effort on computational studies. A preliminary design of the 100 MW sub(t) tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been started in April, 1975. At the same time a conceptual design of the 2000 MW sub(t) power reactor was further improved. In the development of large tokamak device of next generation, programs on JT-60 and JT-4 are being carried out. Research and development works and detailed design studies on JT-60 are started based on the preliminary design studies made in the previous year. Preliminary design studies on JT-4 are completed. (auth.)

  10. Report of the second joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials. July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    Joint research committees in purpose of the discussion on DEMO blanket in view point of the both of reactor technology and materials were held by the Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Fusion Materials. The joint research committee was held in Tokyo on July 12, 2002. In the committee, the present status of development of solid and liquid breeding blanket, the present status of development of reduced activation structure materials, and IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) program were discussed based on the discussions of the development programs of the blanket and materials at the first joint research committee. As a result, it was confirmed that high electric efficiency with 41% would be obtained in the solid breeding blanket system, that neutron radiation data of reduced activation ferritic steel was obtained by HFIR collaboration, and that KEP (key element technology phase) of IFMIF would be finished at the end of 2002 and the data base for the next step, i.e. EVEDA (engineering validation/engineering design activity) was obtained. In addition, the present status of ITER CTA, which was a transient phase for the construction, and the outline of ITER Fast Track, which was an accelerated plan for the performance of the power plants, were reported. This report consists of the summary of the discussion and the viewgraphs which were used at the second joint research committee, and these are very useful for the researchers of the fusion area in Japan. (author)

  11. Accelerator based research facility as an inter university centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    15 UD pelletron has been operating as a user facility from July 1991. It is being utilised by a large number of universities and other institutions for research in basic Nuclear Physics, Materials Science, Atomic Physics, Radiobiology and Radiation Chemistry. There is an on-going programme for augmenting the accelerator facilities by injecting Pelletron beams into superconducting linear accelerator modules. Superconducting niobium resonator is being developed in Argonne National Laboratory as a joint collaborative effort. All other things such as cryostats, rf instrumentation, cryogenic distribution system, computer control etc are being done indigenously. Research facilities, augmentation plans and the research being conducted by the universities in various disciplines are described. (author)

  12. Research programme on controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaucher, C.; Tran, M. Q.; Villard, L.; Marot, L.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1978, research on thermonuclear fusion in Switzerland is closely related to the research programme of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The Swiss projects tackle aspects of plasma physics and fusion technology. Switzerland participates to the construction and operation of the Joint European Torus (JET), which started operation again in 2011. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the last step before DEMO, a prototype fusion reactor able to deliver electricity and demonstrate the economic viability of fusion energy. The 'Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas' (CRPP) of the EPFL went on with its participation to the scientific and technological programme of EURATOM. Researches are carried out essentially on 2 sites: (i) at EPFL, where topics dealt with include the physics of magnetic confinement studied using the Variable Configuration Tokamak (TCV), the basic experiment TORPEX, theory and numerical modelling, and the technology of plasma heating and current generation by hyper-frequency waves; (ii) at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), where activities are devoted to superconductivity and structure materials. Thanks to the large flexibility of the TCV design and operation modus, plasmas of different shapes can be created and controlled, what is a very useful option to verify numerical simulation results. Besides, the injection of millimetre waves allows directing the injected power according to specific profiles. In the TCV it could be demonstrated for the first time that the injection of Electronic Cyclotronic Heating (ECH) waves is able to double the frequency of so-called 'Edge Localized Modes' (ELM), reducing by a factor of 2 the energy expelled by each ELM. In particular, it was possible to considerably reduce the statistical dispersion of the repetition frequency of ELM, and to avoid the appearance of gigantic ELM that are particularly harmful for reactor operation. The effect of plasma internal relaxation

  13. A view of technology maturity assessment to realize fusion reactor by Japanese young researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Goto, Takuya; Miyazawa, Junichi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Japanese young researchers who have interest in realizing fusion reactor have analyzed Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) in Young Scientists Special Interest Group on Fusion Reactor Realization. In this report, brief introduction to TRL assessment and a view of TRL assessment against fusion reactor projects conducting in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry researches at NIES-TERRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuyuki; Yoneda, Minoru; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uehiro, Takashi; Morita, Masatoshi; Uchida, Masao; Yoshinaga, Jun

    2003-01-01

    In the AMS facility at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA; Tandem accelerator for Environmental Research and Radiocarbon Analysis), several research programs have been proceeded, including a program, called GC-AMS, for the compound-specific 14 C analysis in environmental samples

  15. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Spin-off effects of fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morino, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    It is observed that new and sophisticated technologies developed through research and development in relation to magnetic confinement fusion have been transferred to other industrial and scientific fields with remarkable spin-off effects. Approximately 10 years ago, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) has investigated technical transfer and spin-off effects of fusion technologies developed in Japan. The essence of the results of this investigation as well as high technologies developed in the last decade, some of which are in the early stage of technical spin-off, are described. It is additionally explained that independent technical development conducted by our country as well as by engineers themselves is important in achieving effective spin-off. An outline of scientific spin-off effects is also described, including utilization technologies of fusion reactions besides those for energy production purposes, the progress of scientific understanding in the course of fusion research, and scientific information transfer and communication with other fields. (author)

  16. Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility: research highlights and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2014-08-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has served as a user facility for accelerator science for over a quarter of a century. In fulfilling this mission, the ATF offers the unique combination of a high-brightness 80 MeV electron beam that is synchronized to a 1 TW picosecond CO2 laser. We unveil herein our plan to considerably expand the ATF's floor space with an upgrade of the electron beam's energy to 300 MeV and the CO2 laser's peak power to 100 TW. This upgrade will propel the ATF even further to the forefront of research on advanced accelerators and radiation sources, supporting the most innovative ideas in this field. We discuss emerging opportunities for scientific breakthroughs, including the following: plasma wakefield acceleration studies in research directions already active at the ATF; laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), where the longer laser wavelengths are expected to engender a proportional increase in the beam's charge while our linac will assure, for the first time, the opportunity to undertake detailed studies of seeding and staging of the LWFA; proton acceleration to the 100-200 MeV level, which is essential for medical applications; and others.

  17. Accelerator R and D: Research for Science - Science for Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtkamp, N.R.; Biedron, S.; Milton, S.V.; Boeh, L.; Clayton, J.E.; Zdasiuk, G.; Gourlay, S.A.; Zisman, M.S.; Hamm, R.W.; Henderson, S.; Hoffstaetter, G.H.; Merminga, L.; Ozaki, S.; Pilat, F.C.; White, M.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2011 the US Senate Appropriations Committee requested a ten-year strategic plan from the Department of Energy (DOE) that would describe how accelerator R and D today could advance applications directly relevant to society. Based on the 2009 workshop 'Accelerators for America's Future' an assessment was made on how accelerator technology developed by the nation's laboratories and universities could directly translate into a competitive strength for industrial partners and a variety of government agencies in the research, defense and national security sectors. The Office of High Energy Physics, traditionally the steward for advanced accelerator R and D within DOE, commissioned a task force under its auspices to generate and compile ideas on how best to implement strategies that would help fulfill the needs of industry and other agencies, while maintaining focus on its core mission of fundamental science investigation.

  18. The CARE project - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend.

  19. Research project on accelerator-driven subcritical system using FFAG accelerator and Kyoto University critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Unesaki, Hironobu; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanigaki, Minoru; Mori, Yoshiharu; Shiroya, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Ishi, Y.; Fukumoto, Shintaro

    2005-01-01

    The KART (Kumatori Accelerator-driven Reactor Test facility) project started in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University in fiscal year 2002 with the grant by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the basis feasibility of accelerator driven system (ADS), studying the effect of incident neutron energy on the effective multiplication factor in a subcritical nuclear fuel system. For this purpose, a variable-energy FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) accelerator complex is being constructed to be coupled with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The FFAG proton accelerator complex consists of ion-beta, booster and main rings. This system aims to attain 1 μA proton beam with energy range from 20 to 150 MeV with a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The first beam from the FFAG complex is expected to be available by the end of FY 2005, and the experiment on ADS with KUCA and the FFAG complex (FFAG-KUCA experiment) will start in FY 2006. Before the FFAG-KUCA experiment starts, preliminary experiments with 14 MeV neutrons are currently being performed using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator coupled with the KUCA. Experimental data are analyzed using continuous energy Monte-Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and MNCP-X. (author)

  20. Research program. Controlled thermonuclear fusion. Synthesis report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, L.; Marot, L.; Fiocco, D.

    2015-01-01

    In 1961, 3 years after the 2 nd International Conference on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, the Research Centre on Plasma Physics (CRPP) was created as a department of the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1979, CRPP collaborates to the European Program on fusion research in the framework of EURATOM. The advantages of fusion are remarkable: the fuel is available in great quantity all over the world; the reactor is intrinsically safe; the reactor material, activated during operation, loses practically all its activity within about 100 years. But the working up of the controlled fusion necessitates extreme technological conditions. In 1979, the Joint European Torus (JET) began its operation; today it is still the most powerful tokamak in the world; its energy yield Q reached 0.65. The progress realized in the framework of EURATOM has led to the planning of the experimental reactor ITER which is being built at Cadarache (France). ITER is designed to reach a Q-value largely above 1. The future prototype reactor DEMO is foreseen in 2040-2050. It should demonstrate the ability of a fusion reactor to inject electricity into the grid for long term. In 2014, CRPP participated in the works on ITER in the framework of the Fusion for Energy (F4E) agency. At EPFL the research concerns the physics of the magnetic confinement with experiments on the tokamak TCV (variable configuration tokamak), the numerical simulations, the plasma heating and the generation of current by hyper frequency radio waves. At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), research is devoted to the superconductivity. At the Basel University the studies get on interactions between the plasma and the tokamak walls. The large flexibility of TCV allows creating and controlling plasmas of different shapes which are necessary to optimise the core geometry of future reactors. Moreover, the plasma heating by mm radio waves allows guiding the injected power according to specific

  1. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 3 of the proceedings of the twelfth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, held in Nice, France, 12-19 October, 1988, contains papers presented on inertial fusion. Direct and indirect laser implosion experiments, programs of laser construction, computer modelling of implosions and resulting plasmas, and light ion beam fusion experiments are discussed. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Particle accelerator physics and technology for high energy density physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Ni, P.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [Darmstadt Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Schlobgartenstr. 9 (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Kain, V.; Schmidt, R.; Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Zioutas, K. [Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Mintsev, V.; Fortov, V.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    Interaction phenomena of intense ion- and laser radiation with matter have a large range of application in different fields of science, extending from basic research of plasma properties to applications in energy science, especially in inertial fusion. The heavy ion synchrotron at GSI now routinely delivers intense uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Our simulations show that the new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. A natural example of hot dense plasma is provided by our neighbouring star the sun, and allows a deep insight into the physics of fusion, the properties of matter at high energy density, and is moreover an excellent laboratory for astro-particle physics. As such the sun's interior plasma can even be used to probe the existence of novel particles and dark matter candidates. We present an overview on recent results and developments of dense plasma physics addressed with heavy ion and laser beams combined with accelerator- and nuclear physics technology. (authors)

  3. H-1NF: Australian national fusion plasma research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, B.D.; Borg, G.G.; Dewar, R.L.; Howard, J.; Gardner, H.J.; Rudakov, D.L.; Sharp, L.E.; Shats, M.G.; Warr, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    The H-1 heliac is a helical axis stellarator of moderate size and novel, flexible configuration. Since commissioning, H-1 has operated in quasi-continuous mode at low magnetic field. For higher fields ≤1T an ECRH heating system (28GHz, 200kW) has been installed under a collaborative agreement between ANU and NIFS. H-1 has recently been promoted to national facility status (H-1NF), which will include upgrades of the rf and ech heating systems to megawatt powers, and power supply and diagnostic and data system enhancements. This facilitates collaborative research locally (through the Australian Fusion Research Group consortium) and internationally. Results of a number of basic experiments in quasi-continuous mode are presented. (author)

  4. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1, 1995 to March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Michiya; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Shinichi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Seki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1995 to March 31, 1996. The activities in Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high-temperature plasma research in JT-60U and JFT-2M, and progress in ITER-EDA, including technology development. (author)

  5. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998. The activities in Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high temperature plasma research in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and progress in ITER-EDA, including technology development. (J.P.N.)

  6. International power supply policy and the globalisation of research: the example of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechmann, G.; Gloede, F.; Lessmann, E.

    2001-01-01

    At the present state of our information, we can affirm that fusion research, as far as the necessary financial expenditures and their political justification are concerned, is a matter of politically controversial debate. In the political arenas, projects like controlled nuclear fusion are discussed primarily with regard to the controllability of complex technical systems and the sustainability of our future supply of electric power. The attempt to discuss this problem will have to consider: (i) on the one hand, already established concepts of sustainability; (ii) and on the other, the - according to the present state of our knowledge - foreseeable characteristics of a system of power generation and supply based on fusion reactors. Not only do the goals of global technology projects have to be embedded in patterns of universally accepted legitimisation (sustainability), but the organisation of research and development is also changing into networks acting globally. In this sense, globalisation means not only the worldwide linking of financial markets and the permanent availability of information and communication networks, but above all the creation of global organisations of research and innovation processes. The globalisation of research and development of technology has several dimensions: (i) the recognition and treatment of global problems; (ii) the transformation and evolution of new forms of organisation and cooperation in a global community of researchers; (iii) the constitution of Global Change Research. Fusion is playing a 'pathfinder role' for these processes and is at the same time itself an expression of the globalisation of the production of technology

  7. Socioeconomic Research on Fusion. Serf 1997-98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, R.; Lechon, Y.; Cabal, H.; Lomba, L.; Palomino, I.; Recreo, F.; Robles, B.; Suanez, A.; Cancio, D.

    1999-01-01

    Tin this study the environmental externalisation produced in some stages of a hypothetical fusion power plant have been studied. The results are the CIEMAT contribution in the macro task named External costs and benefits of the Socioeconomic Research on Fusion (SERF 1997-98) European project. For the externalisation economical assessment the Externe methodology has been applied. Lauffen, sited in the SW of Germany has been selected as the hypothetical location of the power plant. The technology, for two different models, was described by Max Planck Institute and the externalisation of the materials manufacturing, power plant construction and operation as well as accidents have been monetarily evaluated. The obtained results revealed that for the plant model which uses cooling water, the prevalent cause of external costs were the collective doses produced by the global dispersion of 14C emissions. External costs produced by radiological accidents represent low values, however the preliminary assessment performed for the external impacts caused by the ingestion of contaminated food stuff and water, point out that a more detailed analysis for this stage, is needed. It should be noted that the results presented in this study, are partial values since other potentially important stages such as disposal of radiological waste and decommissioning of the power plant, have not been included. (Author) 30 refs

  8. Status of light ion inertial fusion research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Barker, R.J.; Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.; Meger, R.A.; Mosher, D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the use of high-brightness proton beams, extracted from axial pinch-reflex diodes mounted on the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Gamble II generator, to study light ion inertial fusion. Topics covered include the modular approach, ion beam brightness studies, light-ion beam transport, final focusing, the single diode approach, the inductive storage approach, an energy loss experiment, and future plans. Analysis of a modular inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system using axial pinch-reflex diodes shows that an operational window for transport of light-ion species exists. A proof-of-principle experiment for the required final focusing cell was conducted on Gamble II. Preliminary experiments using vacuum inductive storage and plasma opening switches have demonstrated factorof-three pulse compressions, with corresponding power and voltage multiplications for pulse durations of interest to PBFA II. The stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured in other experiments. It is demonstrated that about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the deuteron beam is focused on the target to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Includes 6 diagrams

  9. Socioeconomic Research on Fusion. SERF 1997-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez, R.; Lechon, Y.; Cabal, H.; Lomba, L.; Palomino, I.; Recreo, F.; Robles, B.; Suanez, A.; Cancio, D. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-09-01

    In this study the environmental externalities produced in some stages of a hypothetical fusion power plant have been studied. The results are the CIEMAT contribution in the macro task named External costs and benefits of the Socioeconomic Research on Fusion (SERF 1997-98) European project. For the externalities economical assessment the Externe methodology has been applied. Lauffen, sited in the SW of Germany has been selected as the hypothetical location of the power plant. The technology, for two different models, was described by Max Planck Institute and the externalities of the materials manufacturing, power plant construction and operation as well as accidents have been monetarily evaluated. The obtained results revealed that for the plant model which uses cooling water, the prevalent cause of external costs were collective doses produced by the global dispersion of 14C emissions. External costs produced by radiological accidents represent low values, however the preliminary assessment performed for the external impacts caused by the ingestion of contaminated foodstuff and water, point out that a more detailed analysis for this stage, is needed. It should be noted that the results presented in this study, are partial values since other potentially important stages such as disposal of radiological waste and decommissioning of the power plant, have not been included. (Author)

  10. [Research progress in hirudin fusion protein--review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Yu, Ai-Ping; Jin, Ji-De; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2007-02-01

    Natural hirudin extracted from the secretion of medical leech salivary gland is a single-chain peptide containing 65 aminoacid residues with molecular weight of 7000 D, and exists in three isomers of HV1, HV2 and HV3. Hirudin possesses three disulfide bridges forming the structure of core cyclic peptides, which binds to the catalytic site of thrombin so as to inhibit the catalysis of thrombin. Its c-terminus rich in acidic aminoacid residues possesses hydrophilicity, and is free on the molecular surface, and can bind with fibrin recognition site of hirudin. The minimal segment of 12 - 16 C-terminal acidic residues keeps the minimal activity of anti-thrombosis. Thus, hirudin, as a potent and specific inhibitor of thrombin, can be used to protect from and to treat clinically thrombosis. As it has some disadvantages such as short half-life, bleeding side-effect and mono-function, and so on, hirudin has been fused with some other functional proteins in recent years. The obtained fusion proteins can prolong the half life of hirudin, or relieve it bleeding side effect, or bring new functions, such as thrombolysis, inhibiting the platelet aggregation, targeting specifically. The research progress in hirudin fusion protein was summarized in this review.

  11. 50 Years of the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is in its 50th year of operation. It was commissioned on April 1, 1967 as a collaboration between the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and members of the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It was initially funded as a user facility for radiobiology and radiological physics, concentrating on monoenergetic neutrons. Facilities for irradiation with MeV light charged particles were d...

  12. Method to prevent ejecta from damaging the Compact Torus Accelerator driver of an inertial fusion energy power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, S.E.K.; Moir, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the conceptual design of fusion reactors using a Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA). A CTA accelerates a plasma torus toward a fusion target. When the torus nears the target, it is compressed and focused down to a small volume, creating a very high energy density and initiating a fusion micro explosion. The focusing cone is destroyed with each shot due to the stress from the passage of the torus as well as from the force of the explosion (1 800 MJ of yield, ∼0.5 Ton TNT equivalent). The focusing cone could be made of solidified Li 2 BeF 4 ; the same material used in liquid state to protect the reaction chamber from the micro explosion and to transport heat away to a power plant. The problem with this design is that when the focusing cone is shattered, the resulting small pieces of solid and liquid debris (ejecta) might be carded along by the expanding vapor of the explosion and might enter the CTA itself, causing damage and shortening the life of the CTA. The proposed solution for this possible problem is to bend the focusing cone so that the ejecta no longer have a clear path to the CTA. Calculations show that the plasma torus may be sent through a radius of curvature of less than 0.5 m just after the focusing cone, without significantly disturbing the plasma

  13. Concept of an accelerator-driven subcritical research reactor within the TESLA accelerator installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, Milan; Neskovic, Nebojsa

    2006-01-01

    Study of a small accelerator-driven subcritical research reactor in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences was initiated in 1999. The idea was to extract a beam of medium-energy protons or deuterons from the TESLA accelerator installation, and to transport and inject it into the reactor. The reactor core was to be composed of the highly enriched uranium fuel elements. The reactor was designated as ADSRR-H. Since the use of this type of fuel elements was not recommended any more, the study of a small accelerator-driven subcritical research reactor employing the low-enriched uranium fuel elements began in 2004. The reactor was designated as ADSRR-L. We compare here the results of the initial computer simulations of ADSRR-H and ADSRR-L. The results have confirmed that our concept could be the basis for designing and construction of a low neutron flux model of the proposed accelerator-driven subcritical power reactor to be moderated and cooled by lead. Our objective is to study the physics and technologies necessary to design and construct ADSRR-L. The reactor would be used for development of nuclear techniques and technologies, and for basic and applied research in neutron physics, metrology, radiation protection and radiobiology

  14. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility

  15. Superconducting magnet and conductor research activities in the US fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, P.C.; Schultz, J.H.; Antaya, T.A.; Ballinger, R.; Chiesa, L.; Feng, J.; Gung, C.-Y.; Harris, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, P.; Martovetsky, N.; Minervini, J.V.; Radovinsky, A.; Salvetti, M.; Takayasu, M.; Titus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion research in the United States is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES). The OFES sponsors a wide range of programs to advance fusion science, fusion technology, and basic plasma science. Most experimental devices in the US fusion program are constructed using conventional technologies; however, a small portion of the fusion research program is directed towards large scale commercial power generation, which typically relies on superconductor technology to facilitate steady-state operation with high fusion power gain, Q. The superconductor portion of the US fusion research program is limited to a small number of laboratories including the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at MIT, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Applied Superconductivity Center at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Although Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are primarily sponsored by the US's High Energy Physics program, both have made significant contributions to advance the superconductor technology needed for the US fusion program. This paper summarizes recent superconductor activities in the US fusion program

  16. THE CARE PROJECT - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend. Presentation of the CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe) to be submitted within FP6 February 10th, at CERN in the council room Agenda Chair : C. Wyss 9:00 General presentation of FP6 and introduction of IA proposal (R. Aleksan) 9:45 Networking activities on e ...

  17. The role of atomic and molecular processes in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the relevance of atomic and molecular processes to research into controlled nuclear fusion and in particular their effects upon the magnetically confined plasma in Tokamak experiments and conceptual Tokamak reactors. The relative significance of collective phenomena and of single particle collisions to both plasma heating and loss processes are discussed and the pertinent principles of plasma refuelling and plasma diagnostics are outlined. The methods by which atomic and molecular data are applied to these problems, the contributing effects of surface interactions and the consequent implications upon the accuracy and the type of data needed are described in a qualitative manner. Whilst particular atomic and molecular processes are not discussed in detail, sufficient information is given of the physical environments of Tokamak devices for significant processes to be self evident. (author)

  18. Harnessing the crowd to accelerate molecular medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-07-01

    Crowdsourcing presents a novel approach to solving complex problems within molecular medicine. By leveraging the expertise of fellow scientists across the globe, broadcasting to and engaging the public for idea generation, harnessing a scalable workforce for quick data management, and fundraising for research endeavors, crowdsourcing creates novel opportunities for accelerating scientific progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Research progress of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Lu, Huiling; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ma, Jingxian

    2013-10-01

    Medical image fusion and recognition has a wide range of applications, such as focal location, cancer staging and treatment effect assessment. Multi-model medical image fusion and recognition are analyzed and summarized in this paper. Firstly, the question of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition is discussed, and its advantage and key steps are discussed. Secondly, three fusion strategies are reviewed from the point of algorithm, and four fusion recognition structures are discussed. Thirdly, difficulties, challenges and possible future research direction are discussed.

  20. Survey of tritium wastes and effluents in near-term fusion-research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, W.E.; Dingee, D.A.; Willingham, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    The use of tritium control technology in near-term research facilities has been studied for both the magnetic and inertial confinement fusion programs. This study focused on routine generation of tritium wastes and effluents, with little referene to accidents or facility decommissioning. This report serves as an independent review of the effectiveness of planned control technology and radiological hazards associated with operation. The facilities examined for the magnetic fusion program included Fusion Materials Irradiation Testing Facility (FMIT), Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in the magnetic fusion program, while NOVA and Antares facilities were examined for the inertial confinement program

  1. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  2. Accelerating Research Innovation by Adopting the Lean Startup Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Still

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Converting scientific expertise into marketable products and services is playing an increasingly important role in the launching of new ventures, the growth of existing firms, and the creation of new jobs. In this article, we explore how the lean startup paradigm, which validates the market for a product with a business model that can sustain subsequent scaling, has led to a new process model to accelerate innovation. We then apply this paradigm to the context of research at universities and other research organizations. The article is based on the assumption that the organizational context matters, and it shows how a deeper understanding of the research context could enable an acceleration of the innovation process. We complement theoretical examples with a case example from VTT Technical Research Institute of Finland. Our findings show that many of the concepts from early-acceleration phases – and the lean startup paradigm – can also be relevant in innovation discussions within the research context. However, the phase of value-proposition discovery is less adequately addressed, and that of growth discovery, with its emphasis on building on a scalable, sustainable business does not seem to be addressed with the presented innovation approaches from the research context. Hence, the entrepreneurial activities at the research context differ from those in startups and internal startups in established organizations.

  3. Advanced Accelerator Development Strategy Report: DOE Advanced Accelerator Concepts Research Roadmap Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-03

    Over a full two day period, February 2–3, 2016, the Office of High Energy Physics convened a workshop in Gaithersburg, MD to seek community input on development of an Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) research roadmap. The workshop was in response to a recommendation by the HEPAP Accelerator R&D Subpanel [1] [2] to “convene the university and laboratory proponents of advanced acceleration concepts to develop R&D roadmaps with a series of milestones and common down selection criteria towards the goal for constructing a multi-TeV e+e– collider” (the charge to the workshop can be found in Appendix A). During the workshop, proponents of laser-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (LWFA), particle-beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), and dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWFA), along with a limited number of invited university and laboratory experts, presented and critically discussed individual concept roadmaps. The roadmap workshop was preceded by several preparatory workshops. The first day of the workshop featured presentation of three initial individual roadmaps with ample time for discussion. The individual roadmaps covered a time period extending until roughly 2040, with the end date assumed to be roughly appropriate for initial operation of a multi-TeV e+e– collider. The second day of the workshop comprised talks on synergies between the roadmaps and with global efforts, potential early applications, diagnostics needs, simulation needs, and beam issues and challenges related to a collider. During the last half of the day the roadmaps were revisited but with emphasis on the next five to ten years (as specifically requested in the charge) and on common challenges. The workshop concluded with critical and unanimous endorsement of the individual roadmaps and an extended discussion on the characteristics of the common challenges. (For the agenda and list of participants see Appendix B.)

  4. A schedule for fusion research development and international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakihana, H.

    1983-01-01

    In order to reach their goal of commercial fusion power reactors, development must proceed in a series of basic stages. Each step is expected to incur an increased level of cost. The cost-sharing benefits of international collaboration will become increasingly important and attractive with each successive step preceding commercialization. Outstanding examples of implementation of international collaboration in fusion include the JET project and the INTOR workshop which lend encouragement for the prospects for international collaboration in fusion in the future. (author)

  5. Computing for magnetic fusion energy research: The next five years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.; Glasser, A.; Sauthoff, N.

    1991-01-01

    This report considers computing needs in magnetic fusion for the next five years. It is the result of two and a half years of effort by representatives of all aspects of the magnetic fusion community. The report also factors in the results of a survey that was distributed to the laboratories and universities that support fusion. There are four areas of computing support discussed: theory, experiment, engineering, and systems

  6. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  7. Summary Report of the 1. Research Coordination Meeting on Testing and Improving the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Simakov, S.P.

    2013-09-01

    In accordance with the recommendations of the International Nuclear Data Committee in May 2012, the Nuclear Data Section of IAEA has initiated a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP number F41031) with the main goal to test, validate and improve the international dosimetry library for fission and fusion (IRDFF). The output of this CRP will be a reference dosimetry database of cross sections and decay data with corresponding documentation. It will serve to the needs of fission, fusion and accelerator applications. The first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) was held 1 to 5 July 2013 in IAEA. At this meeting, the attendees discussed the objectives of the whole CRP, presented their contributions and elaborated on consolidated recommendations and actions for implementation over the next 1.5 year period. This Summary Report documents the individual contributions and joint decisions made during this meeting. (author)

  8. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Deri, R.J.; Erlandson, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  9. FFUSION yearbook 1997. Annual report of the Finnish fusion research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S; Paettikangas, T [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-02-01

    Finnish fusion programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The FFUSION programme was fully integrated into European Fusion Programme just after Finland joined the European Union. The contract of Association Euratom and Tekes was signed in 1995 and extends to the end of 1999. Finland became a member of JET Joint Undertaking in 1996, other contracts with Euratom include NET agreement and the Staff Mobility Agreement. FFUSION programme with participating research institutes and universities forms the Fusion Research Unit of the Association Euratom-Tekes. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1997. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, and Radio-frequency heating and Plasma diagnostics. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), Remote handling and viewing systems, and Superconductors

  10. Developments in bone tissue engineering research for spinal fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many orthopaedic procedures require fusion of a bony defect. Sometimes a bone graft is needed for this fusion. Autograft bone is considered the golden standard. The harvesting of this bone is time consuming and may have serious side effects, such as chronic donor site pain. Available alternatives

  11. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1971. Vol. III. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ultimate goal of controlled nuclear fusion research is to make a new energy source available to mankind, a source that will be virtually unlimited and that gives promise of being environmentally cleaner than the sources currently exploited. This goal has stimulated research in plasma physics over the past two decades, leading to significant advances in the understanding of matter in its most common state as well as to progress in the confinement and heating of plasma. An indication of this progress is that in several countries considerable effort is being devoted to design studies of fusion reactors and to the technological problems that will be encountered in realizing these reactors. This range of research, from plasma physics to fusion reactor engineering, is shown in the present three-volume publication of the Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. The Conference was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA from 17 to 23 June 1971. The enthusiastic co-operation of the University of Wisconsin and of the United States Atomic Energy Commission in the organization of the Conference is gratefully acknowledged. The Conference was attended by over 500 scientists from 24 countries and 3 international organizations, and 143 papers were presented. These papers are published here in the original language; English translations of the Russian papers will be published in a Special Supplement to the journal Nuclear Fusion. The series of conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has become a major international forum for the presentation and discussion of results in this important and challenging field. In addition to sponsoring these conferences, the International Atomic Energy Agency supports controlled nuclear fusion research by publishing the journal Nuclear Fusion, and has recently established an International Fusion Research Council

  12. Support and development for remote collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Jong, R.A.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Major fusion experiments and modeling efforts rely on joint research of scientists from several locations around the world. A variety of software tools are in use to provide remote interactive access to facilities and data are routinely available over wide-area-network connections to researchers. Audio and video communications, monitoring of control room information and synchronization of remote sites with experimental operations all enhance participation during experiments. Remote distributed computing capabilities allow utilization of off-site computers that now help support the demands of control room analyses and plasma modeling. A collaborative software development project is currently using object technologies with CORBA-based communications to build a network executable transport code that further demonstrates the ability to utilize geographically dispersed resources. Development to extend these concepts with security and naming services and possible applications to instrumentation systems has been initiated. An Information Technology Initiative is deploying communication systems, ISDN (telephone) and IP (network) audio/video (A/V) and web browser-based, to build the infrastructure needed to support remote physics meetings, seminars and interactive discussions

  13. Support and development for remote collaboration in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T A; Jong, R A; Meyer, W H; Moller, J M

    1999-01-01

    Major fusion experiments and modeling efforts rely on joint research of scientists from several locations around the world. A variety of software tools are in use to provide remote interactive access to facilities and data are routinely available over wide-area-network connections to researchers. Audio and video communications, monitoring of control room information and synchronization of remote sites with experimental operations all enhance participation during experiments. Remote distributed computing capabilities allow utilization of off-site computers that now help support the demands of control room analyses and plasma modeling. A collaborative software development project is currently using object technologies with CORBA-based communications to build a network executable transport code that further demonstrates the ability to utilize geographically dispersed resources. Development to extend these concepts with security and naming services and possible applications to instrumentation systems has been initiated. An Information Technology Initiative is deploying communication systems, ISDN (telephone) and IP (network) audio/video (A/V) and web browser-based, to build the infrastructure needed to support remote physics meetings, seminars and interactive discussions

  14. Implications of NSTX lithium results for magnetic fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M., E-mail: mono@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Canik, J.M.; Diem, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Mansfield, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Menard, J.; Paul, S.F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington at Seattle, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabbagh, S.A. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Skinner, C.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to {approx}100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium re-loadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, edge localized mode (ELM) control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  15. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Canik, J.M.; Diem, S.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Taylor, G.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ∼ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  16. Implications of NSTX lithium results for magnetic fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Canik, J.M.; Diem, S.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Taylor, G.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ∼100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium re-loadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, edge localized mode (ELM) control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  17. A fast-acting hydrogen gas source for staged pneumatic high-speed acceleration of fusion plasma fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, S.A.; Baekmark, L.

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a possible design of a fast, high-temperature, arc-driven hydrogen gas source module, to be used in a scheme for multistage high-speed pneumatic acceleration of fusion plasma fuel pellets. The potential of this scheme for operating with a moderate driving pressure at long acceleration path lengths is particular attractive for accelerating fragile hydrogen isotope ice pellets. From experiments with an ethanol-based arc unit, design parameters for a propeller module were assessed, and with a barrel-mounted ethanol module staged pneumatic acceleration of a plastic dummy pellet was demonstrated. In experiments with a hydrogenbased, cryogenic arc unit in which 200 joules of electrical energy were dissipated with a power level approaching 5 MW within 30 mus, the velocity of a 23-mg plastic pellet was increased from 1.7 to 2.4 km/s. Results in terms of barrel pressure transients and arc characteristics are described. (author) 20 ills., 8 refs

  18. Fusion power: massive research program aims at formidable problems, almost limitless potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingee, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    This article surveys extensively fusion development under the following topics: US research directions; inertial confinement fusion; foreign fusion efforts; fusion issues; fusion applications; and arguments for fusion development. Dr. Dingee points out that, despite persuasive arguments for development, fusion has as yet attracted no substantial constituency; and that winning greater support for fusion may thus require a considerable technical breakthrough (namely, proof of scientific feasibility or achievement of energy breakeven) - or a new focus on an energy source such as hybrids, which offer a nearer-term payoff than pure fusion. Dr. Dingee says the next major facility for magnetic confinement research (to be built in late 1980s) has not yet been selected, but will probably be an engineering test facility; there are similar plans for inertial confinement. Whichever type is chosen, the first experimental power reactor is scheduled for the first few years of the 2000's, this to be followed by commercial demonstration of fusion power in the 2010 to 2020 time frame. He points out, finally, that the complex technical and institutional issues are being considered in a climate in which the benefits of nuclear energy itself are being questioned; and that there is little doubt that future development is tied to overall decisions the nation will make regarding the value of nuclear energy

  19. Magnetic fusion energy and computers. The role of computing in magnetic fusion energy research and development (second edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the structure and uses of the MFE Network and presents a compilation of future computing requirements. Its primary emphasis is on the role of supercomputers in fusion research. One of its key findings is that with the introduction of each successive class of supercomputer, qualitatively improved understanding of fusion processes has been gained. At the same time, even the current Class VI machines severely limit the attainable realism of computer models. Many important problems will require the introduction of Class VII or even larger machines before they can be successfully attacked

  20. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Shinichi; Tanaka, Fumiya; Tuda, Takashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, during the period from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, and completion of ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) in July 2001, including technology R and D. (J.P.N.)

  1. The South African National Accelerator Centre and its research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    An overview of the South African National Accelerator Centre and its research activities is given with emphasis on medium energy nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements for medical use. Also presented is a preliminary result of {sup 40}Ca(p,p`x) spectrum measurement for 392 MeV which has been carried out at RCNP, Osaka University, under the South Africa-Japan collaborative programme. (author)

  2. The research status of induced radioactivity in accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Deng Daping

    2005-01-01

    The hazards of subsequent-radiation produced by high-energy accelerator must be no ignore. The principle of induced radioactivity and the hazards to the people were introduced in this article. The radiation levels around the treatment head and in the air of the treatment room were discussed thor-oughly. Some effects of the induced radioactivity were also mentioned. At last, the article talks about some problems in present researches and some directions for the following study. (authors)

  3. [Fusion research/tokamak]. Final report, 1 May 1988 - 30 April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Program are: (1) to advance /the transport studies of tokamaks, including the development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the text-upgrade tokamak. Work is described on five basic categories: (1) magnetic fusion energy database; (2) computational support and numerical modeling; (3) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (4) transport studies; and (5) Alfven waves

  4. Conceptual design of a mirror reactor for a fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Burleigh, R.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Dexter, W.L.; Hamilton, G.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hickman, R.G.; Hoffman, M.A.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Moir, R.W.; Nelson, R.L.; Pittenger, L.C.; Smith, B.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Werner, R.W.; Wilcox, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a small mirror fusion reactor for a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF). The reactor produces 3.4 MW of fusion power and a useful neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Superconducting ''yin-yang'' coils are used, and the plasma is sustained by injection of energetic neutral D 0 and T 0 . Conceptual layouts are given for the reactor, its major components, and supporting facilities. (author)

  5. The Research of Vehicle Acceleration at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Bogdanović

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle acceleration is an important parameter used in planning various road elements, traffic signalization, geometric elements of an intersection, signal plans of traffic lights, etc. The knowledge of vehicle acceleration values is also necessary in using simulation softwares for more accurate analysis of the total situation at an intersection, on a road section or in a traffic network. In a lot of earlier studies, acceleration values were analysed and defined, mostly in optimal conditions for traffic functioning. However, values of almost all traffic flow parameters have been changed over time, due to changes in driving-dynamic vehicle characteristics, pneumatic tyres, material used for building road surface, etc. Besides, local environment influence and changes in drivers’ behaviour also significantly affect values of this parameter. According to HCM, it is advisable to perform local research for all values of the parameters recommended within the framework of this handbook, and to adapt their values to local conditions as well. The results of measuring the values of vehicles acceleration at signalized intersections in Novi Sad, Serbia, have been shown in this paper, using the procedure based on video recording processing.

  6. [A preliminary research on multi-source medical image fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuanyuan; Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-04-01

    Multi-modal medical image fusion has important value in clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, the multi-resolution analysis of Daubechies 9/7 Biorthogonal Wavelet Transform is introduced for anatomical and functional image fusion, then a new fusion algorithm with the combination of local standard deviation and energy as texture measurement is presented. At last, a set of quantitative evaluation criteria is given. Experiments show that both anatomical and metabolism information can be obtained effectively, and both the edge and texture features can be reserved successfully. The presented algorithm is more effective than the traditional algorithms.

  7. FY-2013 FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) Joint Research Target Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hubbard, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Whyte, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The H-mode confinement regime is characterized by a region of good thermal and particle confinement at the edge of the confined plasma, and has generally been envisioned as the operating regime for ITER and other next step devices. This good confinement is often interrupted, however, by edge-localized instabilities, known as ELMs. On the one hand, these ELMs provide particle and impurity flushing from the plasma core, a beneficial effect facilitating density control and stationary operation. On the other hand, the ELMs result in a substantial fraction of the edge stored energy flowing in bursts to the divertor and first wall; this impulsive thermal loading would result in unacceptable erosion of these material surfaces if it is not arrested. Hence, developing and understanding operating regimes that have the energy confinement of standard H-mode and the stationarity that is provided by ELMs, while at the same time eliminating the impulsive thermal loading of large ELMs, is the focus of the 2013 FES Joint Research Target (JRT): Annual Target: Conduct experiments and analysis on major fusion facilities, to evaluate stationary enhanced confinement regimes without large Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and to improve understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that allow acceptable edge particle transport while maintaining a strong thermal transport barrier. Mechanisms to be investigated can include intrinsic continuous edge plasma modes and externally applied 3D fields. Candidate regimes and techniques have been pioneered by each of the three major US facilities (C-Mod, D3D and NSTX). Coordinated experiments, measurements, and analysis will be carried out to assess and understand the operational space for the regimes. Exploiting the complementary parameters and tools of the devices, joint teams will aim to more closely approach key dimensionless parameters of ITER, and to identify correlations between edge fluctuations and transport. The role of rotation will be

  8. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  9. History and status of magnetic fusion research; Evolution et statut des recherches sur la fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquinot, J. [CEA Saclay, Cabinet du Haut Commissaire, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-02-15

    Ever since the understanding of the basic process which powers the stars has been elucidated, humanity has been dreaming to master controlled fusion for peaceful purposes. Controlled fusion in a steady state regime must use magnetic confinement of a gas (plasma) heated up to 150 millions degrees. Physics and technology involved in such a state are extremely complex and went through many up and down phases. Nevertheless, the overall progress has been spectacular and a significant amount of energy could be produced in a well controlled manner. On this basis, an international organisation of unprecedented magnitude involving 34 countries has started working in Cadarache for the construction of the ITER project. It aims at the scientific demonstration of controlled fusion at the level of 500 MW and a power gain of 10. (author)

  10. Assessment of contemporary mathematical methods for magnetic fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treve, Y.M.

    1978-03-01

    The mathematical techniques reviewed have been selected on the basis of their relevance to at least four outstanding theoretical problems of magnetic fusion research, namely: (a) ion heating; (b) particle-wave interactions; (c) stability of magnetic surfaces in real tokamaks; and (d) strong plasma turbulence. These problems have a common feature: they all involve chaotic motions in spite of the perfectly deterministic nature of the mathematical models used for their description. In the first section devoted to Hamiltonian systems we briefly review the essentials of the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and discuss the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser theorem and its implications. In section 2 we review the difficulties of the problem of turbulence and present the Ruelle-Takens picture. An example of a dynamical system with a strange attractor is constructed and the Hopf bifurcation theory is discussed. Finally we review the properties of the Lorenz model for the convective instability of an atmospheric layer which is known to have a strange attractor for sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers

  11. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S K; Lee, K W; Hwang, C K; Hong, B G; Hong, G W [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  12. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new

  13. ITER: Fusion research at the dawn of a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.

    2002-01-01

    Given the expected success of on-going negotiations on the Joint Implementing Agreement for ITER construction and operation, a new era is opening in which fusion laboratories will have more dependable external support where they follow programmes supporting fusion as an energy source. The ITER design, cost estimate and safety analysis are supported by a large body of validating physics and technology R and D. The main features of the design, and analysis of its performance, give confidence that it will fulfil its technical objectives and demonstrate the environmental attractiveness of fusion. This paper gives illustrative confirmation of these expectations and an update on the technical preparations for construction, as well as the status of negotiations. These show that ITER is the right next step, integrating the appropriate physics and technology, making the proper technical and financial compromise and being conducted within an international framework, to advance fusion towards the objective of becoming an energy source in the foreseeable future. (author)

  14. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  15. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, F. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melton, Stephanie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The realization of fusion energy is a formidable challenge with significant achievements resulting from close integration of the plasma physics and applied technology disciplines. Presently, the most significant technological challenge for the near-term experiments such as ITER, and next generation fusion power systems, is the inability of current materials and components to withstand the harsh fusion nuclear environment. The overarching goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) fusion materials program is to provide the applied materials science support and understanding to underpin the ongoing Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science fusion energy program while developing materials for fusion power systems. In doing so the program continues to be integrated both with the larger United States (US) and international fusion materials communities, and with the international fusion design and technology communities.This document provides a summary of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for Magnetic Fusion Energy (AT-60-20-10-0) carried out by ORNL. The organization of this report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities. Four projects selected in the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicitation of late 2011 and funded in FY2012-FY2014 are identified by “FOA” in the titles. This report includes the final funded work of these projects, although ORNL plans to continue some of this work within the base program.

  16. Hands-on Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The enhancement of nuclear science education and training in all Member States is of interest to the IAEA since many of these countries, particularly in the developing world, are building up and expanding their scientific and technological infrastructures. Unfortunately, most of these countries still lack sufficient numbers of well-educated and qualified nuclear specialists and technologists. This may arise from, amongst other things: a lack of candidates with sufficient educational background in nuclear science who would qualify to receive specialized training; a lack of institutions available for training nuclear science specialists; a lack of lecturers in nuclear related fields; and a lack of suitable educational and teaching materials. A related concern is the potential loss of valuable knowledge accumulated over many decades due to the ageing workforce. An imperative for Member States is to develop and offer suitable graduate and postgraduate academic programmes which combine study and project work so that students can attain a prerequisite level of knowledge, abilities and skills in their chosen subject area. In nearly all academic programmes, experimental work forms an essential and integral component of study to help students develop general and subject specific skills. Experimental laboratory courses and exercises can mean practical work in a conventional laboratory or an advanced facility with an operational particle accelerator or research reactor often accompanied by computer simulations and theoretical exercises. In this context, available or newly planned research reactors and particle accelerators should be seen as extremely important and indispensable components of nuclear science and technology curricula. Research reactors can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on nuclear fission and the interaction of neutrons and photons with matter, while particle accelerators can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on charged particle

  17. Cost reduction possibilities for a heavy-ion accelerator for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, G.R.; Sims, J.R.; Henke, M.D.; Harris, D.B.; Dudziak, D.J.; Phillips, N.R.

    1987-10-01

    A design was produced for a single module in a cost-optimized accelerator appropriate for a commercial heavy-ion power plant. The goal of the study was to determine if the cost of the accelerator module could be reduced through design options, selection of materials, and manufacturing techniques. Independent cost estimates were obtained for the three main components of the module, and cost reductions of 20% from the cost calculated by the heavy-ion accelerator design/cost-minimization computer code LIACEP were identified. 3 refs., 23 figs

  18. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities at the Naka Fusion Research Establishment, JAERI, during the period from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high temperature plasma research in JT-60 and JFT-2M as well as DIII-D (US-Japan collaboration), and progress in ITER EDA, including ITER technology R and D. (J.P.N.)

  19. Configuration of the Virtual Laboratory for Fusion Researches in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Nakanishi, H.; Ishiguro, S.; Takami, S.; Tsuda, K.; Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Toki (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    SNET is a virtual laboratory system for nuclear fusion research in Japan, it has been developed since 2001 with SINET3, which is a national academic network backbone operated by National Institute of Computer sciences. Twenty one sites including major Japanese universities, JAEA and NIFS are mutually connected on SNET with the speed of 1 Gbps in 2008 fiscal year. The SNET is a closed network system based on L2 and L3 VPN and is connected to the web through the firewall at NIFS for security maintenance. Collaboration categories in SNET are as follows: the LHD remote participation; the remote use of supercomputer system; the all Japan ST (Spherical Tokamak) research program. For example, the collaborators of the first category in a remote station can control their diagnostic devices at LHD and analyze the LHD data as if they were at the LHD control room. The detail of the network policy is different from each other because each category has its own particular purpose. In October 2008, the Kyushu University and NIFS were connected by L2 VPN. The site was already connected by L3 VPN, but the data transfer rate was rather low. L2 VPN supports the bulk data transfer which is produced by QUEST, the spherical tokamak device at Kyushu University. The wide-area broadcast test began to distribute to remote stations the video which is presented at the front panel of the LHD control room. ITER activity started in 2007 and 'The ITER Remote Experimentation Centre' will be constructed at the Rokkasho village in Japan under ITER-BA agreement. SNET would be useful for distributing the data of ITER to Japanese universities and institutions. (authors)

  20. Lasers and particle beam for fusion and strategic defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Fusion Energy consists of the edited transscripts of a symposium on the applications of laser and particle beams to fusion and strategic defense. Its eleven papers discuss these topics: the Strategic Defense Initiative; accelerators for heavy ion fusion; rf accelerators for fusion and strategic defense; Pulsed power, ICF, and the Strategic Defense Initiative; chemical lasers; the feasibility of KrF lasers for fusion; the damage resistance of coated optic; liquid crystal devices for laser systems; fusion neutral-particle beam research and its contribution to the Star Wars program; and induction linacs and free electron laser amplifiers for ICF devices and directed-energy weapons

  1. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Andreani, C., E-mail: carla.andreani@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano—Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Loong, C.-K. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Centro NAST, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-13

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target–moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  2. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I. S.; Andreani, C.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C.-K.; Senesi, R.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target-moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  3. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, I.S.; Andreani, C.; Carpenter, J.M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C.-K.; Senesi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target–moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  4. International research co-operation in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conscience, J.-F.

    2003-01-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Education and Science presents a review of activities carried out in 2002 within the framework of the International Experimental Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) project that involves contributions from Canada, Japan, the Russian Federation and the European Union. Further agreements on the development of a fusion reactor with other countries, including Switzerland, the USA and China, are mentioned. The first chapter describes the current state of research on electricity production using nuclear fusion and discusses feasibility, safety, environmental, fuel supply and economic aspects. A second chapter reviews global efforts in the fusion area, including ITER and EURATOM projects and the activities running under the European Fusion Development Agreement EFDA and the JET Implementing Agreement. Finally, a third chapter deals with fusion research activities in Switzerland and the contributions made to international research by Swiss universities and institutes

  5. Nuclear-fusion research. To bring the sun on the earh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    The course treats first the foundations of nuclear fusion. In the second part the concepts for the realization of nuclear fusion in the laboratory are described. Finally in the last part a survey on the present status of the research as well an outlook on future work is given

  6. Physics in ;Real Life;: Accelerator-based Research with Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klay, J. L.

    All undergraduates in physics and astronomy should have access to significant research experiences. When given the opportunity to tackle challenging open-ended problems outside the classroom, students build their problem-solving skills in ways that better prepare them for the workplace or future research in graduate school. Accelerator-based research on fundamental nuclear and particle physics can provide a myriad of opportunities for undergraduate involvement in hardware and software development as well as ;big data; analysis. The collaborative nature of large experiments exposes students to scientists of every culture and helps them begin to build their professional network even before they graduate. This paper presents an overview of my experiences - the good, the bad, and the ugly - engaging undergraduates in particle and nuclear physics research at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center.

  7. Acceleration systems for heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    Heavy-ion beam pulse parameters needed to achieve useful electric power generation through inertial confinement fusion have been set forth. For successful ignition of a high-gain D-T target a few magajoules of energy per pulse, delivered at a peak power of several hundred terawatts, are needed; it must be deposited with an energy density of 20 to 30 magajoules per gram of the target material on which it impinges. Additional requirements must be met if this form of fusion is to be used for practical power generation; for example, the igniter system for a 1 GWe power plant should have a repetition rate in the neighborhood of 1 to 10 Hz, an overall electrical conversion efficiency from mains to beam of greater than 10%, and high availability. At present under discussion are the needs for a Heavy-Ion Demonstration Experiment (HIDE); an example set of parameters is given for comparison with those for a power plant

  8. Materials research and development for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the critical issues associated with materials selection for proposed magnetic fusion reactors are reviewed, with a brief overview of refractory alloys (vanadium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten) and primary emphasis on ceramic materials. SiC/SiC composites are under consideration for the first wall and blanket structure, and dielectric insulators will be used for the heating, control and diagnostic measurement of the fusion plasma. Key issues for SiC/SiC composites include radiation-induced degradation in the strength and thermal conductivity. Recent work has focused on the development of radiation-resistant fibers and fiber/matrix interfaces (porous SiC, SiC multilayers) which would also produce improved SiC/SiC performance for applications such as heat engines and aerospace components. The key physical parameters for dielectrics include electrical conductivity, dielectric loss tangent and thermal conductivity. Ionizing radiation can increase the electrical conductivity of insulators by many orders of magnitude, and surface leakage currents can compromise the performance of some fusion energy components. Irradiation can cause a pronounced degradation in the loss tangent and thermal conductivity. Fundamental physical parameter measurements on ceramics which are of interest for both fusion and non-fusion applications are discussed

  9. Fiber optic transmission system delivered to Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Mutsuo; Hiramoto, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Kunihiro

    1983-01-01

    In general there are many electromagnetically induced noises in the premises of factories, power plants and substations. Under such electrically bad environments, for the computer data transmission that needs high speed processing and high reliability, the optical fiber cable is superion to the coaxial cable or the flat-type cable in aspects of the inductionlessness and a wide bandwidth. Showa Electric Wire and Cable Co., Ltd. has delivered and installed a computer data transmission system consisting of optical modems and optical fiber cables for connecting every experiment building in the premises of Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This paper describes the outline of this system. (author)

  10. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  11. MYRRHA: a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Ph.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Kupschus, P.; Malambu, E.; Tichelen, K. van; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; Jongen, Y.; Vandeplassche, D.; Ternier, S.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, and IBA s.a., Ion Beam Application, a world leader in accelerator technology, want to fulfil a prominent role in the Accelerator Driven Systems field and are designing an ADS prototype, the MYRRHA Project, and conducting an associated R and D programme. The partners are foreseeing MYRRHA as a first step towards the European ADS-Demo facility. The project focuses primarily on ADS related research, i.e. structural materials and nuclear fuel research, liquid metals and associated aspects, sub-critical reactor physics and subsequently on applications such as waste transmutation, radioisotope production and safety research on sub-critical systems. In this respect, the MYRRHA system should become a new major research infrastructure for the European partners presently involved in the ADS Demo development, supporting and enabling the international R and D programs. Ion Beam Applications, the Belgium world leader in particle accelerators, had joined the MYRRHA Project to perform the accelerator development. Currently the study and preliminary conceptual design of the MYRRHA system is going on and an intensive R and D programme is conducted to assess the most risky points of the present design. This study will define the final choice of the characteristics of the facility depending on the selected fields of application to be achieved. The MYRRHA concept, as it is today, is based on the coupling of an upgraded commercial proton accelerator with a spallation target surrounded by a subcritical neutron-multiplying medium. Its design is determined by the versatility m applications that should be made possible. Further technical and/or strategic developments of the project might change the concept. A cyclotron, based on positive ion acceleration technology brings the protons up to an energy level of 350 MeV. The nominal current is 5 mA of protons. The spallation target system consists in a circuit with, at the upper part, a free

  12. Magnetic fusion energy and computers: the role of computing in magnetic fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This report examines the role of computing in the Department of Energy magnetic confinement fusion program. The present status of the MFECC and its associated network is described. The third part of this report examines the role of computer models in the main elements of the fusion program and discusses their dependence on the most advanced scientific computers. A review of requirements at the National MFE Computer Center was conducted in the spring of 1976. The results of this review led to the procurement of the CRAY 1, the most advanced scientific computer available, in the spring of 1978. The utilization of this computer in the MFE program has been very successful and is also described in the third part of the report. A new study of computer requirements for the MFE program was conducted during the spring of 1979 and the results of this analysis are presented in the forth part of this report

  13. The Design of HVAC System in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Choi, B. H.

    2007-01-01

    The HVAC systems for conventional facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center consist of 3 systems : accelerator building HVAC system, beam application building HVAC system and miscellaneous HVAC system. We designed accelerator building HVAC system and beam application research area HVAC system in the conventional facilities of Proton Accelerator research center. Accelerator building HVAC system is divided into accelerator tunnel area, klystron area, klystron gallery area, accelerator assembly area. Also, Beam application research area HVAC system is divided into those of beam experimental hall, accelerator control area, beam application research area and Ion beam application building. In this paper, We described system design requirements and explained system configuration for each systems. We presented operation scenario of HVAC system in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

  14. Research on fusion algorithm of polarization image in tetrolet domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dexiang; Yuan, BaoHong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-12-01

    Tetrolets are Haar-type wavelets whose supports are tetrominoes which are shapes made by connecting four equal-sized squares. A fusion method for polarization images based on tetrolet transform is proposed. Firstly, the magnitude of polarization image and angle of polarization image can be decomposed into low-frequency coefficients and high-frequency coefficients with multi-scales and multi-directions using tetrolet transform. For the low-frequency coefficients, the average fusion method is used. According to edge distribution differences in high frequency sub-band images, for the directional high-frequency coefficients are used to select the better coefficients by region spectrum entropy algorithm for fusion. At last the fused image can be obtained by utilizing inverse transform for fused tetrolet coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect image features more effectively and the fused image has better subjective visual effect

  15. Engineering Status of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenroeder, Philip J.; Meade, Dale; Thome, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    FIRE is a compact, high field tokamak being studied as an option for the next step in the US magnetic fusion energy program. FIRE's programmatic mission is to attain, explore, understand, and optimize alpha-dominated plasmas to provide the knowledge necessary for the design of attractive magnetic fusion energy systems. This study began in 1999 with broad participation of the US fusion community, including several industrial participants. The design under development has a major radius of 2 m, a minor radius of 0.525 m, a field on axis of 10T and capability to operate at 12T with upgrades to power supplies. Toroidal and poloidal field magnets are inertially cooled with liquid nitrogen. An important goal for FIRE is a total project cost in the $1B range. This paper presents an overview of the engineering details which were developed during the FIRE preconceptual design study in FY99 and 00

  16. Advanced fusion technology research and development. Annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    OAK-B135 The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility, the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility. The report summarizes GA's FY00 work in the areas of Fusion Power Plant Studies, Next Step Options, Advanced Liquid Plasma Facing Surfaces, Advanced Power Extraction Study, Plasma Interactive Materials, Radiation Testing of Magnetic Coil, Vanadium Component Demonstration, RF Technology, Inertial Fusion Energy Target Supply System, ARIES Integrated System Studies, and Spin-offs Brochure. The work in these areas continues to address many of the issues that must be resolved for the successful construction and operation of next-generation experiments and, ultimately, the development of safe, reliable, economic fusion power plants

  17. 1983 Annual technical report on inertial fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.; Monsler, M.J.; Terry, N.C.

    1984-03-01

    An overview of the laser fusion program at KMS Fusion is presented. A two-beam laser (1053 nm and 527 nm) system is used for the implosion physics. Stimulated Raman scattering is used to examine the implosion region for high-energy electrons. Holographic and fringe analysis techniques are also used in the diagnostics of the plasma. Computational techniques based on two-plasmon decay are shock-fitting techniques in Lagrangian hydrocodes are also described. Glass shell technology for laser targets is given. The design of the Chemically Pumped Iodine Laser (CPIL) is also presented. 86 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e + 3 - linear colliders

  19. Research and development plan of fusion technologies in JAERI toward DEMO reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Hayashi, Takumi; Abe, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masato; Isono, Takaaki; Inoue, Takashi; Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sato, Satoshi; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Shogo; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Nishi, Masataka; Hayashi, Kimio; Matsui, Hideki; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    In accordance with the 'Third Phase Basic Program on Fusion Research and Development' established by the Fusion Council of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, research and development (R and D) of fusion technologies aim at realization of two elements: development of ITER key components and their improvement for higher performances; and construction of sound technical basis of fusion nuclear technologies essential for fusion energy utilization. JAERI has been assigned in the Third Phase Basic Program as a responsible institute for developing the above two elements, and accordingly has been implementing technology R and Ds categorized in the following three areas: R and D for ITER construction and operation; R and D for ITER utilization (blanket testing in ITER) and toward DEMO; and R and D on basic fusion technologies. The present report reviews the status and the plan of fusion technology R and Ds in the latter two areas, and presents the technical objectives, technical issues, status of R and D and near-term R and D plans for: breeding blankets; structural materials; the IFMIF program; improvements of the key ITER components for higher performances toward DEMO; and basic fusion technologies. (author)

  20. High intensity linear accelerator development topics for panel discussion on ''Nuclear Energy Research and Accelerators: Future Prospects''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Two companion papers at this meeting have introduced the subject of high intensity linacs for materials research and for radioactive waste transmutation; Prof. Kaneko's paper ''Intense Proton Accelerator,'' and my paper ''Accelerator-Based Intense Neutron Source for Materials R ampersand D.'' I will expand on those remarks to briefly outline some of the extensive work that has been done at Los Alamos toward those two application areas, plus a third --- the production of tritium in an accelerator-based facility (APT--Accelerator Production of Tritium). 1 ref., 11 figs

  1. A survey on publications in fusion research and technology science and technology indicators in fusion R and T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific publications disseminate research results and are therefore an interesting subject for science and technology analysis. Bibliographic databases contain scientific publications which are indexed and structured. The paper considers Fusion Research and Technology records which are stored in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) bibliographic database. For the first time, all scientometric and bibliometric information specific to a selected field of science and technology contained in a bibliographic database, using INIS records, is analysed and quantified. A variety of new science and technology indicators which can be used for assessing research and development activities are also presented. (author)

  2. A survey on publications in fusion research and technology science and technology indicators in fusion R and T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, C.-D.

    2001-01-01

    Scientific publications disseminate research results and are therefore an interesting subject for science and technology analysis. Bibliographic databases contain scientific publications which are indexed and structured. The paper considers Fusion Research and Technology records which are stored in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) bibliographic database. For the first time, all scientometric and bibliometric information specific to a selected field of science and technology contained in a bibliographic database, using INIS records, is analysed and quantified. A variety of new science and technology indicators which can be used for assessing research and development activities are also presented. (author)

  3. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te)

  4. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, Frederick W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melton, Stephanie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document summarizes FY2016 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for MFE carried out by ORNL. The organization of the report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities.

  5. Tritium inventory in fusion reactors. Summary report of the final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2007-11-01

    Detailed discussions were held during the final Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) at IAEA Headquarters on 25-27 September 2006, with the aim of reviewing the work accomplished by the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Tritium Inventory in Fusion Reactors'. Participants summarized the specific results obtained during the final phase of the CRP, and considered the impact of the data generated on the design of fusion devices. Conclusions were formulated and several specific recommendations for future fusion machines were agreed. The discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  6. Experimental research on electromagnetic radiation in inductive energy storage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jianzhong; Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun

    2008-01-01

    There exists strong electromagnetic radiation in inductive energy storage accelerators. In can destroy a measuring device at a distance. By repeated experiments, we found that it is a wide-spectrum electromagnetic wave with a main frequency of 75 MHz. The effector such as coaxial transmission line is effected strongly in short distance. The current in the coaxial transmission line can be measured in Rogowski coils. The strength of field in it is about 500 V/m and the peak current is 217 mA. The radiation source may be LC oscillating or electric exploding opening switch. Through the experimental research, we think it probably may be caused by the LC oscillating in the circuit when the switches conduct. And its strength is correlated to current change ratio. The change rate in secondary circuit is stronger than in primary circuit. So the radiation generated in secondary circuit is stronger than in primary circuit. It may be a reference for further research in inductive energy storage accelerators and shielding electromagnetic disturbing. (authors)

  7. The CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoly, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    CARE, an ambitious and coordinated project of accelerator research and developments oriented towards High Energy Physics projects, has been launched in January 2004 by the main European laboratories and the European Commission with the 6th Framework Programme. This project aims at improving existing infrastructures dedicated to future projects such as linear colliders, upgrades of hadron colliders and high intensity proton drivers An important part of this programme is devoted to advancing the performance of the superconducting technology, both in the fields of RF cavities for electron and proton acceleration and of high field magnets, as well as to developing high intensity electron and proton injectors. We describe the plans of the four main Joint Research Activities and report on the results and progress obtained so far. The CARE project also includes three adjacent Networking Activities whose main goal is to organize a forum of discussions and to provide the strategic plans in the fields of the Linear Collider, intense Neutrino Beams, and future Hadron Colliders

  8. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment. From April 1,2000 to March 31, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Kizu, Kaname; Kusakawa, Fumio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sengoku, Seio

    2001-11-01

    analytical studies is to understand physics of tokamak plasmas. The NEXT (Numerical EXperiment of Tokamak) project has been progressed in order to research complex physical processes both in core and in divertor plasmas by using massively parallel computers. The optimum condition of electron cyclotron (EC) beam injection has been efficiently obtained to stabilize neo-classical tearing modes (NTM). Remarkable progress has been made in the study of turbulence driven by electron temperature gradient instabilities. The study on the formation of a detached-plasma has been much progressed. Major items of Research and Development (R and D) of nuclear fusion reactor technologies, mainly focused on ITER-related areas in FY2000 are as follows: 1) Blanket: Be/DSCu specimens made by HIP method with an Al interlayer have successfully withstood against a heat flux of 5 MW/m 2 for more than 1000 cycles. 2) Superconducting Magnet: The world's largest superconducting pulsed coil was successfully tested at the target field of 13 T and operating current of 46kA, with a stored energy of 640 MJ at a ramping rate of 1.2 T/s. 3) NegativeIon Beam: 1MV voltage folding of the beam accelerator column was successfully demonstrated. The negative ion production mechanism was clarified in detail. 4) RF Heating: A 170GHz gyrotron was successfully tested at 1MW level power for about 10 second (0.9MW x 9.2sec). 5) Tritium handling: Performance of ITER-scale 2,500 m 3 /hr large atmosphere detritiation system was successfully confirmed. A new separation method could separate the mixture gas of H 2 /He to each composition gas with the enrichment more than 99%. 6) Plasma Facing Components of Divertor: A prototype mockup of the ITER divertor could successfully sustain a heat flux up to 20 MW/m 2 (15sec) for more than 1000 thermal cycles. 7) Reactor Structure: The blanket module has been replaced under the required clearance of ± 0.25 mm between key and groove by remote handling. 8) Fusion Neutronics: Radiation

  9. Atomic and Molecular Data Activities for Fusion Research in JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been producing, collecting and compiling cross-section data for atomic and molecular collisions and spectral data relevant to fusion research. In this talk, an overview of our activities since the last meeting in September 2009 will be presented. The state selective charge transfer cross-section data of Be 4+ , C 4+ and C 6+ by collision with H(n=2) in the collision energy range between 62 eV/amu and 6.2 keV/amu have been calculated with a molecular-bases close-coupling method. The calculated charge transfer data of C 4+ was implemented in a collisional-radiative model code for C 3+ , and it is shown that in some cases the charge transfer from C 4+ to H(n=2) populates predominantly C 3+ (n = 6, 7). The cross-section data of dissociative recombination and excitation of HD + , D 2+ , DT + , T 2+ 3 HeH + and 4 HeH + were produced by theoretical calculation. The principal quantum number of dissociated H atom isotopes was also given. The analytical expressions for the cross-section data for 26 processes of He-collision systems were produced in order to facilitate practical use of the data. The compiled data are in preparation for the web site at the URL of http://www-jt60.naka.jaea.go.jp/engish/JEAMDL/. The chemical sputtering yield data of CFC materials with hydrogen isotope collisions have been compiled. The ionization rate of W 44+ and the radiative and the dielectronic recombination rates of W 45+ were calculated with FAC. The ratio of these rates was compared with experimentally measured ratio of W 45+ density to W 44+ density in JT-60U, showing that the calculated ratio of the recombination ratio of W 45+ to the ionization rate of W 44+ is accurate within the experimental uncertainty (∼ 30%). The atomic and molecular data activities in JAEA are pursued in collaboration with Japanese universities, and other department of JAEA. (author)

  10. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  11. Research and Realization of Medical Image Fusion Based on Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new medical image fusion technique is presented. The method is based on three-dimensional reconstruction. After reconstruction, the three-dimensional volume data is normalized by three-dimensional coordinate conversion in the same way and intercepted through setting up cutting plane including anatomical structure, as a result two images in entire registration on space and geometry are obtained and the images are fused at last.Compared with traditional two-dimensional fusion technique, three-dimensional fusion technique can not only resolve the different problems existed in the two kinds of images, but also avoid the registration error of the two kinds of images when they have different scan and imaging parameter. The research proves this fusion technique is more exact and has no registration, so it is more adapt to arbitrary medical image fusion with different equipments.

  12. Accelerating Translational Research through Open Science: The Neuro Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, E Richard

    2016-12-01

    Translational research is often afflicted by a fundamental problem: a limited understanding of disease mechanisms prevents effective targeting of new treatments. Seeking to accelerate research advances and reimagine its role in the community, the Montreal Neurological Institute (Neuro) announced in the spring of 2016 that it is launching a five-year experiment during which it will adopt Open Science-open data, open materials, and no patenting-across the institution. The experiment seeks to examine two hypotheses. The first is whether the Neuro's Open Science initiative will attract new private partners. The second hypothesis is that the Neuro's institution-based approach will draw companies to the Montreal region, where the Neuro is based, leading to the creation of a local knowledge hub. This article explores why these hypotheses are likely to be true and describes the Neuro's approach to exploring them.

  13. Accelerating Translational Research through Open Science: The Neuro Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Richard Gold

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Translational research is often afflicted by a fundamental problem: a limited understanding of disease mechanisms prevents effective targeting of new treatments. Seeking to accelerate research advances and reimagine its role in the community, the Montreal Neurological Institute (Neuro announced in the spring of 2016 that it is launching a five-year experiment during which it will adopt Open Science-open data, open materials, and no patenting-across the institution. The experiment seeks to examine two hypotheses. The first is whether the Neuro's Open Science initiative will attract new private partners. The second hypothesis is that the Neuro's institution-based approach will draw companies to the Montreal region, where the Neuro is based, leading to the creation of a local knowledge hub. This article explores why these hypotheses are likely to be true and describes the Neuro's approach to exploring them.

  14. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    During the academic year 1980 - 1981, the 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator in UTTAC has experienced several troubles. The accelerator tank had to be opened six times including the scheduled overhaul. Due to these troubles, both the beam time and the chain operation time were reduced by 20% as compared with the preceding year. However, the beam pulsing system was completed, and pulsed beam has been in use. The polarized ion source and the sputter ion source have worked well. A heavy ion booster with interdigital H-structure was designed, and has been under construction. Special efforts have been exerted on the detectors and detector systems. The examples of the achievements mainly associated with the Nuclear and Solid State Research Project are enumerated as follows. The complete experiment on d-p system provided the data on nuclear three body problem. The information about the mechanism of two-nucleon transfer reaction (p,t) was obtained. The mechanisms of (p,p) and (p,d) reactions were clarified. The experiment on the measurement of the magnetic moment of β-emitting products with polarized beam began. The properties of very highly excited states were clarified by the study of heavy ion-induced reactions. A new model for heavy ion fusion reaction was proposed. The mechanism of inner shell ionization was clarified by passing heavy ions through solids. (Kako, I.)

  15. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    2003-11-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities, during the period from 1 April, 2002 to 31 March, 2003. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, research and development of fusion reactor technologies towards ITER and fusion power demonstration plants, and activities in support of ITER design and construction. JT-60 program has continued to produce fruitful knowledge and understanding necessary to achieve reactor relevant performances of tokamak fusion devices. JFT-2M has made contributions in more basic areas of tokamak plasma research and development in pursuit of high performance plasma. The objectives of JT-60 research have been more shifted to physics R and Ds in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and establishment of physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR as a fusion power demonstration plant. In JFT-2M, the advanced material tokamak experiment program has been carried out to test the low activation ferritic steel for development of the structural material for a fusion reactor. In the area of theories and analyses, significant progress has been made in understanding of the ITB, energy confinement scaling in ITB plasmas, MHD equilibrium in the current hole region, asymmetric feature of divertor plasmas and the divertor detachment. In addition, through the project of numerical experiment on tokamak, the mechanism of the ion temperature gradient mode was clarified by particle simulations. The physics of divertor plasma was also studied by particle simulations. R and Ds of fusion reactor technologies have been carried out both to further improve technologies necessary for ITER construction, and to accumulate

  16. Implications of the second law for future directions in controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.; Miley, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Many existing energy related technologies have developed under the influence of social, economic, or state of the art constraints, and they cannot be viewed as optimum systems according to the second law of thermodynamics. Controlled fusion research presents an opportunity to optimize a nascent technology with respect to second law considerations in order to develop a practical energy source. In its present state of development, fusion research offers several independent approaches that may result in a net power producing fusion reactor. This paper discusses how second law considerations might be used to narrow the range of choices that must be made among various fusion fuel cycles. From a second law point of view, the most desirable fusion reactors are those for which the energy of charged particles can be converted directly into d.c. electrical power, while still allowing the energy that could be recovered by an efficient high-temperature 'blanket' to be transported largely by radiation. Fusion research in all major industrialized countries is developing the deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel cycle for first-generation fusion power plants. It will be shown that other fuel cycles have significant advantages over the D-T fuel cycle according to second law principles. (author)

  17. Research in the US on heavy ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.; Faltens, A.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1986-10-01

    The US study of high-energy multigap accelerators to produce large currents of heavy ions for inertial fusion is centered on the single-pass induction linac method. The large technology base associated with multigap accelerators for high-energy physics gives confidence that high efficiency, high repetition rate, and good availability can be achieved, and that the path from scientific demonstration to commercial realization can be a smooth one. In an induction linac driver, multiple (parallel) ion beams are accelerated through a sequence of pulsed transformers. Crucial to the design is the manipulation of electric fields to amplify the beam current during acceleration. A proof-of-principle induction linac experiment (MBE-4) is underway and has begun the first demonstration of current amplification, control of the bunch ends, and the acceleration of multiple beams. A recently completed experiment, called the Single Beam Transport Experiment has shown that we can now count on more freedom to design an alternating-gradient quadrupole focusing channel to transport much higher ion-beam currents than formerly believed possible. A recent Heavy Ion Fusion System Assessment (HIFSA) has shown that a substantial cost saving results from use of multiply-charged ions, and that a remarkably broad range of options exist for viable power-plant designs. The driver cost at 3 to 4 MJ could be $200/joule or less, and the cost of electricity in the range of 50 to 55 mills/kWhr

  18. Mass acceleration in a multi-module plasma jet for impact fusion. Final report, 21 May 1984-21 May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, R.L.; Goldstein, S.A.; Tidman, D.A.; Massey, D.W.; Winsor, N.K.; Witherspoon, F.D.

    1985-07-01

    GT-Devices began work on multi-module mass accelerators for impact fusion in 1981. The technique employs sequentially switched high pressure plasma jets to accelerate a lightweight projectile in a circular barrel. The purpose of the work of the past 12 months was to improve the understanding of the plasma jet acceleration process, and to translate that understanding into verifiable results. Both goals have been accomplished. During the past year we conceived, designed, built and fired 325 shots on the Module Test Facility (MTF). This facility provided sufficient diagnostics to investigate a wide variety of geometries, plasmas and current pulses, so that rapid progress was made

  19. Applications of Research Reactors Towards Research on Materials for Nuclear Fusion Technology. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion is widely considered to represent a nearly unlimited source of energy. Recent progress in the quest for fusion energy includes the design and current construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), for which a licence has recently been obtained as a first of its kind fusion nuclear installation. ITER is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy production in excess of 500 MW for several consecutive minutes. ITER, however, will not be able to address all the nuclear fusion technology issues associated with the design, construction and operation of a commercial fusion power plant. The demonstration of an adequate tritium or fuel breeding ratio, as well as the development, characterization and testing of structural and functional materials in an integrated nuclear fusion environment, are examples of issues for which ITER is unable to deliver complete answers. To fill this knowledge gap, several facilities are being discussed, such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility and, eventually, a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO). However, for these facilities, a vast body of preliminary research remains to be performed, for instance, concerning the preselection and testing of suitable materials able to withstand the high temperature and pressure, and intense radiation environment of a fusion reactor. Given their capacity for material testing in terms of available intense neutron fluxes, dedicated irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination laboratories, high flux research reactors or material test reactors (MTRs) will play an indispensable role in the development of fusion technology. Moreover, research reactors have already achieved an esteemed legacy in the understanding of material properties and behaviour, and the knowledge gained from experiments in fission materials in certain cases can be applied to fusion systems, particularly those

  20. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Sato, Masayasu; Kudo, Yusuke; Shu, Wataru; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    2005-09-01

    engineering. Machine has been designed to have a wide-range capability of operation in aspect ratio and plasma shape. Engineering design of the main components of superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnetic field coils, vacuum vessel, in-vessel components, and cryostat has been performed. A series of the experimental programs on the JFT-2M were completed in FY 2003. In FY 2004, experimental data on the Advanced Material Tokamak Experiment (AMTEX) using the reduced activation ferritic steel (F82H), high performance experiment, characteristics of SOL and divertor plasma and compact toroid injection for fueling have been analyzed and evaluated. Concerning the AMTEX, analysis of high-β experiments with the Ferritic Inside Wall (FIW) facing close to the plasma have shown a wall stabilization effect. By using an MHD equilibrium code, it has been confirmed that the plasma with β N - 3.5 is compatible with FIW. In the theoretical and analytical researches, significant progress was made in the studies of transport simulation of current hole plasma, role of low order rational q-values in the ITB events, the theory of Alfven eigenmodes in tokamaks, current spike behavior of disruptive plasma, and stability of external MHD modes. R and Ds of fusion reactor technologies have been carried out both to further improve technologies necessary for ITER construction, and to accumulate technological database to assure the design of fusion DEMO plants. For the design optimization of ITER superconducting magnets, degradation of critical current performances of the Nb 3 Sn conductors has been experimentally and numerically examined. For ITER Neutral Beam Injector, MeV-range accelerator R and D is being in progress and the current density has been extended to 100 A/m 2 . For the further pulse extension and power increase of 170 GHz gyrotron, a built-in radiator at the mode converter has been optimized and pre-program controls of a cathode heater power has been employed. In the R and Ds on Plasma