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Sample records for acceleration head injury

  1. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts.

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    Cripton, Peter A; Dressler, Daniel M; Stuart, Cameron A; Dennison, Christopher R; Richards, Darrin

    2014-09-01

    Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5m and 3.0m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2m (6.3m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824g (unhelmeted) to 181g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4m/s (1.5m drop) and 6.3m/s (2.0m drop), bicycle helmets changed the

  2. Head Injuries

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    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  3. Head and neck control varies with perturbation acceleration but not jerk: implications for whiplash injuries

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    Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that a high rate of acceleration onset, i.e. high jerk, during a low-speed vehicle collision increases the risk of whiplash injury by triggering inappropriate muscle responses and/or increasing peak head acceleration. Our goal was to test these proposed mechanisms at realistic jerk levels and then to determine how collision jerk affects the potential for whiplash injuries. Twenty-three seated volunteers (8 F, 15 M) were exposed to multiple experiments involving perturbations simulating the onset of a vehicle collision in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. In the first experiment, subjects experienced five forward and five rearward perturbations to look for the inappropriate muscle responses and ‘floppy’ head kinematics previously attributed to high jerk perturbations. In the second experiment, we independently varied the jerk (∼125 to 3 000 m s−3) and acceleration (∼0.65 to 2.6 g) of the perturbation to assess their effect on the electromyographic (EMG) responses of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCAL) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscles and the kinematic responses of the head and neck. In the first experiment, we found neither inappropriate muscle responses nor floppy head kinematics when subjects had their eyes open, but observed two subjects with floppy head kinematics with eyes closed. In the second experiment, we found that about 70% of the variations in the SCM and SCAL responses and about 95% of the variations in head/neck kinematics were explained by changes in perturbation acceleration in both the eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Less than 2% of the variation in the muscle and kinematic responses was explained by changes in perturbation jerk and, where significant, response amplitudes diminished with increasing jerk. Based on these findings, collision jerk appears to have little or no role in the genesis of whiplash injuries in low-speed vehicle crashes. PMID:19237420

  4. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

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    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (pbicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required.

  5. Head Injuries

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    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  6. Quantitative relationship between axonal injury and mechanical response in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

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    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-09-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R(2)=0.612, plinear and angular acceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height.

  7. Head Injuries in Children

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    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  8. Expression of S100A6 in Rat Hippocampus after Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Lateral Head Acceleration

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    Bo Fang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI, we investigated changes in cognitive function and S100A6 expression in the hippocampus. TBI-associated changes in this protein have not previously been reported. Rat S100A6 was studied via immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR after either lateral head acceleration or sham. Reduced levels of S100A6 protein and mRNA were observed 1 h after TBI, followed by gradual increases over 6, 12, 24, and 72 h, and then a return to sham level at 14 day. Morris water maze (MWM test was used to evaluate animal spatial cognition. TBI- and sham-rats showed an apparent learning curve, expressed as escape latency. Although TBI-rats displayed a relatively poorer cognitive ability than sham-rats, the disparity was not significant early post-injury. Marked cognitive deficits in TBI-rats were observed at 72 h post-injury compared with sham animals. TBI-rats showed decreased times in platform crossing in the daily MWM test; the performance at 72 h post-injury was the worst. In conclusion, a reduction in S100A6 may be one of the early events that lead to secondary cognitive decline after TBI, and its subsequent elevation is tightly linked with cognitive improvement. S100A6 may play important roles in neuronal degeneration and regeneration in TBI.

  9. Preventing head injuries in children

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    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... Helmets help to prevent head injuries. Your child should wear a ... sports or activities: Playing contact sports, such as lacrosse, ...

  10. Pediatric head injury.

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    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  11. Economics of head injuries

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    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  12. Neuropsychiatric sequelae of head injuries.

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    McAllister, T W

    1992-06-01

    Based on the above review several general points can be highlighted: Head injuries are extremely common, affecting probably close to 2,000,000 people in this country each year. The most common are nonmissile, closed-head injuries, the majority of which occur in association with motor vehicle accidents. Virtually all studies of head injury suggest a peak incidence in the 15 to 24 years of age group. Coarse measures of outcome suggest that the very young and the elderly have poorer outcomes. Because of improved acute care, however, a large number of young, otherwise healthy patients are surviving head injuries with a variety of profound neuropsychiatric sequelae. Because of the mechanics of brain injury in acceleration-deceleration injuries, certain brain injury profiles are common including orbitofrontal, anterior and inferior temporal contusions, and diffuse axonal injury. The latter particularly affects the corpus callosum, superior cerebellar peduncle, basal ganglia, and periventricular white matter. The neuropsychiatric sequelae follow from the above injury profiles. Cognitive impairment is often diffuse with more prominent deficits in rate of information processing, attention, memory, cognitive flexibility, and problem solving. Prominent impulsivity, affective instability, and disinhibition are seen frequently, secondary to injury to frontal, temporal, and limbic areas. In association with the typical cognitive deficits, these sequelae characterize the frequently noted "personality changes" in TBI patients. In addition, these changes can exacerbate premorbid problems with impulse control. Marked difficulties with substance use, sexual expression, and aggression often result. The constellation of symptoms, which make up the postconcussive syndrome, are seen across the whole spectrum of brain injury severity. Even in so-called mild or minor head injury, these symptoms are likely to have an underlying neuropathologic, neurochemical, or neurophysiologic cause

  13. Prognosis in head injury.

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    Jane, J A; Rimel, R W

    1982-01-01

    The prognosis of head injury when viewed from the perspective of the Glasgow Coma Scale confirms the utility of this measure. In particular, decrease in mortality is associated with an increase in GCS. In addition, the motor score portion of the GCS was of predictive value when taken alone. The outcome of patients in coma (GCS less than 8) was closely related to three preventable or treatable factors, namely, hypoxia, shock, and increased intracranial pressure. These three factors, when considered in combination, powerfully predicted mortality. Of considerable interest was the finding that moderate head injury (GCS 9-12) was associated with a small but perhaps preventable mortality. The morbidity was intermediate between that of severe and minor and was surprisingly high. Minor head injury, while not associated with significant mortality, also resulted in considerable morbidity. Neuropsychological evaluation of the patients and an experimental study suggests that an organic component may be involved even in this group. To deal with head injury, distinctions must be made between grades of severity. The Glasgow Coma Scale is suited for this task. Nonetheless, the recognition of this basic continuity should elicit the further recognition that different health providers may be involved in the case of, say, severe, as opposed to mild, injury, and that different outcome measures are suitable for one group but not another.

  14. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

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    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  15. Linear and angular head accelerations during heading of a soccer ball.

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    Naunheim, Rosanne S; Bayly, Philip V; Standeven, John; Neubauer, Jeremy S; Lewis, Larry M; Genin, Guy M

    2003-08-01

    Cognitive deficits observed in professional soccer players may be related to heading of a soccer ball. To assess the severity of a single instance of heading a soccer ball, this study experimentally and theoretically evaluated the linear and angular accelerations experienced by the human head during a frontal heading maneuver. Accelerations were measured using a set of three triaxial accelerometers mounted to the head of each of four adult male subjects. These measurements (nine signals) were used to estimate the linear acceleration of the mass center and the angular acceleration of the head. Results were obtained for ball speeds of 9 and 12 m.s(-1) (approximately 20 and 26 mph). A simple mathematical model was derived for comparison. At 9 m.s(-1), peak linear acceleration of the head was 158 +/- 19 m.s(-2) (mean +/- standard deviation) and peak angular acceleration was 1302 +/- 324 rad.s(-2); at 12 m.s(-1), the values were 199 +/- 27 m.s-2 and 1457 +/- 297 rad.s-2, respectively. The initial acceleration pulses lasted approximately 25 ms. Measured head accelerations confirmed laboratory headform measurements reported in the literature and fell within the ranges predicted by the theoretical model. Linear and angular acceleration levels for a single heading maneuver were well below those thought to be associated with traumatic brain injury, as were computed values of the Gadd Severity Index and the Head Injury Criterion. However, the effect of repeated acceleration at this relatively low level is unknown.

  16. Clinical trials in head injury

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    Narayan, RK; Michel, ME

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000,

  17. Sports-related Head Injury

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    ... difficulty expressing words or thoughts; dysarthric speech Head Injury Prevention Tips Buy and use helmets or protective head gear approved by the ASTM for specific sports 100 percent of the time. The ASTM has ...

  18. Limiting Performance of Helmets for the Prevention of Head Injury

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    Z.Q. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of the theoretical optimal (limiting performance of helmets for the prevention of head injury. A rigid head injury model and a two-mass translational head injury model are employed. Several head injury criteria are utilized, including head acceleration, the head injury criterion (HIC, the energy imparted to the brain which is related to brain injury, and the power developed in the skull that is associated with skull fracture. A helmeted head hitting a rigid surface and a helmeted head hit by a moving object such as a ball are considered. The optimal characteristics of helmets and the impact responses of the helmeted head are investigated computationally. An experiment is conducted on an ensemble of bicycle helmets. Computational results are compared with the experimental results.

  19. Neck strength imbalance correlates with increased head acceleration in soccer heading.

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    Dezman, Zachary D W; Ledet, Eric H; Kerr, Hamish A

    2013-07-01

    Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Observational laboratory investigation. Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (±0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (±1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury.

  20. Boxing-related head injuries.

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    Jayarao, Mayur; Chin, Lawrence S; Cantu, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Fatalities in boxing are most often due to traumatic brain injury that occurs in the ring. In the past 30 years, significant improvements in ringside and medical equipment, safety, and regulations have resulted in a dramatic reduction in the fatality rate. Nonetheless, the rate of boxing-related head injuries, particularly concussions, remains unknown, due in large part to its variability in clinical presentation. Furthermore, the significance of repeat concussions sustained when boxing is just now being understood. In this article, we identify the clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, and management of boxing-related head injuries, and discuss preventive strategies to reduce head injuries sustained by boxers.

  1. Real-time head acceleration measurement in girls' youth soccer.

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    Hanlon, Erin M; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to collect real-time head acceleration data for soccer impacts during girls' youth (U14) soccer play. Linear and angular head accelerations were collected during girls' youth soccer scrimmages using a wireless head acceleration measurement device (the Head Impact Telemetry System). After field data collection, each individual impact was analyzed. The type of impact, header or nonheader, was determined, and nonheader impacts were further assessed by the category of impact. The head injury criterion and resultant linear and angular accelerations were analyzed and compared with current injury tolerance values for all impacts. A total of 47 header and 20 nonheader impacts were observed during the study. The front of the head experienced more headers than the other locations (n = 17). Header impacts ranged in peak linear acceleration from 4.5 g to 62.9 g and in peak angular head acceleration from 444.8 to 8869.1 rad·s(-2). The majority of the nonheader impacts (40%) were player collisions with other players. Only one goalpost collision occurred, but it resulted in the highest peak angular acceleration (5179.5 rad·s(-2)) and was the only nonheader impact to exceed any of the tolerance levels. Head accelerations were found to exceed the majority of previous laboratory studies. None of the impacts exceeded linear acceleration tolerance values for concussion, but angular accelerations did exceed the suggested limits. Three angular acceleration measurements for heading events (4509.8, 5298.3, and 8869.1 rad·s(-2)) exceeded the concussion tolerance values, but no concussions were diagnosed during the study.

  2. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

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    Bruner, Heather C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:435–437.

  3. Preventing head and neck injury.

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    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  4. Sex differences in head acceleration during heading while wearing soccer headgear.

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    Tierney, Ryan T; Higgins, Michael; Caswell, Shane V; Brady, Jessica; McHardy, Krista; Driban, Jeffrey B; Darvish, Kurosh

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have indicated that female soccer players may be at greater risk of concussion compared with their male counterparts. Soccer headgear is marketed for reducing head acceleration and risk of concussion. To determine the effect of sex and soccer headgear on head impact kinematics and dynamic stabilization during soccer heading. Cross-sectional design. Research laboratory. Forty-four college-aged soccer players (29 women, 15 men). Using a head impact model, participants performed 4 soccer headers under 3 headgear conditions (control, Head Blast Soccer Band, and Full90 Select Performance Headguard). Dependent variables assessed before soccer heading were head-neck anthropometrics and isometric neck muscle strength, and those assessed during soccer headers were resultant linear head acceleration, Head Injury Criteria (HIC(36)), and superficial neck muscle electromyography. Statistical analyses included multivariate and univariate analyses of variance with repeated measures, independent-samples t tests, appropriate follow-up analyses of variance and post hoc t tests, and Pearson product moment correlations (alpha = .05). Head acceleration in women was 32% and 44% greater than in men when wearing the Head Blast (21.5 g versus 16.3 g) and Full90 Select (21.8 g versus 15.2 g), respectively (P head accelerations (20.2 g versus 18.2 g) during the control condition (P = .164). Female soccer players exhibited greater head accelerations than their male counterparts when wearing headgear. Our results are important clinically because they indicate that soccer headgear may not be an appropriate head injury prevention tool for all athletes.

  5. Biomechanical analysis of padding in child seats and head injury.

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    Kumaresan, Srirangam; Sances, Anthony; Carlin, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Head injury is a common finding for infants and young children involved in automobile accidents. Although the child restraint seats have increased the level of safety for the pediatric population, skull fracture and/or brain injury occur during the interaction between the child's head and interior of the car seats with no padding. The introduction of effective and sufficient padding may significantly reduce the head injury. The present study was designed to evaluate the biomechanical effects of padding in child seats to reduce the potential for head injury. A head drop test of a six-month old anthropomorphic dummy was conducted. The side of the dummy head impacted the interior wing of child car seats of relatively soft and stiff materials, and a rigid metal plate at velocities of 2.2, 4.5 and 6.7 m/s. In all tests, three types of padding environments were used (no padding, comfort foam, 16 to 19 mm polypropylene padding). All data were collected at 10 kHz and filtered. A total of 39 tests were conducted. The head injury criteria (HIC), and head acceleration, and head angular acceleration were obtained. The HIC was calculated over a 36 ms interval from the resultant tri-axial acceleration. The angular accelerations were derived from the angular velocity data. The head injury biomechanical parameters decreased with the addition of padding. The HIC, peak acceleration, and angular acceleration were reduced up to 91%, 80%, and 61% respectively. The present results emphasize the importance of energy absorbing padding to provide an improved safety environment in child car seats.

  6. Neck forces and moments and head accelerations in side impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Although side-impact sled studies have investigated chest, abdomen, and pelvic injury mechanics, determination of head accelerations and the associated neck forces and moments is very limited. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the temporal forces and moments at

  7. Pediatric head injuries from earthquakes.

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    Martinez-Lage, Juan F; Almagro, María-José; López-Guerrero, Antonio López; Martínez-Lage Azorín, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    By means of some illustrations, the authors briefly report the effects of some accidental head injuries caused by diverse mechanisms occurring in children. Many of these accidents seem to be preventable, but others are completely unavoidable and escape prevention as the one that is depicted in the cover of this issue.

  8. Effect of clenching with a mouthguard on head acceleration during heading of a soccer ball.

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    Narimatsu, Keishiro; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Konno, Michiyo; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are acceleration-deceleration injuries that occur when biomechanical forces are transmitted to the cerebral tissues. By limiting acceleration of the head, enhanced cervical muscle activity derived from clenching with a mouthguard (MG) may reduce the incidence or severity of concussions following impact. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of voluntary clenching with a proper MG on acceleration of the head during "heading" of a soccer ball. Eleven male high school soccer players (mean age, 16.8 years) participated in the study. Each player was given a customized MG. An automated soccer machine was used to project the ball at the participants at a constant speed. The participants headed the ball under 3 different oral conditions: drill 1, heading freely performed without instruction and without the MG; drill 2, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench the masseter muscles tightly while not wearing the MG; drill 3, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench tightly while wearing the MG. Each participant repeated each drill 5 times. Linear acceleration of the head was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Activity of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles was measured by wireless electromyography. Weak masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity was observed during drill 1. After the soccer players had been instructed to clench their masseter muscles (drills 2 and 3), statistically significant decreases in head acceleration and increases in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity were observed (P soccer players to habitually clench while wearing a proper mouthguard to strengthen cervical muscle resistance as a way to mitigate the damage caused by heading.

  9. Head injuries, heading, and the use of headgear in soccer.

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    Niedfeldt, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Soccer has more than 265 million players around the world and is the only contact sport with purposeful use of the head for controlling and advancing the ball. Head contact in soccer has the potential to cause acute traumatic brain injury including concussion or, potentially, a pattern of chronic brain injury. Although early retrospective research on the effects of soccer heading seemed to suggest that purposeful heading may contribute to long-term cognitive impairment, prospective controlled studies do not support this and, in fact, suggest that purposeful heading may not be a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Headgear has not been shown to be effective in reducing ball impact but may be helpful in reducing the force of non-ball-related impacts to the head. There are concerns that universal use of headgear may cause more aggressive heading and head challenges, leading to increased risk of injury.

  10. Emergency management of head injuries.

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    Rimel, R W; Jane, J A; Tyson, G W

    1981-03-01

    Sophisticated care of the head injury patient in the emergency department does not demand sophisticated knowledge of neurosurgery. Instead it depends upon: (1) Meticulous attention to the fundamental principles of resuscitation; (B) Prevention of secondary cardiopulmonary abnormalities which can further injure the traumatized brain; (C) Performance of serial neurologic examinations. (In the case of acute head injury, a simple neurologic examination performed repeatedly usually provides the physician with more useful information than a more elaborate examination performed only once). (D) Consultation with the neurosurgeon. If there is any possibility that neurosurgical consultation might enhance the emergency department management of the patient, one should not hesitate to contact him. There is no question that protocols for any phase of emergency management of central nervous system (CNA) trauma are of no values unless there is a high degree of compliance. This can only be achieved through persons dedicated to training emergency medical technicians, nurses and physicians in the optimal care that can be afforded these patients. If advances are to be made in decreasing the morbidity and mortality of the CNS trauma patient, those actively involved in emergency medicine are going to have to take an active role in training programs, seminars and clinical practice for physicians, emergency department nurses, and emergency medical technicians.

  11. Neuropsychological sequelae of minor head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, J T; Macciocchi, S N; Giordani, B; Rimel, R; Jane, J A; Boll, T J

    1983-11-01

    Seventy-one patients with minor head injury were given extensive neuropsychological evaluations 3 months after injury. A significant percentage of the patients demonstrated cognitive impairment, which seemed essentially unrelated to the length of unconsciousness or of posttraumatic amnesia. Impaired patients evidenced memory and visuospatial deficits. Cognitively impaired patients also had difficulty returning to work after injury. The psychological and cognitive impairment that follows minor head injury is discussed in relation to diagnostic and intervention issues.

  12. Outcome after complicated minor head injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Hunink, M.G.; Rijssel, DA van; Dekker, H.M.; Vos, P.E.; Kool, D.R.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Hofman, P.A.; Twijnstra, A.; Tanghe, H.L.; Dippel, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Functional outcome in patients with minor head injury with neurocranial traumatic findings on CT is largely unknown. We hypothesized that certain CT findings may be predictive of poor functional outcome. Materials and METHODS: All patients from the CT in Head Injury Patients

  13. Head motions while riding roller coasters: implications for brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Bryan J; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-12-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three-dimensional head motions were measured during 3 different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared with published data, using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05 m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure of 28.1 and head impact power of 3.41, over 6 times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides.

  14. NEUROENDOCRINE DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING HEAD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the main causes of death and disability in young adults, with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long - term cognitive, behavioural, psychological and social defects. Recently, c linical evidence has demonstrated that TBI may frequently cause hypothalamic – pituitary dysfunction, probably contributing to a delayed or hampered recovery from TBI. CASE REPORT: 32 year s old female presented with a history of fall from two wheeler on back hitting the head on occipital region with no history of vomiting, loss of consciousness, ENT bleed. Her GCS was 15/15. Patient was asymptomatic and was discharged from hospital on fifth day. Seven days after discharge patient again presented with heavine ss in her both breasts associated with pain and whitish discharge from both the nipples and mild fever since last two days. CONCLUSION: TBI is a public health problem that requires more effective strategies to improve the outcome and minimize disability of the affected patients. Changes in pituitary hormone secretion may be observed during the acute phase post - TBI, representing part of the acute adaptive response to the injury. Neuroendocrine disturbances, caused by damage to the pituitary and/or hypothalam us, is a frequent complication of TBI and may occur at any time after the acute event. Pituitary dysfunction presents more frequently as an isolated, and more rarely as a complete, deficiency.

  15. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  16. [Mild head injuries in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Heinrich W; Jung-Schmidsfeld, Jochen; Pienaar, Simon

    2017-07-01

    In the elderly, particularly those over 80 years old, head injuries often occur as a result of falls. The majority suffer from mild head injury. After clarification of the initial symptoms in these patients, the main aim is to recognize or exclude intracranial injuries (bleeding). Demonstration of intracranial bleeding is possible with cranial computed tomography (CCT), which in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quickly carried out in most cases; however, most patients with mild head injury show no intracranial bleeding. The performance of CCT and the often necessary hospital admission place a severe physical and psychological burden on the elderly. The plasma parameter S100B, combined with the clinical findings, is a valuable instrument for decision making in the management of elderly patients with mild head injury.

  17. Analysis of finite element models for head injury investigation: reconstruction of four real-world impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Fildes, Brian; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King; Sparke, Laurie

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that both excessive linear and rotational accelerations are the cause of head injuries. Although the head injury criterion has been beneficial as an indicator of head injury risk, it only considers linear acceleration, so there is a need to consider both types of motion in future safety standards. Advanced models of the head/brain complex have recently been developed to gain a better understanding of head injury biomechanics. While these models have been verified against laboratory experimental data, there is a lack of suitable real-world data available for validation. Hence, using two computer models of the head/brain, the objective of the current study was to reconstruct four real-world crashes with known head injury outcomes in a full-vehicle crash laboratory, simulate head/brain responses using kinematics obtained during these reconstructions, and to compare the results predicted by the models against the actual injuries sustained by the occupant. Cases where the occupant sustained no head injuries (AIS 0) and head injuries of severity AIS 4, AIS 5, and multiple head injuries were selected. Data collected from a 9-accelerometer skull were input into the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) and the NHTSA Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon). The results demonstrated that both models were able to predict varying injury severities consistent with the difference in AIS injury levels in the real-world cases. The WSUHIM predicted a slightly higher injury threshold than the SIMon, probably due to the finer mesh and different software used for the simulations, and could also determine regions of the brain which had been injured. With further validation, finite element models can be used to establish an injury criterion for each type of brain injury in the future.

  18. Rotational Acceleration during Head Impact Resulting from Different Judo Throwing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURAYAMA, Haruo; HITOSUGI, Masahito; MOTOZAWA, Yasuki; OGINO, Masahiro; KOYAMA, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most severe head injuries in judo are reported as acute subdural hematoma. It is thus necessary to examine the rotational acceleration of the head to clarify the mechanism of head injuries. We determined the rotational acceleration of the head when the subject is thrown by judo techniques. One Japanese male judo expert threw an anthropomorphic test device using two throwing techniques, Osoto-gari and Ouchigari. Rotational and translational head accelerations were measured with and without an under-mat. For Osoto-gari, peak resultant rotational acceleration ranged from 4,284.2 rad/s2 to 5,525.9 rad/s2 and peak resultant translational acceleration ranged from 64.3 g to 87.2 g; for Ouchi-gari, the accelerations respectively ranged from 1,708.0 rad/s2 to 2,104.1 rad/s2 and from 120.2 g to 149.4 g. The resultant rotational acceleration did not decrease with installation of an under-mat for both Ouchi-gari and Osoto-gari. We found that head contact with the tatami could result in the peak values of translational and rotational accelerations, respectively. In general, because kinematics of the body strongly affects translational and rotational accelerations of the head, both accelerations should be measured to analyze the underlying mechanism of head injury. As a primary preventative measure, throwing techniques should be restricted to participants demonstrating ability in ukemi techniques to avoid head contact with the tatami. PMID:24477065

  19. Predicting brain acceleration during heading of soccer ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Hasnun Arif Hassan, Mohd; Azri Aris, Mohd; Anuar, Zulfika

    2013-12-01

    There has been a long debate whether purposeful heading could cause harm to the brain. Studies have shown that repetitive heading could lead to degeneration of brain cells, which is similarly found in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. A two-degree of freedom linear mathematical model was developed to study the impact of soccer ball to the brain during ball-to-head impact in soccer. From the model, the acceleration of the brain upon impact can be obtained. The model is a mass-spring-damper system, in which the skull is modelled as a mass and the neck is modelled as a spring-damper system. The brain is a mass with suspension characteristics that are also defined by a spring and a damper. The model was validated by experiment, in which a ball was dropped from different heights onto an instrumented dummy skull. The validation shows that the results obtained from the model are in a good agreement with the brain acceleration measured from the experiment. This findings show that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on what human brain endures during a ball-to-head impact.

  20. Minimizing Head Acceleration in Soccer: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccese, Jaclyn B; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-11-01

    Physicians and healthcare professionals are often asked for recommendations on how to keep athletes safe during contact sports such as soccer. With an increase in concussion awareness and concern about repetitive subconcussion, many parents and athletes are interested in mitigating head acceleration in soccer, so we conducted a literature review on factors that affect head acceleration in soccer. We searched electronic databases and reference lists to find studies using the keywords 'soccer' OR 'football' AND 'head acceleration'. Because of a lack of current research in soccer heading biomechanics, this review was limited to 18 original research studies. Low head-neck segment mass predisposes athletes to high head acceleration, but head-neck-torso alignment during heading and follow-through after contact can be used to decrease head acceleration. Additionally, improvements in symmetric neck flexor and extensor strength and neuromuscular neck stiffness can decrease head acceleration. Head-to-head impacts and unanticipated ball contacts result in the highest head acceleration. Ball contacts at high velocity may also be dangerous. The risk of concussive impacts may be lessened through the use of headgear, but headgear may also cause athletes to play more recklessly because they feel a sense of increased security. Young, but physically capable, athletes should be taught proper heading technique in a controlled setting, using a carefully planned progression of the skill.

  1. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  2. [Head injuries in infants and children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra, Violaine; Duigou, Anne-Laure; Seizeur, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Head injuries in children are frequent reasons for visits to emergency departments. Depending on age, the causes are different: falls for younger infants and accidents for older children. Those treating children, especially in cases of serious injury, must be aware of the specificities of paediatric anatomy and physiology. As with adults, the initial assessment and surveillance help to prevent the condition from worsening.

  3. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  4. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions Using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, V Carol; Crandall, Jeff R; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-08-15

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of 14 existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degrees-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions substantially over predict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  5. Risk factors for head injury events in professional rugby union: a video analysis of 464 head injury events to inform proposed injury prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ross; Raftery, Martin; Kemp, Simon; Brown, James; Fuller, Gordon; Hester, Ben; Cross, Matthew; Quarrie, Ken

    2017-08-01

    The tackle is responsible for the majority of head injuries during rugby union. In order to address head injury risk, risk factors during the tackle must first be identified. This study analysed tackle characteristics in the professional game in order to inform potential interventions. 464 tackles resulting in a head injury assessment (HIA) were analysed in detail, with tackle type, direction, speed, acceleration, nature of head contact and player body position the characteristics of interest. Propensity to cause an HIA was significantly greater for active shoulder tackles, front-on tackles, high speeder tackles and an accelerating tackler. Head contact between a tackler's head and ball carrier's head or shoulder was significantly more likely to cause an HIA than contact below the level of the shoulder (incident rate ratio (IRR) 4.25, 95%-CI 3.38 to 5.35). The tackler experiences the majority (78%) of HIAs when head-to-head contact occurs. An upright tackler was 1.5 times more likely to experience an HIA than a bent at the waist tackler (IRR 1.44, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.76). This study confirms that energy transfer in the tackle is a risk factor for head injury, since direction, type and speed all influence HIA propensity. The study provides evidence that body position and the height of tackles should be a focus for interventions, since lowering height and adopting a bent at the waist body position is associated with reduced risk for both tacklers and ball carriers. To this end, World Rugby has implemented law change based on the present data. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  7. Head injuries: a study evaluating the impact of the NICE head injury guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Z; Smith, M; Littlewood, S; Bouamra, O; Hughes, D; Biggin, C; Amos, K; Mendelow, A; Lecky, F

    2005-01-01

    Background: The NICE head injury guidelines recommend a different approach in the management of head injury patients. It suggests that CT head scan should replace skull x ray (SXR) and observation/admission as the first investigation. We wished to determine the impact of NICE on SXR, CT scan, and admission on all patients with head injury presenting to the ED setting and estimate the cost effectiveness of these guidelines, which has not been quantified to date. Design: Study of head injury patients presenting to two EDs before and after implementation of NICE guidelines Methods: The rate of SXR, CT scan, and admission were determined six months before and one month after NICE implementation in both centres. The before study also looked at predicted rates had NICE been applied. This enabled predicted and actual cost effectiveness to be determined. Result: 1130 patients with head injury were studied in four 1 month periods (two in each centre). At the teaching hospital, the CT head scan rate more than doubled (3% to 7%), the SXR declined (37% to 4%), while the admission rate more than halved (9% to 4%). This represented a saving of £3381 per 100 head injury patients: greater than predicted with no adverse events. At the District General Hospital, the CT head scan rate more than quadrupled (1.4% to 9%), the SXR dropped (19 to 0.57%), while the admission rate declined (7% to 5%). This represented a saving of £290 per 100 head injury patients: less than predicted. Conclusion: The implementation of the NICE guidelines led to a two to fivefold increase in the CT head scan rate depending on the cases and baseline departmental practice. However, the reduction in SXR and admission appears to more than offset these costs without compromising patient outcomes. PMID:16299190

  8. Biomechanics of head injury in olympic taekwondo and boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, G P; O'Sullivan, D; Pieter, W

    2013-12-01

    The purpose was to examine differences between taekwondo kicks and boxing punches in resultant linear head acceleration (RLA), head injury criterion (HIC15), peak head velocity, and peak foot and fist velocities. Data from two existing publications on boxing punches and taekwondo kicks were compared. For taekwondo head impacts a Hybrid II Crash Dummy (Hybrid II) head was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer mounted inside the Hybrid II head. The Hybrid II was fixed to a height-adjustable frame and fitted with a protective taekwondo helmet. For boxing testing, a Hybrid III Crash Dummy head was instrumented with an array of tri-axial accelerometers mounted at the head centre of gravity. Differences in RLA between the roundhouse kick (130.11±51.67 g) and hook punch (71.23±32.19 g, d = 1.39) and in HIC15 (clench axe kick: 162.63±104.10; uppercut: 24.10±12.54, d = 2.29) were observed. Taekwondo kicks demonstrated significantly larger magnitudes than boxing punches for both RLA and HIC.

  9. BIOMECHANICS OF HEAD INJURY IN OLYMPIC TAEKWONDO AND BOXING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, G.P.; Pieter, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose was to examine differences between taekwondo kicks and boxing punches in resultant linear head acceleration (RLA), head injury criterion (HIC15), peak head velocity, and peak foot and fist velocities. Data from two existing publications on boxing punches and taekwondo kicks were compared. Methods For taekwondo head impacts a Hybrid II Crash Dummy (Hybrid II) head was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer mounted inside the Hybrid II head. The Hybrid II was fixed to a height-adjustable frame and fitted with a protective taekwondo helmet. For boxing testing, a Hybrid III Crash Dummy head was instrumented with an array of tri-axial accelerometers mounted at the head centre of gravity. Results Differences in RLA between the roundhouse kick (130.11±51.67 g) and hook punch (71.23±32.19 g, d = 1.39) and in HIC15 (clench axe kick: 162.63±104.10; uppercut: 24.10±12.54, d = 2.29) were observed. Conclusions Taekwondo kicks demonstrated significantly larger magnitudes than boxing punches for both RLA and HIC. PMID:24744497

  10. Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study. METHODS: We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses...

  11. Head injury from a bungee run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj; Convery, Fiona; Watt, Michael; Fulton, Ailsa; McKinstry, Steven; Flannery, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    An adaptation of bungee jumping, 'bungee running', involves participants attempting to run as far as they can whilst connected to an elastic rope which is anchored to a fixed point. Usually considered a safe recreational activity, we report a potentially life-threatening head injury following a bungee running accident.

  12. Head Injury as Risk Factor for Psychiatric Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlovska, Sonja; Pedersen, Michael Skaarup; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies investigating the relationship between head injury and subsequent psychiatric disorders often suffer from methodological weaknesses and show conflicting results. The authors investigated the incidence of severe psychiatric disorders following hospital contact for head injury. M...

  13. Closed head injury--an inflammatory disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Heyde, Christoph E; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stahel, Philip F

    2005-04-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) remains the leading cause of death and persisting neurological impairment in young individuals in industrialized nations. Research efforts in the past years have brought evidence that the intracranial inflammatory response in the injured brain contributes to the neuropathological sequelae which are, in large part, responsible for the adverse outcome after head injury. The presence of hypoxia and hypotension in the early resuscitative period of brain-injured patients further aggravates the inflammatory response in the brain due to ischemia/reperfusion-mediated injuries. The profound endogenous neuroinflammatory response after CHI, which is phylogenetically aimed at defending the intrathecal compartment from invading pathogens and repairing lesioned brain tissue, contributes to the development of cerebral edema, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and ultimately to delayed neuronal cell death. However, aside from these deleterious effects, neuroinflammation has been recently shown to mediate neuroreparative mechanisms after brain injury as well. This "dual effect" of neuroinflammation was the focus of extensive experimental and clinical research in the past years and has lead to an expanded basic knowledge on the cellular and molecular mechanisms which regulate the intracranial inflammatory response after CHI. Thus, head injury has recently evolved as an inflammatory and immunological disease much more than a pure traumatological, neurological, or neurosurgical entity. The present review will summarize the so far known mechanisms of posttraumatic neuroinflammation after CHI, based on data from clinical and experimental studies, with a special focus on the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and the complement system.

  14. Rotational head kinematics in football impacts: an injury risk function for concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Greenwald, Richard M; Crisco, Joseph J; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; McAllister, Thomas W; Maerlender, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has suggested a possible link between sports-related concussions and neurodegenerative processes, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify head impact tolerance. The use of kinematic parameters of the head to predict brain injury has been suggested because they are indicative of the inertial response of the brain. The objective of this study is to characterize the rotational kinematics of the head associated with concussive impacts using a large head acceleration dataset collected from human subjects. The helmets of 335 football players were instrumented with accelerometer arrays that measured head acceleration following head impacts sustained during play, resulting in data for 300,977 sub-concussive and 57 concussive head impacts. The average sub-concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 1230 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 5.5 rad/s, while the average concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 5022 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 22.3 rad/s. An injury risk curve was developed and a nominal injury value of 6383 rad/s(2) associated with 28.3 rad/s represents 50% risk of concussion. These data provide an increased understanding of the biomechanics associated with concussion and they provide critical insight into injury mechanisms, human tolerance to mechanical stimuli, and injury prevention techniques.

  15. Head injuries and bicycle helmet laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D L

    1996-07-01

    The first year of the mandatory bicycle helmet laws in Australia saw increased helmet wearing from 31% to 75% of cyclists in Victoria and from 31% of children and 26% of adults in New South Wales (NSW) to 76% and 85%. However, the two major surveys using matched before and after samples in Melbourne (Finch et al. 1993; Report No. 45, Monash Univ. Accident Research Centre) and throughout NSW (Smith and Milthorpe 1993; Roads and Traffic Authority) observed reductions in numbers of child cyclists 15 and 2.2 times greater than the increase in numbers of children wearing helmets. This suggests the greatest effect of the helmet law was not to encourage cyclists to wear helmets, but to discourage cycling. In contrast, despite increases to at least 75% helmet wearing, the proportion of head injuries in cyclists admitted or treated at hospital declined by an average of only 13%. The percentage of cyclists with head injuries after collisions with motor vehicles in Victoria declined by more, but the proportion of head injured pedestrians also declined; the two followed a very similar trend. These trends may have been caused by major road safety initiatives introduced at the same time as the helmet law and directed at both speeding and drink-driving. The initiatives seem to have been remarkably effective in reducing road trauma for all road users, perhaps affecting the proportions of victims suffering head injuries as well as total injuries. The benefits of cycling, even without a helmet, have been estimated to outweigh the hazards by a factor of 20 to 1 (Hillman 1993. Cycle helmets-the case for and against. Policy Studies Institute, London). Consequently, a helmet law, whose most notable effect was to reduce cycling, may have generated a net loss of health benefits to the nation. Despite the risk of dying from head injury per hour being similar for unhelmeted cyclists and motor vehicle occupants, cyclists alone have been required to wear head protection. Helmets for motor

  16. Catastrophic Head Injuries in High School and Collegiate Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Frederick O.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the incidence of catastrophic head injuries within high school and college sports. Data from a national surveillance system indicated that a football-related fatality occurred every year except one from 1945-99, mainly related to head injuries. From 1984-99, 69 football head-related injuries resulted in permanent disability. Deaths and…

  17. The rate of change of acceleration: implications to head kinematics during rear-end impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Loriann M; Dickey, James P

    2008-05-01

    Whiplash is a mechanism of injury commonly associated with rear-impact vehicle collisions. To date, research has focused primarily on changes in velocity and acceleration as key factors for determining injuries due to whiplash mechanisms, but other characteristics of the acceleration pulse may be important. This study assessed whether the head acceleration response to whiplash-like perturbation profiles were affected by a change in the rate of the applied acceleration, or jerk. Twenty-one subjects were exposed to different low-velocity rear-impact whiplash-like perturbations using a precisely controlled robotic platform. The perturbations were divided into two groupings of peak acceleration (approximately 10 (high) and 5.7 (low) m/s2) and three groupings of jerk (approximately 260, 310, and 360 m/s3). These six profiles were repeated twice. Results demonstrated that the jerk magnitude significantly affected forehead acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. Increasing the magnitude of the platform acceleration also differentially affected the horizontal and vertical forehead accelerations. This indicates that the level of jerk influences the resulting head kinematics and should be considered when designing or interpreting experiments that are attempting to predict injury from whiplash-like perturbations.

  18. Regressive language in severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, I V; Skinhoj, E

    1976-09-01

    In a follow-up study of 50 patients with severe head injuries three patients had echolalia. One patient with initially global aphasia had echolalia for some weeks when he started talking. Another patient with severe diffuse brain damage, dementia, and emotional regression had echolalia. The dysfunction was considered a detour performance. In the third patient echolalia and palilalia were details in a total pattern of regression lasting for months. The patient, who had extensive frontal atrophy secondary to a very severe head trauma, presented an extreme state of regression returning to a foetal-body pattern and behaving like a baby.

  19. CT analysis of missile head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besenski, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Jadro-Santel, D. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Jelavic-Koic, F. [Dept. of Radiology, General Hospital Sveti Duh, Zagreb (Croatia); Pavic, D. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Mikulic, D. [Zagreb School of Medicine (Croatia); Glavina, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Clinical Hospital, Osijek (Croatia); Maskovic, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Clinical Hospital, Split (Croatia)

    1995-04-01

    Between August 1991 and December 1992, CT was performed in 154 patients who had suffered missile head injury during the war in the Republic of Croatia. In 54% CT was performed 1-24 h after injury, and in 27% follow-up CT was also obtained. The wounds were penetrating, tangential or perforating (45%, 34% and 21%, respectively). Haemorrhage was the most frequent lesion in the brain (84%). Follow-up CT evolution of haemorrhage, oedema, cerebritis, abscess, secondary vascular lesions, necrosis, encephalomalacia and hydrocephalus. The most dynamic changes occurred 7-14 days after injury. In 14% of cases, deep cerebral lesions were found in the corpus callosum, septum pellucidum periventricular region and pons, although bone and shell fragments were in a different part of the brain parenchyma. Such lesions were found in penetrating injuries only. CT proved very useful for assessing the extent and type of lesions. Although different mechanisms of brain damage in missile head injury are known, here they are, to the best of our knowledge, shown for the first time by CT. (orig.)

  20. Delayed epidural hematoma after mild head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traumatic delayed epidural hematoma (DEH can be defined as insignificant or not seen on the initial CT scan performed after a trauma but seen on the subsequent CT scan as a “massive” epidural bleeding. Case report. We presented two cases of traumatic DEH after mild head injury. Both patients were conscious and without neurological deficit on the admission. Initial CT scan did not reveal intracranial hematoma. Repeated CT scan, that was performed after neurological deterioration, revealed epidural hematoma in both cases. The patients were operated with a favorable surgical outcome. Conclusion. Traumatic DEH could occur in the patients with head injuries who were conscious on the admission with a normal initial CT scan finding. Early detection of DEH and an urgent surgical evacuation were essential for a good outcome.

  1. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns.

  2. Survival of social relationships following head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, G; Ford, B; Moran, C

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective search through the medical records at a rehabilitation hospital in Melbourne, Australia, identified 38 subjects (within the age range 19-34 years) suffering the effect of a severe closed-head injury 2-10 years post-trauma. In regard to social relationships, availability of post-trauma close attachment figures and looser social networks were markedly reduced for the head-injured group in relation to a matched community control group. However, they did not generally perceive these social relationships as inadequate when compared to a normal control sample. Moreover, within the head-injured group the perception of inadequate social relationships was not significantly associated with minor psychiatric disturbance. The implications of these results in terms of the social bond theory of depression are discussed, and issues in long-term social support of this population are raised.

  3. Remediation of attention deficits in head injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nag S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Head injury is associated with psychological sequelae which impair the patient′s psychosocial functioning. Information processing, attention and memory deficits are seen in head injuries of all severity. We attempted to improve deficits of focused, sustained and divided attention. The principle of overlapping sources of attention resource pools was utilised in devising the remediation programme. Tasks used simple inexpensive materials. Four head injured young adult males with post concussion syndrome underwent the retraining program for one month. The patients had deficits of focused, sustained and divided attention parallel processing, serial processing, visual scanning, verbal learning and memory and working memory. After the retraining programme the deficits of attention improved in the four patients. Serial processing improved in two patients. Parallel processing and neuropsychological deficits did not improve in any patient. The symptom intensity reduced markedly and behavioural functioning improved in three of the four patients. The results supported an association between improving attention and reduction of symptom intensity. Attention remediation shows promise as a cost effective, time efficient and simple technique to improve the psychological and psychosocial functioning of the head injured patient.

  4. Delayed coma in head injury : Consider cerebral fat embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Rodriger, Lars A.; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    Objective: To describe a case of a young man with delayed coma after mild head injury, suggestive of cerebral fat embolism (CFE). To underline the value of MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of secondary deterioration in mild head injury. Case report: A 21-year-old man admitted with mild head

  5. Moderate head injury: completing the clinical spectrum of brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimel, R W; Giordani, B; Barth, J T; Jane, J A

    1982-09-01

    We have divided head injury into three categories based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (severe, 3-8; moderate, 9-12; and minor, 13-15). In a previous report, we described significant disability after minor head injury. The present report describes 199 patients with moderate head injury, 159 of whom underwent follow-up examinations at 3 months. In contrast to patients with minor head injury, half as many were students (17%) and twice as many were intoxicated (53%). Seventy-five patients were studied with computed tomographic (CT) scanning; 30% of the scans were negative and 31% showed a space-occupying mass. As reported by Gennarelli et al. in patients with severe head injuries, those with moderate head injury and subdural hematoma had a very poor outcome: 65% died or were severely disabled and none made a good recovery as measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale. At 3 months, 38% of the moderate head injury patients had made a good recovery compared with 75% of the minor head injury patients. Within the good recovery category, however, there was much disability (headache, 93%; memory difficulties, 90%; difficulties with activities of daily living, 87%), and only 7% of the patients were asymptomatic. The Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery in an unselected subset (n = 32) showed significant deficits on all test measures. Sixty-six per cent of the patients previously employed had not returned to work, compared to 33% of the minor head injury patients. The major predictors of unemployment after minor head injury were premorbid characteristics (age, education, and socio-economic status). In contrast, all predictors in moderate head injury were measures of the severity of injury (length of coma, CT diagnosis, GCS on discharge). We conclude that: (a) moderate head injury, not described previously in the literature, results in mortality and substantial morbidity intermediate between those of severe and minor head injury; (b) unlike minor head injury, the principal

  6. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy C Ganz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined

  7. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2011-07-01

    A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined.

  8. Acute diabetes insipidus in severe head injury: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjizacharia, Pantelis; Beale, Elizabeth O; Inaba, Kenji; Chan, Linda S; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2008-10-01

    The incidence and risk factors for acute diabetes insipidus after severe head injury and the effect of this complication on outcomes have not been evaluated in any large prospective studies. We conducted a prospective study of all patients admitted to the surgical ICU of a Level I trauma center with severe head injury (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] >or= 3). The following potential risk factors with p risk factors for diabetes insipidus and its association with mortality: age, mechanism of injury (blunt or penetrating), blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, head and other body area AIS, skull fracture, cerebral edema and shift, intracranial hemorrhage, and pneumocephaly. There were 436 patients (blunt injuries, 392; penetrating injuries, 44); 387 patients had isolated head injury. Diabetes insipidus occurred in 15.4% of all patients (blunt, 12.5%; penetrating, 40.9%; p diabetes insipidus. Independent risk factors for diabetes insipidus in isolated head injury were Glasgow Coma Scale3. Diabetes insipidus was an independent risk factor for death (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; 95% CI [1.65, 9.72]; adjusted p value = 0.002). The incidence of acute diabetes insipidus in severe head injury is high, especially in penetrating injuries. Independent risk factors for diabetes insipidus include a Glasgow Coma Scale3. Acute diabetes insipidus was associated with significantly increased mortality.

  9. Validation of a noninvasive system for measuring head acceleration for use during boxing competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Greenwald, Richard M

    2007-08-01

    Although the epidemiology and mechanics of concussion in sports have been investigated for many years, the biomechanical factors that contribute to mild traumatic brain injury remain unclear because of the difficulties in measuring impact events in the field. The purpose of this study was to validate an instrumented boxing headgear (IBH) that can be used to measure impact severity and location during play. The instrumented boxing headgear data were processed to determine linear and rotational acceleration at the head center of gravity, impact location, and impact severity metrics, such as the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) and Gadd Severity Index (GSI). The instrumented boxing headgear was fitted to a Hybrid III (HIII) head form and impacted with a weighted pendulum to characterize accuracy and repeatability. Fifty-six impacts over 3 speeds and 5 locations were used to simulate blows most commonly observed in boxing. A high correlation between the HIII and instrumented boxing headgear was established for peak linear and rotational acceleration (r2= 0.91), HIC (r2 = 0.88), and GSI (r2 = 0.89). Mean location error was 9.7 +/- 5.2 masculine. Based on this study, the IBH is a valid system for measuring head acceleration and impact location that can be integrated into training and competition.

  10. Epidemiology and management of paediatric head injury in eastern Nepal

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    Agrawal A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In children, majority of the head injuries are minor and management of critically ill children depend on a team approach using well-rehearsed, systematic management protocols that can be implemented within hours after injury. This study was carried out to ascertain the epidemiology and management of know the demographic profile and etiology of paediatric head injury in our setting, to know the clinical and radiological characteristics of head injury patients and to know the treatment options and outcome in paediatric head injuries. Patients and Methods: Details of all children (age < 16 years with head injury seen in 1 year from 01.04.2005 to 31.03.2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic profile, clinical details, investigations, treatment offered, and outcome were noted in a proforma. All data were analyzed by appropriate SPSS 11.0 statistical software tools. Results: There were total 43 patients. Young male children were more commonly affected in present series with a mean age of 7.67 years (median - 5.010 years, range 6 months-16 year. Fall (65.11% was the most common mode of injury followed by road traffic accidents (RTAs (25.6%. Mild head injuries (65.11% were most common. Most common complaint was loss of consciousness and all the patients with severe head injury presented loss of consciousness. All patients with mild head showed good recovery; with moderate head injury, nine patients showed good recovery and three patients recovered with moderate disability. Patients with severe head injury (three patients had 100% mortality. Conclusions: In urban areas of Nepal, RTAs like vehicular crashes, motor cycle accidents, and pedestrian hit by moving vehicle are more common and in rural areas fall from height are commoner. We need to develop child safety legislations and risk-specific intervention programs in Nepal.

  11. Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Penetrating Head Injury: A Preliminary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carl; Le, Karen; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Hamilton, Mark; Tyler, Elizabeth; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse analyses have demonstrated utility for delineating subtle communication deficits following closed head injuries (CHIs). The present investigation examined the discourse performance of a large group of individuals with penetrating head injury (PHI). Performance was also compared across 6 subgroups of PHI based on lesion locale. A…

  12. Imaging in Minor Head Injury: Early complications and late consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Smits (Marion)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHead injury is traditionally divided into minor, moderate or severe head injury, depending on the patient’s presenting level of consciousness as expressed in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Th e vast majority of patients (>90%) present with a normal or nearnormal level of consciousne

  13. Learning people's names following severe closed-head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milders, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    Although problems remembering people's names rank highly among the subjective complaints of patients with closed-head injuries, very few studies have examined their memory for people's names by objective measurements. An experiment is reported in which patients with severe closed-head injuries and n

  14. Automatic annotation of head velocity and acceleration in Anvil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart

    2012-01-01

    We describe an automatic face tracker plugin for the ANVIL annotation tool. The face tracker produces data for velocity and for acceleration in two dimensions. We compare the annotations generated by the face tracking algorithm with independently made manual annotations for head movements...

  15. Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R W G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J K; Finnie, J W; Turner, R J; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Vink, R

    2014-08-22

    This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Animals experienced 10 episodes of shaking over 30 min, and then remained under anesthesia for 6h until killed by perfusion fixation of the brain. Each shaking episode lasted for 20s resulting in about 40 cycles per episode. Each cycle typically consisted of three impulsive events that corresponded to specific phases of the head's motion; the most substantial of these were interactions typically with the lamb's own torso, and these generated accelerations of 30-70 g. Impulsive loading was not considered severe. Other kinematic parameters recorded included estimates of head power transfer, head-torso flexion, and rate of flexion. Several styles of shaking were also identified across episodes and subjects. Axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction and to a much greater magnitude in lower body weight lambs that died. This is the first biomechanical description of a large animal model of NAHI in which repetitive naturalistic insults were applied, and that reproduced a spectrum of injury associated with NAHI.

  16. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  17. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pfister, Bryan J.; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI betw...

  18. Acute arterial infarcts in patients with severe head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the incidence, demographic profile, and outcome of patients with severe closed head injuries who develop acute arterial infarcts. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe head injury (Glasgow coma score (GCS ≤8 presenting within 8 h of injury in the Department of Neurosurgery over a period of 5 months were enrolled in the study. Patients with penetrating head injury, infarct due to herniation and iatrogenic arterial injuries were excluded from the study. Only arterial infarcts developing within 8 h of injury were included in the study. A computed tomography (CT head was done on all patients within 8 h of injury and repeated if necessary. Arterial infarct was defined as well-demarcated wedge-shaped hypodensity corresponding to an arterial territory on plain CT of the head. Outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome score (GOS at 1 month post-injury or at death (whichever came earlier. Results: Forty-four patients of severe head injury were included in the study during the above period. Of these, four patients (9.1% had arterial infarcts on the initial CT scan. The male:female ratio was 1:3. The mean age was 54 years (range 3-85 years. Two patients had infarcts in the middle cerebral artery distribution and two in the superior cerebellar artery distribution. Poor outcome (GOS 1-3 was seen in 100% of the patients with arterial infarct compared to 52.5% (n=21 in patients with severe head injury without arterial infarct. Conclusions: A significant percentage of patients with severe head injury have arterial infarcts on admission, which may imply arterial injury. Our study shows that these patients have a poorer prognosis vis-a-vis patient without these findings.

  19. When to suspect head injury or cervical spine injury in maxillofacial trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sajjad A; Chandrasala, Soumithran

    2014-05-01

    The global status report of the World Health Organization (WHO) on road safety suggested that India is leading in road traffic accidents in the world. According to the report on road accidents in India in 2010 by the Transport Research Wing, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, New Delhi, Kerala ranked third in accidents per lakh population and second in persons injured per lakh population. As the face, brain, and cervical spine are in close proximity with one another, associated injuries can be suspected. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the severity of head, cervical spine, and facial injury and incidence of facial injury in patients with head and/or cervical spine injury. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a period of one year. The study population included all patients having computed tomography (CT)-demonstrable head injury, radiographic evidence of cervical spine injury, and associated head or cervical spine injury with facial injury. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test using statistical package SPSS. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of 124 patients, 59 (47.6%) had facial injuries. As severity of head injury increased, the number of facial injuries decreased. Statistically, no significant association between facial and head injury was seen. A statistically significant association between dentoalveolar involvement and cervical spine injury was seen (P < 0.001). The proportion of injuries in patients with cervical spine injuries alone was significantly lower in the frontal (P = 0.001) and orbital (P = 0.004) regions and higher in the mandibular region (P = 0.010). Midface injuries were more commonly associated with head injuries. Decreased facial involvement leads to increased severity of head injury. Simple injuries of the cervical spine were more commonly associated with facial injuries.

  20. When to suspect head injury or cervical spine injury in maxillofacial trauma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad A Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global status report of the World Health Organization (WHO on road safety suggested that India is leading in road traffic accidents in the world. According to the report on road accidents in India in 2010 by the Transport Research Wing, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, New Delhi, Kerala ranked third in accidents per lakh population and second in persons injured per lakh population. As the face, brain, and cervical spine are in close proximity with one another, associated injuries can be suspected. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the severity of head, cervical spine, and facial injury and incidence of facial injury in patients with head and/or cervical spine injury. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted over a period of one year. The study population included all patients having computed tomography (CT-demonstrable head injury, radiographic evidence of cervical spine injury, and associated head or cervical spine injury with facial injury. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test using statistical package SPSS. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of 124 patients, 59 (47.6% had facial injuries. As severity of head injury increased, the number of facial injuries decreased. Statistically, no significant association between facial and head injury was seen. A statistically significant association between dentoalveolar involvement and cervical spine injury was seen (P < 0.001. The proportion of injuries in patients with cervical spine injuries alone was significantly lower in the frontal (P = 0.001 and orbital (P = 0.004 regions and higher in the mandibular region (P = 0.010. Conclusion: Midface injuries were more commonly associated with head injuries. Decreased facial involvement leads to increased severity of head injury. Simple injuries of the cervical spine were more commonly associated with facial injuries.

  1. Mortality resulting from head injury in professional boxing: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Newman, C Benjamin; Volk, Hunter; Svinth, Joseph R; Conklin, Jordan; Levy, Michael L

    2010-08-01

    The majority of boxing-related fatalities result from traumatic brain injury. Biomechanical forces in boxing result in rotational acceleration with resultant subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury. Given the inherent risk and the ongoing criticism boxing has received, we evaluated mortalities associated with professional boxing. We used the Velazquez Fatality Collection of boxing injuries and supplementary sources to analyze mortality from 1950 to 2007. Variables evaluated included age at time of death, association with knockout or other outcome of match, rounds fought, weight class, location of fight, and location of preterminal event. There were 339 mortalities between 1950 and 2007 (mean age, 24 +/- 3.8 years); 64% were associated with knockout and 15% with technical knockout. A higher percentage occurred in the lower weight classes. The preterminal event occurred in the ring (61%), in the locker room (17%), and outside the arena (22%). We evaluated for significant changes after 1983 when championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds. There was a significant decline in mortality after 1983. We found no significant variables to support that this decline is related to a reduction in rounds. Rather, we hypothesize the decline to be the result of a reduction in exposure to repetitive head trauma (shorter careers and fewer fights), along with increased medical oversight and stricter safety regulations. Increased efforts should be made to improve medical supervision of boxers. Mandatory central nervous system imaging after a knockout could lead to a significant reduction in associated mortality.

  2. Mortality resulting from head injury in professional boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Newman, C Benjamin; Volk, Hunter; Svinth, Joseph R; Conklin, Jordan; Levy, Michael L

    2010-11-01

    The majority of boxing-related fatalities result from traumatic brain injury. Biomechanical forces in boxing result in rotational acceleration with resultant subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury. Given the inherent risk and the ongoing criticism boxing has received, we evaluated mortalities associated with professional boxing. We used the Velaquez Fatality Collection of boxing injuries and supplementary sources to analyze mortality from 1950 to 2007. Variables evaluated included age at time of death, association with knockout or other outcome of match, rounds fought, weight class, location of fight, and location of pretermial event. There were 339 mortalities between 1950 and 2007 (mean age, 24 ± 3.8 years); 64% were associated with knockout and 15% with technical knockout. A higher percentage occurred in the lower weight classes. The preterminal event occurred in the ring (61%), in the locker room (17%), and outside the arena (22%), We evaluated for significant changes after 1983 when championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds. There was a significant decline in mortality after 1983. We found no significant variables to support that this decline is related to a reduction in rounds. Rather, we hypothesize the decline to be the result of a reduction in exposure to repetitive head trauma (shorter careers and fewer fights), along with increased medical oversight and stricter safety regulations. Increased efforts should be made to improve medical supervisions of boxers. Mandatory central nervous system imaging after a knockout could lead to a significant reduction in associated mortality.

  3. Effects of Olympic-style taekwondo kicks on an instrumented head-form and resultant injury measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Gabriel P; O'Sullivan, David M; Pieter, Willy; Cook, David P; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of taekwondo kicks and peak foot velocity (FVEL) on resultant head linear acceleration (RLA), head injury criterion (HIC15) and head velocity (HVEL). Each subject (n=12) randomly performed five repetitions of the turning kick (TK), clench axe kick (CA), front leg axe kick, jump back kick (JB) and jump spinning hook kick (JH) at the average standing head height for competitors in their weight division. A Hybrid II Crash Test Dummy head was fitted with a protective taekwondo helmet and instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer and fixed to a height-adjustable frame. Resultant head linear acceleration, HVEL, FVEL data were captured and processed using Qualysis Track Manager. The TK (130.11 ± 51.67 g) produced a higher RLA than the CA (54.95 ± 20.08 g, ptaekwondo. Future studies should aim to understand rotational accelerations of the head.

  4. Head and neck injuries in young taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieter, W; Zemper, E D

    1999-06-01

    To investigate the location, type, situation and mechanism of head and neck injuries in young taekwondo athletes. Prospective. National and international taekwondo tournaments. 3,341 boys and 917 girls, aged 6 to 16 years. Injury rates per 1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E) for total number of head and neck injuries, location, type, situation, and mechanism of injury. There was a significant difference between young male and female taekwondo athletes in total head and neck injury rate (p injury type for both boys (8.41/1,000 A-E) and girls (7.80/1,000 A-E). The cerebral concussion ranked second in both boys (5.11/1,000 A-E) and girls (4.55/1,000 A-E). The unblocked attack was the major injury situation for both boys (19.78/1,000 A-E) and girls (14.96/1,000 A-E). As a consequence, the major injury mechanism was receiving a blow (20.93/1,000 A-E and 16.25/1,000 A-E for boys and girls, respectively). Only the boys (0.66/1,000 A-E) incurred the most serious head and neck injuries that resulted in > or = 21 days away from participation. The national and international taekwondo governing bodies should review their current injury prevention measures. Given the potentially debilitating nature of these injuries, implications for any diagnostic capabilities on site should be carefully reviewed.

  5. Head Injury- A Maxillofacial Surgeon’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choonthar, Muralee Mohan; Raghothaman, Ananthan; Prasad, Rajendra; Pandya, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    Injuries and violence are one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. A substantial portion of these injuries involve the maxillofacial region. Among the concomitant injuries, injuries to the head and cervical spine are amongst those that demand due consideration on account of their life threatening behaviour. Studies have shown that facial fractures have a strong association with traumatic brain injury. Knowledge of the types and mechanisms of traumatic brain injury is crucial for their treatment. Many a times, facial fractures tend to distract our attention from more severe and often life threatening injuries. Early diagnosis of these intracranial haemorrhage leads to prompt treatment which is essential to improve the outcome of these patients. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon should be able to suspect and diagnose head injury and also provide adequate initial management. PMID:26894193

  6. An unusual case of penetrating head injury in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Tanweer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating head injuries can be the result of numerous intentional or unintentional events, including missile wounds, stab wounds, and motor vehicle or occupational accidents (nails, screw-drivers. Penetrating head injuries in children constitute only a small part of the total number of traumatic head injuries seen in casualty. We report a case of neuro-trauma who was operated in our institution. Patient, 4 years male presented in casualty on 15/01/09 with a iron rod penetrating into the skull.

  7. Development of a symptom expectation questionnaire for minor head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert FERRARI; Deon LOUW

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective: Expectations and beliefs are important predictors of outcome following minor head injury. In this paper, the primary purpose is to develop a simple symptom expectation questionnaire for minor head injury for use in future research studies. Methods: An existing database of 179 injury-naive subjects who completed a 56-item checklist of expected symptoms for minor head injury was analyzed to determine which items could correctly identify an a priori case definition of an expecter (a subject who expected at least one of these symptoms would remain chronic following minor head injury). A total of six of the 56 items were found to be discriminatory, and these were tested in additional subject groups against the original questionnaire. Results: From the original database of 179 subjects completing a 56-item symptom expectation checklist, 135 expected that at least one of the 56 symptoms would be chronic following minor head injury. The 135 expecters, however, all chose at least one of six items: headache, anxious or worried, depressed, difficulty concentrating, dizziness, and neck pain. Using these six items, in two new groups of subjects, all those who endorsed one of the 56 symptoms as likely to be chronic following minor head injury (expecters) could also be identified on the 6-item checklist. Conclusions: A shortened (6-item) symptom expectation checklist of commonly reported symptoms following minor head injury (headache, anxious or worried, depressed, difficulty concentrating, dizziness, and neck pain) correctly identifies subjects who expect that at least one symptom will be chronic following minor head injury (i.e., an expecter).

  8. PEDIATRIC HEAD INJURIES, MECHANISM TO MANAGEMENT: EXPERIENCE OF A SINGLE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Head injury is very common in modern life. Patients of any age group may have head injury however mechanism of head injury, pathophysiology and outcome of head injury is quite different in adults as compared to children. Road traffic accident is a common mode of head injury in adults while fall from height and household abuse is common mode in children. In Western countries, there is a separate registry system for pediatric head injury but there is no such system exist in india. Our present study is focused on pediatric head injury and evaluation of factors that affect the final outcome in pediatric patients.

  9. On Impact: A Case of a Student with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Valerie A.; Chesire, David J.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of a student with head injuries. While the symptom presentation for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be vastly different, this case represents common symptoms seen in students who are recovering from a concussion. The authors suggest that school psychologists query the teacher and parents about their…

  10. On Impact: A Case of a Student with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Valerie A.; Chesire, David J.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of a student with head injuries. While the symptom presentation for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be vastly different, this case represents common symptoms seen in students who are recovering from a concussion. The authors suggest that school psychologists query the teacher and parents about their…

  11. Head Injury, from Men to Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. van den Brink (Willem Aart)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn well developed countries, injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults. In less developed countries the incidence of injury is high and rapidly increasing, but the relative mortality due to injuries is overshadowed by other causes, such as infections and maln

  12. Head impact accelerations for brain strain-related responses in contact sports: a model-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songbai; Zhao, Wei; Li, Zhigang; McAllister, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Both linear [Formula: see text] and rotational [Formula: see text] accelerations contribute to head impacts on the field in contact sports; however, they are often isolated in injury studies. It is critical to evaluate the feasibility of estimating brain responses using isolated instead of full degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) accelerations. In this study, we investigated the sensitivities of regional brain strain-related responses to resultant [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as well as the relative contributions of these acceleration components to the responses via random sampling and linear regression using parameterized, triangulated head impacts with kinematic variable values based on on-field measurements. Two independently established and validated finite element models of the human head were employed to evaluate model-consistency and dependency in results: the Dartmouth Head Injury Model and Simulated Injury Monitor. For the majority of the brain, volume-weighted regional peak strain, strain rate, and von Mises stress accumulated from the simulation significantly correlated with the product of the magnitude and duration of [Formula: see text], or effectively, the rotational velocity, but not to [Formula: see text]. Responses from [Formula: see text]-only were comparable to the full-DOF counterparts especially when normalized by injury-causing thresholds (e.g., volume fractions of large differences virtually diminished (i.e., [Formula: see text]1 %) at typical difference percentage levels of 1-4 % on average). These model-consistent results support the inclusion of both rotational acceleration magnitude and duration into kinematics-based injury metrics and demonstrate the feasibility of estimating strain-related responses from isolated [Formula: see text] for analyses of strain-induced injury relevant to contact sports without significant loss of accuracy, especially for the cerebrum.

  13. Subclinical status epilepticus in a child after closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beni, L; Constantini, S; Matoth, I; Pomeranz, S

    1996-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl with closed head injury and a normal computerized tomographic scan underwent an electroencephalographic tracing that surprisingly revealed typical status epilepticus electrical activity. No episodes of motor clinical convulsions were observed from the moment of trauma throughout the admission period. Treatment with phenytoin caused a dramatic clinical improvement. Repeated electroencephalogram (EEG) 4 days later was within normal limits. Posttraumatic seizures are reported after head injury, yet, the issue of "invisible" or "subclinical" seizures associated with trauma is not discussed. In these cases EEG, (an uncommon examination in the early period after head injury) may be the only tool for proper diagnosis and treatment with anticonvulsants. This case report raises the question of the role of EEG in the unconscious patients who does not present with obvious convulsions. Clinical indications for performing EEG after head trauma without seizures are discussed.

  14. Epidemiologic features of head injury in a predominantly rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, J; Levine, J I; Jane, J A; Rimel, R W

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of occurrence of head trauma were studied in north central Virginia. In 1978, 735 cases of head trauma were identified with documented head injuries occurring within the defined service area, and with a minimum overnight hospital stay. Overall occurrence was 208/100,000 population. The highest occurrence was found in the 15-19 age group (407/100,000). Nonwhites showed higher rates than whites. Motor vehicle crashes were the most frequent mechanism of injury (55% of patients) followed by falls (20%), and interpersonal violence (11%). Short-term time trends reveal unique daily, weekly, and seasonal patterns for motor vehicle crashes, falls, and interpersonal violence. Selected prevention strategies are discussed. The use of passive restraints in motor vehicles is recommended as one important means of reducing the occurrence and severity of head injuries.

  15. Evaluation of military helmets and roof padding on head injury potential from vertical impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Laing, Sheridan

    2016-10-02

    Soldiers in military vehicles subjected to underbelly blasts can sustain traumatic head and neck injuries due to a head impact with the roof. The severity of head and neck trauma can be influenced by the amount of head clearance available to the occupant as well as factors such as wearing a military helmet or the presence of padding on the interior roof. The aim of the current study was to examine the interaction between a Hybrid III headform, the helmet system, and the interior roof of the vehicle under vertical loading. Using a head impact machine and a Hybrid III headform, tests were conducted on a rigid steel plate in a number of different configurations and velocities to assess helmet shell and padding performance, to evaluate different vehicle roof padding materials, and to determine the relative injury mitigating contributions of both the helmet and the roof padding. The resultant translational head acceleration was measured and the head injury criterion (HIC) was calculated for each impact. For impacts with a helmeted headform hitting the steel plate only, which represented a common scenario in an underbelly blast event, velocities of ≤6 m/s resulted in HIC values below the FMVSS 201U threshold of 1,000, and a velocity of 7 m/s resulted in HIC values well over the threshold. Roof padding was found to reduce the peak translational head acceleration and the HIC, with rigid IMPAXX foams performing better than semirigid ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam. However, the head injury potential was reduced considerably more by wearing a helmet than by the addition of roof padding. The results of this study provide initial quantitative findings that provide a better understanding of helmet-roof interactions in vertical impacts and the contributions of the military helmet and roof padding to mitigating head injury potential. Findings from this study will be used to inform further testing with the future aim of developing a new minimum head clearance standard for

  16. [Head injuries in Duckburg in 1959 and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Agnete M; Rasmussen, Mads; Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Juul, Niels

    2016-12-12

    Comic books have been a part of popular culture through generations. Debates concerning their graphic depictions of violence have been ongoing for nearly as long. Our aim was to examine if the violence in "Donald Duck & Co." (a weekly published Danish comic book), illustrated through the number of head injuries, increased in the period from 1959 to 2009. The comic book vintages from the years 1959 and 2009 were read, and the number of head injuries noted. The head injuries were characterized by severity, in part by a modified Glasgow Coma Scale and in part by a newly developed Comic Book Coma Scale. The number of head injuries were equal in the examined years, however, the number of head injuries per page decreased from 1/10 pages to 1/20 pages. Donald Duck sustained a better part of the injuries increasing from 17% in 1959 to 33% in 2009. The study indicates that we, with peace of mind, can read a comic book while the rest of the family takes care of the dishes at Christmas.

  17. Risk of Parkinson's disease after hospital contact for head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Ritz, Beate; Korbo, Lise;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a hospital contact for a head injury increases the risk of subsequently developing Parkinson's disease. DESIGN: Population based case-control study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 13 695 patients with a primary diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in the Danish national...... of history of head injury. RESULTS: An overall 50% increase in prevalence of hospital contacts for head injury was seen before the first registration of Parkinson's disease in this population (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 1.7). The observed association was, however, due almost entirely...... to injuries that occurred during the three months before the first record of Parkinson's disease (odds ratio 8.0, 5.6 to 11.6), and no association was found between the two events when they occurred 10 or more years apart (1.1, 0.9 to 1.3). CONCLUSIONS: The steeply increased frequency of hospital contacts...

  18. Indications for CT scanning in minor head injuries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyluk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    To determine indications for performing head CT following minor head injuries, which allow reducing number of imaging. Based on 15 articles dedicated to this topic, the clinical decision rules were systematically analysed. The Canadian Computed Tomography Head Rule was found to be the most reliable instrument meeting these criteria, characterised by excellent sensitivity of 100% and fairly good specificity of 48-77%. Remaining scales, although very sensitive, showed poor ability to reduce number of "unnecessary" CT scans. Features most predictive for intracranial injuries included: disorientation, abnormal alertness, somnolentia and neurological deficits. Patients with no loss of consciousness and in normal physical condition need only clinical assessment. Indications to head CT scanning are determined by decision rules presented in the article. Use of clinical decision rules may have effect on reducing number of head CT scanning performed "just in a case". Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Patients' views on outcome following head injury: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayle Wendy

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head injuries are a common occurrence, with continuing care in the years following injury being provided by primary care teams and a variety of speciality services. The literature on outcome currently reflects areas considered important by health-care professionals, though these may differ in some respects from the views of head injured individuals themselves. Our study aimed to identify aspects of outcome considered important by survivors of traumatic head injury. Methods Thirty-two individuals were interviewed, each of whom had suffered head injury between one and ten years previously from which they still had residual difficulties. Purposive sampling was used in order to ensure that views were represented from individuals of differing age, gender and level of disability. These interviews were fully transcribed and analysed qualitatively by a psychologist, a sociologist and a psychiatrist with regular meetings to discuss the coding. Results Aspects of outcome mentioned by head injury survivors which have received less attention previously included: specific difficulties with group conversations; changes in physical appearance due to scarring or weight change; a sense of loss for the life and sense of self that they had before the injury; and negative reactions of others, often due to lack of understanding of the consequences of injury amongst both family and general public. Conclusion Some aspects of outcome viewed as important by survivors of head injury may be overlooked by health professionals. Consideration of these areas of outcome and the development of suitable interventions should help to improve functional outcome for patients.

  20. Unusual head and neck injury in elevator: autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, B; Türkmen, N; Dokgöz, H

    2012-10-01

    Industrial injuries related to auto-load-carrying vehicles were not frequently reported in the literature. Presented case was, 31-year-old male furniture worker. Deceased was found in awkward position in furniture workshop. Victim was observed on his knees in front of the elevator, head and neck lodged within openings of the elevator, and head and neck structures compressed-guillotined by the lower platform of the elevator were detected. We presented rare case of head and neck compression by elevator. Key words: head - neck - accidents - elevator - autopsy.

  1. Clinical predictors of abnormal head computed tomography scan in patients who are conscious after head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Prathyusha, Vasuki; Shukla, Dhaval P.; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Indication of a head computed tomography (CT) scan in a patient who remains conscious after head injury is controversial. We aimed to determine the clinical features that are most likely to be associated with abnormal CT scan in patients with a history of head injury, and who are conscious at the time of presentation to casualty. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observation study of patients presented to casualty with history of head injury, and who were conscious, i.e., Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 15 at the time of evaluation. All patients underwent head CT scan. The CT scan was reported as abnormal if it showed any pathology ascribed to trauma. The following variables were used: age, gender, mode of injury (road traffic accident, fall, assault, and others), duration since injury, and history of transient loss of consciousness, headache, vomiting, ear/nose bleeding, and seizures. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical features that predicted an abnormal CT scan. Results: During the observation period, a total of 1629 patients with head injury were evaluated, out of which 453 were in GCS 15. Abnormal CT scan was present in 195 (43%) patients. Among all the variables, the following were found significantly associated with abnormal CT scan: duration since injury (>12 h) P < 0.001; vomiting odds, ratio (OR) 1.89 (1.23, 2.80), P < 0.001; and presence of any symptom, OR 2.36 (1.52, 3.71), P < 0.001. Conclusion: A patient with GCS 15 presenting after 12 hours of injury with vomiting or combination of symptoms has a significant risk of abnormal head CT scan.

  2. Clinical predictors of abnormal head computed tomography scan in patients who are conscious after head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indication of a head computed tomography (CT scan in a patient who remains conscious after head injury is controversial. We aimed to determine the clinical features that are most likely to be associated with abnormal CT scan in patients with a history of head injury, and who are conscious at the time of presentation to casualty. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observation study of patients presented to casualty with history of head injury, and who were conscious, i.e., Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS 15 at the time of evaluation. All patients underwent head CT scan. The CT scan was reported as abnormal if it showed any pathology ascribed to trauma. The following variables were used: age, gender, mode of injury (road traffic accident, fall, assault, and others, duration since injury, and history of transient loss of consciousness, headache, vomiting, ear/nose bleeding, and seizures. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical features that predicted an abnormal CT scan. Results: During the observation period, a total of 1629 patients with head injury were evaluated, out of which 453 were in GCS 15. Abnormal CT scan was present in 195 (43% patients. Among all the variables, the following were found significantly associated with abnormal CT scan: duration since injury (>12 h P< 0.001; vomiting odds, ratio (OR 1.89 (1.23, 2.80, P< 0.001; and presence of any symptom, OR 2.36 (1.52, 3.71, P< 0.001. Conclusion: A patient with GCS 15 presenting after 12 hours of injury with vomiting or combination of symptoms has a significant risk of abnormal head CT scan.

  3. Penetrating head injury from angle grinder: A cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumaran, S; Balamurgan, N; Arthanari, K; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P

    2010-01-01

    Penetrating cranial injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Injuries resulting from the use of angle grinders are numerous and cause high-velocity penetrating cranial injuries. We present a series of two penetrating head injuries associated with improper use of angle grinder, which resulted in shattering of disc into high velocity missiles with reference to management and prevention. One of those hit on the forehead of the operator and the other on the occipital region of the co-worker at a distance of five meters. The pathophysiological consequence of penetrating head injuries depends on the kinetic energy and trajectory of the object. In the nearby healthcare center the impacted broken disc was removed without realising the consequences and the wound was packed. As the conscious level declined in both, they were referred. CT brain revealed fracture in skull and changes in the brain in both. Expeditious removal of the penetrating foreign body and focal debridement of the scalp, skull, dura, and involved parenchyma and Watertight dural closure were carried out. The most important thing is not to remove the impacted foreign body at the site of accident. Craniectomy around the foreign body, debridement and removal of foreign body without zigzag motion are needed. Removal should be done following original direction of projectile injury. The neurological sequelae following the non missile penetrating head injuries are determined by the severity and location of initial injury as well as the rapidity of the exploration and fastidious debridement.

  4. Penetrating head injury from angle grinder: A cautionary tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Senthilkumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating cranial injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Injuries resulting from the use of angle grinders are numerous and cause high-velocity penetrating cranial injuries. We present a series of two penetrating head injuries associated with improper use of angle grinder, which resulted in shattering of disc into high velocity missiles with reference to management and prevention. One of those hit on the forehead of the operator and the other on the occipital region of the co-worker at a distance of five meters. The pathophysiological consequence of penetrating head injuries depends on the kinetic energy and trajectory of the object. In the nearby healthcare center the impacted broken disc was removed without realising the consequences and the wound was packed. As the conscious level declined in both, they were referred. CT brain revealed fracture in skull and changes in the brain in both. Expeditious removal of the penetrating foreign body and focal debridement of the scalp, skull, dura, and involved parenchyma and Watertight dural closure were carried out. The most important thing is not to remove the impacted foreign body at the site of accident. Craniectomy around the foreign body, debridement and removal of foreign body without zigzag motion are needed. Removal should be done following original direction of projectile injury. The neurological sequelae following the non missile penetrating head injuries are determined by the severity and location of initial injury as well as the rapidity of the exploration and fastidious debridement.

  5. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  6. Instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for head impacts in amateur rugby union players over a season of matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria A; Brughelli, Matt; Gissane, Conor

    2015-03-01

    Direct impacts with the head (linear acceleration or pressure) and inertial loading of the head (rotational acceleration or strain) have been postulated as the 2 major mechanisms of head-related injuries such as concussion. Although data are accumulating for soccer and American football, there are no published data for nonhelmeted collision sports such as rugby union. To quantify head impacts via instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for rugby union players over a season of matches. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data on impact magnitude and frequency were collected with molded instrumented mouthguards worn by 38 premier amateur senior rugby players participating in the 2013 domestic season of matches. A total of 20,687 impacts >10g (range, 10.0-164.9g) were recorded over the duration of the study. The mean ± SD number of impacts per player over the duration of the season of matches was 564 ± 618, resulting in a mean ± SD of 95 ± 133 impacts to the head per player, per match over the duration of the season of matches. The impact magnitudes for linear accelerations were skewed to the lower values (Sp = 3.7 ± 0.02; P rugby union players over a season of matches, measured via instrumented mouthguard accelerations, were higher than for most sports previously reported. Mean linear acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to the mean linear accelerations previously reported for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but lower than that for female youth soccer players. Mean rotational acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to mean rotational accelerations for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but less than those for female youth soccer players, concussed American collegiate players, collegiate American football players, and professional American football players. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Atlas injury mechanisms during head-first impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2012-05-20

    An in vitro biomechanical study. To investigate atlas injury mechanisms due to horizontally aligned head-first impacts of a cadaveric neck model and to document atlas fracture patterns and associated injuries. Experimental atlas injuries have been created by applying compression or radial forces to isolated C1 vertebrae, dropping weight or applying sagittal moments to the upper cervical spine segments, or vertical drop testing of head-neck specimens or whole cadavers. Atlas injuries that commonly occur due to horizontally aligned head-first impacts have not been previously investigated. Horizontally aligned head-first impacts into a padded barrier were simulated at 4.1 m/s, using a human cadaver neck model mounted horizontally to a torso-equivalent mass on a sled and carrying a surrogate head. Atlantal radial force was computed using head and neck load cell data. Postimpact dissection documented atlas and associated injuries. Average atlantal radial force peaks and their occurrence times were statistically compared (P Atlas injuries consisted of either 3- or 4-part burst fractures or incomplete lateral mass fracture unilaterally. Associated injuries included bony avulsion of the transverse ligament unilaterally and fractures of the occipital condyles, superior facets of the axis, or odontoid. The results indicated that the varied atlas fracture patterns were due primarily to radial forces causing outward lateral expansion of its lateral masses. Anterior and posterior arch fracture locations are dependent, in part, upon the cross-sectional arch dimensions. Transverse ligament rupture or bony avulsion is likely associated with real-life atlantal burst fractures.

  8. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions.

  9. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury. CASE REPORT: A male patient, aged 42 years, sought medical care after falling from a skateboard. The patient related pain and limitation of movement in the right elbow and difficulty to extend the fingers of the right hand. During physical examination, thumb and fingers extension deficit was observed. The wrist extension showed a slight radial deviation. After imaging, it became evident that the patient had a fracture of the radial head that was classified as grade III in the Mason classification. The patient underwent fracture fixation; at the first postoperative day, thumb and fingers extension was observed. Although rare, posterior interosseous nerve branch injury may be associated with radial head fractures. In the present case, the authors believe that neuropraxia occurred as a result of the fracture hematoma and edema.

  10. Organisation of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S; Sundstrøm, T; Ingebrigtsen, T

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to map and evaluate the available resources and the premises of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries, before the implementation of a Nordic adaption of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for prehospital management. METHODS: The study...... with acute traumatic head injury. A substantial proportion of the operations are performed at local and central hospitals without neurosurgical expertise, despite an efficient pre and interhospital transport system. The Nordic adaption of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines recommends that this practice...

  11. Evoked potentials and head injury. 2. Clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hopkins, H K; Hall, K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    The method of rating abnormality of evoked brain potential patterns and assessing the extent and severity of cortical and subcortical brain dysfunction in head injury patients described in Part I is applied in a clinical context. Evoked potential abnormality (EPA) scores are found to be significantly correlated both with admission and outcome disability approximately one year after head injury. Correlations increase with the increase in the number of sensory modalities tested. Correlations between EPA scores and clinical disability (measured by the Disability Rating Scale) decrease with time after injury. Significant correlations, however, persist for about 60 days after onset of injury. It was found that EP pattern abnormalities can reflect specific sensory (and at times motor) deficits in noncommunicative patients and thereby contribute significantly to early treatment and rehabilitation planning.

  12. Neurobehavioural consequences of closed head injury in older adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, F C; Levin, H S; Presley, R M; Searcy, J.; Colohan, A R; Eisenberg, H M; Jann, B; Bertolino-Kusnerik, L

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the neurobehavioural effects of closed head injury (CHI) in adults aged 50 years and older. Twenty two mild to moderate CHI patients who were within seven months of the injury were administered measures of language, memory, attention, and executive functioning. Compared with demographically similar normal controls, the patients exhibited significantly poorer functioning on the cognitive domains. Naming and word fluency under timed conditions, verbal and visual memory, and ...

  13. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Amin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003. The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%, followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8% and 31–40 years (14.3%. The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients

  14. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yattoo, Gh; Tabish, Amin

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003).The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21-30 years (18.8%), followed by 11-20 years age group (17.8%) and 31-40 years (14.3%). The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas.To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres) need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients.

  15. Optimal Impact Isolation for Injury Prevention Evaluated by the Head Injury Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Balandin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal control of the deceleration of a particle moving along a straight line after an impact against an isolated surface is considered. The force applied to the particle by the surface is treated as the control variable. The deceleration distance is minimized subject to a constraint on the Head Injury Criterion functional. This functional is an integral criterion that is utilized in engineering biomechanics to evaluate the expected severity of impact-induced head injury of a human being. The solution obtained provides characteristics of the limiting capabilities for the prevention of head injuries by means of an impact isolator, such as a coating of the surface against which the impacts occur. The head injuries can be due to impact occurrences, including traffic crashes, falling, and contacts with ballistic objects.

  16. Gradation of Neck Muscle Responses and Head/Neck Kinematics to Acceleration and Speed Change in Rear-end Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Sanderson, David J; Inglis, J Timothy

    2004-11-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that the potential for whiplash injury varies with both the average acceleration and speed change of a rear-end collision. The goal of this study was to examine the gradation of neck muscle responses and the head and neck kinematics to rear-end collision pulses in which the acceleration and speed change were independently varied. Thirty subjects (15F, 15M) underwent 36 consecutive rear-end collisions consisting of three different average accelerations (ā = 0.5, 0.9 and 1.3 g) and three different speed changes (Deltav = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 m/s). Onset and amplitude of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscle responses were measured using surface electromyography. Kinematic measures included linear and angular accelerations and displacements of the head and torso. The results showed that the amplitude of the muscle and kinematics responses was graded to both collision acceleration and speed change. The magnitude of early peaks in the head/neck kinematics correlated more strongly with collision acceleration (r(2) = 0.63 to 0.69), whereas the magnitude of later kinematic peaks correlated more strongly with collision speed change (r(2) = 0.59 to 0.95). Onset of the SCM muscle response correlated only weakly with collision acceleration and speed change (r(2) acceleration and speed change (āDeltav) yielded the strongest and most consistent correlations with neck muscle (r(2) = 0.48 to 0.58) and head/neck kinematic responses (r(2) = 0.78 to 0.94). This measure of collision severity is also consistent with the recent epidemiological evidence that whiplash symptom intensity and duration increases with both average acceleration and speed change.

  17. Accelerated fractionation in advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmi, P.; Cellai, E. (Florence University (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy); Chiavacci, A.; Fablai, C. (Florence Hospital (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy)

    1990-03-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 161 patients affected by head and neck cancer (58 oropharynx, 67 oral cavity, 36 paranasal sinuses) were treated with radiotherapy using an accelerated fractionation (AF) schedule at the University and Hospital Radiotherapy Departments of Florence. Five-year actuarial local control and survival was 38% for the oropharynx, 18% and 20% for the oral cavity, and 38% and 31% for the paranasal sinuses. Results were analysed according to T and N stage as well. Severe late sequelae were evaluated in 53 patients without local disease and with a minimum follow-up of one year: 8 patients developed osteonecrosis; there were 3 cases of trismus, 2 cases of laryngeal oedema, one case of blindness and one case of opththalmitis. (author). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 9 tabs.

  18. Head injuries in skiers: an analysis of injury severity and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, P T; Gale, S D; Denkhaus, H K

    2001-05-01

    To examine the incidence, injury severity, and outcomes of persons hospitalized as a result of ski-related head trauma, a cross-sectional survey was carried out from the Colorado traumatic brain injury database. This database is an ongoing population-based statewise surveillance system, compiled by the Department of Public Health and Environment. Participants were Colorado residents who sustained a head injury while skiing at Colorado ski resorts and hospitalized over three full ski seasons (1994--1997). Injury severity measures included GCS, ISS, AIS, and presence/absence of intracranial lesion, skull fracture and amnesia. Outcome measures included GOS and hospital length of stay. Mean injury severity scores were as follows: GCS 14.51 (SD=0.99), AIS 2.98 (0.99) and ISS 13.17 (6.71). Twenty-four per cent sustained skull fracture, 39% had intracranial lesions, and 79% demonstrated amnesia. Mean length of stay was 4.31 days (10.58). Head injury incidence was 0.77 per 100 000 ski visits (age-specific range=0.17--1.91). Males were more likely to have a skull fracture and evidence of intracranial lesion. Finally, children and older adults were at increased risk of ski-related head trauma, suggesting head injury prevention programmes geared toward these age groups should be emphasized.

  19. Accidental and Nonaccidental Head Injuries in Infants: Distinguishing Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty infants hospitalized with head injury over a 3-year period, 57 (38% due to child abuse, were studied prospectively at the Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Legal Medicine, CHRU de Lille, France.

  20. Social Cognition after Head Injury: Sarcasm and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, S.; Pellijeff, A.; Rule, A.

    2005-01-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) is associated with communication difficulties in everyday social interactions. Previous work has reported impaired comprehension of sarcasm, using sarcastic remarks where the intended meaning is the opposite of the sincere or literal meaning. Participants with CHI in the present study were assessed using two types of…

  1. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration.

  2. No impact of early intervention on late outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Waterloo, Knut; Baardsen, Roald

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury.......To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury....

  3. CRANIOROFACIAL AND HEAD INJURY MANAGEMENT :A RESIDENTS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD AKHEEL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Everyday, men, women and children suffer head injuries. A car accident, a fall from height or sports injury can range in severity from concussion to coma. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI can be fatal,dangerous and survivors, can show persistent problems that significantly affect their livelihood and well-being. India has rather unenviable distinction of having the highest rate of head injury in the world. In India, more than 100,000 lives are lost every year with over 1 million suffering from serious head injuries, to be addressed by a handful number of craniofacial and neurosurgeons , as craniofacial neurosciences in India is new and rapidly expanding discipline and one has to be competent and razor sharp in applying its cognitive base and principles, and residency as is always described as an island in shades of grey, and in India it means higher pressure, higher stress loads, lesser patience, and longer quantum of time spent at work with sleepless nights and merciless bosses.

  4. Non-accidental head injury - the evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Timothy J. [University of Manchester, Blackley, Department of Child Health, Booth Hall Children' s Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    A postmortem examination and the CT scan documented the above injuries (neuropathology showed acute but with foci of older subdural bleeding) and indicated that in addition there were five recent rib fractures (left ribs 3-5 posteriorly and right ribs 6-7 posteriorly), a large perimacular retinal fold in the left retina, and subscalp bruising in the area of the anterior fontanelle and the occipital area. Family proceedings were commenced in order to protect the 2-year-old girl. Expert forensic, neuro- and eye pathologists instructed on behalf of the girl's father were of the view that the baby's injuries were likely to have resulted from the fall from the bed to the carpet, or alternatively from the step-father's efforts to revive the infant; other possibilities being apnoea and cerebral anoxia and cardiac arrest resulting from gastrooesophageal reflux or overly rough rocking of the baby in a baby rocker by the 2-year-old girl, the scalp bruising allegedly being the result of palpation of the baby's fontanelle by the treating paediatricians. The rib fractures were attributed to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. This short review looks at the type of evidence that might help one to distinguish between the differing opinions offered as to the cause of this child's injuries. (orig.)

  5. Conventional vs accelerated fractionation in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, W; Dobrowsky, E; Naudé, J; Millesi, W; Pavelka, R; Kautzky, M; Grasl, M; Köhler, W; Wilson, G D; Reichel, M

    1996-07-01

    From October 1990 to March 1994, 90 patients entered a prospectively randomised trial in head and neck cancer. All patients had verified squamous cell carcinoma and were referred for primary radiation therapy. Tumours originated in the oral cavity in 25, oropharynx in 37, larynx in 15 and hypopharynx in 13 cases. Patients' stages were predominantely T3 and T4 (71/90) and had lymph node metastases (60/90). Seventy-nine male patients and 11 female patients, with a median age of 57 years (range 37-76 years) were treated. Patients were randomised to one of three treatment options: conventional fractionation (CF) consisting of 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (Vienna-CHART) or Vienna-CHART with administration of a single dose of mitomycin C on day 5 of treatment (V-CHART + MMC). By the accelerated regimen a total dose of 55.3 Gy was given in 33 fractions within 17 consecutive days. Acute mucositis was the main toxicity recorded in those patients treated by accelerated fractionation, although the overall duration of mucosal reaction did not differ in the three treatment groups. There was no influence on local toxicity if MMC was added to radiation therapy or not. Those patients treated with additional MMC experienced a grade III/IV haematological toxicity in 4/28 cases. Complete remission (CR) was recorded in 48% following CF, 79% after Vienna-CHART (P < 0.05) and 71% after Vienna-CHART + MMC. The overall local failure rates were 73%, 59% and 42% (P = NS) for patients treated by CF, Vienna-CHART and Vienna-CHART + MMC respectively.

  6. Sir Hugh Cairns and World War II British advances in head injury management, diffuse brain injury, and concussion: an Oxford tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James L; Patel, Vimal; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-11-01

    The authors trace the Oxford, England, roots of World War II (WWII)-related advances in head injury management, the biomechanics of concussion and brain injury, and postwar delineation of pathological findings in severe concussion and diffuse brain injury in man. The prominent figure in these developments was the charismatic and innovative Harvey Cushing-trained neurosurgeon Sir Hugh Cairns. Cairns, who was to closely emulate Cushing's surgical and scholarly approach, is credited with saving thousands of lives during WWII by introducing and implementing innovative programs such as helmets for motorcyclists, mobile neurosurgical units near battle zones, and the military usage of penicillin. In addition, he inspired and taught a generation of neurosurgeons, neurologists, and neurological nurses in the care of brain and spinal cord injuries at Oxford's Military Hospital for Head Injuries. During this time Cairns also trained the first full-time female neurosurgeon. Pivotal in supporting animal research demonstrating the critical role of acceleration in the causation of concussion, Cairns recruited the physicist Hylas Holbourn, whose research implicated rotary acceleration and shear strains as particularly damaging. Cairns' work in military medicine and head injury remain highly influential in efforts to mitigate and manage brain injury.

  7. Analysis of pediatric head anthropometry using computed tomography for application to head injury prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Kathryn L; Geer, Carol P; Danelson, Kerry A; Slice, Dennis E; Stitze, Joel D

    2007-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death of people between one and thirty-four years of age in the U.S., and head trauma is a significant lethal injury in such cases. During a motor vehicle crash, the head often experiences blunt force trauma from impacts with seat backs, steering wheels, windows, and dashes. The resulting injuries can cause skull fractures, concussions, bleeding and swelling of the brain. Crash test dummies and finite element models are often used to study the nature and likelihood of injury during a crash, but these are currently based on scaled versions of a standard, 50th percentile male. This approach fails to accurately capture the size and shape variation in even the adult population, but may be especially inappropriate for modeling pediatric head injuries where, for instance, infants have fontanelles and reduced bone structure. In this presentation, an approach for modification of a finite element model of the human head based on 50th percentile male dimensions and representing the skull, brain, dura/CSF layer, and Falx Celebri, that will incorporate the anatomical and nonlinear morphological changes observed in pediatric skulls during ontogeny. Using 96 CT scans of normal pediatric skulls, landmark coordinate points are identified to map the changes in skull shape and size as aging occurs. The pediatric skull changes rapidly in size and shape during the first two years of age. Using this information, a pediatric finite element head model will be created, using parametric mesh generation software, to measure head injury in children in a motor vehicle crash.

  8. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.025

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed - a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to in...

  9. Does padded headgear prevent head injury in rugby union football?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Andrew S; McCrory, Paul; Finch, Caroline F; Best, John P; Chalmers, David J; Wolfe, Rory

    2009-02-01

    Concussion is a serious problem in many contact sports, including rugby union football. The study's primary aim was to measure the efficacy of padded headgear in reducing the rates of head injury or concussion. A cluster randomized controlled trial with three arms was conducted with rugby union football teams as the unit of randomization. Teams consisted of males participating in under 13-, 15-, 18-, and 20-yr age group competitions. The interventions were "standard" and "modified" padded headgear. Headgear wearing and injury were measured for each study team at each game over two seasons. Eighty-two teams participated in year 1 and 87 in year 2. A total of 1493 participants (10,040 player hours) were in the control group, 1128 participants (8170 player hours) were assigned to the standard headgear group, and 1474 participants (10,650 player hours) were assigned to the modified headgear group. The compliance rates were low in all groups, but 46% of participants wore standard headgear. An intention-to-treat analysis showed no differences in the rates of head injury or concussion between controls and headgear arms. Incidence rate ratios for standard headgear wearers referenced to controls were 0.95 and 1.02 for game and missed game injuries. Analyses of injury rates based on observed wearing patterns also showed no significant differences. Incidence rate ratios for standard headgear wearers referenced to nonwearers were 1.11 and 1.10 for game and missed game injuries. Padded headgear does not reduce the rate of head injury or concussion. The low compliance rates are a limitation. Although individuals may choose to wear padded headgear, the routine or mandatory use of protective headgear cannot be recommended.

  10. Validation of a wireless head acceleration measurement system for use in soccer play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Erin; Bir, Cynthia

    2010-11-01

    Soccer heading has been studied previously with conflicting results. One major issue is the lack of knowledge regarding what actually occurs biomechanically during soccer heading impacts. The purpose of the current study is to validate a wireless head acceleration measurement system, head impact telemetry system (HITS) that can be used to collect head accelerations during soccer play. The HIT system was fitted to a Hybrid III (HIII) head form that was instrumented with a 3-2-2-2 accelerometer setup. Fifteen impact conditions were tested to simulate impacts commonly experienced during soccer play. Linear and angular acceleration were calculated for both systems and compared. Root mean square (RMS) error and cross correlations were also calculated and compared for both systems. Cross correlation values were very strong with r = .95 ± 0.02 for ball to head forehead impacts and r = .96 ± 0.02 for head to head forehead impacts. The systems showed a strong relationship when comparing RMS error, linear head acceleration, angular head acceleration, and the cross correlation values.

  11. Severe head injury caused by motorcycle traffic accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李钢

    1999-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristic and treatment of the severe head injury due to motorcycle accident.Methods Review and analysis of 27 motorcycle traffic trauma cases who were admitted to our hospital from Oct.1995 to Sep.1997.Results Young men were the main composition of these patients.Multiple injuries associated with brain ste or diffuse axonal injury were common,which were the main factors influencing the consciousness and prognosis of the patients.The wound was usually severely contaminated.Evacuation of hematomas,decompression by depleting skull flap,hypotheymia and artificial hibernation were conducted in this series.Among them,14 cases were cured ,3 cases were seriously disabled,10 cases died.Conclusions Motorcycle's weight is light so it easily loses its balance.The riders and the passengers are exposed and lack protection.Driving against traffic regulations is frquently seen.All these are the reasons why the motorcycle traffic accidents often take place. When the traffic accident happens,the patients' head generally is thrown a long distance and dashed against the barrier or the ground.The psture nd mechanism of injury were complicated and varied.The decelerated injury and rolling injury occurred frequently and they were the main reasons for brain stem or diffuse axonal injury.The patients who have surgical indication should be operated upon as soon as possible.Hibernation and low temoerature therapy are conducive to the protection of the brain function at the early stage of postinjury or postoperation.A careful epluchage is essential to reduce infection of the open injury.

  12. Head injuries in youth soccer players presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, W; Streight, S; Simpson, K; Brison, R J

    2005-04-01

    There has been recent concern about neuropsychological injuries experienced by soccer players, particularly related to the purposeful heading of the ball. There are few population based analyses examining whether this is a legitimate concern. To explore, using an existing injury surveillance system, one of many parts of this issue: acute injuries requiring emergency medical care experienced by youth soccer players. Descriptive epidemiological analysis of emergency department injury surveillance data (1996-2001) for youths aged 10-24 years from the Kingston sites of the Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. A total of 1714 cases of soccer injury were identified (mean 286 a year); 235 (13.7%) involved diagnoses of injuries to the head. Leading mechanical factors resulting in head injury were contact with other players or persons (153/235; 65.1%) and balls (62/235; 26.4%). Heading was reported in 4/62 (6%) of the ball contact injuries, and attempted heading was reported in 15/153 (9.8%) of the cases involving person to person contact. Unspecified head to head contact between players was reported in 39 cases. Minor head injuries that result in emergency medical treatment do not happen often in youth soccer, and very few can be attributed to the purposeful heading of the ball. Player contact injuries appear to be a more important injury control concern. This study informs one of many aspects of the soccer heading injury debate.

  13. Accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Togawa, Takashi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    From May 1994 to May 1997, 52 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total dose to 67.2-70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin. The median follow-up period was 19.8 months with a range of 2-44 months. Complete response rate was 73% (38/52). Cumulative survival rate at 3 years was 46.7% and the relapse rate was 21.1% (8/38). The relapse sites were as follows, primary site; 2 cases, lymphnodes; 4 cases and distant metastases; 2 cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis. Grade 3-4 late sequelae was observed in 7 cases. Grade 3 xerostomia was observed in 2 cases, esophageal stenosis was observed in 2 cases and arytenoid necrosis was observed in 2 cases. There were no fatal sequelae. Acute sequelae are very variable and it will be necessary to individualize the treatment time according to the state of their stomatitis. (author)

  14. Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug A; Hume, Patria A; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor N

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct impact with the head and the inertial loading of the head have been postulated as major mechanisms of head-related injuries, such as concussion. METHODS This descriptive observational study was conducted to quantify the head impact acceleration characteristics in under-9-year-old junior rugby union players in New Zealand. The impact magnitude, frequency, and location were collected with a wireless head impact sensor that was worn by 14 junior rugby players who participated in 4 matches. RESULTS A total of 721 impacts > 10g were recorded. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of impacts per player was 46 (IQR 37-58), resulting in 10 (IQR 4-18) impacts to the head per player per match. The median impact magnitudes recorded were 15g (IQR 12g-21g) for linear acceleration and 2296 rad/sec(2) (IQR 1352-4152 rad/sec(2)) for rotational acceleration. CONCLUSIONS There were 121 impacts (16.8%) above the rotational injury risk limit and 1 (0.1%) impact above the linear injury risk limit. The acceleration magnitude and number of head impacts in junior rugby union players were higher than those previously reported in similar age-group sports participants. The median linear acceleration for the under-9-year-old rugby players were similar to 7- to 8-year-old American football players, but lower than 9- to 12-year-old youth American football players. The median rotational accelerations measured were higher than the median and 95th percentiles in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players.

  15. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Toshiki; Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  16. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Fukuoka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1. No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  17. Neurogenic pulmonary edema in head injuries: analysis of 5 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Shi-qiang; SUN Wei; WANG Han-bin; ZHANG Qing-lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To review the pathophysiology and study the diagnosis and clinical management of neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). Methods: The data of 5 patients who developed NPE after head injury treated in our hospital form December 1995 to May 2003 were collected and analyzed.Results: The patients developed dyspnea and respiratory failure 2-8 hours after neurologic event. Four of the 5 patients presented with pink frothy sputum. Chest radiography showed bilateral diffuse infiltrations in all the 5 patients. After supportive measures such as oxygen support and pharmacologic therapy, 4 patients recovered in 72 hours and one patient died. Conclusions: The pathophysiologic mechanisms of NPE is unclear. In acute respiratory failure following head injury, NPE must be given much attention and timely and effective measures should be taken.

  18. Head injuries in children; Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma bei Kindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Trauma is the reason for 40-60% of emergency callouts concerning children. Approximately half of the children have head injuries. As for adults early recognition of findings indicating an intervention are decisive for the prognosis. In children head injury can be divided into three categories: birth trauma, accidental and non-accidental trauma. This article concentrates on accidental trauma with respect to characteristics of causes, epidemiology, mechanisms of accidents and illustrated morphological findings. (orig.) [German] In 40-60% der Faelle ist ein Trauma die Ursache fuer Noteinsaetze bei Kindern. Dabei weist ca. die Haelfte der Verletzten ein Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma (SHT) auf. Wie bei Erwachsenen ist das fruehzeitige Erkennen interventionspflichtiger Befunde entscheidend fuer die Prognose. Man unterscheidet bei Kindern 3 Formen des SHT: das Geburtstrauma, das akzidentelle und das nichtakzidentelle Trauma. Der folgende Artikel befasst sich mit dem akzidentellen Trauma, wobei Besonderheiten hinsichtlich der Ursachen, der Epidemiologie, des Unfallmechanismus und der bildmorphlogischen Befunde herausgearbeitet werden. (orig.)

  19. The state of head injury biomechanics: past, present, and future part 2: physical experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Werner; Monson, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is the continuation of the article published in Critical Reviews of Biomedical Engineering, 29(5-6), 2001. That issue contained topics dealing with components and geometry of the human head, classification of head injuries, some early experimental studies, and tolerance considerations. It then dealt with head motion and load characterization, investigations during the period from 1939 to 1966, injury causation and early modeling efforts, the 1966 Head Injury Conference and its sequels, mechanical properties of solid tissues, fluid characterization, and early investigation of the mechanical properties of cranial materials. It continued with a description of the systematic investigations of solid cranial components and structural properties since 1966, fetal cranial properties, analytical head modeling, and numerical solutions of head injury. The paper concluded with experimental dynamic loading of human living and cadaver heads, dynamic loading of surrogate heads, and head injury mechanics. This portion of the paper describes physical head injury experimentation involving animals, primarily primates, human cadavers, volunteers, and inanimate physical models. In order to address the entire domain of head injury biomechanics in the two-part survey, it was intended that this information be supplemented by discussions of head injury tolerance and criteria, automotive and sports safety considerations, and the design of protective equipment, but Professor Goldsmith passed away before these sections could be completed. It is nevertheless anticipated that this attenuated installment will provide, in conjunction with the first part of the survey, a valuable resource for students and practitioners of head injury biomechanics.

  20. Postconcussive symptom report: the relative influence of head injury and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Julie A; Gunstad, John

    2002-12-01

    The present study explored whether any subset of self-reported postconcussion (PCS) symptoms or specific PCS symptom is sensitive and/or specific to head injury in non-self-selected samples of individuals aged 18-21 with head injury and depression (n = 32), head injury without depression (n = 31), depression without head injury (n = 25), and controls (n = 50). All participants completed a self-report PCS symptom scale based on their current symptoms. Results showed that depression, not head-injury status, largely accounted for elevation in PCS symptom reports, including cognitive symptoms. Thus, report of cognitive PCS symptoms is not specific to head injury, raising concerns about using such items to screen for head injury in the general population.

  1. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in head injury: a missed insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, R K; Soryal, I N; Pentland, B

    2000-01-01

    A survey of the use of thiamine in patients at risk from Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Scottish specialist neurosurgical units, and a 2-year retrospective study of 218 at-risk patients admitted to a regional neurosurgical unit with a head injury were undertaken. Although responses to the survey indicated otherwise, the study revealed that there was no consistent practice regarding thiamine administration. Overall, 20.6% of patients received thiamine, with an alcohol history being the only factor correlating with thiamine administration. Of known alcoholics and heavy drinkers, 56.1% and 26.2% respectively received thiamine as in-patients; 44.5% of patients received additional carbohydrate loads in the form of i.v. dextrose or parenteral nutrition, but only 28.9% of these received thiamine as well. Although the actual thiamine status of these patients was not known, given the difficulties of diagnosing WKS in the presence of a head injury, the conclusion is that written protocols are needed in units to ensure that head injury patients at risk of WKS receive appropriate thiamine treatment or prophylaxis.

  2. Relationship between hyperventilation and intracranial pressure in patients with severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@With high fatality rate and disability rate, the pathophysiologic changes of severe head injury are complicated. But the method of lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) through artificial hyperventilation is called in question recently. To understand the related changes of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery (PaCO2) and the ICP at the acute period of severe head injury, a total of 64 patients with severe head injury were monitored and analyzed on the 3rd day after injury.

  3. Behavioral deficits and axonal injury persistence after rotational head injury are direction dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Friess, Stuart H; Ralston, Jill; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen J; Rapp, Paul E; Margulies, Susan S

    2013-04-01

    Pigs continue to grow in importance as a tool in neuroscience. However, behavioral tests that have been validated in the rodent model do not translate well to pigs because of their very different responses to behavioral stimuli. We refined metrics for assessing porcine open field behavior to detect a wide spectrum of clinically relevant behaviors in the piglet post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). Female neonatal piglets underwent a rapid non-impact head rotation in the sagittal plane (n=8 evaluable) or were instrumented shams (n=7 evaluable). Open field testing was conducted 1 day prior to injury (day -1) in order to establish an individual baseline for analysis, and at days +1 and +4 after injury. Animals were then killed on day +6 after injury for neuropathological assessment of axonal injury. Injured piglets were less interested in interacting with environmental stimuli and had a lower activity level than did shams. These data were compared with previously published data for axial rotational injuries in neonatal piglets. Acute behavioral outcomes post-TBI showed a dependence on the rotational plane of the brain injury, with animals with sagittal injuries demonstrating a greater level of inactivity and less random usage of the open field space than those with axial injuries. The persistence of axonal injury is also dependent on the rotational plane, with sagittal rotations causing more prolonged injuries than axial rotations. These results are consistent with animal studies, finite element models, and studies of concussions in football, which have all demonstrated differences in injury severity depending upon the direction of head impact rotation.

  4. Is heading a soccer ball injurious to brain function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroff, G S

    1998-04-01

    With the growing popularity of soccer both in the United States and worldwide, reports of adverse effects of 'heading' on brain function are a source of concern. This article reviews the related research literature on neurologic and neuropsychological findings. Neurologic and neuropsychological abnormalities have been reported in a significant minority of older former professional players in Norway. Purportedly unrelated to age, the most prominent findings were cerebral atrophy and impairment on intelligence test abilities that are particularly vulnerable to brain damage. Also noteworthy in these retired players were persistent physical, cognitive, and emotional complaints consistent with a postconcussive syndrome. Younger amateur players appear to be free of major abnormalities, although some report persistent difficulties with memory and concentration. The severity of these complaints may be related to a history of soccer-related head injuries and not necessarily specific to heading. Research findings specific to heading are not more than suggestive at best, and clarification of the risks of heading a soccer ball awaits more definitive studies.

  5. The economic divide in outcome following severe head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, S. S.; Manju, D.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic status is an important determinant of the standard of living and health status of people. Objectives: To assess the influence of economic status on the outcome following severe head injury. Materials and Methods: Adult patients of severe head injury, whose guardians' volunteered information on family income, were enrolled for the study. The family per capita income was then calculated. They were studied prospectively in relation to various factors and followed-up. Results: Among 99 patients, monthly per capita income of Rs. 2000 were noted in 20, 43, 22, and 14 patients, respectively. The credibility of information on income was confirmed by positive correlation with patients' mid arm circumference measurements (PRs.1000). The comparability of both groups based on age, Glasgow Coma Scale, systemic injury, and surgical intervention was confirmed (P>0.05). Mortality at one month was 49% among patients whose monthly per capita income ≤Rs.1000 compared with 17% of the rest (Odds ratio [OR] 4.0, P=0.003). Unfavorable outcome at three months was noted in 63% of patients whose monthly per capita income ≤Rs.1000, as compared with 35% of those with per capita income >Rs.1000 (OR 4.1, P=0.01). In multivariate analysis, family monthly per capita income ≤Rs.1000 emerged as an independent risk factor for unfavorable outcome at three months (P=0.02). Conclusion: In patients of severe head injury, lower economic status is significantly associated with unfavorable outcome at three months, independent of other factors. PMID:22639686

  6. Isolated traumatic head injury in children: Analysis of 276 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : To determine predictive factors of mortality among children after isolated traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods : In this retrospective study, we included all consecutive children with isolated traumatic brain injury admitted to the 22-bed intensive care unit (ICU of Habib Bourguiba University Hospital (Sfax, Tunisia. Basic demographic, clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were recorded on admission and during ICU stay. Results : There were 276 patients with 196 boys (71% and 80 girls, with a mean age of 6.7 ± 3.8 years. The main cause of trauma was road traffic accident (58.3%. Mean Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 ± 2, Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 23.3 ± 5.9, Mean Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS was 4.8 ± 2.3, and Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM was 10.8 ± 8. A total of 259 children required mechanical ventilation. Forty-eight children (17.4% died. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with a poor prognosis were PRISM > 24 (OR: 10.98, neurovegetative disorder (OR: 7.1, meningeal hemorrhage (OR: 2.74, and lesion type VI according to Marshall tomographic grading (OR: 13.26. Conclusion : In Tunisia, head injury is a frequent cause of hospital admission and is most often due to road traffic injuries. Short-term prognosis is influenced by demographic, clinical, radiological, and biochemical factors. The need to put preventive measures in place is underscored.

  7. Clinical indicators of intracranial injury in head-injured infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenes, D S; Schutzman, S A

    1999-10-01

    1) To determine whether clinical signs of brain injury are sensitive indicators of intracranial injury (ICI) in head-injured infants. 2) To determine whether radiographic imaging of otherwise asymptomatic infants with scalp hematoma is a useful means of detecting cases of ICI. 3) To determine whether head-injured infants without signs of brain injury or scalp hematoma may be safely managed without radiographic imaging. We performed a 1-year prospective study of all infants younger than 2 years of age presenting to a pediatric emergency department with head trauma. Data were collected on historical features, physical findings, radiographic findings, and hospital course. Follow-up telephone calls were made 2 weeks after discharge to assess for any late deterioration. Of 608 study subjects, 30 (5%) had ICI; 12/92 (13%) infants 0 to 2 months of age had ICI, compared with 13/224 (6%) infants 3 to 11 months of age, and 5/292 (2%) infants 12 months of age or older. Only 16/30 (52%) subjects with ICI had at least one of the following clinical symptoms or signs of brain injury: loss of consciousness, history of behavior change, seizures, emesis, depressed mental status, irritability, bulging fontanel, focal neurologic findings, or vital signs indicating increased intracranial pressure. Of the 14 asymptomatic subjects with ICI, 13 (93%) had significant scalp hematoma. Among subjects who had head computed tomography, significant scalp hematoma had an odds ratio of 2.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.15,6.70) for association with ICI. A total of 265 subjects (43%) were asymptomatic and had no significant scalp hematoma. None (95% confidence interval: 0,1.2%) required specific therapy or had any subsequent clinical deterioration. Clinical signs of brain injury are insensitive indicators of ICI in infants. A substantial fraction of infants with ICI will be detected through radiographic imaging of otherwise asymptomatic infants with significant scalp hematomas. Asymptomatic infants

  8. Improved measurement of brain deformation during mild head acceleration using a novel tagged MRI sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Andrew K; Magrath, Elizabeth; McEntee, Julie E; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L; Bayly, Philip V; Butman, John A; Pham, Dzung L

    2014-11-07

    In vivo measurements of human brain deformation during mild acceleration are needed to help validate computational models of traumatic brain injury and to understand the factors that govern the mechanical response of the brain. Tagged magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive technique to track tissue motion in vivo which has been used to quantify brain deformation in live human subjects. However, these prior studies required from 72 to 144 head rotations to generate deformation data for a single image slice, precluding its use to investigate the entire brain in a single subject. Here, a novel method is introduced that significantly reduces temporal variability in the acquisition and improves the accuracy of displacement estimates. Optimization of the acquisition parameters in a gelatin phantom and three human subjects leads to a reduction in the number of rotations from 72 to 144 to as few as 8 for a single image slice. The ability to estimate accurate, well-resolved, fields of displacement and strain in far fewer repetitions will enable comprehensive studies of acceleration-induced deformation throughout the human brain in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Damage control of multiple injuries headed by cervical spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Si-hai; WANG Ai-min; DU Quan-yin; ZHAO Yu-feng; WANG Zi-ming; GUO Qing-shan; SHEN Yue

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the strategy of damage control in clinical treatment of multiple injuries headed by cervical spinal cord injury.Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in 32 patients. Cervical fractures associated with tetraplegia occurred in 18 patients, traumatic intervertebral disk hernia associated with tetraplegia in 2 patients, and cervical fractures and dislocation associated with tetraplegia in 12 patients. Seventeen cases were combined with craniocerebral injury, 7 combined with pulmonary contusion, multi-fractures of rib or hemopneumothorax, 2 combined with pelvic fracture and other 8 combined with fracture of limbs. The neural function was assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale.Results:Thirty-one patients were followed up for an average of 14 months. Of them, 10 got complete recovery, 13 obtained improvement of more than one ASIA grade, 8 did not improve, and 1 died.Conclusions: For the emergency treatment of multiple injuries headed by cervical spinal cord injury, the damage control strategy is the principle to follow. The final operations are preferably performed within 5 to 10 days after injury so as to raise the successful rate of remedy.

  10. Arterial injuries after penetrating brain injury in civilians: risk factors on admission head computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Aarabi, Bizhan; Roy, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the specific CT findings of the injury profile in penetrating brain injury (PBI) that are risk factors related to intracranial arterial injuries. The authors retrospectively evaluated admission head CTs and accompanying digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies from patients with penetrating trauma to the head in the period between January 2005 and December 2012. Two authors reviewed the CT images to determine the presence or absence of 30 injury profile variables and quantified selected variables. The CT characteristics in patients with and without arterial injuries were compared using univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the respective risk factors, independent predictors, and optimal threshold values for the continuous variables. Fifty-five patients were eligible for study inclusion. The risk factors for an intracranial arterial injury on univariate analysis were an entry wound over the frontobasal-temporal regions, a bihemispheric wound trajectory, a wound trajectory in proximity to the circle of Willis (COW), a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a higher SAH score, an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and a higher IVH score. A trajectory in proximity to the COW was the best predictor of injury (OR 6.8 and p = 0.005 for all penetrating brain injuries [PBIs]; OR 13.3 and p = 0.001 for gunshot wounds [GSWs]). Significant quantitative variables were higher SAH and IVH scores. An SAH score of 3 (area under the ROC curve [AUC] for all PBIs 0.72; AUC for GSWs 0.71) and an IVH score of 3 (AUC for all PBIs 0.65; AUC for GSWs 0.65) could be used as threshold values to suggest an arterial injury. The risk factors identified may help radiologists suggest the possibility of arterial injury and prioritize neurointerventional consultation and potential DSA studies.

  11. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J.; Fildes, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997–2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000–2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990–1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03–1.04, pcrash- and occupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation. PMID:22105402

  12. Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures after Head Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scévola

    2009-01-01

    another medical illness. The gold standard for PNES diagnosis is video electroencephalogram (Video-EEG. PNESs are defined by modern psychiatry as conversion and dissociative disorders but these disorders may coexist with many others psychiatric disorders, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and personality disorders. It is well known that epileptic seizures are a frequent and well-studied complication of traumatic head injury (THI. However, THI may also generate psychic symptoms including PNES. In this paper we describe a patient who developed PNES after THI in a bus accident and received a diagnosis of refractory epilepsy for 24 years until she underwent Video-EEG.

  13. Incidence of hospital referred head injuries in Norway: a population based survey from the Stavanger region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommer, Bertil Roland; Heskestad, Ben; Baardsen, Roald;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In three previous Norwegian studies conducted between 1974 and 1993, the annual incidence rates of hospital admitted head injuries were 236, 200 and 169 per 100,000 population. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of head injury in the Stavanger region and to compare......,317 inhabitants (2003). RESULTS: The annual incidence rate was 207/100,000 population for hospital referred head injury and 157/100,000 population for hospital admitted head injury. High age- and sex specific incidence rates were observed among the oldest, and the highest rate (882/100,000) among men above 90...

  14. The relation between mechanical impact parameters and most frequent bicycle related head injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monea, A.G.; Perre, G. van der; Baeck, K.; Delye, H.H.; Verschueren, P.; Forausebergher, E.; Lierde, C. van; Verpoest, I.; Sloten, J. van der; Goffin, J.; Depreitere, B.

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent head injuries resulting from bicycle accidents include skull fracture acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), cerebral contusions, and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). This review includes epidemiological studies, cadaver experiments, in vivo imaging, image processing techniques, and computer

  15. [Thromboprophylaxis in multiple trauma and head injury patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomina, M J; Mora, L; Ciércoles, E

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD) is a frequent condition with serious clinical consequences and elevated mortality related to underdiagnosis or undertreatment, especially in patients with multiple trauma. The incidence of VTD in these patients ranges from 5% to 58% and thromboprophylaxis is considered essential for proper management. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been cited as risk factors for VTD; however, how these factors combine with others to predict high risk is still unclear. The best way to approach VTD prophylaxis in multiple trauma patients is currently unclear. Both mechanical and pharmacologic means are available. The main clinical practice guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin, which can be started 48 hours after trauma, unless patients are still bleeding, in which case mechanical compression is recommended in spite of the limited effectiveness of that measure. Compression is maintained until the risk of hemorrhage has diminished. There is insufficient evidence to support routine use of ultrasound imaging or venography. In patients with head injury who are at risk for intracranial bleeding, the use of low-molecular weight heparin should be delayed until risk disappears but mechanical prophylaxis (compression) can be considered according to clinical status.

  16. Head, Neck, Face, and Shoulder Injuries in Female and Male Rugby Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havkins, Sabina B.

    1986-01-01

    Injuries to 150 players in the Southern California Rugby Football Union were studied in order to compare head, neck, face, and shoulder injury rates for female and male players. While overall rates did not differ significantly, women received fewer disabling injuries. Ways to decrease injuries are recommended. (Author/MT)

  17. Head, Neck, Face, and Shoulder Injuries in Female and Male Rugby Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havkins, Sabina B.

    1986-01-01

    Injuries to 150 players in the Southern California Rugby Football Union were studied in order to compare head, neck, face, and shoulder injury rates for female and male players. While overall rates did not differ significantly, women received fewer disabling injuries. Ways to decrease injuries are recommended. (Author/MT)

  18. Evaluation of the traumatic coma data bank computed tomography classification for severe head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P E; van Voskuilen, A C; Beems, T; Krabbe, P F; Vogels, O J

    2004-01-01

    This study determines the interrater and intrarater reliability of the Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB) computed tomography (CT) scan classification for severe head injury. This classification grades the severity of the injury as follows: I = normal, II = diffuse injury, III = diffuse injury with swe

  19. The neurobehavioural rating scale: assessment of the behavioural sequelae of head injury by the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H S; High, W M; Goethe, K E; Sisson, R A; Overall, J E; Rhoades, H M; Eisenberg, H M; Kalisky, Z; Gary, H E

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the inter-rater reliability and validity of the Neurobehavioural Rating Scale at various stages of recovery after hospitalisation for closed head injury, we studied 101 head trauma patients who had no antecedent neuropsychiatric disorder. The results demonstrated satisfactory inter-rater reliability and showed that the Neurobehavioural Rating Scale reflects both the severity and chronicity of closed head injury. A principal components analysis revealed four factors which were differentially related to severity of head injury and the presence of a frontal lobe mass lesion. Although our findings provide support for utilising clinical ratings of behaviour to investigate sequelae of head injury, extension of this technique to other settings is necessary to evaluate the distinctiveness of the neurobehavioural profile of closed head injury as compared with other aetiologies of brain damage. PMID:3572433

  20. Bicycle accident-related head injuries in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Munivenkatappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of head injuries sustained due to bicycle accidents in India. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively collected over a period of six months (15 May 2011 to 15 November 2011. Demography of patients, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, clinical and imaging findings, and mortality and outcome using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS, Rivermead post-concussion symptom questionnaire (RPCSQ and Rivermead head injury follow-up questionnaire (RHFUQ, were analyzed. Outcome was assessed by telephonic interview. Results: There were 108 patients (100 males with mean age of 27.7 years. Seventy-four (68.5% were from rural areas. Accidents due to vehicular collision accounted for 60 (55.6% cases. None wore a helmet. The admission GCS was 14-15 in 68.5% cases, 13-3 in 31.5%. The risk of moderate to severe injuries was increased among working laborers (OR = 5, and patients with loss of consciousness (OR = 4. Sixty-three (49% patients had abnormal computed tomography (CT findings; most common finding was skull fracture 25 (23.1%. Four patients needed surgery. The GOS assessment at three to six months revealed favorable outcome in 66 patients (61.1% and death in 8 (7.4%. The common post-concussion symptoms were headache, fatigue, and poor concentration. Conclusion: The majority of hospitalized cyclists were from a rural background and of the lower income group. After three months the majority of patients had good recovery with few persistent concussion symptoms.

  1. Why most traumatic brain injuries are not caused by linear acceleration but skull fractures are.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein eKleiven

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Injury statistics have found the most common accident situation to be an oblique impact. An oblique impact will give rise to both linear and rotational head kinematics. The human brain is most sensitive to rotational motion. The bulk modulus of brain tissue is roughly five to six orders of magnitude larger than the shear modulus so that for a given impact it tends to deform predominantly in shear. This gives a large sensitivity of the strain in the brain to rotational loading and a small sensitivity to linear kinematics. Therefore, rotational kinematics should be a better indicator of traumatic brain injury risk than linear acceleration. To illustrate the difference between radial and oblique impacts, perpendicular impacts through the center of gravity of the head and 45o oblique impacts were simulated. It is obvious that substantially higher strain levels in the brain are obtained for an oblique impact, compared to a corresponding perpendicular one, when impacted into the same padding using an identical impact velocity. It was also clearly illustrated that the radial impact causes substantially higher stresses in the skull with an associated higher risk of skull fractures, and traumatic brain injuries secondary to those.

  2. Effect of mild head injury on intelligence in Zahedan, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hadi Shorooei; Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Soheil Saadat; Arya Sheikh-Mozaffari; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of mild head injury (HI) on the victims' intelligence by measuring their intelligence quotient (IQ).Methods: This cohort study was performed in Khatamol-Anbia Hospital, Zahedan, Iran and the IQs of 30 mild HI patients were measured right after the injury (IQ0) and six months later (IQ6). The IQs of 90 close relatives of the patients were also measured at the same period of time as the non-exposure group. The IQs were measured with Wechsler adult intelligence scale-revised (WAIS-R). The IQ0, IQ6 and their differences (IQ change) were compared in HI patients and their relatives using the Student's t test.Results: The mean IQ0 of the HI patients was similar to their relatives. The IQ6 of HI patients appeared to be less than those of their relatives. Moreover, the IQ6 of the HI patients appeared to be less than their initial scores. HI was associated with more decrease in IQ6 compared with IQ0and the female subjects showed more decrease in IQ6 compared with their IQ0.Conclusion: HI seems to be associated with decrease in IQ six months after the injury and it is more evident in female HI patients.

  3. Behavioral Deficits and Axonal Injury Persistence after Rotational Head Injury Are Direction Dependent

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Sarah; Friess, Stuart H.; Ralston, Jill; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen J.; Rapp, Paul E.; Margulies, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    Pigs continue to grow in importance as a tool in neuroscience. However, behavioral tests that have been validated in the rodent model do not translate well to pigs because of their very different responses to behavioral stimuli. We refined metrics for assessing porcine open field behavior to detect a wide spectrum of clinically relevant behaviors in the piglet post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). Female neonatal piglets underwent a rapid non-impact head rotation in the sagittal plane (n=8 evalu...

  4. Neck Flexion Induces Larger Deformation of the Brain Than Extension at a Rotational Acceleration, Closed Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Arne Hansson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A closed head trauma induces incompletely characterized temporary movement and deformation of the brain, contributing to the primary traumatic brain injury. We used the pressure patterns recorded with light-operated miniature sensors in anaesthetized adult rabbits exposed to a sagittal plane rotational acceleration of the head, lasting 1 ms, as a measure of brain deformation. Two exposure levels were used and scaled to correspond to force levels reported to cause mild and moderate diffuse injury in an adult man, respectively. Flexion induced transient, strong, extended, and predominantly negative pressures while extension generated a short positive pressure peak followed by a minor negative peak. Low level flexion caused as strong, extended negative pressures as did high level extension. Time differences were demonstrated between the deformation of the cerebrum, brainstem, and cerebellum. Available X-ray and MRI techniques do not have as high time resolution as pressure recordings in demonstrating complex, sequential compression and stretching of the brain during a trauma. The exposure to flexion caused more protracted and extensive deformation of the brain than extension, in agreement with a published histopathological report. The severity and extent of the brain deformation generated at a head trauma thus related to the direction at equal force.

  5. Demographic Profile and Pathological Patterns of Head Injury in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Hoxha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head injury (HI is a serious morbid state caused by structural changes of the scalp, skull, and/or its contents, due to mechanical forces. Generally, the most frequent cause of HI is road traffic accident (RTA, followed by homicidal and falling injuries. The aim of present study is to assess epidemiology data, causes and patterns responsible for HI among Albanian subjects. Methodology: All HI cases (1000 are collected by the Forensic Institute of Albania, based on medical and forensic records of traumatized subjects between 2007- 2012. The prospectively-collected and descriptive information is focused on demographic data, responsible factors, type and level of cranial and brain injury, as well as their outcome. Results: The majority of HI victims were male (84% of age range of 15yrs -35yrs (70%. RTA was the HI cause in 88%, followed by homicides (3.8%, falling (3% etc. With respect to injury mechanisms, extra-dural hematoma was found in 93% of cases, followed by cerebral edema (61%, cerebral contusion (37%, skull bone fractures (35%, etc. Severe alteration of the consciousness was observed in 57% of the cases, while amnesia lasted longer than 4 weeks in 44% of the subjects included in our study. Discussion: This survey demonstrates that the majority of HI victims' is young and middle age males target group exposed to RTA. The increase of vehicles' use in placecountry-regionAlbania is more evident than RTA-related HI, indicating that driving newer vehicles with safer technology or helmets use while motorcycling can potentially decline the fatal outcome.

  6. Missile injuries in head — neck and maxillo-facial region — an experience in eastern nepal

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Ballistic injuries to head-neck and maxillofacial region is quite common problem nowadays. Most of the time the injuries seem to be dreadful but the mechanism of the injuries caused by ballistics and the anatomical conditions of maxillofacial and head-neck region mitigate the severity of the injuries. Proper primary management followed by reconstruction and management of associated injuries decreases the mortality and morbidity of missile injuries in head-neck and maxillofacial region. Eleven...

  7. Head injury predictors in sports trauma--a state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fábio A O; de Sousa, Ricardo J Alves

    2015-08-01

    Head injuries occur in a great variety of sports. Many of these have been associated with neurological injuries, affecting the central nervous system. Some examples are motorsports, cycling, skiing, horse riding, mountaineering and most contact sports such as football, ice and field hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The outcome of head impacts in these sports can be very severe. The worst-case scenarios of permanent disability or even death are possibilities. Over recent decades, many In recent decades, a great number of head injury criteria and respective thresholds have been proposed. However, the available information is much dispersed and a consensus has still not been achieved regarding the best injury criteria or even their thresholds. This review paper gives a thorough overview of the work carried out by the scientific community in the field of impact biomechanics about head injuries sustained during sports activity. The main goal is to review the head injury criteria, as well as their thresholds. Several are reviewed, from the predictors based on kinematics to the ones based on human tissue thresholds. In this work, we start to briefly introduce the head injuries and their mechanisms commonly seen as a result of head trauma in sports. Then, we present and summarize the head injury criteria and their respective thresholds.

  8. Head Injury Secondary to Suspected Child Maltreatment: Results of a Prospective Canadian National Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Susan; Ward, Michelle; Moreau, Katherine; Fortin, Gilles; King, Jim; MacKay, Morag; Plint, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence, clinical features, and demographic profile of head injury secondary to suspected child maltreatment (abuse or neglect) in Canada to help inform the development and evaluation of prevention programs for abusive head injuries. Methods: From March 1, 2005 to February 28, 2008, an average of 2,545…

  9. A video analysis of head injuries satisfying the criteria for a head injury assessment in professional Rugby Union: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ross; Raftery, Martin; Fuller, Gordon Ward; Hester, Ben; Kemp, Simon; Cross, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    Concussion is the most common match injury in professional Rugby Union, accounting for 25% of match injuries. The primary prevention of head injuries requires that the injury mechanism be known so that interventions can be targeted to specifically overall incidence by focusing on characteristics with the greatest propensity to cause a head injury. 611 head injury assessment (HIA) events in professional Rugby Union over a 3-year period were analysed, with specific reference to match events, position, time and nature of head contact. 464 (76%) of HIA events occur during tackles, with the tackler experiencing a significantly greater propensity for an HIA than the ball carrier (1.40 HIAs/1000 tackles for the tackler vs 0.54 HIAs/1000 tackles for the ball carrier, incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.59). Propensity was significantly greater for backline players than forwards (IRR 1.54, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.84), but did not increase over the course of the match. Head to head contact accounted for the most tackler HIAs, with the greatest propensity. By virtue of its high propensity and frequency, the tackle should be the focus for interventions that may include law change and technique education. A specific investigation of the characteristics of the tackle is warranted to refine the approach to preventative strategies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Chronic post-traumatic headache after mild head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard, Dorte; Forchhammer, Hysse; Teasdale, Tom

    2014-01-01

    to or above the cut-off score for having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the HTQ. In terms of demographics and headache, the groups were comparable except the CPTH group were more often without affiliation to the labour market ( P ...BACKGROUND: The aetiology behind chronic post-traumatic headache (CPTH) after mild head injury is unclear and management is complicated. In order to optimize treatment strategies we aimed to characterize a CPTH population. METHODS: Ninety patients with CPTH and 45 patients with chronic primary...... headaches were enrolled from the Danish Headache Center. All patients were interviewed about demographic and headache data. They completed the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire, SF-36 and a headache diary. RESULTS: The CPTH group experienced more cognitive...

  11. Variations in the Presentation of Aphasia in Patients with Closed Head Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Oliver Kavanagh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  12. Variations in the presentation of aphasia in patients with closed head injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara Oliver

    2012-01-31

    Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  13. Motocross-associated head and spine injuries in adult patients evaluated in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Oliveira J E; Fernanda Bellolio, M; Smith, Elisa M; Daniels, David J; Lohse, Christine M; Campbell, Ronna L

    2017-10-01

    Motor vehicle-related injuries (including off-road) are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and acute traumatic spinal cord injury in the United States. To describe motocross-related head and spine injuries of adult patients presenting to an academic emergency department (ED). We performed an observational cohort study of adult ED patients evaluated for motocross-related injuries from 2010 through 2015. Electronic health records were reviewed and data extracted using a standardized review process. A total of 145 motocross-related ED visits (143 unique patients) were included. Overall, 95.2% of patients were men with a median age of 25years. Sixty-seven visits (46.2%) were associated with head or spine injuries. Forty-three visits (29.7%) were associated with head injuries, and 46 (31.7%) were associated with spine injuries. Among the 43 head injuries, 36 (83.7%) were concussions. Seven visits (16.3%) were associated with at least 1 head abnormality identified by computed tomography, including skull fracture (n=2), subdural hematoma (n=1), subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=4), intraparenchymal hemorrhage (n=3), and diffuse axonal injury (n=3). Among the 46 spine injuries, 32 (69.6%) were acute spinal fractures. Seven patients (4.9%) had clinically significant and persistent neurologic injuries. One patient (0.7%) died, and 3 patients had severe TBIs. Adult patients evaluated in the ED after motocross trauma had high rates of head and spine injuries with considerable morbidity and mortality. Almost half had head or spine injuries (or both), with permanent impairment for nearly 5% and death for 0.7%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Protective effects of taurine against closed head injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming; Zhao, Yumei; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2015-01-01

    Taurine, an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, is reported to reduce ischemic brain injury in a dose-dependent manner. This study was designed to investigate whether taurine protected the brain against closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Taurine was administered intravenously 30 min after CHI. It was found that taurine lessened body-weight loss and improved neurological functions at 7 days after CHI. Moreover, it lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced activity of superoxide dismutase and the level of glutathione, and reduced levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. In addition, it attenuated neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. All of these effects were dose dependent. These data demonstrated the dose-dependent protection of taurine against experimental CHI and suggest that taurine treatment might be beneficial in reducing trauma-induced oxidative damage to the brain, thus showing the potential for clinical implications.

  15. Conventional vs accelerated fractionation in head and neck cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    From October 1990 to March 1994, 90 patients entered a prospectively randomised trial in head and neck cancer. All patients had verified squamous cell carcinoma and were referred for primary radiation therapy. Tumours originated in the oral cavity in 25, oropharynx in 37, larynx in 15 and hypopharynx in 13 cases. Patients' stages were predominantely T3 and T4 (71/90) and had lymph node metastases (60/90). Seventy-nine male patients and 11 female patients, with a median age of 57 years (range ...

  16. Position paper on fatal abusive head injuries in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, M E; Graham, M A; Handy, T C; Jentzen, J M; Monteleone, J A

    2001-06-01

    This article represents the work of the National Association of Medical Examiners Ad Hoc Committee on shaken baby syndrome. Abusive head injuries include injuries caused by shaking as well as impact to the head, either by directly striking the head or by causing the head to strike another object or surface. Because of anatomic and developmental differences in the brain and skull of the young child, the mechanisms and types of injuries that affect the head differ from those that affect the older child or adult. The mechanism of injury produced by inflicted head injuries in these children is most often rotational movement of the brain within the cranial cavity. Rotational movement of the brain damages the nervous system by creating shearing forces, which cause diffuse axonal injury with disruption of axons and tearing of bridging veins, which causes subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages, and is very commonly associated with retinal schisis and hemorrhages. Recognition of this mechanism of injury may be helpful in severe acute rotational brain injuries because it facilitates understanding of such clinical features as the decrease in the level of consciousness and respiratory distress seen in these injured children. The pathologic findings of subdural hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and retinal hemorrhages are offered as "markers" to assist in the recognition of the presence of shearing brain injury in young children.

  17. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography...... mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P ....1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury....

  18. Epidemiological features of 1 281 patients with head injuries arising from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Chao-hua

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To analyze the epidemiologi-cal features of patients with head injuries in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Methods: Medical records of patients with head inju-ries who were admitted to 14 hospitals in Deyang, Mianyang and Chengdu cities after the earthquake were retrospec-tively analyzed. The patients’ age, gender, cause of injury, diagnosis, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1 281 patients with 807 males and 474 females were included. According to Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission, 1 029 patients presented with mild injury, 161 moderate injury and 91 severe injury. The major cause of injuries (83% was bruise by collapsed buildings. Open head injuries accounted for 60.8%. A total of 720 pa-tients underwent surgical treatment. Good recovery was achieved in 1 056 patients, moderate disability in 106, se-vere disability in 71, coma in 29 and death in 19. Conclusions: In this series, male patients were more than female patients. The main cause of injury was hit by falling objects due to building collapse. Minor and open craniocerebral injuries were most common. The epidemio-logical features of head injuries in Wenchuan earthquake may be helpful to preparation for future rescue. Key words: Brain injuries; Epidemiology; Earthquakes; Rescue work

  19. Epidemiology of head injury in Malaysian children: a hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohana, J; Ong, L C; Abu Hassan, A

    1998-09-01

    A prospective observational study was carried out at the Emergency Department, Hospital Kuala Lumpur to determine the proportion of accidental head injury among children and the circumstances of injury. The study was carried out from November 1993 to January 1994 on all children below 14 years who presented to the Emergency Department with accidental head injury. Accidental head injury made up (4.75%) of all cases seen at the Casualty Department. The ratio of boys to girls was 2:1. The mean age of head injured children was 5.2 (S.D. 3.63) years. The leading cause of head injury was fall (63%) followed by road traffic accidents (RTA) in (30.7%) while the rest were due to 'impact' (injury caused by flying object or missiles) injuries. More than half (54.4%) of those injured in RTA were pedestrians. Pedestrian injury was particularly important in the 5-< 14 years age group, where adult supervision was lacking in two thirds of the children. None of the patients who were involved in vehicle-related injuries had used a suitable protective or restraining device. All three patients who died were from this group. This study emphasises the need for stricter enforcement of laws related to the use of protective devices and measures to decrease child pedestrian injury. The issues of lack of adult supervision, both in and outside the home need to be addressed.

  20. Continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with/without mitomycin C in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrowsky, W; Naude, J; Widder, J; Dobrowsky, E; Millesi, W; Pavelka, R; Grasl, C; Reichel, M

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of mitomycin C to an accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. The aim was to test a very short schedule with/without mitomycin C (MMC) with conventional fractionation in histologically verified squamous cell carinoma of the head and neck region. Methods and Ma

  1. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HFA-RCT) with mitomycin C for advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Selzer, E; Potter, R

    2004-01-01

    To investigate efficacy and feasibility of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy combined with mitomycin C, patients with locally advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region were administered 64-66 Gy in four weeks and mitomycin C (20 mg/m(2)) on day five. Twenty-

  2. Head linear and rotational accelerations and craniocervical loads in lateral impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.; Phillippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine lateral impact-induced three-dimensional temporal head center of gravity linear and angular accelerations, and craniocervical forces and moments from post mortem human subject (PMHS) sled tests and compare with the European side impact dummy, ES-II, respon

  3. Epidemiological features of 1281 patients with head injuries arising from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chao-hua; LI Qiang; LAN Zhi-gang; LIU Jia-gang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the epidemiological features of patients with head injuries in the 2008Wenchuan earthquake.Methods: Medical records of patients with head injuries who were admitted to 14 hospitals in Deyang,Mianyang and Chengdu cities after the earthquake were retrospectively analyzed.The patients' age,gender,cause of injury,diagnosis,and outcome were analyzed retrospectively.Results: A total of 1 281 patients with 807 males and 474 females were included.According to Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission,1 029 patients presented with mild injury,161 moderate injury and 91 severe injury.The major cause of injuries (83%) was bruise by collapsed buildings.Open head injuries accounted for 60.8%.A total of 720 patients underwent surgical treatment.Good recovery was achieved in 1 056 patients,moderate disability in 106,severe disability in 71,coma in 29 and death in 19.Conclusions: In this series,male patients were more than female patients.The main cause of injury was hit by falling objects due to building collapse.Minor and open craniocerebral injuries were most common.The epidemiological features of head injuries in Wenchuan earthquake may be helpful to preparation for future rescue.

  4. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-03-22

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Concussions and Head Injuries in English Community Rugby Union Match Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon P; Trewartha, Grant; England, Michael; Goodison, William; Stokes, Keith A

    2017-02-01

    Previous research has described general injury patterns in community-level rugby union, but specific information on time-loss head injuries has not been reported. To establish the incidence and nature of significant time-loss head injuries in English community rugby match play, and to identify the injury risk for specific contact events. Descriptive epidemiology study. Over 6 seasons, injury information was collected from 46 (2009-2010), 67 (2010-2011), 76 (2011-2012), 50 (2012-2013), 67 (2013-2014), and 58 (2014-2015) English community rugby clubs (Rugby Football Union levels 3-9) over a total of 175,940 hours of player match exposure. Club injury management staff reported information for all head injuries sustained during match play whereby the player was absent for 8 days or greater. Clubs were subdivided into semiprofessional (mean player age, 24.6 ± 4.7 years), amateur (24.9 ± 5.1 years), and recreational (25.6 ± 6.1 years) playing levels. Contact events from a sample of 30 matches filmed over seasons 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 provided mean values for the frequency of contact events. The overall incidence for time-loss head injuries was 2.43 injuries per 1000 player match hours, with a higher incidence for the amateur (2.78; 95% CI, 2.37-3.20) compared with recreational (2.20; 95% CI, 1.86-2.53) ( P = .032) playing level but not different to the semiprofessional (2.31; 95% CI, 1.83-2.79) playing level. Concussion was the most common time-loss head injury, with 1.46 per 1000 player match hours. The tackle event was associated with 64% of all head injuries and 74% of all concussions. There was also a higher risk of injuries per tackle (0.33 per 1000 events; 95% CI, 0.30-0.37) compared with all other contact events. Concussion was the most common head injury diagnosis, although it is likely that this injury was underreported. Continuing education programs for medical staff and players are essential for the improved identification and management of

  6. A new PMHS model for lumbar spine injuries during vertical acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Storvik, Steven G; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Fijalkowski, Ronald J; Pintar, Frank A; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2011-08-01

    Ejection from military aircraft exerts substantial loads on the lumbar spine. Fractures remain common, although the overall survivability of the event has considerably increased over recent decades. The present study was performed to develop and validate a biomechanically accurate experimental model for the high vertical acceleration loading to the lumbar spine that occurs during the catapult phase of aircraft ejection. The model consisted of a vertical drop tower with two horizontal platforms attached to a monorail using low friction linear bearings. A total of four human cadaveric spine specimens (T12-L5) were tested. Each lumbar column was attached to the lower platform through a load cell. Weights were added to the upper platform to match the thorax, head-neck, and upper extremity mass of a 50th percentile male. Both platforms were raised to the drop height and released in unison. Deceleration characteristics of the lower platform were modulated by foam at the bottom of the drop tower. The upper platform applied compressive inertial loads to the top of the specimen during deceleration. All specimens demonstrated complex bending during ejection simulations, with the pattern dependent upon the anterior-posterior location of load application. The model demonstrated adequate inter-specimen kinematic repeatability on a spinal level-by-level basis under different subfailure loading scenarios. One specimen was then exposed to additional tests of increasing acceleration to induce identifiable injury and validate the model as an injury-producing system. Multiple noncontiguous vertebral fractures were obtained at an acceleration of 21 g with 488 g/s rate of onset. This clinically relevant trauma consisted of burst fracture at L1 and wedge fracture at L4. Compression of the vertebral body approached 60% during the failure test, with -6,106 N axial force and 168 Nm flexion moment. Future applications of this model include developing a better understanding of the vertebral

  7. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  8. Curative effect of wilsonii injecta on severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 曾凡俊; 杨立斌; 柴建康; 李开慧; 卢敏; 匡永勤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the curative effect of wilsoniiinjecta on severe head injury (SHI).Methods: A total of 120 patients with SHI weredivided randomly into 2 groups, the patients treated withconventional methods as Group A (n = 60) and the patientstreated with wilsonii injecta as Group B (n = 60). Thechanges of neural function indexes were evaluated withGlasgow Coma Scale (GCS) before treatment and withGlasgow Outcome Scale ( GOS ) after treatment,simultaneously, the paramneters of hemorrheological indexes(HI), brain electrical activity map ( BEAM ) andtranscranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were observedbefore and after treatment.Results: In Group B, the clinical GCS, the HI, theBEAM and the prognosis GOS were improved much morethan those in Group A. And the TCD parameters in GroupB decreased, which had significant difference comparedwith that in Group A (P <0.01).Conclusions: Wilsonii injecta can rapidly improve theinjured persons' conscious states, the abnormal BEAM and the surviving quality. It suggests that the improvement of the HI is related to the relief of the vasospasm of thearterial blood vessels in the brain, which may be one of theimportant mechanisms of wilsonii injecta in improving theprognosis.

  9. Resultant linear acceleration of an instrumented head form does not differ between junior and collegiate taekwondo athletes’ kicks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David O’Sullivan; Gabriel P. Fife; Willy Pieter; Taehee Lim; Insik Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of various taekwondo kicks and age (school level) in absolute terms and relative body mass on the resultant linear acceleration (RLA) of an instrumented head form. Methods: Forty-eight male (middle school: 16; high school: 16; university: 16) taekwondo athletes were recruited for this study. Subjects performed 10 turning, 10 jump spinning hook, and 10 jump back kicks on a Hybrid II head mounted on a height-adjustable frame. Results: A 2-way (School × Kick) MANOVA was used to determine the differences in RLA between schools (age groups) by type of kick. There was no univariate School main effect for absolute RLA (η2=0.06) and RLA relative to body mass (η2=0.06). No univariate Kick main effects were found for absolute (η2=0.06) and relative RLA (η2=0.06). Conclusion: It is of concern that RLA did not significantly differ between school levels, implying that young taekwondo athletes generate similar forces to their adult counterparts, possibly exposing young athletes to an increased risk for head injuries.

  10. "Heading" and neck injuries in soccer: a review of biomechanics and potential long-term effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Michael J; Agesen, Thomas; Malanga, Gerard A

    2005-10-01

    Although soccer has a lower injury rate than does American football, injuries to the head and neck do occur. Indeed, soccer is classified as a contact sport. The potential for cervical injuries from the maneuver known as "heading" are of particular concern. This review provides a synopsis of soccer-related head and neck injuries, an overview of the biomechanics of trauma, and a rational approach to evaluating patients. This review was conducted to assess and evaluate existing literature on the biomechanics of the act of heading in soccer and the potential for acute and long-term injury to the head and neck. The resulting work is based on literature searches of the PubMed and Medline databases, textbook reviews, and bibliographies of articles and textbooks obtained during the search. Findings from several studies were summarized and critiqued. Biomechanics, anatomy, pathophysiology, and their relation to the act of heading in soccer were also synthesized into the discussion. Relevant studies of athletes in other sports where activity can affect the neck and head in a manner similar to heading were also considered. The act of heading in soccer involves the athlete's entire body, and studies have used electromyography to define the activity of neck musculature during heading. The majority of head and neck injuries in soccer occur secondary to impacts other than those that occur during heading, however, rare case reports of serious injury exist. Degenerative bony changes in the cervical spine of soccer players have been noted in a few studies, but the connection with heading is not well established. Data from research in other sports, particularly American football and rugby, suggest a predisposition to degenerative disease of the neck secondary to axial loading mechanisms; the exact relevance of these studies to heading and soccer is unclear. The complex biomechanics of heading in soccer are not completely defined, especially with regard to long-term effects on the

  11. Paediatric head injury admissions over a 10-year period in a regional neurosurgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, I; Mathieson, C; Sexton, I; Forsyth, S; Brown, J; St George, E J

    2012-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in childhood. A retrospective study of all paediatric head injuries admitted to the neurosurgical unit for the West of Scotland over a 10-year period was performed to assess the impact of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence head injury guidelines on the admission rate and to determine the associated risk factors, causes, severity and outcomes of these injuries. There were 564 admissions between 1998 and 2007. The median age at presentation was nine years and two months. There was no change in the admission rate, injury mechanism or severity of head injury admitted over the period studied. A relationship was observed between the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation Score and the incidence of head injury (P = 0.05). Alcohol was reported as a causative factor in only a small number of cases, and moderate to severe head injuries were more commonly identified as a result of road traffic accidents.

  12. Clinical outcome and cost effectiveness of early tracheostomy in isolated severe head injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Tariq Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In patients with severe TBI, ET decreases total days of ventilation and ICU stay, and is associated with a decrease in the frequency of VAP. ET should be considered in severe head injury patients requiring prolong ventilatory support.

  13. A case of organic brain syndrome following head injury successfully treated with carbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvy, P F; van de Wetering, B J; Meerwaldt, J D; Bruijn, J B

    1988-03-01

    A case of organic brain syndrome occurring in relation to psychological stress 2 years after a severe head injury is described. Treatment with haloperidol resulted only in slight improvement. A dramatic improvement was achieved with carbamazepine.

  14. Acute onset of trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresis and dysphagia after mild head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkekas, Nikolaos; Primikiris, Panagiotis; Georgakoulias, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the rare and first documented case of concomitant microvascular decompression of trigeminal, facial and glossopharyngeal nerves for the management of intractable to medical therapy acute onset of trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresis and dysphagia after mild head injury.

  15. Head, face and neck injury in youth rugby: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P; Finch, C F; Wolfe, R

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the incidence of head, neck and facial injuries in youth rugby was determined, and the associated risk factors were assessed. Data were extracted from a cluster randomised controlled trial of headgear with the football teams as the unit of randomisation. No effect was observed for headgear use on injury rates, and the data were pooled. General school and club-based community competitive youth rugby in the 2002 and 2003 seasons. Young male rugby union football players participating in under-13, under 15, under 18 and under 21 years competitions. Eighty-two teams participated in year 1 and 87 in year 2. Injury rates for all body regions combined, head, neck and face calculated for game and missed game injuries. 554 head, face and neck injuries were recorded within a total of 28 902 h of rugby game exposure. Level of play and player position were related to injury risk. Younger players had the lowest rates of injury; forwards, especially the front row had the highest rate of neck injury; and inside backs had the highest rate of injuries causing the player to miss a game. Contact events, including the scrum and tackle, were the main events leading to injury. Injury prevention must focus on the tackle and scrum elements of a youth rugby game.

  16. Pseudoaneurysm of the occipital artery: an unusual cause of persisting headache after minor head injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the extracranial arteries in the scalp are uncommon sequelae of head injury. We report on a patient who presented four weeks after a minor head injury with a tender, pulsating and enlarging mass in the course of the left occipital artery. There was associated headache radiating to the vertex. Computed tomographic angiography confirmed the lesion to be a pseudoaneurysm of the occipital artery. The lump was resected with complete resolution of symptoms.

  17. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome following Head Injury in a Child Managed Successfully with Fludrocortisone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Chaudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral salt wasting (CSW syndrome is an important cause of hyponatremia in head injuries apart from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH. Proper diagnosis and differentiation between these two entities are necessary for management as the treatment is quite opposite in both conditions. Fludrocortisone can help in managing CSW where alone saline infusion does not work. We report a 17-month-old female child with head injury managed successfully with saline infusion and fludrocortisone.

  18. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome following Head Injury in a Child Managed Successfully with Fludrocortisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nagendra; Pathak, Santosh; Gupta, Murli Manohar; Agrawal, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome is an important cause of hyponatremia in head injuries apart from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Proper diagnosis and differentiation between these two entities are necessary for management as the treatment is quite opposite in both conditions. Fludrocortisone can help in managing CSW where alone saline infusion does not work. We report a 17-month-old female child with head injury managed successfully with saline infusion and fludrocortisone.

  19. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  20. Nail gun injuries to the head with minimal neurological consequences: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoshi, Ziyad; AlKherayf, Fahad; Da Silva, Vasco; Lesiuk, Howard

    2016-03-16

    An estimated 3700 individuals are seen annually in US emergency departments for nail gun-related injuries. Approximately 45 cases have been reported in the literature concerning nail gun injuries penetrating the cranium. These cases pose a challenge for the neurosurgeon because of the uniqueness of each case, the dynamics of high pressure nail gun injuries, and the surgical planning to remove the foreign body without further vascular injury or uncontrolled intracranial hemorrhage. Here we present four cases of penetrating nail gun injuries with variable presentations. Case 1 is of a 33-year-old white man who sustained 10 nail gunshot injuries to his head. Case 2 is of a 51-year-old white man who sustained bi-temporal nail gun injuries to his head. Cases 3 and 4 are of two white men aged 22 years and 49 years with a single nail gun injury to the head. In the context of these individual cases and a review of similar cases in the literature we present surgical approaches and considerations in the management of nail gun injuries to the cranium. Case 1 presented with cranial nerve deficits, Case 2 required intubation for low Glasgow Coma Scale, while Cases 3 and 4 were neurologically intact on presentation. Three patients underwent angiography for assessment of vascular injury and all patients underwent surgical removal of foreign objects using a vice-grip. No neurological deficits were found in these patients on follow-up. Nail gun injuries can present with variable clinical status; mortality and morbidity is low for surgically managed isolated nail gun-related injuries to the head. The current case series describes the surgical use of a vice-grip for a good grip of the nail head and controlled extraction, and these patients appear to have a good postoperative prognosis with minimal neurological deficits postoperatively and on follow-up.

  1. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2015-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. PMID:22227592

  2. Characteristics of Syntactic Comprehension Deficits Following Closed Head Injury versus Left Cerebrovascular Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Hinz, Susan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two studies examined the ability to assign thematic roles and to coindex referentially dependent noun phrases in closed head injured adults (N=20), adult stroke patients (N=20), and normal adults (N=20). Results suggested that syntactic comprehension disturbances are similar following left cerebral hemisphere infarction and closed head injury.…

  3. Characteristics of Syntactic Comprehension Deficits Following Closed Head Injury versus Left Cerebrovascular Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Hinz, Susan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two studies examined the ability to assign thematic roles and to coindex referentially dependent noun phrases in closed head injured adults (N=20), adult stroke patients (N=20), and normal adults (N=20). Results suggested that syntactic comprehension disturbances are similar following left cerebral hemisphere infarction and closed head injury.…

  4. Acceleration-caused injury of the cervical spine. Whiplash injury; Beschleunigungsverletzung der Halswirbelsaeule. HWS-Schleudertrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedig, Hans-Dieter (eds.) [Kanzlei Dr. W.G. Schmidt, Sonthofen (Germany); Graf, Michael; Grill, Christian

    2009-07-01

    Acceleration injuries of the cervical spine are mostly caused by car accidents. Due to the high traffic density and the increasing number of car accidents with personal injuries the number of concerned persons is also increasing. A large percentage of injured persons suffer ongoing troubles following ineffective therapy trials up to occupational disability. Therefore the whiplash injury is a significant medical and legal problem. The book includes contributions of international experts on the latest state of research and the actual knowledge on the controversial discussed field. An interdisciplinary forum discusses medical, injury-mechanical, consultant-related and legal questions and therapeutic approaches that might be successful. [German] Beschleunigungsverletzungen der Halswirbelsaeule treten ueberwiegend nach Autounfaellen auf. Aufgrund der hohen Verkehrsdichte und der steigenden Anzahl an Verkehrsunfaellen mit Personenschaeden steigt auch die Zahl der Betroffenen stetig an. Einer grossen Zahl von Unfallgeschaedigten, die nach kurzer Zeit beschwerdefrei leben koennen, steht leider eine wachsende Zahl von Betroffenen mit anhaltenden Beschwerden, erfolglosen Therapieversuchen bis hin zur Berufsunfaehigkeit gegenueber. Das 'HWS-Schleudertrauma' stellt nach wie vor ein erhebliches medizinisches und rechtliches Problem dar. In diesem Buch beschreiben international ausgewiesene Experten den neuesten Forschungsstand, das aktuelle Wissen und die Lehrmeinungen auf diesem kontrovers diskutierten und komplexen Gebiet. In einem interdisziplinaeren Ansatz werden medizinische, verletzungsmechanische, gutachterliche und gerichtliche Fragestellungen diskutiert und Erfolg versprechende Therapieansaetze eroertert. Aerzte, Juristen, Versicherungen und Betroffene werden in einen gemeinsamen Dialog gebracht, mit dem Ziel, konstruktive Loesungen zu erarbeiten. Eine praktische Arbeitshilfe - das Buch fuer alle, die mit dieser Problematik befasst sind. (orig.)

  5. No neurochemical evidence for brain injury caused by heading in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Jonsson, Michael; Rasulzada, Abdullah; Popa, Cornel; Styrud, Ewa; Hietala, Max Albert; Rosengren, Lars; Wallin, Anders; Blennow, Kaj

    2007-09-01

    The possible injurious effect to the brain of heading in soccer is a matter of discussion. To determine whether standardised headings in soccer are associated with increased levels of biochemical markers for neuronal injury in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. 23 male amateur soccer players took part in a heading training session involving heading a ball kicked from a distance of 30 m at least 10 m forward. Ten players performed 10 and 13 players performed 20 approved headings. The players underwent lumbar puncture and serum sampling 7-10 days after the headings. The study also included 10 healthy male non-athletic control subjects. CSF was analysed for neurofilament light protein, total tau, glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100B and albumin concentrations. Serum was analysed for S-100B and albumin. None of the biomarker levels were abnormal and there were no significant differences between any of the three groups, except for a slightly increased CSF S-100B concentration in controls compared with headers. Biomarker levels did not correlate with the number of headings performed. Repeated low-severity head impacts due to heading in soccer are not associated with any neurochemical signs of injury to the brain.

  6. Perfusion Computed Tomography in the Acute Phase of Mild Head Injury : Regional Dysfunction and Prognostic Value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Rodiger, Lars A.; Stewart, Roy E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic brain injury is a major Cause of disability and death. Most patients sustain a mild head injury with a subgroup that experiences disabling symptoms interfering with return to work. Brain imaging in the acute phase is not predictive of outcome, as 20% of noncontrast computed tomo

  7. Forensic medical study on morphology and formative mechanism of blunt head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Hong-wei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To study the patterns and morphologic characteristics of blunt head injury and analyse its formative mechanism in attempt to provide references for medicolegal expertise. Methods: The statistical analysis was done in terms of gender, age, as well as the nature, pattern, location, and feature of the injuries. Results: Among the 202 cases of head injury-induced death, 124 were male and 78 female with the age ranging from 1-81 years. Death caused by homicide was dominant (106, 52.5%, followed by suicide (49, 24.3% and accident (44, 21.8%. The majority of suicide-induced death were by falling from height, and traffic crash was responsible for majority of unexpected death cases. The morphology and pathogenesis of the injuries varied according to differences on the mode, magnitude, and orientation of the outside force giving rise to blunt injury as well as the character of vulnerants. Conclusion: Studies on the morphology and its forma-tive rationale of blunt head injury will offer easy access to medicolegal expertise on the mode and character of the injury. Key words: Brain; Head injuries, closed; Cranioce-rebral trauma; Forensic medicine

  8. Chronic Post-Traumatic Headache after Head Injury in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Charlotte; Nagiub, George; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq

    2008-01-01

    This was a prospective, observational study of children aged 3 to 15 years admitted to hospital with head injury (HI). Demographic data and information on the nature of the HI, and history of premorbid headache were collected. A structured telephone questionnaire was used to interview parents and children 2 months after injury and at 4-monthly…

  9. Computerised tomography after recent severe head injury in patients without acute intracranial haematoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, Jos; Jennett, Bryan

    1979-01-01

    Sixty patients with severe head injury who did not have an acute intracranial haematoma on CAT scanning are reviewed. The scans are correlated with the level of consciousness at the time of scanning and with the outcome six months after injury. The initial scan was interpreted as being normal in 38%

  10. Chronic Post-Traumatic Headache after Head Injury in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Charlotte; Nagiub, George; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq

    2008-01-01

    This was a prospective, observational study of children aged 3 to 15 years admitted to hospital with head injury (HI). Demographic data and information on the nature of the HI, and history of premorbid headache were collected. A structured telephone questionnaire was used to interview parents and children 2 months after injury and at 4-monthly…

  11. Reconstruction of Head Injury Cases Arising from Falls Using the UCD Brain Trauma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Doorly, Mary C.; Horgan, T. J.; Gilchrist, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    While Road Traffic Accidents continue to be the largest contributor to head injury, falls are usually second in prevalence. This paper looks at numerical modelling techniques, namely multibody body dynamics and finite element methods, in order to reconstruct two real-life accident cases arising from falls. Various modelling strategies are explored, and the results are compared with existing published brain injury tolerance levels.

  12. The fronto-temporal component in mild and moderately severe head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, JM; vanZomeren, AH; vanderNaalt, J

    The history of the identification of the so-called (fronto-)temporal lobe contusion is reviewed. Treatment of minor head injuries actually starts with the right diagnosis. Injuries of the temporal lobe, characterized by a comparatively long period of post-traumatic amnesia should be distinguished

  13. Capabilities of Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries Induced by Ballistic Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Balandin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The limiting performance of ballistically loaded helmets designed to reduce head injuries is studied analytically. The projectile does not penetrate the helmet. This analysis evaluates the absolute minimum of the peak displacement of the helmet shell relative to the head, provided that criteria measuring the severity of head injuries lie within prescribed limits. Rather than optimize a specific design configuration, e.g. a viscoelastic foam liner, characteristics of a time-dependent force representing the helmet liner are calculated. The formulation reduces the limiting performance analysis to an optimal control problem.

  14. HIGH BLOOD LEVELS PROCALCITONIN AS SYSTEMIC IMFLAMATORY RESPONSE SYNDROME PREDICTOR IN SEVERE AND MODERATE HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sinaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous studies have shown that procalcitonin (PCT was not related to degree of trauma. High PCT serum levels have been found in patients with bacterial or fungal infection and also in acute phase of trauma. Currently, there has been no research discussed about changes in serum levels of PCT in particular head injuries and severe head injuries. Moderate and severe head injuries were common trauma cases in Emergency Room (ER and had high mortality rate. Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, moderate and severe head injuries were scored between 3 and 13. This research aim to determine whether high blood levels PCT can be used as a predictor of the occurrence of SIRS. Method: A cohort prospective study was applied in this research to determine high blood levels of PCT as a predictor for SIRS in moderate and severe head injury. This study was conducted from June 2013 - August 2013 at Sanglah General Hospital with 40 research subjects. Data was presented in tables and analyzed with Chi Square test at 95% CI and p <0.05% was considered significant. Results: From the 40 samples, there were 34 males (85% and 6 females (15%, 18 samples (45% had moderate head injury and 22 samples (65% had severe head injury. One sample (2.5 % was 0-10 years old, 15 samples (37.5% were 10-20 years old, 13 samples (32.5% were 20-40 years old, 7 samples (17.5% were 40-60 years old and 4 samples (10% were>60 years old. PCT levels in the blood obtained on day first were normal in 6 samples (15% and elevated in 34 samples (85%, SIRS (+ were found in 35 samples (87.5% and 5 samples (12.5% were SIRS (-. Using bivariate analysis between PCT levels and SIRS showed p = 0.000 (p < 0.05, and multivariate analysis of the control variables showed no significant correlation between variables with PCT levels. Conclusion: From 40 samples moderate head injury and severe head injury, there were 34 samples (85% with elevated PCT level on the first day, while 35 samples (87.5% had SIRS

  15. The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Scott R; Olivier, Jake; Churches, Tim; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2011-11-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries given the ongoing debate in Australia as to the efficacy of this measure at a population level. We used hospital admissions data from New South Wales, Australia, from a 36 month period centred at the time legislation came into effect. Negative binomial regression of hospital admission counts of head and limb injuries to cyclists were performed to identify differential changes in head and limb injury rates at the time of legislation. Interaction terms were included to allow different trends between injury types and pre- and post-law time periods. To avoid the issue of lack of cyclist exposure data, we assumed equal exposures between head and limb injuries which allowed an arbitrary proxy exposure to be used in the model. As a comparison, analyses were also performed for pedestrian data to identify which of the observed effects were specific to cyclists. In general, the models identified a decreasing trend in injury rates prior to legislation, an increasing trend thereafter and a drop in rates at the time legislation was enacted, all of which were thought to represent background effects in transport safety. Head injury rates decreased significantly more than limb injury rates at the time of legislation among cyclists but not among pedestrians. This additional benefit was attributed to compulsory helmet legislation. Despite numerous data limitations, we identified evidence of a positive effect of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries at a population level such that repealing the law cannot be justified.

  16. Severe head injuries and intracranial pressure monitoring outcome in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Farrokhi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Head injury is still a major cause of death and disability. Despite advances in intensive monitoring and clinical practice, little data is available to show the predictive value of intracranial pressure monitoring in assessment of the outcome of head injuries. This study was undertaken to evaluate this predictive value and is the first Iranian study in which ICP monitoring has been included. METHODS: In a prospective study from September 1999 to September 2003, all head- injured patients (53 patients with GCS of 4-8 who were admitted to Nemazee Hospital of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were included in this study. Subarachnoid screw method or ventricular catheter via ventriculostomy was used to determine intracranial pressure. Patients were monitored for 3 days and were followed for two years at 6-month intervals. RESULTS: Car accidents were the most common cause of head injury (43.3% and 43.3% of patients had GCS of 8. Sixty percent of patients had abnormal intracranial pressure. The patients were most commonly in their first decade of life (18.8% and 81% of patients were male. Controlling increased intracranial pressure was successful in 60% of patients and resulted in a decrease of mortality rate from 60% to 15%. CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment of increased intracranial pressure in head injury patients would be beneficial in reducing mortality and morbidity rates. KEY WORDS: Southern Iran, head injury, outcome, intracranial pressure.

  17. University of Virginia prospective study of football-induced minor head injury: status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, W M; Rimel, R W; Nelson, W E

    1987-01-01

    We have recently completed the field work phase of a 4-year prospective study of football-induced minor head injuries. Players from 10 University football teams were monitored up to 4 years, and a brief neuropsychological and psychosocial assessment battery was administered to them up to five times before and after injury. Objectives of this project focus on the frequency of head injuries in college football, the impairments that might result from such injury, the duration of impairments, the time course of their recovery, and the possibility of cumulative effects of multiple injuries during the player's college career. Approximately 2500 players were monitored during the study, and nearly 200 players were restudied following minor head injuries. A series of nearly 60 players with orthopedic injuries were tested using the same protocol, and a college student control series of 50 patients were similarly studied. Data analyses are currently underway, and the first report of the findings of this study will be available soon. This article has described the objectives and design of this study, outlined the neuropsychological and psychosocial assessment protocol, and discussed some of the issues related to project implementation. Current data analyses focus on the size of the effects of minor head injury on cognitive and psychosocial performance observed following minor head injury. Upon completion of the initial data analyses, our analysis plan includes having at least two neuropsychologists make independent assessments of the clinical significance of the findings. Similar assessments will be made of the neurophysical symptoms and complaints and psychosocial performance of players after injury.

  18. Pattern of head injuries in Malta (EU): a small Mediterranean island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Shawn; Ansari, Sohail; Zrinzo, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    We have reviewed all acute neurosurgical admissions between December 2007 and December 2009. Hundred and nine (46.6%) of our admissions were head injuries. A subdural haematoma(SDH) was found in 51.4%(56) of the head injuries. Of these, 50/56 presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS) of 14 to 15, 41.1% (23) of these SDH needed surgery. The commonest mode of injury was falls [67.9%(74) of head injuries]. Risk factors for falls are co-morbidities which are particular to an elderly population, these include osteoarthritis and audio/ visual impairment. Falls are more common in rural areas where elderly are more likely to feel comfortable to walk and sustain trivial falls resulting in chronic subdural heamatomas.

  19. Tau hyperphosphorylation in apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice after closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, L; Chen, Y; Shohami, E; Michaelson, D M

    2000-05-15

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have learning and memory impairments that are associated with specific neurochemical changes and hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the cytoskeletal protein tau. Furthermore, such mice are highly susceptible to the sequelae of brain trauma and their ability to recover from head injury is impaired. In the present study we investigated the extent that the neuronal maintenance and repair impairments of apoE-deficient mice are related to aberrations at the tau phosphorylation level. This was pursued by subjecting control and apoE-deficient mice to closed head injury (CHI) and examination, utilizing immunoblot assays, of the resulting effects on tau phosphorylation. The results thus obtained revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice is hyperphosphorylated before CHI and that this insult results in transient tau hyperphosphorylation, whose extent and time course in the two mouse groups varied markedly. Tau hyperphosphorylation in the injured controls was maximal by about 4 hr after injury and reverted to basal levels by 24 hr. In contrast, almost no head injury-induced tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the apoE-deficient mice at 4 hr after injury. Some tau hyper-phosphorylation was detected in the head-injured apoE-deficient mice after longer time intervals, but its extent was markedly lower than the maximal values obtained in the head injured controls. These findings show that the chronic neuronal impairments brought about by apoE deficiency and the acute response to head injury are both associated with hyperphosphorylation of the same tau domain and that the ability of apoE-deficient mice to mount the acute tau hyperphosphorylation response to head injury is impaired.

  20. Prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries in children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated severe injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Lee, Lois K; Hoyle, John; Stanley, Rachel M; Gorelick, Marc H; Miskin, Michelle; Atabaki, Shireen M; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2012-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) with severe injury mechanisms in children with minor blunt head trauma but with no other risk factors from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI prediction rules (defined as isolated severe injury mechanisms). Secondary analysis of a large prospective observational cohort study. Twenty-five emergency departments participating in the PECARN. Children with minor blunt head trauma and Glasgow Coma Scale scores of at least 14. Treating clinicians completed a structured data form that included injury mechanism (severity categories defined a priori). Clinically important TBIs were defined as intracranial injuries resulting in death, neurosurgical intervention, intubation for more than 24 hours, or hospital admission for at least 2 nights. We investigated the rate of clinically important TBIs in children with either severe injury mechanisms or isolated severe injury mechanisms. Of the 42,412 patients enrolled in the overall study, 42,099 (99%) had injury mechanisms recorded, and their data were included for analysis. Of all study patients, 5869 (14%) had severe injury mechanisms, and 3302 (8%) had isolated severe injury mechanisms. Overall, 367 children had clinically important TBIs (0.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%-1.0%). Of the 1327 children younger than 2 years with isolated severe injury mechanisms, 4 (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.8%) had clinically important TBIs, as did 12 of the 1975 children 2 years or older (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.3%-1.1%). Children with isolated severe injury mechanisms are at low risk of clinically important TBI, and many do not require emergent neuroimaging.

  1. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  2. Resultant linear acceleration of an instrumented head form does not differ between junior and collegiate taekwondo athletes' kicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O'Sullivan

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: It is of concern that RLA did not significantly differ between school levels, implying that young taekwondo athletes generate similar forces to their adult counterparts, possibly exposing young athletes to an increased risk for head injuries.

  3. Cognitive contributions to theory of mind ability in children with a traumatic head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Naomi Kahana; Milgram, Noach

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to examine the contribution of intellectual abilities, executive functions (EF), and facial emotion recognition to difficulties in Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in children with a traumatic head injury. Israeli children with a traumatic head injury were compared with their non-injured counterparts. Each group included 18 children (12 males) ages 7-13. Measurements included reading the mind in the eyes, facial emotion recognition, reasoning the other's characteristics based on motive and outcome, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, similarities and digit span (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Revised 95 subscales), verbal fluency, and the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Non-injured children performed significantly better on ToM, abstract reasoning, and EF measures compared with children with a traumatic head injury. However, differences in ToM abilities between the groups were no longer significant after controlling for abstract reasoning, working memory, verbal fluency, or facial emotion recognition. Impaired ToM recognition and reasoning abilities after a head injury may result from other cognitive impairments. In children with mild and moderate head injury, poorer performance on ToM tasks may reflect poorer abstract reasoning, a general tendency to concretize stimuli, working memory and verbal fluency deficits, and difficulties in facial emotion recognition, rather than deficits in the ability to understand the other's thoughts and emotions. ToM impairments may be secondary to a range of cognitive deficits in determining social outcomes in this population.

  4. Elderly patients with severe head injury in coma from the outset--has anything changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushewokunze, S; Nannapaneni, R; Gregson, B A; Stobbart, L; Chambers, I R; Mendelow, A D

    2004-12-01

    Advancing age is known to be a determinant of outcome in head injury. We have sought to discover whether there has been any change in the outcome of elderly patients with severe head injury in Newcastle, where these patients have continued to be treated with maximum intervention. A review of prospectively collected data from the Newcastle Head Injury Database for the period 1990 to 2000 was carried out. All patients aged 70 years and above who had sustained a severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Score of 8 or less from the outset) were included. The Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) was determined at 6 months. Seventy-one patients were identified. Fifty-seven (80%) died and 2 (3%) were in a vegetative state, 11 (16%) had severe disability, 1 (1%) had moderate disability and no patients made a good recovery. The natural history of this condition remains unchanged and due consideration should be given to this when evaluating interventions for elderly patients with a severe head injury.

  5. Penetrating Bihemispheric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Collective Review of Gunshot Wounds to the Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Lauren; Cornell, David L; Phillips, Bradley

    2017-08-01

    Head injuries that cross midline structures of the brain are bihemispheric. Other terms have been used to describe such injuries, but bihemispheric is the most accurate and should be standard nomenclature. Bihemispheric head injuries are associated with greater mortality and morbidity than other penetrating traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Currently, there is a tendency to manage severe gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the head nonoperatively, despite reports of improved outcome in military patients treated aggressively. Thus, controversy exists in the management of civilian TBI. PubMed was searched for query terms, and PRISMA guidelines were used. Studies were selected by relevance and inclusion of data regarding etiology, diagnosis, and management of bihemispheric TBI. Case reports, studies not in English, and records lacking information on mechanism or bihemispheric injuries were excluded. Thirteen studies were included and most contained level IV evidence. The mean mortality rate of all head GSWs was 62% in adults and 32% in children. Bihemispheric GSWs had greater mortality rates of 82% in adults and 60% in children. There was a larger proportion of self-inflicted injury in studies with greater rates of bihemispheric injuries. Bihemispheric injuries have greater mortality rates than other penetrating TBI. Violation of midline brain structures such as the diencephalon and mesencephalon, increased rate of self-inflicted wounds, and lack of a standard management algorithm may increase the lethality of these injuries. Although bihemispheric injuries historically have been considered nonsalvageable, an aggressive surgical approach has been shown to improve outcomes, particularly in the military population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  7. [Mild head injury in children and adults: Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-06-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  8. [Mild head injury in children and adults. Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-01-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  9. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gunge Riberholt

    Full Text Available Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury.

  10. Suspected alcohol and addictive narcotic use were more at risk to severe head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Cedera kepala menyebabkan dampak seperti gangguan kognitif, perilaku dan keterbatasan fisik. Tujuan studi ini untuk menentukan faktor utama yang berkontribusi terhadap keparahan cedera kepala pada pasien yang dirawat inap di rumah sakit. Metode: Studi ini merupakan bagian dari penelitian “Pengembangan Database Registri Trauma sebagai Penunjang Sistem Surveilans Cedera”. Data dikumpulkan dengan cara abstraksi dari rekam medis oleh petugas terlatih dengan formulir registri pada pasien cedera yang dirawat inap di 3 rumah sakit dari bulan Januari – Agustus 2010. Keparahan cedera diklasifikasikan berdasarkan Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS dengan batasan nilai 3-9 mengalami cedera kepala berat, 10-12 cedera kepala sedang dan 13-15 cedera kepala ringan. Hasil: Dari 450 pasien cedera rawat inap terdapat 36 pasien (8% yang mengalami cedera kepala berat. Pasien dengan indikasi mengkonsumsi alkohol/narkotik mempunyai risiko hampir 5 kali mengalami cedera kepala berat [rasio odds suaian (ORa = 4,77; 95% interval kepercayaan (CI=1,04–21,75] dibanding tanpa indikasi. Pasien yang tidak dirujuk mempunyai risiko 5,5 kali  mengalami cedera kepala berat (ORa=5,50; 95% CI=2,28–13,27 dibanding pasien yang dirujuk. Pasien cedera karena kecelakaaan lalu lintas dibanding bukan kecelakaan lalu lintas mempunyai risiko 3 kali mengalami cedera kepala berat (ORa=3,43; 95% CI=1,14–10,32. Kesimpulan: Indikasi mengkonsumsi alkohol/narkotik berkontribusi paling besar terhadap keparahan cedera kepala. Kampanye anti alkohol/narkotik dan perlu dilakukan untuk mencegah cedera kepala berat. (Health Science Indones 2011;2:34-40   Abstract Background: The impact of head injuries were cognitive disorder, behavioral disorder and physical limitation. The objective of this study was to identify a major factor that contributes to head injury severity in hospitalized patients. Methods: This study was part of research "Development of Trauma Registry Databases as a

  11. Cerebral sinodural thrombosis following minor head injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikis, Stylianos; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal; Cohen, José E

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral sinodural thrombosis (CSDT) is a rare complication of minor head trauma in children. Despite recommendations, anticoagulation is frequently withheld. We aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of pediatric CSDT following minor head trauma, and specifically to evaluate factors associated with anticoagulation use following minor head trauma in pediatric patients with CSDT. A literature search from 1990 to 2012 identified manuscripts discussing epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, management, and outcome in pediatric patients with CSDT subsequent to minor head trauma. One pediatric patient diagnosed with CSDT following minor head trauma in our institution was also included in the study. There were 18 pediatric patients with CSDT following minor trauma, including the current patient. Mean patient age was 7.8years (range 23months-15years). There was a strong female predominance (2.4:1). Vomiting and headache were the most common symptoms. Five patients had pre-existing risk factors (gastroenteritis, protein S deficiency, estroprogestenic medication, elevated antiphospholipid antibodies, malnutrition). Anticoagulation was administered to six patients with additional risk factors, severe symptoms, or deterioration. There was no mortality, 12 patients recovered fully, and four patients improved with residual symptoms. One patient required lumboperitoneal shunt placement. Pediatric CSDT is a rare complication of minor head trauma, with variable presentation. Anticoagulation has generally been reserved for patients suffering from severe symptoms, for those who deteriorate neurologically during observation, and for those who suffer from a concomitant prothrombotic disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. ‘Studying Injured Minds’ - The Vietnam Head Injury Study and 40 years of brain injury research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eRaymont

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of those who have sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBI during military conflicts has greatly facilitated research in the fields of neuropsychology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neurology and neuroimaging. The Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS is a prospective, long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 1,221 Vietnam veterans with mostly penetrating brain injuries, which has stretched over more than 40 years. The scope of this study, both in terms of the types of injury and fields of examination, has been extremely broad. It has been instrumental in extending the field of TBI research and in exposing pressing medical and social issues that affect those who suffer such injuries. This review summarizes the history of conflict-related TBI research and the VHIS to date, as well as the vast range of important findings the VHIS has established.

  13. [Penetrating head and brain injuries with nonmetal foreign bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A A; Okhlopkov, V A; Latyshev, Ya A; Serova, N K; Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are common in neurosurgical practice. Most of them are civil or war-time missile and blast injuries. This type of trauma is widely presented in neurosurgical publication, textbooks and clinical evidence-based guidelines. At the same time, PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies are very rare. All the data are limited to case reports and small series of cases. Moreover, there are no clinical consideration on diagnosis, treatment, complication, outcome and prognosis of PBI by non-metallic penetrating brain injuries. In this review all the data are summarized to provide recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies.

  14. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brors, D. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Schick, B.; Draf, W. [Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Dazert, S. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Kahle, G. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Fulda (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  15. [Intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery after minor closed head injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, S; Tomokiyo, M; Koga, H; Furukawa, Y; Nomura, S; Shimokawa, S; Nakagawa, S; Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T

    2001-10-01

    Thrombosis of the extracranial portion of the internal carotid artery as a result of nonpenetrating head and neck injury is not uncommon. However, intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery after minor head and neck injury without skull fracture is rare. We report a case of 14-year-old male who suffered a minor head injury during an athletic meeting of his school and developed a right hemiparesis and a lethargy state resulting from thrombosis of the supraclinoid portion of the left internal carotid artery. On admission, skull films and a CT scan revealed no abnormality. One hour later, he fully recovered. One day later, no definite lesions were detected on T1-weighted and T2-weighted image of MRI, but an abnormal high signal lesion in the left frontal lobe was detected on diffusion-weighted image of MRI. On additional MR angiography, intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery due to dissection was demonstrated.

  16. Forensic medical study on morphology and formative mechanism of blunt head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-wei; CHANG Hong-fa; YU Yong-min; DAI Guo-xin; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To study the patterns and morphologic characteristics of blunt head injury and analyse its formative mechanism in attempt to provide references for medicolegal expertise.Methods:The statistical analysis was done in terms of gender,age,as well as the nature,pattern,location,and feature of the injuries.Results:Among the 202 cases of head injury-induced death,124 were male and 78 female with the age ranging from 1-81 years.Death caused by homicide was dominant (106,52.5%),followed by suicide (49,24.3%) and accident (44,21.8%).The majority of suicide-induced death were by falling from height,and traffic crash was responsible for majority of unexpected death cases.The morphology and pathogenesis of the injuries varied according to differences on the mode,magnitude,and orientation of the outside force giving rise to blunt injury as well as the character of vulnerants.Conclusion:Studies on the morphology and its formative rationale of blunt head injury will offer easy access to medicolegal expertise on the mode and character of the injury.

  17. Computerised tomographic patterns in patients with head injury at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-15

    Apr 15, 2011 ... Address for correspondence: Dr. AA Adeyekun, ... injury.[6] Computerised Tomography, being a cross sectional imaging method can accurately ... preferred as first line investigative modality because the imaging time is faster: ...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Chemical Pathology and Immunology, University of Ilorin, Ilorin ... Abstract. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common health problem which is one of the main causes of chronic disability ... Twenty-five patients with TBI (16 men, 9 women; age.

  19. Epidemiologic features of lethal head injury caused by highway traffic accidents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To study the epidemiologic features of highway traffic accidents by analyzing the clinical data of the patients died of head injury.Methods:The reatures of the cases' age,occupation,status of head injury and complications.and the rescue procedures were retrospectively analyzed based on the data of 214 patients died of head injury.Results:The main victime were adults(78%)and peasants(52.8%).And the ost common head injuries were severe cerebral contusion with intracranial hematomas(73.4%).The mean arrival time from the accident spots to hospitals was(2.2±1.9)h.And the mean interval time between the arrival and operation was(1.9±0.9)h.Primary and secondary brainstem damage were the main causes of early death.Yet pulmonary infection and multiple organs failure were the common reasons for late death.Conclusions:Enhancing the propaganda for traffic regulations,establishing perfect pre-hospital and in-hospital EMS(emergency medical service)system,catching the opportunity of operation,and preventing complications are essential to reduce the mortality of traffic accidents induced head trauma.

  20. Moral decision-making in university students with self-reported mild head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordt, Stefon; Chiappetta, Katie; Good, Dawn

    2017-10-01

    Converging evidence shows that the prefrontal cortex is involved in moral decision-making. Individuals who have suffered injury to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex are more willing to endorse personal moral transgressions (e.g., make their decisions faster, and have attenuated sympathetic responses to those violations). We examined whether university students who have experienced a mild head injury (MHI), and are asymptomatic, present with a similar pattern of responding to moral dilemmas. Students reporting a history of MHI responded more quickly when making moral choices and exhibited less reticence toward the endorsement of personal moral transgressions than their non-MHI counterparts. Our results are consistent with studies involving persons with more serious, and evident, neuronal injury, and emphasize the important relationship between head injury and moral decision-making.

  1. Traumatic pneumorrachis after isolated closed head injuries: An up-to-date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios F; Singh, Ranjodh; Stefanopoulos, Panagiotis; Petsanas, Adamantios; Hadjigeorgiou, Fivos G; Fountas, Kostas

    2016-12-01

    Pneumorrachis (PR) is characterized by the presence of air within the spinal canal. It can be classified descriptively into internal or intradural and external or epidural. The causes of PR can be divided as iatrogenic, nontraumatic and traumatic. In the present study, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all previous cases of PR after an isolate head injury. Two additional cases were also reported. We concluded, that PR after isolated head injuries is a rare but likely an underdiagnosed entity. It is a marker of severe injury and the majority of such patients have a poor outcome. Although, PR is usually asymptomatic and reabsorbs spontaneously, prompt recognition and management of the underlying cause is essential. Therefore, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for serious underlying injury in cases where initial radiological imaging reveals intraspinal air.

  2. Efficacy of Family Intervention in Acquired Head-Injury Cases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Narasimha Vranda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In India, there are few studies on interventions for families of persons with acquired or traumatic brain injuries. This study aimed to test the efficacy of the Family Intervention Package (FIP with caregivers of persons with head injuries.Method: The study was carried out at the Neuro-Surgery Department of the National Institute for Mental Health and Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS, Bangalore, India. Ninety persons with severe head injuries and their caregivers were included in the study using the socio-demographic schedule and family interaction pattern scale.Results: The findings revealed that the Family Intervention Package (FIP was effective in bringing about changes in the functioning of persons with head injuries, and interactions among their families in the experimental group, as compared to the control group.Conclusion: The multi-disciplinary team dealing with persons with head injury need to recognise the importance of multi-component FIP for this group and their families. The current FIP should be made a part of treatment in clinical settings.doi: 10.5463/dcid.v23i3.120

  3. Neuropsychological functioning and recovery after mild head injury in collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macciocchi, S N; Barth, J T; Alves, W; Rimel, R W; Jane, J A

    1996-09-01

    This study prospectively examined neuropsychological functioning in 2300 collegiate football players from 10 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division A universities. The study was designed to determine the presence and duration of neuropsychological symptoms after mild head injury. A nonequivalent repeated measures control group design was used to compare the neuropsychological test scores and symptoms of injured players (n = 183) with those of gender, age, and education matched controls. A number of neuropsychological tests, including the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, the Digit Symbol Test, and the Trail Making Test, as well as a symptom checklist were used. Players and controls were assessed before engaging in game activity and 24 hours, 5 days, and 10 days after injury, using the standardized test battery and symptom checklist. Players with head injuries displayed impaired performance and increased symptoms in comparison to controls, but this impairment resolved within 5 days in most players. Players with head injuries showed significant improvement between 24 hours and 5 days, as well as between 5 and 10 days. Although single, uncomplicated mild head injuries do cause limited neuropsychological impairment, injured players generally experience rapid resolution of symptoms with minimal prolonged sequelae.

  4. Deep intracerebral (basal ganglia) haematomas in fatal non-missile head injury in man.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, J H; Doyle, D.; Graham, D I; Lawrence, A E; McLellan, D R

    1986-01-01

    Deep intracerebral (basal ganglia) haematomas were found post mortem in 63 of 635 fatal non-missile head injuries. In patients with a basal ganglia haematoma, contusions were more severe, there was a reduced incidence of a lucid interval, and there was an increased incidence of road traffic accidents, gliding contusions and diffuse axonal injury than in patients without this type of haematoma. Intracranial haematoma is usually thought to be a secondary event, that is a complication of the ori...

  5. Deficits of attention after closed-head injury : Slowness only?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, JM; vanZomeren, AH; Deelman, BG

    1996-01-01

    The performance of a group of 60 severely closed-head-injured patients in the subacute stage of recovery on a series of tests addressing focused, divided, and sustained attention, and supervisory attentional control was compared to the performance of a matched group of 60 healthy controls. Patients

  6. Spasm of the near reflex associated with head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Christopher; Sachdev, Arun; Gottlob, Irene

    2002-03-01

    Spasm of the near reflex is characterized by intermittent miosis, convergence spasm and pseudomyopia with blurred vision at distance. Usually, it is a functional disorder in young patients with underlying emotional problems. Only rarely is it caused by organic disorder. We report a patient who developed convergent spasm associated with miosis after head trauma at the age of 84 years.

  7. Acute cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Yul; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of traumatic cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to intracranial injury. There has been no report on traumatic cervical spinal subdrual hematoma not related to intracranial injury. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room due to severe neck pain and right arm motor weakness after car collision. On admission, she presented with complete monoplegia and hypoesthesia of right arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subdural hematoma compressing spinal cord. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 210,000 red blood cells/mm(3). She was managed conservatively by administrations of steroid pulse therapy and CSF drainage. Her muscle power of right arm improved to a Grade III 16 days after admission. Follow-up MRI taken 16th days after admission revealed almost complete resolution of the hematoma. Here, the authors report a traumatic cervical spinal SDH not associated with intracranial injury.

  8. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  9. Functional Data Analysis of Spaceflight-Induced Changes in Coordination and Phase in Head Pitch Acceleration During Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher; Peters, Brian; Feiveson, Alan; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from spaceflight experience neurovestibular disturbances during head movements and attempt to mitigate them by limiting head motion. Analyses to date of the head movements made during walking have concentrated on amplitude and variability measures extracted from ensemble averages of individual gait cycles. Phase shifts within each gait cycle can be determined by functional data analysis through the computation of time-warping functions. Large, localized variations in the timing of peaks in head kinematics may indicate changes in coordination. The purpose of this study was to determine timing changes in head pitch acceleration of astronauts during treadmill walking before and after flight. Six astronauts (5M/1F; age = 43.5+/-6.4yr) participated in the study. Subjects walked at 1.8 m/sec (4 mph) on a motorized treadmill while reading optotypes displayed on a computer screen 4 m in front of their eyes. Three-dimensional motion of the subject s head was recorded with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) device. Data were recorded twice before flight and four times after landing. The head pitch acceleration was calculated by taking the time derivative of the pitch velocity data from the IMU. Data for each session with each subject were time-normalized into gait cycles, then registered to align significant features and create a mean curve. The mean curves of each postflight session for each subject were re-registered based on their preflight mean curve to create time-warping functions. The root mean squares (RMS) of these warping functions were calculated to assess the deviation of head pitch acceleration mean curves in each postflight session from the preflight mean curve. After landing, most crewmembers exhibited localized shifts within their head pitch acceleration regimes, with the greatest deviations in RMS occurring on landing day or 1 day after landing. These results show that the alteration of head pitch coordination due to spaceflight may be

  10. Risk of maltreatment-related injury: a cross-sectional study of children under five years old admitted to hospital with a head or neck injury or fracture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jonathan Lee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the predictive value and sensitivity of demographic features and injuries (indicators for maltreatment-related codes in hospital discharge records of children admitted with a head or neck injury or fracture. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Population-based, cross sectional study. SETTING: NHS hospitals in England. SUBJECTS: Children under five years old admitted acutely to hospital with head or neck injury or fracture. DATA SOURCE: Hospital Episodes Statistics, 1997 to 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Maltreatment-related injury admissions, defined by ICD10 codes, were used to calculate for each indicator (demographic feature and/or type of injury: i the predictive value (proportion of injury admissions that were maltreatment-related; ii sensitivity (proportion of all maltreatment-related injury admissions with the indicator. RESULTS: Of 260,294 childhood admissions for fracture or head or neck injury, 3.2% (8,337 were maltreatment-related. With increasing age of the child, the predictive value for maltreatment-related injury declined but sensitivity increased. Half of the maltreatment-related admissions occurred in children older than one year, and 63% occurred in children with head injuries without fractures or intracranial injury. CONCLUSIONS: Highly predictive injuries accounted for very few maltreatment-related admissions. Protocols that focus on high-risk injuries may miss the majority of maltreated children.

  11. Accelerating image reconstruction in dual-head PET system by GPU and symmetry properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ying Chou

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an important imaging modality in both clinical usage and research studies. We have developed a compact high-sensitivity PET system that consisted of two large-area panel PET detector heads, which produce more than 224 million lines of response and thus request dramatic computational demands. In this work, we employed a state-of-the-art graphics processing unit (GPU, NVIDIA Tesla C2070, to yield an efficient reconstruction process. Our approaches ingeniously integrate the distinguished features of the symmetry properties of the imaging system and GPU architectures, including block/warp/thread assignments and effective memory usage, to accelerate the computations for ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM image reconstruction. The OSEM reconstruction algorithms were implemented employing both CPU-based and GPU-based codes, and their computational performance was quantitatively analyzed and compared. The results showed that the GPU-accelerated scheme can drastically reduce the reconstruction time and thus can largely expand the applicability of the dual-head PET system.

  12. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Concussive Head Injuries in Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vállez Garcia, David; Otte, Andreas; Glaudemans, Andor WJM; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Gielen, Jan LMA; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Concussions in sports and during recreational activities are a major source of traumatic brain injury in our society. This is mainly relevant in adolescence and young adulthood, where the annual rate of diagnosed concussions is increasing from year to year. Contact sports (e.g., ice hockey, American

  13. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Concussive Head Injuries in Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vállez Garcia, David; Otte, Andreas; Glaudemans, Andor WJM; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Gielen, Jan LMA; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Concussions in sports and during recreational activities are a major source of traumatic brain injury in our society. This is mainly relevant in adolescence and young adulthood, where the annual rate of diagnosed concussions is increasing from year to year. Contact sports (e.g., ice hockey, American

  14. Head Injury by Pneumatic Nail Gun: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Shim, Yu Shik; Oh, Se Yang; Hyun, Dong Keun; Park, Hyeon Seon; Kim, Eun Young

    2014-10-01

    A 56-year-old man had five nail gun-shots on his skull due to attempted suicide and was transferred to the emergency room. Because the nail head played a role as a brake, the launched nail made a hole in the skull but did not entirely pass through it. If major artery or sinuses are not involved, cautious retrieval after a small scalp incision can be performed and prophylactic antibiotics be administered for treatment.

  15. Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    magnitude filter was applied to the images. Bones with small articular spaces (such as cervical vertebra ) were manually separated. The polygon surfaces...the neck. Cervical vertebrae 1 through 7, the hyoid bone, the C2 cartilage, spinal cord, 52 muscles of the neck (listed in Figure 12 and Figure 13...studies of the cervical spine is provided in place the head supported mass analysis (Task 2.1/2.2), as agreed upon with USAARL. Task 3 includes the finite

  16. Accelerating the development of emotion competence in Head Start children: effects on adaptive and maladaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Carroll E; King, Kristen A; Trentacosta, Christopher J; Morgan, Judith K; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Krauthamer-Ewing, E Stephanie; Finlon, Kristy J

    2008-01-01

    Separate studies of rural and urban Head Start systems tested the hypothesis that an emotion-based prevention program (EBP) would accelerate the development of emotion and social competence and decrease agonistic behavior and potential precursors of psychopathology. In both studies, Head Start centers were randomly assigned to treatment and control/comparison group conditions. In Study 1 (rural community), results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that compared to the control condition (Head Start as usual), EBP produced greater increases in emotion knowledge and emotion regulation and greater decreases in children's negative emotion expressions, aggression, anxious/depressed behavior, and negative peer and adult interactions. In Study 2 (inner city), compared to the established prevention program I Can Problem Solve, EBP led to greater increases in emotion knowledge, emotion regulation, positive emotion expression, and social competence. In Study 2, emotion knowledge mediated the effects of EBP on emotion regulation, and emotion competence (an aggregate of emotion knowledge and emotion regulation) mediated the effects of EBP on social competence.

  17. ACCELERATING COLUMN FOR SEPARATION OF ETHANOL FROM FACTIONS OF INTERMEDIATE AND HEAD IMPURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Agafonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Nowadays purification of ethanol from the head and intermediate impurities is done with the selection of fractions of fusel alcohol and fusel oil from the distillation column and head and intermediate fractions impurities from condenser Epuration column operating accord-ing to the hydro-selection method. Due to this the fraction contains at least 13% ethyl alcohol, resulting in a reduced yield of the final product. Distillation of these fractions in the known acceleration columns requires increased consumption of heating steam for 6-8 kg / dal and increasing installation metal content. In this paper we investigate the process of distillation fraction from the condenser of Epura-tion column, fusel alcohol from the distillation column and subfusel liquid layer from the decanter, which is fed on a plate of supply of new accelerating column (AC, which operates on Epuration technology with the supply of hydro-selection water on the top plate and has in its composition concentration, boiling and stripping parts, a dephlagmator, a condenser, a boiler. Material balance equations of the column were obtained and ethyl alcohol concentration on its plates were determined by them. Having converted the material balance equations, we determined the dependences for the impurities ratio being drawn from the accelerating column with the Luther flows and ethyl alcohol fraction. Then we received the equation for determining the proportion of impurities taken from the column condenser with fraction. These calculations proved that the studied impurities are almost completely selected with this faction, ethyl alcohol content of it being 0.14% of the hourly output.

  18. A mathematical outcome prediction model in severe head injury : a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee K

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available 103 patients of head injury, with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS score of 8 or less, were studied prospectively. GCS score, brain stem reflexes, motor score, reaction level scale, and Glasgow Liege scale were evaluated as prognostic variables. Linear logistic regression analysis was used to obtain coefficients of these variables and mathematical formulae developed to predict outcome in individual patients.

  19. Kinematics of judo breakfall for osoto-gari: Considerations for head injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Sentaro; Ishii, Takanori; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Hashimoto, Toshihiko

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies suggest that increasing the skill level of judokas will decrease the number of head injuries sustained during judo. However, the kinematics are poorly understood, making it difficult to establish an effective breakfall teaching programme. Therefore, we studied the kinematic parameters of breakfall for osoto-gari to identify the risk of judo-related head injuries by comparing experienced and novice judokas. This information will provide insight into developing a better prevention plan for judo-related head injuries. A total of 10 experienced and 12 novice judokas volunteered to participate in this study. The kinematic data of the breakfall motion for osoto-gari were collected using a three-dimensional motion analysis technique (200 Hz). We observed a significantly higher peak neck extension momentum in the novice group than in the experienced group. This suggests that neck extension momentum during breakfall is associated with the risk of head injuries during judo. In addition, the novice judokas demonstrated a significantly greater flexed pattern in the trunk and hip movement than the experienced judokas (P < 0.05). The results suggest that the trunk and lower extremity motion are important kinematic parameters that determine the skill level in performing the breakfall for osoto-gari.

  20. The Effects of Head Trauma and Brain Injury on Neuroendocrinologic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-13

    LH 437, FSH 397, testosterone 282, estradiol 79, 17 hydroxy- progesterone 36, androstenedione 36, dihydrotestosterone 36, DHEA sulfate 22, sex...Twenty-three patients in either the medical or surgical intensive care units of Strong Memorial Hospital were followed. Fourteen had acute head injury

  1. HYPERTRANSLATION OF THE HEAD BACKWARDS - PART OF THE MECHANISM OF CERVICAL WHIPLASH INJURY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PENNING, L

    1994-01-01

    Based upon a review of the literature, a theory is developed that in whiplash injury the primary mechanism of the trauma is not hyperretroflexion but hypertranslation of the head backwards. Thus a hyperanteflexion (not hyperretroflexion) of the upper cervical spine, probably especially of the atlant

  2. Prediction of outcome in mild to moderate head injury : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the functional outcome of patients sustaining mild and moderate head injury (HI). Discrepancies across studies in the definition of minor, mild, and moderate HI are discussed in terms of hindering the interpretation of recovery. The predictive value of acute severity indices, neur

  3. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  4. Divided attention years after severe closed head injury : The effect of dependencies between the subtasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, W; Verzendaal, M; van der Naalt, J; Smit, J; van Zomeren, E

    2001-01-01

    Lesions of white matter which connects distant brain areas are characteristic for closed head injury (CHI). It was predicted that this impairs divided attention only if dependent subtasks are used which require communication between corresponding brain processes. Fourteen chronic severe CHI patients

  5. Retrieving familiar people's names in patients with severe closed-head injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milders, M; Deelman, B; Berg, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    Patients with closed-head injury frequently complain about difficulties with retrieving the names of familiar people, bur very few studies have investigated these complaints by objective measurements. Three experiments are reported that compared personal name retrieval in patients with severe closed

  6. HYPERTRANSLATION OF THE HEAD BACKWARDS - PART OF THE MECHANISM OF CERVICAL WHIPLASH INJURY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PENNING, L

    Based upon a review of the literature, a theory is developed that in whiplash injury the primary mechanism of the trauma is not hyperretroflexion but hypertranslation of the head backwards. Thus a hyperanteflexion (not hyperretroflexion) of the upper cervical spine, probably especially of the

  7. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel: the head injury that may have prolonged the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Heather A; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Sloffer, Chris A

    2016-07-01

    War-related head injury, indeed neurological injury in general, has been a part of the history of humankind for as long as there has been warfare. Such injuries can result in the removal of the individual from combat, thus eliminating any subsequent contribution that he or she might have made to the battle. However, at times, the injuries can have more wide-reaching effects. In the case of commanders or leaders, the impact of their injuries may include the loss of their influence, planning, and leadership, and thus have a disproportionate effect on the battle, or indeed the war. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was a talented military strategist and leader who was respected by friends and foes alike. He held an honored reputation by the German people and the military leadership. His head injury on July 17, 1944, resulted in his being removed from the field of battle in northern France, but also meant that he was not able to lend his stature to the assassination attempt of Adolph Hitler on July 20. It is possible that, had he been able to lend his stature to the events, Hitler's hold on the nation's government might have been loosened, and the war might have been brought to an end a year earlier. The authors review Rommel's career, his injury, the subsequent medical treatment, and his subsequent death.

  8. Six nails in the head: multiple pneumatic nail gun head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Sub; Park, Kyung Hye

    2010-08-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital after attempting to commit suicide with a pneumatic nail gun. Six nails were launched. Because the nail head acted as a brake, the launched nail could make a hole in the skull but could not entirely pass it.

  9. Defining an Analytic Framework to Evaluate Quantitative MRI Markers of Traumatic Axonal Injury: Preliminary Results in a Mouse Closed Head Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, N.; Namjoshi, D.; Irfanoglu, M. O.; Wellington, C.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathology. Recently, the Closed Head Injury Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration (CHIMERA) was developed to generate an experimental model of DAI in a mouse. The characterization of DAI using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; diffusion tensor imaging, DTI) may provide a useful set of outcome measures for preclinical and clinical studies. The objective of this study was to identify the complex neurobiological underpinnings of DTI features following DAI using a comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of DTI and histopathology in the CHIMERA mouse model. A consistent neuroanatomical pattern of pathology in specific white matter tracts was identified across ex vivo DTI maps and photomicrographs of histology. These observations were confirmed by voxelwise and regional analysis of DTI maps, demonstrating reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in distinct regions such as the optic tract. Similar regions were identified by quantitative histology and exhibited axonal damage as well as robust gliosis. Additional analysis using a machine-learning algorithm was performed to identify regions and metrics important for injury classification in a manner free from potential user bias. This analysis found that diffusion metrics were able to identify injured brains almost with the same degree of accuracy as the histology metrics. Good agreement between regions detected as abnormal by histology and MRI was also found. The findings of this work elucidate the complexity of cellular changes that give rise to imaging abnormalities and provide a comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of the relative importance of DTI and histological measures to detect brain injury. PMID:28966972

  10. Fatal head injury: a sequelae to electric shock - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanth, S H; Hugar, Basappa S; Chandra, Y P Girish; Krishnan, A Gokula

    2015-03-01

    Deaths due to electric shock are increasing despite stringent laws and preventive measures. These shocks are a leading cause of death amongst construction workers. In about 20% of the cases, no visible injury due to electricity can be seen. In some cases, non-electrical injuries are present and at times there are no eyewitnesses to provide a detailed account of events. In such circumstances, examination of scene of death, autopsy and accident reconstruction with the help of an electrical expert are all necessary to determine the cause of death. Here, we report one such case where a mason working on the second floor of a building under construction sustained an electrical injury, following which he was thrown to the ground sustaining a fatal traumatic injury. After careful consideration, his death was attributed to the head injury.

  11. Nitric oxide accelerates interleukin-13 cytotoxin-mediated regression in head and neck cancer animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Koji; Kawakami, Mariko; Puri, Raj K

    2004-08-01

    Receptors for interleukin-13 (IL-13R) are overexpressed on several types of solid cancers including gliobastoma, renal cell carcinoma, AIDS Kaposi's sarcoma, and head and neck cancer. Recombinant fusion proteins IL-13 cytotoxin (IL13-PE38QQR or IL13-PE38) have been developed to directly target IL-13R-expressing cancer cells. Although it has been found that IL-13 cytotoxin has a direct potent antitumor activity in vivo in nude mice models of human cancers, the involvement of indirect antitumor effecter molecules such as nitric oxide (NO) is unknown. To address this issue, we assessed the effect of NO inhibiter N(omega)-monomethyl-l-arginine on IL-13 cytotoxin-mediated cytotoxicity and NO2/NO3 production in HN12 head and neck cancer cells. In addition, antitumor effects and NO levels in HN12 and KCCT873 head and neck tumors xenografted s.c. in nude mice when treated with IL-13 cytotoxin were evaluated by tumor measurement, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Pretreatment of animals with N(omega)-monomethyl-l-arginine significantly decreased the NO levels and IL-13 cytotoxin-mediated antitumor effects. In addition, depletion of macrophages, known to produce NO, also decreased antitumor activity of IL-13 cytotoxin. Based on these studies, we concluded that NO accelerates antitumor effect of IL-13 cytotoxin on head and neck tumor cells. Because IL-13 cytotoxin is currently being tested in the clinic for the treatment of patients with recurrent glioblastoma maltiforme, our current findings suggest maintaining macrophage and NO-producing cellular function for optimal therapeutic effect of this targeted agent.

  12. Early neurosurgical procedures enhance survival in blunt head injury: propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Jerris R; Newgard, Craig D; Veum-Stone, Judith; Selden, Nathan R; Adams, Annette L; Diggs, Brian S; Arthur, Melanie; Mullins, Richard J

    2009-08-01

    Studies of trauma systems have identified traumatic brain injury as a frequent cause of death or disability. Due to the heterogeneity of patient presentations, practice variations, and potential for secondary brain injury, the importance of early neurosurgical procedures upon survival remains controversial. Traditional observational outcome studies have been biased because injury severity and clinical prognosis are associated with use of such interventions. We used propensity analysis to investigate the clinical efficacy of early neurosurgical procedures in patients with traumatic brain injury. We analyzed a retrospectively identified cohort of 518 consecutive patients (ages 18-65 years) with blunt, traumatic brain injury (head Abbreviated Injury Scale score of >or= 3) presenting to the emergency department of a Level-1 trauma center. The propensity for a neurosurgical procedure (i.e., craniotomy or ventriculostomy) in the first 24 h was determined (based upon demographic, clinical presentation, head computed tomography scan findings, intracranial pressure monitor use, and injury severity). Multivariate logistic regression models for survival were developed using both the propensity for a neurosurgical procedure and actual performance of the procedure. The odds of in-hospital death were substantially less in those patients who received an early neurosurgical procedure (odds ratio [OR] 0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-0.41). The mortality benefit of early neurosurgical intervention persisted after exclusion of patients who died within the first 24 h (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.04-0.48). Analysis of observational data after adjustment using the propensity score for a neurosurgical procedure in the first 24 h supports the association of early neurosurgical intervention and patient survival in the setting of significant blunt, traumatic brain injury. Transfer of at-risk head-injured patients to facilities with high-level neurosurgical capabilities seems warranted.

  13. Skull fracture and hemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims - a critical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrabhal Tripathi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial hemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial hemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. METHODS: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. RESULTS: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases.

  14. Effect of sub-hypothermia therapy on coagulopathy after severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; XU Ru-xiang; KE Yi-quan; JIANG Xiao-dan; ZHANG Shu-fen; DENG Bi-lan; YU Xing

    2008-01-01

    @@ Sub-hypothermia therapy is one of the treatments for patients with severe head injury.The objective of the therapy is to treat traumatic brain injury (TBI) by alleviating brain edema,protecting blood brain barrier (BBB),and preventing subsequent damage to neurons.It can protect brain function by depressing metabolism,reducing the release of excitatory amino acids and free radicals,reducing the level of lactic acid,and lowering the damage of cytoskeletal structure.1 However,sub-hypothemia may-affect patients' coagulatory function including amendment to hypercoagulation state or hyperfibrinolysis and platelet (PLT) functional disturbance.2,3 This study aimed to observe how sub-hypothermia therapy exerts effects on coagulopathy of patients after head injury.

  15. High occurrence of head and spine injuries in the pediatric population following motocross accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, David J; Clarke, Michelle J; Puffer, Ross; Luo, T David; McIntosh, Amy L; Wetjen, Nicolas M

    2015-03-01

    Off-road motorcycling is a very popular sport practiced by countless people worldwide. Despite its popularity, not much has been published on the severity and distribution of central nervous system-related injuries associated with this activity in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to confirm, characterize, and document the rate of head and spine injuries associated with off-road motorcycling in this population. All patients aged 18 years or less who were treated for a motorbike injury at the authors' institution (a Level 1 regional trauma center) between 2000 and 2007 were identified through in-house surgical and trauma registries. Type, mechanism, and severity of CNS-related injuries were assessed, including: incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), loss of consciousness (LOC), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, head CT findings, neurological deficits, spinal fractures, cervical strain, and use of protective gear, including helmets. During the 8-year period of study, 298 accidents were evaluated in 248 patients. The patients' mean age at the time of injury was 14.2 ± 2.7 years. Head injury or TBI was identified in 60 (20.1%) of 298 cases (involving 58 of 248 patients). Fifty-seven cases were associated with LOC, and abnormalities were identified on head CT in 10 patients; these abnormalities included skull fractures and epidural, subdural, subarachnoid, and intraparenchymal hemorrhages. The GCS score was abnormal in 11 cases and ranged from 3 to 15, with an overall mean of 14.5. No patients required cranial surgery. Helmet use was confirmed in 43 (71.6%) of the cases involving TBI. Spine fractures were identified in 13 patients (4.3%) and 5 required surgical fixation for their injury. The authors found a high occurrence of head injuries following pediatric off-road motorcycle riding or motocross accidents despite the use of helmets. Additionally, this study severely underestimates the rate of mild TBIs in this patient population. Our data

  16. Causes of fatal childhood accidents involving head injury in northern region, 1979-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, P M; Storey, A; Aynsley-Green, A; Eyre, J A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the causes and circumstances surrounding fatal accidents involving head injuries in children in the Northern region. DESIGN--Retrospective review of the hospital case notes, necropsy reports, and records of the coroners' inquests. SETTING--Northern Regional Health Authority. PATIENTS--All 255 children aged less than 16 years who died with a head injury during 1979-86. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cause of injury and circumstances of accident according to reports of inquests; injury severity score; number of fatal accidents and mortality per 100,000 children in 10 groups of local authority wards ranked according to their score on the overall deprivation index; and distance of site of accident from child's home. RESULTS--Of the 255 children who died after a head injury, 136 (53%) children were playing at the time of the accident. 195 (76%) children sustained the head injury in road traffic accidents, 135 as pedestrians, 35 as cyclists, and 25 as passengers in a vehicle. In 120 accidents in child pedestrians the primary cause of accident was the unsafe behaviour of the child. 172 (67%) accidents occurred within one to two km of the child's home and 153 (63%) between 3 pm and 9 pm. The mortality was significantly related to social deprivation; excluding eight children injured while on holiday in the region, 15-fold decrease in mortality was recorded between the local authority wards that ranked highest on the overall deprivation index and those that ranked lowest (14.0/100,000 children, group 10 v 0.9/100,000, group 1 respectively, p less than 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS--The finding that most accidents occurred in children living in deprived areas who were playing unsupervised near their home suggests that childhood mortality might be appreciably reduced if children at play were protected from traffic, particularly in socially deprived areas. PMID:2261557

  17. Therapeutic effect of mild hypothermia on severe traumatic head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘五四; 刘伟国; 沈宏; 王卫民; 章志量; 张瑛; 江素君; 杨小锋

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of mild hypothermia on severe traumatic brain injury.Methods: Eighty-six in-patients with severe traumatic brain injury treated ordinarily were consecutively randomized into two groups: a hypothermia group (n=43) and a normothermia group (the control group, n=43). In the hypothermia group, the core temperature (i.e., nasopharyngeal or brain temperature) of the patient was reduced to and maintained at 33-35℃ with a systemic cooling blanket. Natural rewarming began after 3-5 days (mean: 4.3 days) of hypothermia treatment. In the control group, the patient received no hypothermia treatment. The vital sign, extradural pressure and serum superoxide dismutase were observed and measured during treatment, and the complications as well as the Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated at 2 years after injury.Results: The mean extradural pressure in the hypothermia group (27.38 mm Hg±4.88 mm Hg at 24 hours, 29.40 mm Hg±4.50 mm Hg at 48 hours and 26.40 mm Hg±4.13 mm Hg at 72 hours after injury) was much lower than that in the control group (32.63 mm Hg±3.00 mm Hg, 34.80 mm Hg±6.00 mm Hg and 31.81 mm Hg±4.50 mm Hg respectively at 24, 48 and 72 hours, P<0.05). The mean serum superoxide dismutase levels in the hypothermia group on days 3 and 7 (583.7 μg/L±99.6 μg/L and 699.4 μg/L±217.3 μg/L, respectively) were much higher than those in the control group at the same time period (446.6 μg/L±79.5 μg/L and 497.1 μg/L±101.2 μg/L, respectively, P<0.01). The recovery rates at 2 years after injury were 65.1% in the hypothermia group and 37.2% in the control group (P<0.05). The mortality rates were 25.6% in the hypothermia group and 51.2% in the control group (P<0.05). The complications, including pulmonary infections, thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100×109/L), hemorrhage in the digestive tract, electrolyte disorders and renal malfunction, were managed without severe sequelae .Conclusions: Mild hypothermia is a safe and

  18. Development of Medical Adjunctive Treatment for Acute Penetrating Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    severity of an injury will increase if certain out- comes are noted. For example, Lung Contusion AIS 3 vs. Lung Contusion with bilat- eral hemothorax ...organisms on the gram stain specimen or culture. Lung abscesses and empyemas are coded under "Pulmonary Complications". 440N. WOUND DEHScENCE. 45N...Patient on Ventilator 0 No I Yes U Unknown 43U. Seizure Type (Choose one ) 0 None 3 Suspected 1 General 4 Type unknown 2 Focal 5 Combination 44U. Number

  19. Occupant accelerations and injury potential during an ambulance-to-curb impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellen L; Hayes, Wilson C

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents real world acceleration data for an ambulance driving up and over a curb. A full scale reenactment was performed for a litigated case in which a patient on a gurney in an ambulance claimed a variety of bodily injuries after the ambulance struck a curb. A height and weight matched surrogate rode on the gurney during the tests. Results demonstrated that peak vehicle and occupant accelerations never exceeded 1.1g's. To address the claimed injuries, the accelerations likely sustained by the patient were compared to those experienced during daily life. Since ambulances are wide vehicles that travel fast on potentially narrow arterial, collector or local roadways, curb or median impacts may occur during the normal course of driving. Thus, these results may be useful for forensic experts in dealing with similar cases involving claimed injuries following curb impacts.

  20. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury.

  1. A Mechanistic End-to-End Concussion Model That Translates Head Kinematics to Neurologic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J. Ng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Past concussion studies have focused on understanding the injury processes occurring on discrete length scales (e.g., tissue-level stresses and strains, cell-level stresses and strains, or injury-induced cellular pathology. A comprehensive approach that connects all length scales and relates measurable macroscopic parameters to neurological outcomes is the first step toward rationally unraveling the complexity of this multi-scale system, for better guidance of future research. This paper describes the development of the first quantitative end-to-end (E2E multi-scale model that links gross head motion to neurological injury by integrating fundamental elements of tissue and cellular mechanical response with axonal dysfunction. The model quantifies axonal stretch (i.e., tension injury in the corpus callosum, with axonal functionality parameterized in terms of axonal signaling. An internal injury correlate is obtained by calculating a neurological injury measure (the average reduction in the axonal signal amplitude over the corpus callosum. By using a neurologically based quantity rather than externally measured head kinematics, the E2E model is able to unify concussion data across a range of exposure conditions and species with greater sensitivity and specificity than correlates based on external measures. In addition, this model quantitatively links injury of the corpus callosum to observed specific neurobehavioral outcomes that reflect clinical measures of mild traumatic brain injury. This comprehensive modeling framework provides a basis for the systematic improvement and expansion of this mechanistic-based understanding, including widening the range of neurological injury estimation, improving concussion risk correlates, guiding the design of protective equipment, and setting safety standards.

  2. Nontraumatic head and neck injuries: a clinical approach. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Esteban García, L; Tuñón Gómez, M; Cepeda Ibarra, Y

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons. As explained in the first part of this update, these entities affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Maintaining the same approach as in the first part, focusing on the clinical presentations in the emergency department rather than on the anatomic regions affected, we will study the entities that present with two patterns: those that present with a combination of cervical numbness, dysphagia, and dyspnea and those that present with acute sensory deficits. In the latter group, we will specifically focus on visual deficits, because this is the most common symptom that calls for urgent imaging studies. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Unilateral hypoxic-ischemic injury in young children from abusive head trauma, lacking craniocervical vascular dissection or cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Thompson, Linda R.; Truwit, Charles L.; Velders, Scott; Karagulle, Ayse; Kiragu, Andrew [University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) in young children usually has a severe outcome when associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which is best characterized by MRI in the acute or subacute phase utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). HIE in this setting has been hypothesized to result from stretching of the spinal cord, brainstem, or vasculature. To provide clinical correlation in patients with unilateral HIE and to postulate a mechanism in the setting of suspected AHT. IRB approval was obtained. Over a 5-year period, the medical records and images were reviewed of the 53 children {<=}3 years of age who presented with acute head trauma according to the hospital registry. The children were subselected in order to determine how many suffered either HIE or AHT, and to detect those with unilateral HIE. In 11 of the 53 children, the etiology of the head trauma was highly suspicious for abuse. In 38 the head trauma was accidental and in 4 the trauma was of unknown etiology and at the time of this report was unresolved legally. Of the 53, 4 suffered HIE confirmed by CT or MRI. In three of these four with HIE the trauma was considered highly suspicious for AHT. Two of these three were the only patients with unilateral HIE, and both (7 months and 14 months of age) presented with early subacute phase HIE seen on DW MRI (range 4-7 days) and are described in detail with clinical correlation. The third child with AHT and HIE had bilateral findings. In the fourth patient the HIE was bilateral and was considered accidental. The work-up for both patients with unilateral HIE included head CT, craniocervical MRI, and craniocervical MR angiography (MRA). In both, there was mostly unilateral, deep white matter restricted diffusion, with subdural hematomas that were small compared to the extent of hypoxic-ischemic insult, and no skull fracture. Craniocervical MRA and axial thin-section fat-saturation images were negative for dissection, brainstem, or cord injury. Legal

  4. Critical thresholds of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure related to age in paediatric head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, I R; Jones, P A; Lo, T Y M; Forsyth, R J; Fulton, B; Andrews, P J D; Mendelow, A D; Minns, R A

    2006-01-01

    Background The principal strategy for managing head injury is to reduce the frequency and severity of secondary brain insults from intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hence improve outcome. Precise critical threshold levels have not been determined in head injured children. Objective To create a novel pressure–time index (PTI) measuring both duration and amplitude of insult, and then employ it to determine critical insult thresholds of ICP and CPP in children. Methods Prospective, observational, physiologically based study from Edinburgh and Newcastle, using patient monitored blood pressure, ICP, and CPP time series data. The PTI for ICP and CPP for 81 children, using theoretical values derived from physiological norms, was varied systematically to derive critical insult thresholds which delineate Glasgow outcome scale categories. Results The PTI for CPP had a very high predictive value for outcome (receiver operating characteristic analyses: area under curve = 0.957 and 0.890 for mortality and favourable outcome, respectively) and was more predictive than for ICP. Initial physiological values most accurately predicted favourable outcome. The CPP critical threshold values determined for children aged 2–6, 7–10, and 11–15 years were 48, 54, and 58 mm Hg. respectively. Conclusions The PTI is the first substantive paediatric index of total ICP and CPP following head injury. The insult thresholds generated are identical to age related physiological values. Management guidelines for paediatric head injuries should take account of these CPP thresholds to titrate appropriate pressor therapy. PMID:16103043

  5. [Mathematical simulation of mild brain injury in children heading soccer balls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Ernesto; Pérez, Jesús; Ponce, Daniel; Andresen, Max

    2011-08-01

    Heading professional soccer balls can generate mild traumatic brain injury in children. The long-term consequences could include difficulty in solving problems and deficits in memory and language. To assess the impact of a professional adult soccer ball on a child's head, using the finite element method and dynamic effects to predict brain damage. The minimum conditions of an adult game were considered: the ball speed was 6 m/s and the diffuse blow was 345 and 369 Newtons (N), on the forehead and top of the head, respectively. A head was modeled in order to know the stresses, strains and displacements generated by the impacts. The extent of the alteration was determined by comparing the strength of brain tissue, with predictions of computed stresses. The geometric characteristics of the head were transferred from medical images. The input data of the materials of a child's head was obtained from the literature. In the case of heading with the forehead, mathematical simulation showed frontal lobe alterations, with brain stresses between 0.064 and 0.059 N/mm(2). When the heading was with the upper head zone, the brain alterations were in the parietal lobe, with stresses between 0.089 and 0.067 N/mm(2). In the cerebral spinal fluid the pressure was 3.61 to 3.24 N/mm(2). The mathematical simulations reveal evidence of brain alterations caused by a child heading adult soccer balls. The model presented is an economical and quick tool that can help predict brain damage. It demonstrates the ability of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to absorb shock loads.

  6. Teaching of the assessment of head and brain injury in UK dental schools--The Headway Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H R; Nickson, G P; Curran, A L M

    2005-09-01

    Under the auspices of Headway--the brain injury association, the charity supplies information on head/brain injury and runs a telephone advice line: (0115 924 0800). Questionnaires regarding the undergraduate teaching related to head/brain injuries were sent to, and returned by, all 12 UK dental schools. The replies suggest that undergraduate teaching of this subject is patchy and inadequately prepares dentists to recognise and cope with patients who may have had head, and consequently brain, injuries. It is recommended that dental schools review their teaching of this subject and ensure that it is consistent with the current guidelines issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) on the recognition of head injury and that the findings are brought to the attention of the General Dental Council in the context of the GDC's "The first five years" report.

  7. Prognosis in children with head injury: An analysis of 340 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outcome in children with head injury is distinctive because of the different biophysical properties of the child's skull and brain, and their reaction to injury. Methods: In this retrospective study of three hundred and forty children with head injury, managed from January 1993 to December 1998, at NIMHANS, the factors influencing outcome were analyzed. Results: On admission there were 40 children in GCS 3-5, 55 children in GCS 6-8, 96 in GCS 9-12 and 152 children in GCS 13-15. Eleven patients were under 2 years of age, 53 were between 3-5 years, 140 were between 6-10 years and 156 were between 11-15 years of age. The prognosis in various intracranial pathologies due to head injury was evaluated and outcome assessed at discharge. There were 95 children with EDH and 8.4% had poor outcome (vegetative state or death. There were 85 patients with contusion and poor outcome was noted in 18.8%. One hundred patients had diffuse cerebral oedema on CT scan and outcome was poor in 25% of these patients. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis were, absence of ocular movements (50%, abnormal pupillary size and reaction (49% and age less than 2 years (27%.

  8. Influence of elevator acceleration induced loading on injury levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funai, K.; Schijndel-de Nooij, M. van; Nunen, E. van

    2008-01-01

    The influence on human body of the acceleration caused by the elevator emergency stop has been studied. Experiments were performed with an automotive dummy in an elevator. The study is furthermore based on numerical simulations in MADYMO with an active human model. Kinematics and contact forces of v

  9. Intensive care management of head injury patients without routine intracranial pressure monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhanam R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head injury contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity in India. Evaluation of the available trauma care facilities may help improve outcome. Aim: To evaluate the factors influencing the mortality of patients with head injury who had intensive care management and evolve strategies to improve outcome. Setting and Design: Retrospective study in a tertiary hospital where intracranial pressure monitoring (ICPM is not routinely practiced. Materials and Methods: All patients with head injury managed in the intensive care unit in a two-year period were included. The factors evaluated were age, vital signs, Glasgow Coma scale score (GCS at admission, pupillary light reflex (PR, oculocephalic reflex (OCR, hemodynamic stability, computerized tomography (CT findings, diabetes mellitus, anemia, infections and abnormalities of serum sodium. Results: We analyzed 208 patients (202 without ICPM. In-hospital mortality was 64 (31%. Only 24 (11.5% patients were admitted within one hour of injury, while one-third arrived after six hours. The clinical factors (at admission that influenced mortality included age, GCS, PR, OCR and diastolic blood pressure (DBP. Effacement of the basal cisterns in the initial and repeat CT scans, hyperglycemia, hemodynamic instability and serum sodium imbalances were associated with higher mortality. The independent predictors of mortality by logistic regression were initial GCS, DBP, hemodynamic instability and effacement of cisterns on repeat CT. Conclusions: Mortality following head injury is high. Pre-hospital emergency medical services are disorganized. The key to reducing mortality within the limitations of our current trauma system is maintenance of DBP>70 mmHg and SBP> 90 mmHg from the time of first contact.

  10. Head and Maxillofacial Injuries in Child and Adolescent Victims of Automotive Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Victims of motor vehicle accidents may suffer multiple lesions, including maxillofacial injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with head, facial, and maxillofacial injuries in child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with analysis of forensic medical reports from the Legal Medical Institute of Campina Grande, Brazil, between January 2008 and December 2011. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square test (α = 0.05. From 1613 medical reports analyzed, the sample is composed 232 (14.4% reports referring to child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents aged 0–19 years of both sexes. Victims were mostly adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years (64.2%, males (73.7%, and motorcyclists (51.3%. More than half of the victims had single lesions (54.3% located in the head (20.7% and face (21.6%. Head injuries occurred more frequently in children aged 0–4 years (53.8%, PR = 5.065, 95% CI = 1.617–5.870 and pedestrians (30.4%, PR = 2.039, 95% CI = 1.024–4.061, while facial and maxillofacial injuries occurred in higher proportion among females (31.1%, PR = 0.489, 95% CI = 0.251–0.954. Our findings suggest that accidents involving motorcyclists are the most prevalent, affecting male adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years, resulting in a high frequency of injuries in the head and face regions.

  11. A population-based study of survival and discharge status for survivors after head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Teasdale, T W

    2004-01-01

    were characterized by age, gender, place and severity of injury, as well as neurophysical, speech and mental deficits at discharge from hospital. RESULTS: Acute/subacute mortality of hospitalized patients was 27% for cerebral lesions and 4% after cranial fracture. As attrition by death outweighed....... There was no tendency with time of injury with regard to percentage occurrence of neurophysical, speech or mental deficits at discharge. The calculated number of candidates for rehabilitation of personal activities of daily life briefly after injury was 9.8 per 100 000 with cerebral lesion and 1.2 per 100 000......OBJECTIVES: Creation of a basis for the planning of rehabilitation after head injury in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with cranial fractures or traumatic cerebral lesions occurring in Denmark in 1979-93 were identified by computerized searches in the national hospital register. Kaplan...

  12. [Determination of head scatter factors released from a scanning-type therapeutic accelerator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2003-07-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron capable of taking out photon beams and electron beams with energies of up to 50 MeV. It flattens the beam by the beam-scanning method, while the microtron MM22 utilizes a flattening filter. The head-scatter factors (hereafter called S(h)), which are important for evaluating the output of the photon beam of the MM50 and MM22, were measured using a mini-phantom and build-up cap. S(h) measured with the build-up cap showed the influence of contaminated electrons, whereas S(h) measured with the mini-phantom showed less influence, even for 50 MV photon beams. Compared with the MM22, the MM50 showed less change in S(h) according to field size and energy. The reason for this seemed to be that the MM50 has a smaller extra-focal region than other accelerators equipped with flattening filters and, therefore, can essentially be considered a point source by using the beam-scanning method without a flattening filter. This study demonstrated that photons scattered by the flattening filter used for beam flattening in typical medical accelerators mainly contribute to S(h).

  13. Acute severe head injury resulted from road traffic accidents:a report on 231 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敬业; 张赛; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the epidemiology and clinical outcome of acute severe head injurey induced by road traffic accidents.Methods:The data of 231 patients with acute severe head injury induced by road traffic accidents were retrospectively studied.Results:The major victim-maker was automobiles (98.8%).The first three common types of traffic accidents were automobiles crashing into automobiles,automobiles crashing into bicycles(42.9%),and automobiles crashing pedestrians(40.3%).Eighty-seven patients out of 231 died,with the mortality of 37.7%.Conclusions:It suggests tat improving traffic administration and traffic safety consciousness may significantly reduce traffic trauma.

  14. The Current State of Head and Neck Injuries in Extreme Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinay K; Rango, Juan; Connaughton, Alexander J; Lombardo, Daniel J; Sabesan, Vani J

    2015-01-01

    Since their conception during the mid-1970s, international participation in extreme sports has grown rapidly. The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports. To examine the incidence and prevalence of head and neck injuries (HNIs) in extreme sports. Descriptive epidemiological study. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data from 7 sports (2000-2011) that were included in the Winter and Summer X Games. Data from the NEISS database were collected for each individual sport per year and type of HNI. Cumulative data for overall incidence and injuries over the entire 11-year period were calculated. National estimates were determined using NEISS-weighted calculations. Incidence rates were calculated for extreme sports using data from Outdoor Foundation Participation Reports. Over 4 million injuries were reported between 2000 and 2011, of which 11.3% were HNIs. Of all HNIs, 83% were head injuries and 17% neck injuries. The 4 sports with the highest total incidence of HNI were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236). Severe HNI (cervical or skull fracture) accounted for 2.5% of extreme sports HNIs. Of these, skateboarding had the highest percentage of severe HNIs. The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow. A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries.

  15. The effect of head restraints and seat belts on the incidence of neck injury in car accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, D B; Marsden, A K

    1986-11-01

    During a 5-month period a study was made of motor vehicle occupants presenting at an Accident and Emergency department following an accident. Records were made of the incidence of neck injuries in relation to the presence of head restraints and the use of seat belts. There was a slight reduction in injuries when a head restraint was fitted but this difference did not achieve statistical significance. The incidence of neck injury was not increased if a seat belt was worn. It may be that the reason for the failure of head restraints to afford the expected protection is their inappropriate design and lack of adequate adjustability.

  16. Study Of 50 Cases With Craniofacial Trauma Who Experienced Head Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mesgarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that cranial injuries associated with facial fractures may cause a great risk of mortality and neurological morbidity, which mainly occurs in young adults. Aims and objectives: Study of the features of facial injuries associated with head injuries, discussing the management options and detecting the outcomes following craniofacial trauma. Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out at Imam reza and Shohada Hospitals. Radiographs and hospital data of 50 patients with craniofacial trauma between January 2013 and December 2014, managed at the Oral and Maxillofacial surgery department were gathered and analyzed. Results: The greatest number of the patients had 20 to 50 years old (68% and most of them were male. (M/F ratio was 6.09:1. The most prevalent causes of the trauma in this study were the motor vehicle accidents (44% and falling from height (36%, respectively. The most common bone fracture among the patients was the zygomatic bone fx (38.2%. Among the symptoms which the patients presented, Loss of the consciousness (52% and headache (43% showed the highest prevalence. Compound depressed fractures, contusions and intracranial hematoma were the leading causes of the surgical intervention for intracranial lesions. A high number of patients who have died in this study had associated systemic injuries. Displaced facial bone fracture were the indications for operation in facial fractures. Conclusions: The majority of the patients with craniofacial trauma were the adult males and the leading cause of trauma were road traffic accidents. A high number of the patients had mild head injuries and required only a conservational therapy.     Keywords:  head injury; craniofacial trauma; facial fracture

  17. Characteristics of associated craniofacial trauma in patients with head injuries: An experience with 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial fractures and concomitant cranial injuries carry the significant potential for mortality and neurological morbidity mainly in young adults. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of head injuries and associated facial injuries, the management options and outcome following cranio-facial trauma. Methods: This retrospective review was performed at Justice K. S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, and associated A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. Following Ethical Committee approval, hospital charts and radiographs of 100 consecutive patients of cranio-facial trauma managed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Neurosurgery between January 2004 and December 2004 were reviewed. Results: Majority of the patients were in the 2nd to 4th decade (79% with a male to female ratio of -8.09:1. Road traffic accidents were the common cause of craniofacial trauma in present study (54% followed by fall from height (30%. Loss of consciousness was the most common clinical symptom (62% followed by headache (33%. Zygoma was the most commonly fractured facial bone 48.2% (alone 21.2%, in combination 27.2%. Majority of patients had mild head injury and managed conservatively in present series. Causes of surgical intervention for intracranial lesions were compound depressed fracture, contusion and intracranial hematoma. Operative indications for facial fractures were displaced facial bone fractures. Major causes of mortality were associated systemic injuries. Conclusion: Adult males are the most common victims in craniofacial trauma, and road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority. Most of the patients sustained mild head injuries and were managed conservatively. Open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates was used for displaced facial bone fractures.

  18. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedicini Piernicola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr, respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif, was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-9095% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.095% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6, 5.9 (6.6, 4.6 (6.1, 14.3 (12.9 days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29, 0.33 (0.29, 0.42 (0.31, 0.14 (0.15 Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck

  19. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography......, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery...

  20. Multivariate head injury threshold measures for various sized children seated behind vehicle seats in rear impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczalski, Kenneth; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Pozzi, Mark; Saczalski, Todd; Burton, J L; Lewis, P

    2004-01-01

    Government recommendations to place children into the rear areas of motor vehicles to avoid airbag induced injuries have been complicated by the fact that most adult occupied front seats will collapse into the rear area during rear-impacts, and thus pose another potentially serious injury hazard to rear-seated children. Many variables affect whether or not a front seat occupant will collapse into the rear child, and whether that interaction could be injurious to the child. For instance, the severity of rear impact, coupled with front and rear occupant sizes (mass and stature), and the level of front seat strength, all interrelate to influence whether or not a rear seated child is likely to be impacted and possibly injured. The most common types of child injuries in these instances are head and chest injuries. In this study, a "high-low" experimental method was employed with a multi-level "factorial analysis" technique to study "multivariate" biomechanics of child head injury potential determined from rear-seated 3 and 6 year-old child surrogates in different types of vehicle bodies mounted to a sled system. The sled-buck systems were towed rearward into crushable barriers that matched the crash pulses of the vehicle types being tested. Various sizes of adult surrogates (i.e. 50 kg up to 110 kg), seated in both the "typical" low strength "single recliner" collapsing type front seat (i.e. 3.2 kN) and a much stronger "belt-integrated" seat design (i.e. up to 14.5 kN), were tested in the two different "sled body-buck" set-ups at various impact levels (i.e. 22.5 to 50 kph). One set-up used a popular minivan vehicle body with "built-in booster" seats for the 3 year-old. The other used a 4-door family sedan vehicle body with the 6 year-old in a standard rear bench seat. The parameters of the tests enabled the experimental data to be combined into polynomial "head injury" functions of the independent variables so the "likelihood" of rear child head-injury potential could

  1. Combat body armor and injuries to the head, face, and neck region: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl; Beirne, Ross

    2013-04-01

    There has been a reported increase in combat-related head, face, and neck (HFN) injuries among service personnel wearing combat body armor (CBA) that have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Modern ceramic plate CBA has decreased the incidence of fatal-penetrating injuries to the torso but offers no protection to the limbs and face which remain exposed to gunshot wounds and fragments from explosive devices. The aim of this review was to systematically summarize the literature reporting on HFN injuries sustained by combat personnel wearing CBA and to highlight recommendations for increased protection to the facial region. Three major contributing factors were identified with this proportional increase in HFN injuries, namely the increased survivability of soldiers because of CBA, fragments injuries from explosive devices, and the lack of protection to the face and limbs. There appears to be no evidence to suggest that by virtue of wearing CBA the likelihood of sustaining an HFN injury increases as such, but a higher incidence of fragment injuries to the HFN region may be due to the more common use of improvised explosive devicess and other explosive devices. Further development of lightweight protection for the face is needed.

  2. [An autopsy case of head injury with a manic-depressive states (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Miyakawa, T; Suzuki, T

    1977-07-01

    M. M. a man aged 49. He suffered from a head injury at the aged of 41. At that time he lost consciousness for a few minutes and he was diagnosed as a consquassatio cerebri. The sequelaes of his head injury were a change of character and a disturbance of autonomic nerve function. The changes of character were decreased of activity, lie-down for all day, decrease of speech and depressive mode, and occasionally he was ill-humored, restless and irritative. Periodically he became euphoris, talkative and childisch. He had a disturbance of autonomic nerve function which became worse in parallel to the depressive states. We speculated that character changes, such as manic-depressive states and disturbances of autonomic nerve function were due to the bruising of the bilateral orbital surfaces of frontal lobes.

  3. An occupational therapy work skills assessment for individuals with head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M

    2003-06-01

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation is a critical step in the return-to-work process for individuals with head injury. Research findings have been reported on the barriers for a successful return to work. Assessment frameworks have been published, but they do not include a protocol that contains each component for the assessment. This paper describes an occupational therapy assessment protocol developed and used in the evaluation of the work skills of individuals with head injury. This protocol focuses on assessment of physical, cognitive and behavioural abilities in relation to the demands of the workplace and measures these within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills and safety. The functional approach inherent in this protocol provides information to complement the findings of other interdisciplinary team members. This paper also explores the strengths and limitations of this protocol.

  4. PATTERN OF HEAD INJURIES IN FATAL ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN INDORE REGION, M. P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaturvedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident is the leading cause of serious injuries with associated head trauma especially in youth and middle age persons. Head injury is the most common cause of mortality and major health problem all over the world The Incidence of RTAs was higher in males and in 3rd to 4th decade of life owing to increase risk exposure to males due to more outdoor activities. Incidence of deaths due to RTAs was maximum (45.67% in two wheeler riders followed by pedestrians in 33.33% cases. The present study was conducted on dead bodies, died of accidents involving two wheeler, four wheeler and bicycle. The rate of incidence is higher in India because of bad traffic patterns and possibly the lack of awareness about traffic rules and also lack of good hospital services to our victims of RTAs

  5. JSNT-Guidelines for the Management of Severe Head Injury (Abridged edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Katsuji; Aruga, Tohru; Onuma, Takehide; Shigemori, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce the principal part of the JSNT-guidelines for the management of severe head injury in adults. The JSNT-guidelines were developed in 2000 by the Guidelines Committee of the Japan Society of Neurotraumatology (JSNT) based on the results of literature review and the Committee consensus. The guidelines updated in 2006 consist of 7 topics pertaining not only to prehospital care, initial, ICU and surgical management, but also the management of pediatric and geriatric patients. The JSNT-guidelines are of practical nature accounting for the difference in the medical system and conditions in Japan, but in their essence they are similar to those of Western countries. Reports on the application of these guidelines indicate their positive affect on the results of management of severe head injury.

  6. Cerebrovascular Time Constant in Patients with Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alex; Kalentiev, George; Gribkov, Alexander; Voennov, Oleg; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The cerebrovascular time constant (τ) theoretically estimates how fast the cerebral arterial bed is filled by blood volume after a sudden change in arterial blood pressure during one cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to assess the time constant of the cerebral arterial bed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with and without intracranial hematomas (IH). We examined 116 patients with severe TBI (mean 35 ± 15 years, 61 men, 55 women). The first group included 58 patients without IH and the second group included 58 patients with epidural (7), subdural (48), and multiple (3) hematomas. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) was performed 1-12 days after TBI in the first group and 2-8 days after surgical evacuation of the hematoma in the second group. Arteriovenous amplitude of regional cerebral blood volume oscillation was calculated as the difference between arterial and venous blood volume in the "region of interest" of 1 cm(2). Mean arterial pressure was measured and the flow rate of the middle cerebral artery was recorded with transcranial Doppler ultrasound after PCT. The time constant was calculated by the formula modified by Kasprowicz. The τ was shorter (p = 0.05) in both groups 1 and 2 in comparison with normal data. The time constant in group 2 was shorter than in group 1, both on the side of the former hematoma (р = 0.012) and on the contralateral side (р = 0.044). The results indicate failure of autoregulation of cerebral capillary blood flow in severe TBI, which increases in patients with polytrauma and traumatic IH.

  7. A QCT-Based Nonsegmentation Finite Element Head Model for Studying Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the existing finite element head models (FEHMs that are constructed from medical images, head tissues are usually segmented into a number of components according to the interior anatomical structure of the head. Each component is represented by a homogenous material model. There are a number of disadvantages in the segmentation-based finite element head models. Therefore, we developed a nonsegmentation finite element head model with pointwise-heterogeneous material properties and corroborated it by available experiment data. From the obtained results, it was found that although intracranial pressures predicted by the existing (piecewise-homogeneous and the proposed (pointwise-heterogeneous FEHM are very similar to each other, strain/stress levels in the head tissues are very different. The maximum peak strains/stresses predicted by the proposed FEHM are much higher than those by the existing FEHM, indicating that piecewise-homogeneous FEHM may have underestimated the stress/strain level induced by impact and thus may be inaccurate in predicting traumatic brain injuries.

  8. A QCT-Based Nonsegmentation Finite Element Head Model for Studying Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaoyang; Luo, Yunhua

    2015-01-01

    In the existing finite element head models (FEHMs) that are constructed from medical images, head tissues are usually segmented into a number of components according to the interior anatomical structure of the head. Each component is represented by a homogenous material model. There are a number of disadvantages in the segmentation-based finite element head models. Therefore, we developed a nonsegmentation finite element head model with pointwise-heterogeneous material properties and corroborated it by available experiment data. From the obtained results, it was found that although intracranial pressures predicted by the existing (piecewise-homogeneous) and the proposed (pointwise-heterogeneous) FEHM are very similar to each other, strain/stress levels in the head tissues are very different. The maximum peak strains/stresses predicted by the proposed FEHM are much higher than those by the existing FEHM, indicating that piecewise-homogeneous FEHM may have underestimated the stress/strain level induced by impact and thus may be inaccurate in predicting traumatic brain injuries.

  9. HIGH ARTERIAL BLOOD LACTATE AS SIRS PREDICTOR IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Lengkong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lactate is one of the prognostic factor for evaluation of clinical severe head injury patients outcome. Lactate is also known as a factor to support diagnostic and prognosis of SIRS cases. Severe head injury is a head traumatic case frequently found in Emergency Units, where some cases result in mortality. Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, severe head injury is define as a head injury with GCSscore between 3 and 8. This study aims to determine whether high arterial blood lactate can be used as predictor that causes the occurrence of SIRS.Method: A Cohort prospective study applied in thisresearch to determine arterial blood lactate as a predictor that causes the occurrence of SIRS. This study was conducted at Sanglah General Hospital Bali-Indonesia from May 2013 to July 2013 with 40 patients who fulfilled the inclusive criteria. Data were presented in tables and analyzed by applying Chi Square Test with CI 95% and p <0.05 was considered significant.Results: From 40 samples, 27 were male (62.5% and 17 female (37.5% at the age of 0-10, 2 people (5%, 10-20 years 7 people (17.5%, 20-40 years 14 people (35%, 40-60 years 12 people (30% and over 60 years 5 people (12.5%. On the first day, patients with normal level blood arterial lactate 2 (5%, and high 38 (95% causing SIRS (+ 39 (97.5% and SIRS (- 1 (2.5% samples to occur. Using bivariate analysis between arterial blood lactate level and the amount occurrence of SIRS, we obtain p < 0.05 and variable control using multivariate analysis we obtained variable of liver dysfunction that give significant value with level arterial blood lactate with p < 0.05.Conclusion: From 40 samples of Severe head injury, there were 38 (95% whose blood arterial lactate level increased on the first day, 2 (5% in normal limit and 39 (97.5% with SIRS on the third day when p < 0.05 so that high level arterial blood lactate can be used as predictor that causes SIRS to occur.

  10. AHEAD Study: an observational study of the management of anticoagulated patients who suffer head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Suzanne; Kuczawski, Maxine; Teare, M Dawn; Stevenson, Matt; Goodacre, Steve; Ramlakhan, Shammi; Morris, Francis; Rothwell, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Management of anticoagulated patients after head injury is unclear due to lack of robust evidence. This study aimed to determine the adverse outcome rate in these patients and identify risk factors associated with poor outcome. Design Multicentre, observational study using routine patient records. Setting 33 emergency departments in England and Scotland. Participants 3566 adults (aged ≥16 years) who had suffered blunt head injury and were currently taking warfarin. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was rate of adverse outcome defined as death or neurosurgery following initial injury, clinically significant CT scan finding or reattendance with related complication within 10 weeks of initial hospital attendance. Secondary objectives included identifying risk factors for adverse outcome using univariable and multivariable analyses. Results Clinical data available for 3534/3566 patients (99.1%), median age 79 years; mean initial international normalised ratio (INR) 2.67 (SD 1.34); 81.2% Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 15: 59.8% received a CT scan with significant head injury-related finding in 5.4% (n=208); 0.5% underwent neurosurgery; 1.2% patients suffered a head injury-related death. Overall adverse outcome rate was 5.9% (95% CI 5.2% to 6.7%). Patients with GCS=15 and no associated symptoms had lowest risk of adverse outcome (risk 2.7%; 95% CI 2.1 to 3.6). Patients with GCS=15 multivariable analysis (using imputation) found risk of adverse outcome to increase when reporting at least one associated symptom: vomiting (relative risk (RR) 1.8; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.4), amnesia (RR 3.5; 95% CI 2.1 to 5.7), headache (RR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8 to 2.2), loss of consciousness (RR 1.75; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.0). INR measurement did not predict adverse outcome in patients with GCS=15 (RR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2). Conclusions In alert warfarinised patients following head injury, the presence of symptoms is associated with greater risk of adverse outcome. Those with GCS=15

  11. The influence of severe malnutrition on rehabilitation in patients with severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, Zoltán

    2004-10-07

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the consequences of severe malnutrition in patients with severe head injury during rehabilitation. The data were collected from medical records of patients admitted to the neurorehabilitation unit over the last 5 years. Twenty of 1850 patients had severe malnutrition, the body mass index (BMI) of these patients were under 15 (10-14) kg/m2. The majority of patients suffered traumatic brain damage (17/20). Thirteen patients arrived with percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy /PEG, three nasogastric tube in 3 cases we placed PEG. The nutritional strategy included a high-calorie diet, by means of bolus feeding five times during the day, continuous feeding during the night; the daily intake target being more than 2500 kcal. During rehabilitation treatment the majority of patients (13/20) revealed weight gain with a rate of 0.5-2 kg/week. The following complications were treated during the rehabilitation phase: 20 pressure sores, 20 contractures, 11 urinal infections, 6 cases of pneumonia, 2 of purulent bronchitis, 6 of sepsis, 1 penoscrotal abscess, epidydymitis, and 1 case of purulent arthritis. The patients required total assistance at the time of admission. At discharge 10 patients remained completely dependent, 6 patients needed minimal assistance, and 4 patients could perform daily activities independently. The average length of stay in our unit was 78/6-150/days. Patients with head injury suffering from severe malnutrition exhibit serious complications at the time of admission as well as during rehabilitation treatment. The patients were very difficult to mobilize. The length of stay at the rehabilitation unit was 28 days longer when complicated by malnutrition, than head injuries showing normal nutritional status. These findings underline the importance of adequate nutrition in patients with head injury in both the acute ward and in the rehabilitation unit.

  12. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  13. The Effect of Alcohol Intoxication on Mortality of Blunt Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Lin Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is found to have neuroprotection in recent studies in head injuries. We investigated the association of blood alcohol concentration (BAC with mortality of patients with blunt head injury after traffic accident. All patients sustaining blunt head injury caused by traffic accident brought to our emergency department who had obtained a brain computed tomography scans and BAC were analyzed. Patients with unknown mechanisms, transfers from outside hospitals, and incomplete data were excluded. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of mortality. During the study period, 3,628 patients with brain computed tomography (CT were included. Of these, BAC was measured in 556 patients. Patients with the lowest BAC (less than 8 mg/dl had lower mortality; intoxicated patients with BAC between 8 and less than 100 mg/dl were associated with significantly higher mortality than those patients in other intoxicated groups. Adjusted logistic regression demonstrated higher BAC group and Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores, and lower ISS and age were identified as independent predictors of reduced mortality. In our study, we found that patients who had moderate alcohol intoxication had higher risk of mortality. However, higher GCS scores, lower ISS, and younger age were identified as independent predictors of reduced mortality in the study patients.

  14. Incidental cranial CT findings in head injury patients in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin I Ogbole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidental findings on computed tomography (CT scans are occasionally noted in patients presenting with head injury. Since it can be assumed that head injured patients are of normal health status before the accident, these findings may be a representation of their frequency in the general population. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of such incidental findings among head injured patients in Nigeria′s foremost center of clinical neurosciences. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of CT scan images of 591 consecutive eligible patients over a 5-year period (2006-2010 to identify incidental findings. The images were evaluated by consensus agreement of two radiologists. Associations with gender and age were explored using appropriate statistical tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results: The mean patient age was 34.6 ± 21.2 years, and male to female ratio was 3.2: 1. Incidental findings were noted in 503/591 (85.1 % of the scans. Intracranial calcification was the commonest finding occurring in 61.8% of patients. Over 90% of the findings were benign. Compared with older ones, patients under the age of 60 were less likely, (P < 0.001, to have incidental findings. Conclusion: Although the majority of incidental findings in this African cohort of head injury patients are benign some clinically significant lesions were detectable. It is therefore recommended that such findings be adequately described in the radiological reports for proper counseling and follow-up.

  15. Imaging of spinal injury in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A.I. DuPont Children Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Ishak, Ramsay; Zacharia, Thomas T. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Spinal imaging has been a neglected part of abusive head trauma (AHT) imaging. As most of the radiographs and CT spine are negative in AHT in infants, the cervical spine is assumed to be normal. There is increasing evidence in the role of injury to brainstem and cervical cord in the pathogenesis of AHT. In addition, in courts of law, there is fierce debate about AHT, its mimics and other disparate nontraumatic diagnoses explaining the neuroradiological and skeletal findings. However, this discussion ignores the evidence and significance of spinal injury. We sought to study the cervical spine in an AHT cohort to understand the true prevalence of spinal injuries in AHT and contrast it with cohorts of accidental and nontraumatic groups to give the clinicians a robust diagnostic tool in evaluating AHT. The purpose of this study is to compare the relative incidence of spinal ligamentous and soft-tissue abnormalities on spinal MRI among three groups of children ages < 48 months: (1) those with AHT, (2) those with accidental trauma, and (3) those with nontraumatic conditions. This comparative study included 183 children who underwent spine MRI: 67 with AHT, 46 with accidental trauma and a clinical suspicion of spinal injury, and 70 with nontraumatic conditions. Clinical and radiographic findings were collected in all cases and were analyzed retrospectively to identify MRI evidence of traumatic spinal injuries. The incidence of spinal injuries among the three groups was compared. The incidence of spinal ligamentous injuries was calculated for those with and without radiographic evidence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. All comparisons were performed using Fisher exact test with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Cervical spine ligamentous injuries (predominantly the nuchal, atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial ligaments) were present in 78% of the AHT group, 46% of the accidental trauma group and 1% of the nontraumatic group; all of these differences were

  16. [The hardness of the traumatic object and the extent of injury (as exemplified by head injuries)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadymov, A B; Kazymov, M A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of the surface hardness of a traumatic agent on the extent and character of the injury to the soft and bone tissues of the cranial vault associated with various forms of injurious exposure. The authors evaluated forensic medical significance of the hardness as one of the most important properties of the major injurious agents involved in the formation of skull fractures and soft tissue ruptures under effect of an impact action or compression. The objects differing in the hardness of the contact element (striking pin) were studied in comparison with the hardness of the bone tissue. The extent and morphological features of the injuries to the bones and soft tissues in different parts of the skull were compared with reference to deformation and strength characteristics developing in response to a blow and compression.

  17. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Khademian, Zarir; Vezina, Gilbert; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rice, Amy [Independent Consultant (Biostatistics), Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Hinds, Tanya [Children' s National Medical Center, Child and Adolescent Protection Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a

  18. Early decompressive craniectomy for severe penetrating and closed head injury during wartime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy S; Mossop, Corey M; Dirks, Michael S; Stephens, Frederick L; Mulligan, Lisa; Ecker, Robert; Neal, Christopher J; Kumar, Anand; Tigno, Teodoro; Armonda, Rocco A

    2010-05-01

    Decompressive craniectomy has defined this era of damage-control wartime neurosurgery. Injuries that in previous conflicts were treated in an expectant manner are now aggressively decompressed at the far-forward Combat Support Hospital and transferred to Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda for definitive care. The purpose of this paper is to examine the baseline characteristics of those injured warriors who received decompressive craniectomies. The importance of this procedure will be emphasized and guidance provided to current and future neurosurgeons deployed in theater. The authors retrospectively searched a database for all soldiers injured in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom between April 2003 and October 2008 at WRAMC and NNMC. Criteria for inclusion in this study included either a closed or penetrating head injury suffered during combat operations in either Iraq or Afghanistan with subsequent neurosurgical evaluation at NNMC or WRAMC. Exclusion criteria included all cases in which primary demographic data could not be verified. Primary outcome data included the type and mechanism of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and injury severity score (ISS) at admission, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at discharge, 6 months, and 1-2 years. Four hundred eight patients presented with head injury during the study period. In this population, a total of 188 decompressive craniectomies were performed (154 for penetrating head injury, 22 for closed head injury, and 12 for unknown injury mechanism). Patients who underwent decompressive craniectomies in the combat theater had significantly lower initial GCS scores (7.7 +/- 4.2 vs 10.8 +/- 4.0, p < 0.05) and higher ISSs (32.5 +/- 9.4 vs 26.8 +/- 11.8, p < 0.05) than those who did not. When comparing the GOS scores at hospital discharge, 6 months, and 1-2 years after discharge, those receiving decompressive craniectomies had significantly lower

  19. Catalase Deficiency Accelerates Diabetic Renal Injury Through Peroxisomal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jiyoun; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Jehyun; Lee, Hi Bahl; Ho, Ye-Shih; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in diabetes complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) as well as glucose are increased in diabetes, and peroxisomes and mitochondria participate in FFA oxidation in an interconnected fashion. Therefore, we investigated whether deficiency of catalase, a major peroxisomal antioxidant, accelerates DN through peroxisomal dysfunction and abnormal renal FFA metabolism. Diabetes was induced by multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin into catalase knock-out (CKO) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Murine mesangial cells (MMCs) transfected with catalase small interfering RNA followed by catalase overexpression were used to further elucidate the role of endogenous catalase. Despite equivalent hyperglycemia, parameters of DN, along with markers of oxidative stress, were more accelerated in diabetic CKO mice than in diabetic WT mice up to 10 weeks of diabetes. CKO mice and MMCs showed impaired peroxisomal/mitochondrial biogenesis and FFA oxidation. Catalase deficiency increased mitochondrial ROS and fibronectin expression in response to FFAs, which were effectively restored by catalase overexpression or N-acetylcysteine. These data provide unprecedented evidence that FFA-induced peroxisomal dysfunction exacerbates DN and that endogenous catalase plays an important role in protecting the kidney from diabetic stress through maintaining peroxisomal and mitochondrial fitness. PMID:22315314

  20. Intention tremor after head injury. Clinical features and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Saeki, Naokatsu; Namba, Hiroki; Odaki, Masaru; Oka, Nobuo.

    1989-02-01

    Eight cases of intention tremor as a late complication of head injury were investigated. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 24 years. All received severe head injuries and lapsed into coma immediately afterward (Glasgow Coma Scale scores /le/8). Six patients exhibited decerebration or decortication. Hemiparesis was present in six cases and oculomotor nerve palsy in four. In the chronic stage, all patients displayed some degree of impairment of higher cortical function and five had dysarthria and/or ataxia. Initial computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 hours after the injury were obtained in five cases, of which four showed a hemorrhagic lesion in the midbrain or its surroundings. Other CT findings were diffuse cerebral swelling (four cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (three), and multiple hemorrhagic lesions (two). In the chronic stage, generalized cortical atrophy or ventricular enlargement was noted in five cases. These clinical features and CT findings indicate diffuse brain damage as well as midbrain damage and may reflect shearing injury. (author).

  1. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Ralston, Jill; Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Margulies, Susan S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2009-05-01

    We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6 h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R=0.89, p<0.00001). Injury-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes were quantified, and significant changes were found in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation, and cerebral blood flow after the injury. The diffuse optical measurements were robust and also correlated well with recordings of vital physiological parameters over the 6-h monitoring period, such as mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit.

  2. Brain and head injury in infancy and childhood; Schaedel- und Hirntrauma im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struffert, T. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66421, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg, Saar (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    This article describes typical head injuries in infants and children. In comparison with adults there are distinct differences in the etiology of trauma and in the kind of reaction of the skull and brain. In infants and children there are three different types of trauma: birth trauma, accidental and non-accidental injury. The typical injuries in these three groups are described. (orig.) [German] In diesem Beitrag werden die typischen Schaedel- und Hirnverletzungen bei Kindern zusammengefasst. Bei diesen bestehen im Vergleich zu Erwachsenen deutliche Unterschiede in der Aetiologie und der Reaktion der Kalotte und des Gehirns auf ein Trauma. Bezueglich der Aetiologie kann unterschieden werden in Geburtstrauma, akzidentelles und nichtakzidentelles Trauma. Die typischen Verletzungen dieser 3 Gruppen werden ausfuehrlich beschrieben. (orig.)

  3. A population-based study of survival and discharge status for survivors after head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Teasdale, T W

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Creation of a basis for the planning of rehabilitation after head injury in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with cranial fractures or traumatic cerebral lesions occurring in Denmark in 1979-93 were identified by computerized searches in the national hospital register. Kaplan......-Meier survival functions were calculated for these two categories. Hospital records for a random sample of 389 survivors in 1997 after cranial fracture, acute brain lesion or chronical subdural haematoma, which occurred in 1982, 1987 and 1992 in patients aged 15 years or more at injury, were reviewed. Survivors...... were characterized by age, gender, place and severity of injury, as well as neurophysical, speech and mental deficits at discharge from hospital. RESULTS: Acute/subacute mortality of hospitalized patients was 27% for cerebral lesions and 4% after cranial fracture. As attrition by death outweighed...

  4. Can glasgow score at discharge represent final outcome in severe head injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with head injury continue to improve over time and a minimum follow-up of six months is considered necessary to evaluate outcome. However, this may be difficult to assess due to lack of follow-up. It is also well known that operated patients who return for cranioplasty usually have the best outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess the outcome following severe head injury using cranioplasty as a surrogate marker for good outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out from January 2009 to December 2010. All patients with severe head injury who underwent decompressive craniectomy (DC in the study period were included. Patients who came back for cranioplasty in the same period were also included. Case records, imaging and follow up visit data from all patients were reviewed. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS on admission and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS at discharge were assessed. Observations and Results: Of the 273 patients, 84.25% (n=230 were males and 15.75% (n= 43 were females. The mean age was 34.3 years (range 2-81 years, SD 16.817. The mean GCS on admission was 5.615 (range 3-8, SD 1.438. The in-hospital mortality was 54% (n=149. Good outcome (GOS of 4 or 5 at discharge was attained in 22% (n=60 patients. Sixty five patients returned for cranioplasty (with a GOS of 4 or 5 during the study period. There was no statistical difference in the number of patients discharged with good outcome and those coming back for cranioplasty in the study period (P>0.5. Patients who came back for cranioplasty were younger in age (mean age 28.815 years SD 13.396 with better admission GCS prior to DC (mean GCS 6.32 SD1.39. Conclusions: In operated severe head injury patients significant number of patients (24% in our study have excellent outcome. However, insignificant number of patients had further improvement to GOS 4 or 5 (good outcome from the time of initial discharge. This suggests that due to lack of intensive

  5. Alcohol consumption, blood alcohol concentration level and guideline compliance in hospital referred patients with minimal, mild and moderate head injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harr, Marianne Efskind; Heskestad, Ben; Ingebrigtsen, Tor;

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee published guidelines for safe and cost-effective management of minimal, mild and moderate head injured patients.The aims of this study were to investigate to what extent the head injury population is under the influence of alcohol, and to evaluate...... whether the physicians' compliance to the guidelines is affected when patients are influenced by alcohol....

  6. An observational study of compliance with the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Waterloo, Knut; Ingebrigtsen, Tor;

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries were developed to provide safe and cost effective assessment of head injured patients. In a previous study conducted one year after publication and implementation of the guidelines (2003), we showed low...

  7. Nonuse of bicycle helmets and risk of fatal head injury: a proportional mortality, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Navindra; Coleman, Emily; Zwolakowski, Dorothy; Lauwers, Bert; Cass, Dan

    2012-11-20

    The effectiveness of helmets at preventing cycling fatalities, a leading cause of death among young adults worldwide, is controversial, and safety regulations for cycling vary by jurisdiction. We sought to determine whether nonuse of helmets is associated with an increased risk of fatal head injury. We used a case-control design involving 129 fatalities using data from a coroner's review of cycling deaths in Ontario, Canada, between 2006 and 2010. We defined cases as cyclists who died as a result of head injuries; we defined controls as cyclists who died as a result of other injuries. The exposure variable was nonuse of a bicycle helmet. Not wearing a helmet while cycling was associated with an increased risk of dying as a result of sustaining a head injury (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-7.3). We saw the same relationship when we excluded people younger than 18 years from the analysis (adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.4-8.5) and when we used a more stringent case definition (i.e., only a head injury with no other substantial injuries; adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2-10.2). Not wearing a helmet while cycling is associated with an increased risk of sustaining a fatal head injury. Policy changes and educational programs that increase the use of helmets while cycling may prevent deaths.

  8. How soccer players head the ball: a test of Optic Acceleration Cancellation theory with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Peter; Reed, Nick; Gilson, Stuart; Glennerster, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    We measured the movements of soccer players heading a football in a fully immersive virtual reality environment. In mid-flight the ball's trajectory was altered from its normal quasi-parabolic path to a linear one, producing a jump in the rate of change of the angle of elevation of gaze (alpha) from player to ball. One reaction time later the players adjusted their speed so that the rate of change of alpha increased when it had been reduced and reduced it when it had been increased. Since the result of the player's movement was to regain a value of the rate of change close to that before the disturbance, the data suggest that the players have an expectation of, and memory for, the pattern that the rate of change of alpha will follow during the flight. The results support the general claim that players intercepting balls use servo control strategies and are consistent with the particular claim of Optic Acceleration Cancellation theory that the servo strategy is to allow alpha to increase at a steadily decreasing rate.

  9. Exploring the King’s outcome scale for childhood head injury in children attending a rehabilitation hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumney, Peter; Hung, Ryan; McAdam, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Few tools exist to assess and monitor impairment and disability in children with acquired brain injury. The King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) was developed as an alternative to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. However, limited information is available to support its rel...

  10. Specificities of prosthetic and orthotic rehabilitation in amputees with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofilovski Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The prosthetic-orthotic rehabilitation (POR of amputees with head injury within the polytrauma presents a specific entity. The number of traumas caused by the traffic and the low-intensity war conflicts, increases constantly. The aim of our study was to examine the influence of complications on the POR duration and outcome in polytrauma amputees with head injury (PTAHI recording complications at the beginning and during the POR. Methods. The study was carried out on the patients divided into two groups of 35 polytrauma male patients each of corresponding age with unilateral transfemoral amputation caused by the war injury. The experimental group consisted of the amputees with head injury. Standard clinical techniques and procedures, as well as special functional evaluation techniques were used. Results. The PATHI started POR with a greater number of complications (average rate 7.29 vs 5.11 per patient; W = 928.000: Z = 3.730: p = 0.000. There was a highly significant positive correlation between this number and the Barthel Score value change (Fx, H, p < 0.01, and negative significant correlation considering prosthetic use and functional capacity test values (Fx, H p < 0.05. On admision, the amount of complications defined for the value 4 of POR outcome was significantly higher than values 2 and 3, respectively (H = 8.948; df = 2; p = 0.011. The PTAHI developed significantly more frequently complications during rehabilitation (X2 = 1.061; df = 1; p < 0.01. The proportion of the examinees with the value 4 who developed complications during rehabilitations was significantly higher than those with value 2 (Fp = 3.406; df1 = 2; df2 = 67; p = 0.038. The rehabilitation of the PTAHI lasted significantly longer (average 259.09 vs 183.63 days; W = 923.500; Z = -3.748; p = 0.000. Conclusion. The PTAHI including head injuries started prostheticorthotic rehabilitation with more prosthetic complications and their psychological status was worse

  11. Simulative investigation on head injuries of electric self-balancing scooter riders subject to ground impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Shang, Shi; Qi, Hongsheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The safety performance of an electric self-balancing scooter (ESS) has recently become a main concern in preventing its further wide application as a major candidate for green transportation. Scooter riders may suffer severe brain injuries in possible vehicle crash accidents not only from contact with a windshield or bonnet but also from secondary contact with the ground. In this paper, virtual vehicle-ESS crash scenarios combined with finite element (FE) car models and multi-body scooter/human models are set up. Post-impact kinematic gestures of scooter riders under various contact conditions, such as different vehicle impact speeds, ESS moving speeds, impact angles or positions, and different human sizes, are classified and analyzed. Furthermore, head-ground impact processes are reconstructed using validated FE head models, and important parameters of contusion and laceration (e.g., coup or contrecoup pressures and Von Mises stress and the maximum shear stress) are extracted and analyzed to assess the severity of regional contusion from head-ground contact. Results show that the brain injury risk increases with vehicle speeds and ESS moving speeds and may provide fundamental knowledge to popularize the use of a helmet and the vehicle-fitted safety systems, and lay a strong foundation for the reconstruction of ESS-involved accidents. There is scope to improve safety for the use of ESS in public roads according to the analysis and conclusions.

  12. Development of a Human Head FE Model and Impact Simulation on the Focal Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Dai; Yuge, Kohei; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Takao, Hiroyuki

    In this paper, a three-dimensional digital human-head model was developed and several dynamic analyses on the head trauma were conducted. This model was built up by the VOXEL approach using 433 slice CT images (512×512 pixels) and made of 1.22 million parallelepiped finite elements with 10 anatomical tissue properties such as scalp, CSF, skull, brain, dura mater and so on. The numerical analyses were conducted using a finite element code the authors have developed. The main features of the code are 1) it is based on the explicit time integration method and 2) it uses the one point integration method to evaluate the equivalent nodal forces with the hourglass control proposed by Flanagan and Belytschko(1) and 3) it utilizes the parallel computation system based on MPI. In order to verify the developed model, the head impact experiment for a cadaver by Nahum et al.(2) was simulated. The calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental ones. A front and rear impact analyses were also performed to discuss on the characteristic measure of the brain injury, in which the von-Mises stress was high in the frontal lobe in both of the analyses because of the large deformations of a frontal cranial base. This result suggests that the von-Mises stress can be a good measure of the brain injury since it is empirically well known that the frontal lobe tends to get injured regardless of the impact positions.

  13. Traumatic brain injuries in illustrated literature: experience from a series of over 700 head injuries in the Asterix comic books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Marcel A; Slotty, Philipp; Sarikaya-Seiwert, Sevgi; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze the epidemiology and specific risk factors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the Asterix illustrated comic books. Among the illustrated literature, TBI is a predominating injury pattern. A retrospective analysis of TBI in all 34 Asterix comic books was performed by examining the initial neurological status and signs of TBI. Clinical data were correlated to information regarding the trauma mechanism, the sociocultural background of victims and offenders, and the circumstances of the traumata, to identify specific risk factors. Seven hundred and four TBIs were identified. The majority of persons involved were adult and male. The major cause of trauma was assault (98.8%). Traumata were classified to be severe in over 50% (GCS 3-8). Different neurological deficits and signs of basal skull fractures were identified. Although over half of head-injury victims had a severe initial impairment of consciousness, no case of death or permanent neurological deficit was found. The largest group of head-injured characters was constituted by Romans (63.9%), while Gauls caused nearly 90% of the TBIs. A helmet had been worn by 70.5% of victims but had been lost in the vast majority of cases (87.7%). In 83% of cases, TBIs were caused under the influence of a doping agent called "the magic potion". Although over half of patients had an initially severe impairment of consciousness after TBI, no permanent deficit could be found. Roman nationality, hypoglossal paresis, lost helmet, and ingestion of the magic potion were significantly correlated with severe initial impairment of consciousness (p ≤ 0.05).

  14. Routine techniques in forensic neuropathology as demonstrated by gunshot injury to the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Meissner, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    It will be vital to the practical activity of every forensic and/or clinical pathologist to be able to answer three questions regarding the reconstruction of a lethal event: the type and cause of death, as well as the survival time. The authors offer an overview of the application of selected morphological techniques in general forensic neuropathology, techniques that provide answers to some of the main questions in forensic neurotraumatology. The methods are illustrated by individual cases of lethal gunshot injury to the head from low velocity handguns. Besides the general forensic tasks of interpretation of the crime scene and postmortem external examination of the victim's body a computed tomography is recommended for documentation and reconstruction of the missile track. The microscopic techniques involve Nissl-stain for neurons, hematoxylin and eosin for delayed ischemic neuronal alterations, microtubule-associated protein (MAP) expression for acute neuronal ischemia, luxol-fast-blue-stain for myelin destruction (and demyelination), silver-stain for axons, beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) for axonal injury, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) for astrocytic characterization, naphthol AS-D-chloroacetate esterase for neutrophilic infiltration and CD68-expression for microglial reaction. The pattern of methods lead--in the case of gunshot injury as well as in any traumatic impact to the head--to answers according the extent of tissue destruction (and the cause of death), the biometric reconstruction of the criminal event, and the timing of (gunshot) wounds of the brain. These methods will be indispensable for the preparation of future neuropathological expert reports addressing questions of type of injury, the consequent pathological symptoms, timing of the injury, and the cause of death.

  15. Beneficial effect of cerebrolysin on moderate and severe head injury patients: result of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G K C; Zhu, X L; Poon, W S

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is used as a neurotrophic agent for the treatment of ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's Disease. Exploratory studies in patients with post-acute traumatic brain injury have shown that this treatment might help improve recovery. Aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of Cerebrolysin to the initial treatment regimen of moderate and severe head injury patients would improve their outcome. At 6 months, 67% of the patients (Cerebrolysin group) attained good outcome (GOS 3-5). The study group was compared with the historical cohort of patients from the hospital trauma data bank, with age, sex and admitting GCS matching. More patients tended to a good outcome in the Cerebrolysin group (P = 0.065). No significant side-effect requiring cessation of Cerebrolysin was noted. It can be concluded that the use of Cerebrolysin as part of the initial management of moderate and severe head injury is safe and well tolerated. The results suggest that Cerebrolysin is beneficial in regard to the outcome in these patients, especially in elderly patients.

  16. Short-term and long-term outcome of athletic closed head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, Frank M; Barth, Jeffrey T

    2003-07-01

    The continued development of the sport environment as a laboratory for clinical investigation of mild head injury has greatly advanced the use of neuropsychological assessment in evaluating brain-injured athletes, and tracking their symptoms and recovery in an objective manner. The use of neurocognitive baseline measures has become critical in determining whether a brain-injured athlete has recovered function sufficiently to return to play. The rapid growth of computerized and web-based neurocognitive assessment measures provides an efficient, valid technology to put such testing within the reach of most institutions and organizations that field sport teams. Moreover, the knowledge of the recovery curve following mild head injury in the sport environment can be generalized to the management of MTBI in general clinical environments where baseline measures are unlikely. What we know today is that sideline assessments of severity are not predictive of which athletes will show the most typical 5- to 10-day recovery period and which will report persistent PCS complaints and exhibit impaired neurocognitive performance for an extended time. The research on mechanisms of brain injury in MTBI suggests that unpredictable, diffuse white-matter damage may control much of the variability in functional impairments and recovery duration.

  17. HEAD INJURY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    light. The patient is then completely exposed to allow adequate examination .... Palpable or visible skull fossa . 12 deformity ... veins.7. Urine output is monitored and attention is paid to pressure points, oral .... 0 ICP monitoring devices can be.

  18. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF SERUM ELETROLYTE (NA + , K + , CA ++ , PO 4 -- IMBALANCE IN SEVERE AND MODERATE TRAUMATIC HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjeev Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Electrolyte abnormalities are common in patients with traumatic brain injury. Disturbances of serum sodium levels are among the most common and frequently occur in neurologically morbid patients and exacerbate their severity. Hypernatremia usually results from diabetes insipidus syndr ome, whereas hyponatremia develops due to syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH or cerebral salt - wasting syndrome (CSWS and contribute to the high morbidity and mortality rates observed in these patients. The aim of this stud y is to measure the serum levels of Na + , K + , Ca ++ , PO 4 --- in head injury patients and find the range & compare the levels in severe and moderate head injury patients with mild head injury patients. METHOD: Na + , K + , Ca ++ , PO 4 --- levels of patients in age group 13 - 60 years were estimated by ion selective electrode method. RESULTS: it was found that most common electrolyte imbalance found is hyperphosphotemia (87% followed by hyponatremia (62.90%. In case of hyperelectrolytemia, h yperkalemia (46.6% to be the most common electrolyte imbalance in mild type of head injury whereas in severe and moderate cases hyperphosphotemia (28.40% is most common dyselectrolytemia. CONCLUSION: hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disbalanc e among Na+, K+, Ca++, PO4 --- in patients of traumatic head injury which is also very dangerous and need to be correct promptly.

  19. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury: Imaging Spectrum from Mild to Severe Closed Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    methemoglobin, which corresponds with the area of contusion on CT (Fig. 5C). The constellation of these findings are consistent with diffuse axonal injury...paucity of interoperability of RIS-HIS (Radiology and Hospital Information Systems ) between PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications) and the EHR...falltbi.html. 17 Meagher, R.J., W.F. Young, Subdural hematoma, eMedicine, Nov 2, 2006. http://www.emedicine.com/ NEURO /topic575.htm 18 Ingebrigsten

  1. Systemic vascular resistance is increased and associated with accelerated arterial stiffening change in patients with chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S C; May-Kuen Wong, A; Lien, H Y; Fuk-Tan Tang, S; Fu, T C; Lin, Y; Wang, J S

    2013-02-01

    Despite of stiffening change of conduit arteries, how total peripheral resistance (TPR) is adapted to chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains unclear. To investigate how chronic cervical SCI influences hemodynamic characteristics Cross-sectional, case-control study. Rehabilitation department in the tertiary medical center. Twenty-one male patients with traumatic SCI resulting from cervical spine fracture were recruited. The injury occurred three to 289 months (46 months in average) previously. Twenty-one healthy male participants with matched age and body mass index were enrolled as control group. The subjects were asked to maintain supine rest (SR) and then head-up tilt (HUT) at 60 degree for five minutes, respectively. A novel noninvasive bio-reactance device was employed to measure cardiac hemodynamics, whereas heart rate variability was used to determine cardiac autonomic activity. Additionally, the digital volume pulse analysis was applied to calculate arterial stiffness index (SI) and arteriolar reflection index (RI). SCI patients revealed less stroke volume and cardiac output (CO), as well as, greater total peripheral resistance (TPR) and SI during SR than normal subjects did. Moreover, the positive correlation between TPR and SI was observed in SCI patients rather than normal subjects. In SCI patients, HUT (1) markedly decreased TPR while CO and cardio-acceleration responses remained intact and (2) decreased HF power value but failed to change LF/HF ratio. Furthermore, the degree of orthostatic hypotension was correlated with the TPRHUT/TPRSR ratio but not the COHUT/COSR ratio. Chronic cervical SCI leads to a progressively accelerated increase in vascular stiffness, which is associated with increase in systemic vascular resistance. Furthermore, the cervical SCI-related orthostatic hypotension lies in the impairment of vasoconstriction without cardiac dysfunction. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact. SI, rather than blood pressure, reflects not only

  2. Supramolecular Photochirogenesis with a Higher-Order Complex: Highly Accelerated Exclusively Head-to-Head Photocyclodimerization of 2-Anthracenecarboxylic Acid via 2:2 Complexation with Prolinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Yuko; Katsumata, Shin-Ya; Nishijima, Masaki; Fukuhara, Gaku; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Yang, Cheng; Nakamura, Asao; Mori, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshihisa

    2016-09-21

    An unprecedented 2:2 complex was shown to intervene in the enantiodifferentiating photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid (A) mediated by a hydrogen-bonding template l-prolinol (P) to accelerate the formation of chiral anti-head-to-head and achiral syn-head-to-head cyclodimers in >99% combined yield with enhanced enantioselectivities of up to 72% ee for the former. The supramolecular complexation and photochirogenic behaviors, as well as the plausible structures, of intervening Am·Pn complexes (m, n = 1 or 2) were elucidated by combined theoretical and experimental spectroscopic, photophysical, and photochemical studies. Furthermore, the photochemical chiral amplification was achieved for the first time by utilizing the preferential 2:2 complexation of A with homochiral P to give normalized product enantioselectivities higher than those of the template used. The present strategy based on the higher-order hydrogen-bonding motif, which is potentially applicable to a variety of carboxylic acids and β-aminoalcohols, is not only conceptually new and expandable to other (photo)chirogenic and sensing systems but also may serve as a versatile tool for achieving photochemical asymmetric amplification and constructing chiral functional supramolecular architectures.

  3. A revolution in preventing fatal craniovertebral junction injuries: lessons learned from the Head and Neck Support device in professional auto racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anand; Abbas, Ahmed; Smith, Gabriel; Manjila, Sunil; Pace, Jonathan; Steinmetz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Fatal craniovertebral junction (CVJ) injuries were the most common cause of death in high-speed motor sports prior to 2001. Following the death of a mutual friend and race car driver, Patrick Jacquemart (1946-1981), biomechanical engineer Dr. Robert Hubbard, along with race car driver and brother-in-law Jim Downing, developed the concept for the Head and Neck Support (HANS) device to prevent flexion-distraction injuries during high-velocity impact. Biomechanical testing showed that neck shear and loading forces experienced during collisions were 3 times the required amount for a catastrophic injury. Crash sled testing with and without the HANS device elucidated reductions in neck tension, neck compression, head acceleration, and chest acceleration experienced by dummies during high-energy crashes. Simultaneously, motor sports accidents such as Dale Earnhardt Sr.'s fatal crash in 2001 galvanized public opinion in favor of serious safety reform. Analysis of Earnhardt's accident demonstrated that his car's velocity parallel to the barrier was more than 150 miles per hour (mph), with deceleration upon impact of roughly 43 mph in a total of 0.08 seconds. After careful review, several major racing series such as the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) and Championship Auto Racing Team (CART) made major changes to ensure the safety of drivers at the turn of the 21st century. Since the rule requiring the HANS device in professional auto racing series was put in place, there has not been a single reported case of a fatal CVJ injury.

  4. The protective effects of propofol and citicoline combination in experimental head injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menku, Ahmet; Ogden, Mustafa; Saraymen, Recep

    2010-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LP) is an important factor in tissue damage following head injury. Reactive oxygen radicals which damage cellular components play an important role in ischemic or hypoxic tissue. They initiate the lipid peroxidation process after head trauma. However, antioxidant agents may protect brain tissue against oxidative damage 39 male Swiss Albino rats (200-250 g) were used in this experimental study. These animals were divided into 3 groups: 1) control group, 2) propofol group (100 mg/kg) and, 3) citicoline (250 mg/kg) and propofol (100 mg/kg) combination group. Oxidant effect in brain tissue content was assessed by measuring the Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Gluthatione Peroxidase (GPx) activities. There was no statistically meaningful difference among the groups regarding GPx levels. MDA levels were significantly lower in the citicoline and combination group than those of the control group. As for the levels of SOD, there was an increase both in the propofol and combination groups. Atherapeutic benefit of the propofol and citicolin combination in head trauma has not been previously demonstrated. We examined the possible potential protective effect of propofol and citicolin against oxidative damage in experimental head trauma in the present study.

  5. Medieval times' influencing figure Rhaze's approach to head injuries in Liber Almansoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acıduman, Ahmet; Aşkit, Cağatay; Belen, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    To present the chapter "On wound of the head and fracture of the head bone" of Kitāb al-Manṣūrī / Liber Almansoris, which was one of the early works of Rhazes. Both Arabic (Süleymaniye Manuscript Library, Ayasofya collection, Nr. 3751 and Millet Library, Feyzullah Efendi collection, Nr. 1327) and the Latin (Basileae, 1544) texts of Kitāb al-Manṣūrī / Liber Almansoris were studied, and the 26th section of the 7th chapter, entitled "Fī al-shajja kasr al-'aẓm al-ra's / De plagis capitis et fractura cranei / On wound of the head and fracture of the head bone" was translated into English and English text created. Rhazes underlined removing bone fragments in depressed and separated fractures of cranium along with protection of the dura, but he did not describe any surgical technique in this chapter. Galen's contemplation for the care of the dura with its integrity and as well his proposal to remove the bone fragments for preventing the dura from injury were the golden standards at the time that Rhazes also followed in the treatment of skull fractures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Refractory Intracranial Hypertension due to Fentanyl Administration Following Closed Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Hocker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough the effects of opioids on intracranial pressure have long been a subject of controversy, they are frequently administered to patients with severe head trauma. We present a patient with an uncommon paradoxical response to opioids.Case ReportA patient with refractory intracranial hypertension after closed head injury was managed with standard medical therapy with only transient decreases in the intracranial pressure. Only after discontinuation of opiates did the intracranial pressure become manageable without metabolic suppression and rescue osmotic therapy, implicating opiates as the etiology of refractory intracranial hypertension in this patient. ConclusionsClinicians should consider opioids as a contributing factor in malignant intracranial hypertension when findings on neuroimaging do not explain persistent and refractory intracranial hypertension.

  7. Evoked potentials and head injury. 1. Rating of evoked potential abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, H K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes a method for rating the degree of abnormality of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potential patterns in head injury (HI) patients. Criteria for judging degree of EP abnormality are presented that allow assessment of the extent and severity of subcortical and cortical dysfunction associated with traumatic brain damage. Interrater reliability data based upon blind ratings of normal and HI patients are presented and shown to be highly significant. Tables of normative values of peak latencies and amplitudes are given and illustrations of EP patterns of different degrees of abnormality are presented.

  8. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring.

  9. Therapeutic effectiveness of epicranial nerve blocks on post-traumatic syndrome from head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Caputi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The autor describes the case of a 53-year-old woman suffering from headache and dizziness, sometimes nausea, tinnitus in the right ear, and diffuse scalp allodynia following an occupational accident involving a head injury. Hyposensitizing treatment by anesthetic blockade at the emergence points of the epicranial nerves, which were hyperalgesic to fi nger pressure, rapidly controlled the allodynia and eventually the headache. Unexpectedly, the patient also reported reduced dizziness and resolution of the tinnitus. The unforeseen outcome highlights the unpredictable therapeutic potential of a simple and modestly invasive procedure. The neuropathophysiological interpretation is consequently very interesting.

  10. Differential reading recovery in patients with severe to moderate closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, C P

    1990-12-01

    A differential recovery was seen when alternate forms of a nationally standardized test of Reading Vocabulary, Literal Reading Comprehension and Inferential Reading Comprehension was administered serially to 10 consecutive closed head injury admissions to a university rehabilitation hospital. Inferential Reading Comprehension was the most impaired and had the fastest recovery rate. Subtle cognitive deficits in Inferential Reading Comprehension were detected when Reading Vocabulary was at or better than a twelfth grade level. Maximal recovery of all three reading functions occurred within 4 months after trauma, with most occurring in the first 3 months. The reading recovery pattern parallels the recovery of intelligence scores in the literature.

  11. Computed tomography following paediatric head injury. Computertomographische Verlaufskontrollen nach Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, U. (Klinikum Essen (Germany, F.R.). Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut); Lins, E.; Rembrink, K. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Neurochirurgische Klinik)

    1989-08-01

    38 children with moderate and severe head injuries had CT follow-ups. On initial scans combined lesions dominated over diffuse (diffuse swelling, subarachnoid haemorrhage) and focal lesions (focal swelling, contusions). Contusion showed up until the 6th day after the accident. Two cases of focal lesions could be demonstrated only after intravenous contrast. Up to 40% of the children developed hypodense extracerebral accumulations. Long-term CT follow-ups showed ventricular (84%) and sulcal enlargement (63%) as well as hypodense parenchymal lesions (50%). Combined and diffuse lesions showed a correlation of initial scans and long-term follow-up which could not be demonstrated in case of focal lesions. (orig.).

  12. Neurosurgical complications after apparently minor head injury. Assessment of risk in a series of 610 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, R G; Alves, W M; Rimel, R W; Winn, H R; Jane, J A

    1986-08-01

    A small number of patients with an apparently minor head injury will develop a life-threatening intracranial hematoma that must be rapidly detected and removed. To assess the risk of a significant intracranial neurosurgical complication after apparently minor head injury, the authors collected data prospectively on 610 patients who had sustained a transient posttraumatic loss of consciousness or other neurological function and who had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13, 14, or 15 in the emergency room. Skull x-ray films were obtained in 583 patients, 66 of whom (10.8% of the study population) had cranial fractures. Eighteen of the 610 patients (3.0%) required a neurosurgical procedure. Three acute subdural hematomas, one epidural hematoma, and one traumatic intracerebral hematoma required craniotomy. Of the 66 patients who had skull fracture, 7.6% required a craniotomy for intracranial hematoma. Thirteen (19.7%) of the 66 patients with skull fracture required an operative procedure as compared to five (1.0%) of the 517 patients without skull fracture. Two patients with a normal GCS score of 15 and normal skull x-ray films subsequently underwent operative treatment. The cost of three alternative management schemes for these patients was estimated. A 50% reduction in cost of management could be effected by the use of computerized tomography (CT) scans (or possibly skull x-ray films) in determining which of the patients who are alert at the time of presentation should be admitted for observation. Several other conclusions can be drawn from this study. First, an initial GCS score between 13 and 15 does not necessarily indicate that a patient has sustained a trivial head injury, since 3% of such patients will require an operative procedure despite an initially normal level of alertness. Second, an abnormal skull x-ray film increases by a factor of 20 the probability that a patient will need neurosurgical treatment. Third, it is very unusual for patients who have a

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in young men following head injury in childhood and adolescence: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2003-01-01

    admissions and the draft board, 3091 young men were identified who had been injured before age 18 and tested at age 18 or shortly thereafter: 970 had suffered a single concussion and were in hospital for one day only; 521 had two concussions at separate times and were in hospital for one day only on each...... Danish men appearing before the draft board had a score classified as dysfunctional). RESULTS: For young men who had suffered a single concussion, cranial fracture, or cerebral lesion before 12 years of age, resulting in less than 12 days of hospital admission (n = 376), rates of cognitive dysfunction.......0, irrespective of age at injury. For cases of two concussions, all odds ratios were > 1.4 but were not significant for all age groupings. CONCLUSIONS: For milder forms of single head injury before age 12 there is no evidence of enduring cognitive dysfunction. The apparent effect at later ages may reflect...

  14. Injuries of the head from backface deformation of ballistic protective helmets under ballistic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaels, Karin A; Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Salzar, Robert S; Davis, Martin; Boggess, Brian; Bush, Bryan; Harris, Robert; Rountree, Mark Steve; Sanderson, Ellory; Campman, Steven; Koch, Spencer; Dale Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Modern ballistic helmets defeat penetrating bullets by energy transfer from the projectile to the helmet, producing helmet deformation. This deformation may cause severe injuries without completely perforating the helmet, termed "behind armor blunt trauma" (BABT). As helmets become lighter, the likelihood of larger helmet backface deformation under ballistic impact increases. To characterize the potential for BABT, seven postmortem human head/neck specimens wearing a ballistic protective helmet were exposed to nonperforating impact, using a 9 mm, full metal jacket, 124 grain bullet with velocities of 400-460 m/s. An increasing trend of injury severity was observed, ranging from simple linear fractures to combinations of linear and depressed fractures. Overall, the ability to identify skull fractures resulting from BABT can be used in forensic investigations. Our results demonstrate a high risk of skull fracture due to BABT and necessitate the prevention of BABT as a design factor in future generations of protective gear.

  15. Translational Research in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Support for Patients with Severe Head Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Fa-liang; CHI Nan; LI Wei; XIE Lin; WANG Xue-xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the key points of the translational research in enteral and pareenteral nutrition support for patients with severe head injury (SHI), and to analyze the influence of different nutritional support routes on the prognosis of SHI patients. Methods: Totally 141 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were selected as study subjects, 47 cases for each group, and were given early enteral nutrition (EEN), delayed enteral nutrition (DEN), and parenteral nutrition (PN), respectively. The effect of different nutritional support routes on SHI patients was observed. Results: After 14 d of treatment, Glasgow comascale (GCS) scores of 3 groups were higher than treatment before (P Conclusion: EEN support is more conductive to the improvement of the nutrition status, reduction of the incidence of complications, and promotion of the prognosis of SHI patients than DEN and PN.

  16. The relationship between social skill and family problem-solving following very severe closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, H P; Knight, R G; Bishara, S N

    1991-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between level of social skill and family problem-solving behaviour in a group of 18, community dwelling, very severe closed head injury (CHI) patients who had suffered their injury at least 18 months previously, and who were still in contact with rehabilitation services. The main findings of this study were a positive relationship between CHI patients' level of social skill and their rate of positive effect, and an inverse relationship between the CHI patients' level of social skill and the rate of facilitative behaviour displayed by relatives during problem-solving interactions. It is suggested that socially unskilled CHI patients may be more demanding to interact with, and that this may cause a significant burden for their relatives.

  17. Age related outcome in acute subdural haematoma following traumatic head injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanif, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute subdural haematoma (ASDH) is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Reports prior to 1980 describe overall mortality rates for acute subdural haematomas (SDH\\'s) ranging from 40% to 90% with poor outcomes observed in all age groups. Recently, improved results have been reported with rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment. The elderly are predisposed to bleeding due to normal cerebral atrophy related to aging, stretching the bridging veins from the dura. Prognosis in ASDH is associated with age, time from injury to treatment, presence of pupillary abnormalities, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) or motor score on admission, immediate coma or lucid interval, computerized tomography findings (haematoma volume, degree of midline shift, associated intradural lesion, compression of basal cisterns), post-operative intracranial pressure and type of surgery. Advancing age is known to be a determinant of outcome in head injury. We present the results of a retrospective study carried out in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland\\'s national neurosurgical centre. The aim of our study was to examine the impact of age on outcome in patients with ASDH following severe head injury. Only cases with acute subdural haematoma requiring surgical evacuation were recruited. Mortality was significantly higher in older patients (50% above 70 years, 25.6% between 40 and 70 years and 26% below 40 years). Overall poor outcome (defined as Glasgow outcome scores 3-5) was also higher in older patients; 74.1% above 70 years, 48% between 40 and 70 years and 30% below 40 years. Poor outcome in traumatic acute subdural haematoma is higher in elderly patients even after surgical intervention.

  18. Return of memory and sleep efficiency following moderate to severe closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makley, Michael J; Johnson-Greene, Lisa; Tarwater, Patrick M; Kreuz, Andrew J; Spiro, J; Rao, V; Celnik, Pablo A

    2009-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in the subacute recovery phase following brain injury. A previous study from the authors' group found 68% of patients with closed head injury (CHI) had disrupted sleep on a rehabilitation unit. In the present study, the authors investigated whether improvement in sleep efficiency correlates with duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) after CHI. Fourteen CHI patients were enrolled and followed prospectively. Mechanism of injury included motor vehicle accident, fall, and blunt assault. An actigraph was placed on each subject's wrist within 72 hours of admission to the rehabilitation unit and recorded data for the duration of their stay. A minimum of 7 days of continuous actigraphy data was obtained on all subjects. PTA was measured daily using the Orientation Log (O-LOG). Seventy-eight percent of subjects had mean week-1 sleep efficiency scores of amnesia (P = .032). For those patients admitted with ongoing PTA, each 10-unit increase in sleep efficiency score correlated with 1 unit increase in O-LOG score (P = .056). Disrupted sleep is common in the postacute stage following CHI. Improved sleep efficiency correlates with resolution of PTA. Decreased sleep efficiency may negatively affect memory return after traumatic brain injury. Actigraphy is uniquely suited to study the sleep patterns of these patients.

  19. Effects of acceleration level on lumbar spine injuries in military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Baisden, Jamie L; Pintar, Frank A; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that thoracolumbar trauma occurs in the civilian population at its junction. In contrast, injury patterns in military populations indicate a shift to the inferior vertebral levels of the lumbar spine. Controlled studies offering an explanation for such migrations and the associated clinical biomechanics are sparse in literature. The goals of this study were to investigate the potential roles of acceleration loading on the production of injuries and their stability characteristics using a human cadaver model for applications to high-speed aircraft ejection and helicopter crashes. Biomechanical laboratory study using unembalmed human cadaver lumbar spinal columns. Thoracolumbar columns from post-mortem human surrogates were procured, x-rays taken, intervertebral joints and bony components evaluated for degeneration, and fixed using polymethylmethacrylate. The inferior end was attached to a platform via a load cell and uniaxial accelerometer. The superior end was attached to the upper metal platform via a semi-circular cylinder. The pre-flexed specimen was preloaded to simulate torso mass. The ends of the platform were connected to the vertical post of a custom-designed drop tower. The specimen was dropped inducing acceleration loading to the column. Axial force and acceleration data were gathered at high sampling rates, filtered, and peak accelerations and inertia-compensated axial forces were obtained during the loading phase. Computed tomography images were used to identify and classify injuries using the three-column concept (stable vs. unstable trauma). The mean age, total body mass, and stature of the five healthy degeneration-free specimens were 42 years, 73 kg, and 167 cm. The first two specimens subjected to peak accelerations of approximately 200 m/sec(2) were classified as belonging to high-speed aircraft ejection-type and the other three specimens subjected to greater amplitudes (347-549 m/sec(2)) were classified as

  20. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Miracle

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs, which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  1. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  2. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF PATTERN OF FATAL HEAD INJURY IN HELMETED AND NONHELMETED VICTIMS OF TWO WHEELER ACCIDENTS

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    P. A. Sheeju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Motor vehicle crashes are a major cause of fatality all over the world. By 2020, motor vehicle injury is projected to become the third leading contributor to the global burden of disease in the world. Motor cyclists are about 25 times more likely than car occupants to die in Road Traffic Accidents. Data on the incidence and types of crashes is required to guide safety policy. Knowledge of how injuries are caused and of what type they are of valuable instrument for identifying interventions and monitoring the effectiveness of intervention. The present study was done to find out the factors that contribute for motor cycle crashes and to study the injury pattern seen in helmeted and non-helmeted victims. MATERIAL AND METHODS Victims of two wheeler accidents brought for autopsy in a Govt. Medical College were studied from October 2010 to August 2011. Two wheelers include motor cycles, scooters and mopeds. Bicycles were excluded from the study. Accidents include all types; against all types of vehicles running on the road, collision with any object, surface or any animal or fall from vehicle. The details of the accident were collected in a printed proforma from relative/witnesses and from police officials. The injuries were entered in the specific columns of proforma. Data was analysed with MS Excel. RESULTS Death due to head injury is more in non-helmeted (52.5% compared to helmeted drivers (43.8 % whereas injury to chest and abdomen and limbs are more in helmeted. Combination of injuries (Head+Chest+Abdomen predominated in helmeted drivers (18.8% compared to 5% in non-helmeted drivers. Spinal injuries were more in helmeted than in non-helmeted. CONCLUSION The pattern of head injury was analysed in detail in helmeted and non-helmeted drivers. This will help in detailing of pattern of head injury in both groups.

  3. Profile of patients with head injury among vehicular accidents: An experience from a tertiary care centre of India

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    Manjul Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pattern of injuries among drivers, pillion riders and co-passengers of two and four-wheeler vehicles need to be separately evaluated and addressed. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 1545 patients (1314 males and 231 females between 01 April, 2011 to 31 December, 2011, to evaluate the profile of head injury patients due to road traffic accidents, admitted in Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh. Proper subset of cases and controls with or without helmet, seat belt and history of alcohol intake were compared. Data was analyzed to evaluate the incidence, severity, pattern of head injury and outcome of the patients. Results: Male drivers of two-wheeler vehicular accidents (71.4% were most commonly injured. Among helmeted patients, only 4.8% sustained severe head injuries compared to 23.7% of un-helmeted patients. Only full coverage helmets were effective in preventing head injury. Among helmeted patients with a proper chinstrap, 2.6% suffered critical injuries compared to 14% of non-strapped ones. In 142 patients, helmet was at position after the crash and only 0.7% of these sustained severe head injuries. Drunk driving was noticed among 19% and 6% of two- and four-wheeler vehicular occupants, respectively. Only 7.5% of the four-wheel vehicular occupants were wearing seat belt at the time of accident. Conclusions: Injury profile of two- and four-wheeler vehicular accident victims is entirely different. A ready supply of affordable helmets of appropriate quality and strict legislation for safety constraints is the need of the hour for road safety.

  4. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome secondary to head injury: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawajiri, K; Matsuoka, Y; Kan, M

    1992-09-01

    A case of cerebral salt wasting syndrome secondary to head injury is reported here. A 4-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with head injury. Neurological examination revealed no abnormal findings other than consciousness disturbance. Plain skull X-ray demonstrated a linear fracture of the bilateral parietal bones, and CT scan demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage of the tentorium of the cerebellum. He gradually improved, but on the 6th day deterioration of consciousness developed. At that time CT scan demonstrated no abnormal findings. Biochemical analysis showed hyponatremia (116mEq/L) with increased natriuresis. Although a high dose of NaCl was supplied, serum sodium levels did not normalize. So we suspected that SIADH might be causing the hyponatremia, and water restriction was started. He lost 1 kg in body weight over 3 days, but serum sodium levels remained low (118mEq/L) with increased natriuresis. We found that the hyponatremia was caused by cerebral salt wasting syndrome, so we treated the patient with fludrocortisone acetate. Consciousness disturbance improved two days after the medication with fludrocortisone acetate, and serum sodium levels became normal (137mEq/L) on the 27th day. The administration of fludrocortisone acetate was able to be stopped two months after admission, and then the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. We discussed in detail the diagnosis and the treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

  5. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  6. A retrospective review over 1999 to 2007 of head, shoulder and knee soft tissue and fracture dislocation injuries and associated costs for rugby league in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D; Hume, P; Gianotti, S; Clark, T

    2011-04-01

    King et al. reported that of 5 941 moderate to serious claims resulting in medical treatment for rugby league injuries, the knee, shoulder, and head and neck body sites and soft tissue and fracture-dislocation injuries were most frequent and costly in the New Zealand national no-fault injury compensation corporation database during 1999 to 2007. However, additional analyses of knee, shoulder and head and neck body sites by soft tissue and fracture-dislocation injury types was required to enable a greater understanding of the nature of injuries most likely to be seen by sports medical personnel dealing with rugby league players. From 1999 to 2007 the injury claims and costs for head and neck soft tissue, fracture-dislocations, shoulders soft tissue significantly increased. Knee soft tissue injury claims and costs significantly decreased from 1999 to 2007. There was no significant difference in knee fracture-dislocation injury claims but there was a significant increase in knee fracture-dislocation injury costs from 1999 to 2007. Changes in the nature of injuries may be related to changes in defensive techniques employed in rugby league during this time. Sports medical personnel dealing with rugby league players should focus their injury prevention strategies on reducing musculoskeletal injuries to the head and shoulder. There should be a focus on increasing awareness of correct tackling technique, head injury awareness and management of suspected cervical spine injuries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Topical diagnostics of traumatic condylar injuries and alloplastic reconstruction of temporomandibular joint heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvenetadze, Z; Danelia, T; Nemsadze, G; Gvenetadze, G

    2014-04-01

    Condylar fractures have an important place in facial traumatic injuries. Classification of condylar fractures according to clinical-anatomic picture is common in clinical practice. According to this classification there are: 1) fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures, 2) condylar neck fractures or high extra articular fractures, 3) condylar base fractures. Radiographic imaging plays important role in diagnosing condylar fractures along with knowledge of clinical symptoms. We used computer tomography imaging in our clinical practice. Three-dimensional imaging of computer tomography gives exact information about location of condylar fractures, impact of fractured fragments, displacement of condylar head from articular fossa. This method is mostly important for the cases which are hard to diagnose (fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures). For this group of patients surgical treatment is necessary with the method of arthroplasty. We have observed 5 patients with bilateral, fragmented, high condylar fractures. In all cases the surgery was performed on both sides with bone cement and titanium mini-plates. Long-term effects of the treatment included observation from 6 months to 2 years. In all cases anatomic and functional results were good. Shape of the mandible is restored, opening of mouth 3-3.5 cm, absence of malocclusion.

  8. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF PAEDIATRIC HEAD INJURY IN GANDHI MEDICAL COLLEGE BHOPAL FROM MAY 2011 TO JUNE 2013

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    Sudhir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinic pathological study of paediatric head injury was conducted in patients admitted in Gandhi medical college Bhopal during a period of 23 months from June 2011 to M ay 2013. This was done to assess various epidemiological parameters that influence that causation to trauma as well as the consequent morbidity and mortality in the paediatric age group. The study also included analysis of the paediatric age group head injury in relation to the age, sex, mode and type of injury. We also estimated differences in the incidence of recorded traumatic head injury by geographic area. Computerized tomography was done to diagnose the degree of the severity. Patients were classified by Glasgow coma scale and Scandinavian neurotrauma committee classification. It was found that 6 - 9 years of aged male patient with history of fall from height followed by RTA was the most common group. Closed injuries are more common and mostly associated with the orthopedic injuries. Chest infection is most common complication. Prognosis of open injury is better than closed

  9. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide application accelerates muscle injury repair in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Shiho; Sakai, Yoshitada; Ueha, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Hanako; Inoue, Miho; Niikura, Takahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are commonly observed in sports and traumatology medicine. Previously, we demonstrated that transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO2) to lower limbs increased the number of muscle mitochondria and promoted muscle endurance. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether transcutaneous CO2 application could enhance recovery from muscle injury. Tibialis anterior muscle damage was induced in 27 Sprague Dawley rats via intramuscular injection of bupivacaine. After muscle injury, rats were randomly assigned to transcutaneous CO2-treated or -untreated groups. From each group, three rats were sacrificed at weeks one, two, four and six. At each time point, histology and immunofluorescence analyses were performed, and changes in muscle weight, muscle weight/body weight ratio, muscle fibre circumference, gene expression levels and capillary density were measured. Injured muscle fibres were completely repaired at week six in the CO2-treated group but only partially repaired in the untreated group. The repair of basement and plasma membranes did not differ significantly between groups. However, expression levels of genes and proteins related to muscle protein synthesis were significantly higher in the CO2-treated group and significantly more capillaries four weeks after injury. Transcutaneous CO2 application can accelerate recovery after muscle injury in rats.

  10. Head and neck injury patterns in fatal falls: epidemiologic and biomechanical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael D; Eriksson, Anders; Leith, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Fatal falls often involve a head impact, which are in turn associated with a fracture of the skull or cervical spine. Prior authors have noted that the degree of inversion of the victim at the time of impact is an important predictor of the distribution of skull fractures, with skull base fractures more common than skull vault fractures in falls with a high degree of inversion. The majority of fatal fall publications have focused on skull fractures, and no research has described the association between fall circumstances and the distribution of fractures in the skull and neck. In the present study, we accessed data regarding head and neck fractures resulting from fatal falls from a Swedish autopsy database for the years 1992-2010, for the purposes of examining the relationships between skull and cervical spine fracture distribution and the circumstances of the fatal fall. Out of 102,310 medico-legal autopsies performed there were 1008 cases of falls associated with skull or cervical spine fractures. The circumstances of the falls were grouped in 3 statistically homogenous categories; falls occurring at ground level, falls from a height of cervical injuries (C0-C1 dislocation, C1 and C2 fractures), and lower cervical fractures. Logistic regression modeling revealed increased odds of skull base and lower cervical fracture in the middle and upper fall severity groups, relative to ground level falls (lower cervical cervical ≥3 m falls, OR = 2.23 [0.98, 5.08]; skull base cervical spine fracture in falls from a height are consistent with prior observations that the risk of such injuries is related to the degree of victim inversion at impact. The finding that C0-C1 dislocations are most common in falls from more than 3 m is unique, an indication that the injuries likely result from high energy shear forces rather than pure tension, as previously thought.

  11. Dislocation of the fibular head in an unusual sports injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Riaz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction One of the primary functions of the proximal tibiofibular joint is slight rotation to accommodate rotational stress at the ankle. Proximal tibiofibular joint dislocation is a rare injury and accounts for less than 1% of all knee injuries. This dislocation has been reported in patients who had been engaged in football, ballet dancing, equestrian jumping, parachuting and snowboarding. Case presentation A 20-year-old man was injured whilst playing football. He felt a pop in the right knee and was subsequently unable to bear weight on it. The range of movement in his knee joint was limited. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays of the knee revealed anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint. Comparison views confirmed the anterolateral dislocation. He had a failed manipulation under anaesthesia and the joint needed an open reduction in which the fibular head was levered back into place. Operative findings revealed a horizontal type of joint. Conclusion An exceedingly rare dislocation of a horizontal type of proximal tibiofibular joint was presented following a football injury. This dislocation was irreducible by a closed method.

  12. Neuroimaging for non-accidental head injury in childhood: A proposed protocol

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    Jaspan, T.; Griffiths, P.D.; McConachie, N.S.; Punt, J.A.G

    2003-01-01

    Non-accidental head injury (NAHI) is a major cause of neurological disability and death during infancy. Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in evaluating craniospinal injury, both for guiding medical management and the forensic aspects of abusive trauma. The damage sustained is varied, complex and may be accompanied by an evolving pattern of brain injury secondary to a cascade of metabolic and physiological derangements. Regrettably, many cases are poorly or incompletely evaluated leading to diagnostic errors and difficulties in executing subsequent child care or criminal proceedings. It is evident, from cases referred to the authors, that imaging protocols for NAHI are lacking (or only loosely adhered to, if present) in many centres throughout the U.K. Future research in this field will also be hampered if there is a lack of consistent and reliable radiological data. There is no nationally agreed protocol for imaging NAHI. We propose such a protocol, based upon a wide experience in the medical management of child abuse and extensive involvement in the medicolegal aspects of NAHI. Jaspan, T., et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 44--53.

  13. Vestibular and stabilometric findings in whiplash injury and minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacci, A; Ferrazzi, M; Berrettini, S; Panicucci, E; Matteucci, J; Bruschini, L; Ursino, F; Fattori, B

    2011-12-01

    Vertigo and postural instability following whiplash and/or minor head injuries is very frequent. According to some authors, post-whiplash vertigo cannot be caused by real injury to vestibular structures; other authors maintain that vestibular damage is possible even in the case of isolated whiplash, with vascular or post-traumatic involvement. Furthermore, many of the balance disorders reported after trauma can be justified by post-traumatic modification to the cervical proprioceptive input, with consequent damage to the vestibular spinal reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vestibular condition and postural status in a group of patients (Group A, n = 90) affected with balance disorders following whiplash, and in a second group (Group B, n = 20) with balance disorders after minor head injury associated with whiplash. Both groups were submitted to videonystagmography (VNG) and stabilometric investigation (open eyes - O E, closed eyes - CE, closed eyes with head retroflexed - CER) within 15 days of their injuries and repeated within 10 days after conclusion of cervical physiotherapy treatment. The VNG tests revealed vestibulopathy in 19% of cases in Group A (11% peripheral, 5% central, 3% in an undefined site) and in 60% of subjects in Group B (50% peripheral, 10% central). At the follow-up examination, all cases of non-compensated labyrinth deficit showed signs of compensation, while there were two cases (2%) in Group A and one case (5%) in Group B of PPV. As far as the altered posturographic recordings are concerned, while there was no specific pattern in the two groups, they were clearly pathologic, especially during CER. Both in OE and in CE there was an increase in the surface values and in those pertaining to shifting of the gravity centre on the sagittal plane, which was even more evident during CER. In Group A, the pre-post-physiotherapy comparison of CER results showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in the majority of the

  14. EFFECT OF CEREBROPROTEIN HYDROLYSATE WITH CITICOLINE VERSUS CITICOLINE ALONE IN THE INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF HEAD INJURY AND ITS CLINICAL OUTCOME “A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED COMPARATIVE STUDY”

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    Varadaraju D. N

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury is an important cause of morbidity. It also represents the most frequent reason for neurological illness after headache. Compared with other types of brain insult, traumatic brain injury produces more diffuse injury causing more cognitive and neuropsychiatric disturbances. Various drugs have been used in an attempt to improve the clinical outcome, citicoline and Cerebrolysin hydrolysate have been used to improve the clinical outcome in traumatic brain injury. The evidence thus far has been conflicting with reports in favour and against the use of these drugs in the clinical benefit of the patients with traumatic brain injury. We attempt to determine the benefits and advantages of using these drugs in the management of traumatic brain injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study comprising 60 patients of head injury admitted in the Department of Neurosurgery at Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bangalore. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the effect of cerebroprotein hydrolysate with citicoline compared to citicoline alone in the initial management of head injury and its clinical outcome and to assess the improvement. RESULTS Sixty patients with head injury were recruited and divided into group A and group B randomly. The mean age was 43.5 years with 43 male patients and 17 female patients. The GCS at admission of 27 patients was mild head injury and of 33 patients was moderate head injury. Group A had 13 patients with mild head injury and 17 patients with moderate head injury. Group B had 14 patients with mild and 16 patients with moderate head injury at the time of admission. The GCS was assessed at 1 week and 3 weeks. On assessing the patients at 1 week, group A had 14 patients with mild head injury and 16 patients with moderate head injury, whereas group B had 14 patients with mild and 16 patients with moderate head injury. The extended Glasgow Outcome Scale

  15. A Military Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Because of sports injuries, automobile...head injury will be studied in the WRAIR PCI model using longitudinal and multi-modal designs to fully characterize the neuromotor, cognitive, emotional ...timeframe, the cumulative effects of which can produce long-lasting effects including physical, mental, emotional and cognitive impairments and may place our

  16. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.

    2006-01-01

    -specified categories: hyperfractionated, accelerated, and accelerated with total dose reduction. FINDINGS: 15 trials with 6515 patients were included. The median follow-up was 6 years. Tumours sites were mostly oropharynx and larynx; 5221 (74%) patients had stage III-IV disease (International Union Against Cancer...

  17. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury:emphasis on cognitive and neurological deifciency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Igor Khalin; Nor Laili Azua Jamari; Nadiawati Bt Abdul Razak; Zubaidah Bt Hasain; Mohd Asri bin Mohd Nor; Mohd Hakimi bin Ahmad Zainudin; Ainsah Bt Omar; Renad Alyautdin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Produc-ing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modiifcations concerning cognitive deifciency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  18. A seven-year study on head injuries in infants, Iran the changing pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esmaeil Fakharian; Mahdi Mohammadzadeh; Samin Behdad; Atoosa Babamohammadi; Azadeh Sadat Mirzadeh; Javad Mohammadzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Head injury (HI) is the leading cause of mortality and life-long disability in infants.Infants have different anatomical and pathophysiological brain structures from other age groups.The aim of this study was to survey infant HI patients admitted to Shahid Behest Hospital in Kashan,Iran from 2004 to 2010,and to identify the causes of His in this age group.Methods:In this retrospective study,all HI patients under the age of two who were hospitalized for more than 24 hours between January 2004 and January 2010 were enrolled in the study.Demographic,etiologic,and injury data were collected and a descriptive analysis was performed.Results:Infants comprised 20.8% of all children (under 15 years old) with His and 65.1% of the injuries occurred in the home.Falls were the most common cause of injury (63.4%).In hospital mortality was 6.6 per 100 000 infants.A decreasing trend was seen in home events,but His caused by traffic accidents were increasing during the study period.The amount of HI infants resulting from car accidents has tripled from the years 2004 to 2010.Conclusion:Although home events and falling are the main causes of infant HIs and need attention,our study showed an increase of HIs caused by road traffic accidents,especially by car accidents,thus legislation for the implementation of protective equipment such as child safety seats and programs is urgently needed.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Therapy in Critically Ill Polytrauma Patients with Severe Head Injury

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    Luca Loredana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI is one of the leading causes of death among critically ill patients from the Intensive Care Units (ICU. After primary traumatic injuries, secondary complications occur, which are responsible for the progressive degradation of the clinical status in this type of patients. These include severe inflammation, biochemical and physiological imbalances and disruption of the cellular functionality. The redox cellular potential is determined by the oxidant/antioxidant ratio. Redox potential is disturbed in case of TBI leading to oxidative stress (OS. A series of agression factors that accumulate after primary traumatic injuries lead to secondary lesions represented by brain ischemia and hypoxia, inflammatory and metabolic factors, coagulopathy, microvascular damage, neurotransmitter accumulation, blood-brain barrier disruption, excitotoxic damage, blood-spinal cord barrier damage, and mitochondrial dysfunctions. A cascade of pathophysiological events lead to accelerated production of free radicals (FR that further sustain the OS. To minimize the OS and restore normal oxidant/antioxidant ratio, a series of antioxidant substances is recommended to be administrated (vitamin C, vitamin E, resveratrol, N-acetylcysteine. In this paper we present the biochemical and pathophysiological mechanism of action of FR in patients with TBI and the antioxidant therapy available.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide preconditioning prevents acceleration of kindling epileptogenesis induced by traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Mansoureh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Alizadeh, Leila; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza

    2015-12-15

    10-20% of symptomatic epilepsies are post-traumatic. We examined effect of LPS preconditioning on epileptogenesis after controlled cortical impact (CCI). LPS (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg) was injected i.p. to rats 5 days before induction of CCI to parieto-temporal cortex. Kindling started 24h after CCI by i.p. injection of 30 mg/kg of pentylenetetrazole every other day until manifestation of 3 consecutive generalized seizures. CCI injury accelerated the rate of kindled seizures acquisition. LPS (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg) prevented the acceleration of kindling. LPS preconditioning significantly decreased IL-1β and TNF-α over-expression and the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus of traumatic rats.

  1. Clinical factors associated with intracranial complications after pediatric traumatic head injury: an observational study of children submitted to a neurosurgical referral unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åstrand, Ramona Alice; Undén, Johan; Hesselgard, Karin;

    2010-01-01

    Clinically validated guidelines for the management of head injury in children do not exist, and the treatment is often based upon adult management routines. In order to examine the safety of this procedure, an analysis of clinical factors associated with complications after pediatric head injury ...

  2. Clinical factors associated with intracranial complications after pediatric traumatic head injury: an observational study of children submitted to a neurosurgical referral unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åstrand, Ramona Alice; Undén, Johan; Hesselgard, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Clinically validated guidelines for the management of head injury in children do not exist, and the treatment is often based upon adult management routines. In order to examine the safety of this procedure, an analysis of clinical factors associated with complications after pediatric head injury ...

  3. Can low serum levels of S100B predict normal CT findings after minor head injury in adults?: an evidence-based review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Undén, Johan; Romner, Bertil

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether low levels of S100B in serum can predict normal computed tomography (CT) findings after minor head injury (MHI) in adults.......To determine whether low levels of S100B in serum can predict normal computed tomography (CT) findings after minor head injury (MHI) in adults....

  4. An accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam design for BNCT and dosimetric evaluation using a voxel head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-jae; Han, Chi Young; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    The beam shaping assembly design has been investigated in order to improve the epithermal neutron beam for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy in intensity and quality, and dosimetric evaluation for the beams has been performed using both mathematical and voxel head phantoms with MCNP runs. The neutron source was assumed to be produced from a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a thick (7)Li target. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance epithermal neutron flux remarkably as well as to embody a good spectrum shaping to epithermal neutrons only with the proper combination of moderator and reflector. It is also found that a larger number of thermal neutrons can reach deeply into the brain and, therefore, can reduce considerably the treatment time for brain tumours. Consequently, the epithermal neutron beams designed in this study can treat more effectively deep-seated brain tumours.

  5. Prediction of intracranial injury in children aged five years and older with loss of consciousness after minor head injury due to nontrivial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydel, Micelle J; Shembekar, Amit D

    2003-10-01

    Indications for computed tomography (CT) in children with minor head injury remain controversial. The objective of this preliminary study is to determine whether a clinical decision rule developed for adults could be used in children aged 5 years and older. A prospective questionnaire was completed on all patients who were aged 5 to 17 years with major mechanisms of injury resulting in minor head injury (defined as normal Glasgow Coma Scale or modified coma scale in infants, plus normal brief neurologic examination) and loss of consciousness. The questionnaire documented 6 clinical variables: headache, emesis, intoxication, seizure, short-term memory deficits, and physical evidence of trauma above the clavicles. CT was obtained for all patients, findings were compared with the results of the questionnaires, and the sensitivity and specificity of the decision rule were determined. Throughout a 30-month period, 175 patients were enrolled, with a mean age of 12.8 years. Fourteen (8%) patients had intracranial injury or depressed skull fracture on CT. The presence of any of the 6 criteria was significantly associated with an abnormal CT scan result (Pinjury. In this preliminary study, CT use in pediatric patients with minor head injury could have been safely reduced by 23% by using a clinical decision rule previously validated in adults.

  6. [Treatment of head injury coma with prolonged pentobarbital anaesthesia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artru, F; Guerin, J M; Latarjet, J; Deleuze, R

    1981-04-11

    Forty-five patients in deep coma resulting from head injury were treated with pentobarbital in doses adjusted to maintain serum barbiturate levels between 15 and 25 mg/l and short burst suppression phases on EEG. Brain death occurred in 20%. The overall mortality rate was 60%, no death being attributable to treatment; 24% of the patients were able to resume active life. Patients with non-reactive pupils during the early phase of coma were compared with patients of similar ages and neurological symptoms non treated with pentobarbital. In treated patients the incidence of brain death was reduced by 50% and the mortality rate by 25% (p less than 0.05), without increase in deaths from intercurrent complications and in severe sequelae among survivors.

  7. Imaging of penetrating injuries of the head and neck:current practice at a level I trauma center in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Naoko; Hito, Rania; Burke, Peter A; Sakai, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating neck injuries are commonly related to stab wounds and gunshot wounds in the United States. The injuries are classified by penetration site in terms of the three anatomical zones of the neck. Based on this zonal classification system, penetrating injuries to the head and neck have traditionally been evaluated by conventional angiography and/or surgical exploration. In recent years, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) angiography has significantly improved detectability of vascular injuries and extravascular injuries in the setting of penetrating injuries. CT angiography is a fast and minimally invasive imaging modality to evaluate penetrating injuries of the head and neck for stable patients. The spectrum of penetrating neck injuries includes vascular injury (extravasation, pseudoaneurysm, dissection, occlusion, and arteriovenous fistula), aerodigestive injury (esophageal and tracheal injuries), salivary gland injury, neurologic injury (spinal canal and cerebral injuries), and osseous injury, all of which can be evaluated using CT angiography. Familiarity with the complications and imaging characteristics of penetrating injuries of the head and neck is essential for accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment.

  8. Comparison of two methods for assessing leakage radiation dose around the head of the medical linear accelerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ehab M Attalla

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to measure the leakage by two methods with ion chamber and ready packs film, and to investigate the feasibility and the advantages of using two dosimetry methods for assessing leakage radiation around the head of the linear accelerators. Methods:Measurements were performed using a 30 cm3 ion chamber;the gantry at 0°, the X-ray head at 0°, the field size at between the central axis and a plane surface at a FSD of 100 as a reference, a series of concentric circles having radi of 50, 75, and 100 cm with their common centre at the reference point. The absorbed dose was measured at the reference point, and this would be used as the reference dose. With the diaphragm closed, the measurements were taken along the circumference of the three circles and at 45° intervals. Results:Leakage radiations while the treatment head was in the vertical position varied between 0.016%–0.04%. With the head lying horizontal y, leak-age radiation was the same order magnitude and varied between 0.02%–0.07%. In the second method, the verification was accomplished by closing the col imator jaws and covering the head of the treatment unit with the ready pack films. The films were marked to permit the determination of their positions on the machine after exposed and processed. With the diaphragm closed, and the ready packs films around the linear accelerator the beam turned on for 2500 cGy (2500 MU). The optical den-sity of these films was measured and compared with this of the reference dose. Leakage radiation varied according to the film positions and the magnitude of leakage was between 0.005%–0.075%. Conclusion:The dif erences between the values of the leakage radiation levels observed at dif erent measurement points do not only reflect dif erences in the ef ective shielding thickness of the head wal , but are also related to dif erences in the distances between the target and the measurement points. The experimental errors involved in dosimetric

  9. Prospective survey on neurosurgical intensive care for patients with severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively compare the clinical outcome ofintensive care therapy (ICT) with that of conventional care therapy (CCT) in severe head injured patients.Methods: Patients with severe head injury were assigned randomly into Group ICT and Group CCT, 100 patients in each group. Patients in Group ICT accepted intensive care therapy in neurosurgical intensive care (NIC) unit for the first 2 weeks after admission, while patients in Group CCT accepted conventional care therapy in ordinary ward. The outcomes were evaluated 3 months after injury.Results: There was a significant increase in good recovery (54%) (χ2=4.43, P<0.05) and significant decrease of death (25%) (χ2=4.50, P<0.05) in Group ICT compared to 39% and 39% in Group CCT respectively. The differences were also confirmed statistically in the following aspects: the patients under 50 years with good recovery pronounced a number increase (χ2=7.54, P<0.01), while the mortality in the same range of age was decreased in Group ICT (χ2=5.28, P<0.05). The mortality was reduced significantly in patients with GCS for 6-8 on admission (χ2=8.47, P<0.01) and in patients with the level of brain stem injured bellow mesencephalon (χ2=4.15, P<0.05). ICT would improve the outcome in patients undergoing conservative therapy only (χ2=13.13, P<0.01).Conclusions: NIC plays an important role in assessing the neurological state, guiding management, evaluating curative effect and estimating the outcome.

  10. Epidemiology and management of head injury in paediatric age group in North-Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Y Chinda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paediatric head injury (HI is the single most common cause of death and permanent disability in children world over, and this is increasingly becoming worrisome in our society because of increased risks and proneness to road traffic accidents on our highways and streets. The study set to determine causes and management of HI among children in our society. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of all children aged 0-15 years with traumatic head injury (THIs who were managed at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital between July, 2006 and August, 2008. Results: A total of 45 children with THIs presented to the casualty unit of the hospital; 30 (66.7% were boys and 15 (33.3% were girls. Three (6.7% children were less than 1 year of age, 21 (46.7% were between 1 years and 6 years while 16 (35.6% and 5 (11.0% were aged 7-11 years and 12-15 years respectively. Thirty six (80.0% of the children were pedestrians, 6 (13.4% fell from a height, while 2 (4.4% and 1 (2.2% were as a result of home accident and assault, respectively. Twenty one patients (46.7% had mild HI, while 53.3% had moderate to severe category. Forty one (91.1% of children were managed as in-patients, mostly (95.1% by conservative non-operative management, while 4 (8.9% were treated on the out-patient basis. The mortality rate was 17.8%. Conclusion: H1 among children is of a great concern, because of its incremental magnitude, due to increasing child labour and interstate religious discipleship among children, with attendant high mortality and permanent disabilities. Necessary laws and legislations should be formulated and implemented with organized campaigns and public enlightenment to prevent and mitigate this menace.

  11. Admissions for isolated nonoperative mild head injuries: Sharing the burden among trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Mejaddam, Ali Y; Chang, Yuchiao; DeMoya, Marc A; King, David R; Yeh, Daniel D; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Alam, Hasan B; Velmahos, George C

    2016-10-01

    Isolated nonoperative mild head injuries (INOMHI) occur with increasing frequency in an aging population. These patients often have multiple social, discharge, and rehabilitation issues, which far exceed the acute component of their care. This study was aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with INOMHI admitted to three services: trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. Retrospective case series (January 1, 2009 to August 31, 2013) at an academic Level I trauma center. According to an institutional protocol, INOMHI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15 were admitted on a weekly rotational basis to trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. The three populations were compared, and the primary outcomes were survival rate to discharge, neurological status at hospital discharge as measured by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), and discharge disposition. Four hundred eighty-eight INOMHI patients were admitted (trauma surgery, 172; neurosurgery, 131; neurology, 185). The mean age of the study population was 65.3 years, and 58.8% of patients were male. Seventy-seven percent of patients has a GCS score of 15. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale in head and neck, and GCS were similar among the three groups. Patients who were admitted to trauma surgery, neurosurgery and neurology services had similar proportions of survivors (98.8% vs 95.7% vs 94.7%), and discharge disposition (home, 57.0% vs 61.6% vs 55.7%). The proportion of patients with GOS of 4 or 5 on discharge was slightly higher among patients admitted to trauma (97.7% vs 93.0% vs 92.4%). In a logistic regression model adjusting for Charlson Comorbidity Index CCI and Abbreviated Injury Scale head and neck scores, patients who were admitted to neurology or neurosurgery had significantly lower odds being discharged with GOS 4 or 5. While the trauma group had the lowest proportion of repeats of brain computed tomography (61

  12. Susceptibility of the MMPI-2-RF neurological complaints and cognitive complaints scales to over-reporting in simulated head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolinger, Elizabeth; Reese, Caitlin; Suhr, Julie; Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effect of simulated head injury on scores on the Neurological Complaints (NUC) and Cognitive Complaints (COG) scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF). Young adults with a history of mild head injury were randomly assigned to simulate head injury or give their best effort on a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the MMPI-2-RF. Simulators who also showed poor effort on performance validity tests (PVTs) were compared with controls who showed valid performance on PVTs. Results showed that both scales, but especially NUC, are elevated in individuals simulating head injury, with medium to large effect sizes. Although both scales were highly correlated with all MMPI-2-RF over-reporting validity scales, the relationship of Response Bias Scale to both NUC and COG was much stronger in the simulators than controls. Even accounting for over-reporting on the MMPI-2-RF, NUC was related to general somatic complaints regardless of group membership, whereas COG was related to both psychological distress and somatic complaints in the control group only. Neither scale was related to actual neuropsychological performance, regardless of group membership. Overall, results provide further evidence that self-reported cognitive symptoms can be due to many causes, not necessarily cognitive impairment, and can be exaggerated in a non-credible manner.

  13. Construct Validity of WAIS-R Factors: Neuropsychological Test Correlates in Adults Referred for Evaluation of Possible Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Elisabeth M. S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A 3-factor solution of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised (WAIS-R) in 260 adults with suspected head injury suggested relatively good construct validity for the factors, based on correlations with neuropsychological tests. Findings are discussed in terms of the multidimensional nature of neuropsychological tests and WAIS-R factors.…

  14. Head injury resulting from scooter accidents in Rome: Differences before and after implementing a universal helmet law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. La Torre (Giuseppe); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); G. Bertazzoni (Giuliano); W. Ricciardi

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To estimate the incidence rates and related determinants of head injuries before and after the implementation of a new universal helmet law in Italy. Methods: The investigation took place in the Emergency Room of the Accident and Emergency Department, Teaching Hospital 'Umber

  15. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  16. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in mild to moderate head injury : Early and late imaging related to outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, J; Hew, JM; van Zomeren, AH; Sluiter, WJ; Minderhoud, JM

    1999-01-01

    Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) studies were performed in mild to moderate head injury to evaluate whether early and late imaging have additional value in predicting outcome in this category of patients. During 1-year follow-up of a series of 67 patients, a CT s

  17. Indices of slowness of information processing in head injury patients : Tests for selective attention related to ERP latencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, Jacoba M.; Naalt, van der Joukje; Weerden , van Tiemen; Zomeren , van Adriaan H.

    2004-01-01

    We explored the relation between neuropsychological (attention tests involving time constraints) and neurophysiological (N2 and P3 event-related potential (ERP) latencies) indices of slowness of information processing after closed head injury (CHI). A group of 44 CHI patients performed worse than he

  18. Indices of slowness of information processing in head injury patients: Tests for selective attention related to ERP latencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba; van Weerden, Tiemen; van Zomeren, Adriaan

    2004-01-01

    We explored the relation between neuropsychological (attention tests involving time constraints) and neurophysiological (N2 and P3 event-related potential (ERP) latencies) indices of slowness of information processing after closed head injury (CHI). A group of 44 CHI patients performed worse than he

  19. The usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in detection of diffuse axonal injury in a patient with head trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeok Gyu Kwon; Sung Ho Jang

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is the predominant mechanism of injuries in patients with traumatic brain injury. Neither conventional brain computed tomography nor magnetic resonance imaging has shown sufficient sensitivity in the diagnosis of diffuse axonal injury. In the current study, we attempted to demonstrate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in the detection of lesion sites of diffuse axonal injury in a patient with head trauma who had been misdiagnosed as having a stroke. A 44-year-old man fell from a height of about 2 m. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (32 months after onset) showed leukomalactic lesions in the isthmus of the corpus callosum and the left temporal lobe. He presented with mild quadriparesis, intentional tremor of both hands, and trunkal ataxia. From diffusion tensor imaging results of 33 months after traumatic brain injury onset, we found diffuse axonal injury in the right corticospinal tract (centrum semiovale, pons), both fornices (columns and crus), and both inferior cerebellar peduncles (cerebellar portions). We think that diffusion tensor imaging could be a useful tool in the detection of lesion sites of diffuse axonal injuryin patients with head trauma.

  20. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic head injuries in the forensic setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cryan, J

    2010-11-01

    Excessive drinking increases the risk of dying unnaturally. In the Republic of Ireland such deaths are referred to the State Pathologist. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is routinely measured. We created a database of cases presenting to the State Pathologist over a nine year period (2000-2008 inclusive) to evaluate the relationship between alcohol and fatal traumatic brain injuries (FTBI). Of a total of 1778 cases, 332 (275 Male [M]; 57 Female [F]) died of head injuries. Fatalities were highest in males aged 36-50 (N = 97) and 26-35 (N = 73). Assaults (N = 147), falls (N = 95), road traffic accidents (RTA) (N = 50) and suicide (N = 15) were the commonest modes of presentation. A positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was found in 36% of assaults, 41% of falls and 40% of suicides. In the RTA group BAC was positive in 59% of pedestrians, 33% of drivers and 14% of passengers. Alcohol clearly plays a significant role in FTBI in the forensic setting.

  1. From conception to evaluation of mobile services for people with head injury: A participatory design perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, Pierre-Yves; Pigot, Hélène; Giroux, Sylvain

    2015-12-17

    Adults with cognitive impairments lack the means to organise their daily life, plan their appointments, cope with fatigue, and manage their budget. They manifest interest in using new technologies to be part of society. Unfortunately, the applications offered on smart phones are often beyond their cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to design a mobile cognitive assistant to enhance autonomy of people living with acquired traumatic brain injury. Participatory design methodologies guided this research by involving adults with cognitive impairments (CI) and their caregivers in the early stages of the design process. The population of the study is composed of four male adults who present cognitive impairments (three with head injury and one with stroke) and three caregivers. The first phase of this research was to design the Services Assistance Mobile and Intelligent (SAMI) application based on the needs expressed by the participants. During three focus groups, needs emerged concerning planning, health monitoring and money management and led to the implementation of assistive solutions on an Android mobile phone. During the second phase, the participants evaluated the mobile assistant SAMI at home for eight weeks. The results demonstrate that the participants were able to participate actively in the conception of SAMI and to use it successfully. People with CI showed a slight improvement in their life satisfaction. Due to the small number of participants, these promising results need to be confirmed by a larger-scale study.

  2. Translational Research in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Support for Patients with Severe Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-liang LIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the key points of the translational research in enteral and pareenteral nutrition support for patients with severe head injury (SHI, and to analyze the influence of different nutritional support routes on the prognosis of SHI patients. Methods: Totally 141 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were selected as study subjects, 47 cases for each group, and were given early enteral nutrition (EEN, delayed enteral nutrition (DEN, and parenteral nutrition (PN, respectively. The effect of different nutritional support routes on SHI patients was observed. Results: After 14 d of treatment, Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores of 3 groups were higher than treatment before (P<0.01, and with statistical differences among groups (P<0.05, or P<0.01. The levels of serum albumin, total serum protein and hemoglobin were higher in EEN group than the other groups (P<0.01. The level of serum albumin was lower in PN group than in DEN group (P<0.05. There were statistical differences in the incidence of complications among three groups (χ2=9.2487, P=0.0098. Conclusion: EEN support is more conductive to the improvement of the nutrition status, reduction of the incidence of complications, and promotion of the prognosis of SHI patients than DEN and PN.

  3. Repeated Closed Head Injury in Mice Results in Sustained Motor and Memory Deficits and Chronic Cellular Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda N Bolton Hall

    Full Text Available Millions of mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs occur every year in the United States, with many people subject to multiple head injuries that can lead to chronic behavioral dysfunction. We previously reported that mild TBI induced using closed head injuries (CHI repeated at 24h intervals produced more acute neuron death and glial reactivity than a single CHI, and increasing the length of time between injuries to 48h reduced the cumulative acute effects of repeated CHI. To determine whether repeated CHI is associated with behavioral dysfunction or persistent cellular damage, mice receiving either five CHI at 24h intervals, five CHI at 48h intervals, or five sham injuries at 24h intervals were evaluated across a 10 week period after injury. Animals with repeated CHI exhibited motor coordination and memory deficits, but not gait abnormalities when compared to sham animals. At 10wks post-injury, no notable neuron loss or glial reactivity was observed in the cortex, hippocampus, or corpus callosum. Argyrophilic axons were found in the pyramidal tract of some injured animals, but neither silver stain accumulation nor inflammatory responses in the injury groups were statistically different from the sham group in this region. However, argyrophilic axons, microgliosis and astrogliosis were significantly increased within the optic tract of injured animals. Repeated mild CHI also resulted in microgliosis and a loss of neurofilament protein 200 in the optic nerve. Lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h did not effectively reduce these behavioral or cellular responses. These results suggest that repeated mild CHI results in persistent behavioral dysfunction and chronic pathological changes within the visual system, neither of which was significantly attenuated by lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h.

  4. Skull fracture and haemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims – a critical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Tripathi, Chandrabhal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial haemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial haemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. Methods: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. Results: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. Conclusions: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases. PMID:21483205

  5. Caregivers' voices: The experiences of caregivers of children who sustained serious accidental and non-accidental head injury in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharewera-Mika, Julie; Cooper, Erana; Kool, Bridget; Pereira, Susana; Kelly, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Head injury is a leading cause of mortality and acquired neurological impairment in children. Head-injured children may have neurobehavioural deficits that persist for years following injury. Head injury can result in significant and persistent caregiver burden, including mental health issues, family stress and disorganisation, and unmet social and healthcare service needs. Few studies have examined the healthcare and social service needs of children and their families following head injury sustained at an early age. This qualitative study aims to describe the experiences of caregivers of children who sustained a serious head injury (particularly non-accidental head injury) before the age of 2 years. Caregivers were interviewed up to 15 years following the initial injury. Semi-structured interviews with 21 caregivers of 15 children (aged 3-15 years at the time of interview) were completed. Thematic analysis of interview data generated three key themes: impact, support and information. The study's findings reveal the broad impact of serious childhood head injury on caregivers, specifically the significant distress and burden brought about through lack of information, challenges in accessing support and inconsistent care. Recommendations for developing a quality 'model of care' and improving ease of access to supports for caregivers are provided.

  6. Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy In Head And Neck Cancers- A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini B

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion:CHART achieves good locoregional response in stages III and IV of head and neck cancer. The acute mucosal reactions were within acceptable limits. The compliance to the treatment was good. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(3.000: 218-221

  7. Applying DTI white matter orientations to finite element head models to examine diffuse TBI under high rotational accelerations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colgan, Niall C

    2010-12-01

    The in-vivo mechanical response of neural tissue during impact loading of the head is simulated using geometrically accurate finite element (FE) head models. However, current FE models do not account for the anisotropic elastic material behaviour of brain tissue. In soft biological tissue, there is a correlation between internal microscopic structure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, constitutive equations are important for the numerical analysis of the soft biological tissues. By exploiting diffusion tensor techniques the anisotropic orientation of neural tissue is incorporated into a non-linear viscoelastic material model for brain tissue and implemented in an explicit FE analysis. The viscoelastic material parameters are derived from published data and the viscoelastic model is used to describe the mechanical response of brain tissue. The model is formulated in terms of a large strain viscoelastic framework and considers non-linear viscous deformations in combination with non-linear elastic behaviour. The constitutive model was applied in the University College Dublin brain trauma model (UCDBTM) (i.e. three-dimensional finite element head model) to predict the mechanical response of the intra-cranial contents due to rotational injury.

  8. Is the Canadian CT head rule for minor head injury applicable for patients in Germany?; Laesst sich die Canadian CT Head Rule fuer das leichte Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma auf Deutschland uebertragen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, P.M.; Walter, M.A.; Kloska, S.P.; Heindel, W. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany); Rieger, B.; Wassmann, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany); Fischer, R.J. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Biomathematik, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the applicability of the Canadian CT head rule (CCHR) on head trauma patients in a German university hospital. Methods: 122 patients (m = 74; f = 48; 40 {+-} 19 years) were examined with cranial CT due to minor head trauma. The need for cranial CT according to the CCHR was evaluated retrospectively. Results: with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 46.6% all patients with the need for neurosurgical intervention were detected by applying the major criteria of the CCHR. Also, every patient with severe brain injury was detected by the extended criteria with a sensitivity of 99.6% and a specificity of 34.1%. This would have led to a reduction in the rate of cranial CT examinations by 45.1% for the major and 22.1% for the extended criteria. No patient with severe brain injury would have been missed by application of the criteria. Conclusion: the Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head trauma is applicable with a very high sensitivity and the potential of significantly reducing the rate of cranial CT examinations in these patients. (orig.)

  9. The Head Injury Transportation Straight to Neurosurgery (HITS-NS) randomised trial: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Fiona; Russell, Wanda; Fuller, Gordon; McClelland, Graham; Pennington, Elspeth; Goodacre, Steve; Han, Kyee; Curran, Andrew; Holliman, Damien; Freeman, Jennifer; Chapman, Nathan; Stevenson, Matt; Byers, Sonia; Mason, Suzanne; Potter, Hugh; Coats, Tim; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Peters, Mary; Shewan, Jane; Strong, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ), with 7% (n = 20) requiring neurosurgery (craniotomy, craniectomy or intracranial pressure monitoring) but a further 18 requiring admission to an intensive care unit. An intention-to-treat analysis revealed the two trial arms to be equivalent in terms of age, GCS and severity of injury. No significant 30-day mortality differences were found (8.8% vs. 9.1/%; p > 0.05) in the 273 (159/113) patients with data available. There were no apparent differences in staff and patient preferences for either pathway, with satisfaction high with both. Very low responses to invitations to consent for follow-up in the large number of mild head injury-enrolled patients meant that only 20% of patients had 6-month outcomes. The trial-based economic evaluation could not focus on early neurosurgery because of these low numbers but instead investigated the comparative cost-effectiveness of bypass compared with selective secondary transfer for eligible patients at the scene of injury. Current NHS England practice of bypassing patients with suspected TBI to neuroscience centres gives overtriage ratios of 13 : 1 for neurosurgery and 4 : 1 for TBI. This important finding makes studying the impact of bypass to facilitate early neurosurgery not plausible using this study design. Future research should explore an efficient comparative effectiveness design for evaluating 'early neurosurgery through bypass' and address the challenge of reliable TBI diagnosis at the scene of injury. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68087745. This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 1. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.

  10. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    synaptophysin, and synaptophilin are three proteins crucial for maintaining functional synapses. Immunoblot measurements of these proteins revealed a...energy test- ing of small projectiles, ranging in shape and size, showed the steel sphere produced the highest impact energy and the most consistent...impact characteristics. Additional tests confirmed the steel sphere produced linear and rotational motions on the rat’s head while remaining within a

  11. Endurance exercise accelerates myocardial tissue oxygenation recovery and reduces ischemia reperfusion injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjing Li

    Full Text Available Exercise training offers cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury. However, few essential signals have been identified to underscore the protection from injury. In the present study, we hypothesized that exercise-induced acceleration of myocardial tissue oxygenation recovery contributes to this protection. C57BL/6 mice (4 weeks old were trained on treadmills for 45 min/day at a treading rate of 15 m/min for 8 weeks. At the end of 8-week exercise training, mice underwent 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 60-min or 24-h reperfusion. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was performed to measure myocardial tissue oxygenation. Western immunoblotting analyses, gene transfection, and myography were examined. The oximetry study demonstrated that exercise markedly shortened myocardial tissue oxygenation recovery time following reperfusion. Exercise training up-regulated Kir6.1 protein expression (a subunit of ATP-sensitive K(+channel on vascular smooth muscle cells, VSMC sarc-K(ATP and protected the heart from I/R injury. In vivo gene transfer of dominant negative Kir6.1AAA prolonged the recovery time and enlarged infarct size. In addition, transfection of Kir6.1AAA increased the stiffness and reduced the relaxation capacity in the vasculature. Together, our study demonstrated that exercise training up-regulated Kir6.1, improved tissue oxygenation recovery, and protected the heart against I/R injury. This exercise-induced cardioprotective mechanism may provide a potential therapeutic intervention targeting VSMC sarc-K(ATP channels and reperfusion recovery.

  12. Accelerated reendothelialization, increased neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation after arterial injury in BAMBI-/- mice.

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    Nicolas Guillot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intimal injury rapidly activates TGFβ and enhances vascular repair by the growth of endothelial (EC and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. The response to the TGFβ family of growth factors can be modified by BAMBI (BMP, Activin, Membrane Bound Inhibitor acting as a non-signaling, competitive antagonist of TGFβ type I receptors such as ALK 1 and 5. In vivo the effect of BAMBI will depend on its cell-specific expression and of that of the ALK type receptors. We recently reported EC restricted BAMBI expression and genetic elimination of BAMBI resulting in an in vitro and in vivo phenotype characterized by endothelial activation and proliferation involving alternative pathway activation by TGFβ through ALK 1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that BAMBI modulates arterial response to injury via its effects on endothelial repair and arterial wall neovascularization we used a model of femoral arterial denudation injury in wild type (WT and BAMBI(-/- mice. Arterial response was evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks after luminal endothelial denudation of femoral arteries. The BAMBI(-/- genotype mice showed accelerated luminal endothelial repair at 2 weeks and a highly unusual increase in arterial wall neovascularization compared to WT mice. The exuberant intimal and medial neovessel formation with BAMBI(-/- genotype was also associated with significant red blood cell extravasation. The bleeding into the neointima at 2 weeks transiently increased it's area in the BAMBI(-/-genotype despite the faster luminal endothelial repair in this group. Vascular smooth muscle cells were decreased at 2 weeks in BAMBI(-/- mice, but comparable to wild type at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The absence of BAMBI results in a highly unusual surge in arterial wall neovascularization that surprisingly mimiks features of intra-plaque hemorrhage of advanced atheroma in a mechanical injury model. This suggests important effects of BAMBI on

  13. Early insulin resistance in severe trauma without head injury as outcome predictor? A prospective, monocentric pilot study

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    Bonizzoli Manuela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia following major trauma is a well know phenomenon related to stress-induced systemic reaction. Reports on glucose level management in patients with head trauma have been published, but the development of insulin resistance in trauma patients without head injury has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prognostic role of acute insulin-resistance, assessed by the HOMA model, in patients with severe trauma without head injury. Methods All patients consecutively admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a tertiary referral center (Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, IT for major trauma without head injury (Jan-Dec 2010 were enrolled. Patients with a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy or metabolism alteration were excluded from the analysis. Patients were divided into “insulin resistant” and “non-insulin resistant” based on the Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA IR. Results are expressed as medians. Results Out of 175 trauma patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, a total of 54 patients without head trauma were considered for the study, 37 of whom met the inclusion criteria. In total, 23 patients (62.2% resulted insulin resistant, whereas 14 patients (37.8% were non-insulin resistant. Groups were comparable in demographic, clinical/laboratory characteristics, and severity of injury. Insulin resistant patients had a significantly higher BMI (P=0.0416, C-reactive protein (P=0.0265, and leukocytes count (0.0301, compared to non-insulin resistant patients. Also ICU length of stay was longer in insulin resistant patients (P=0.0381. Conclusions Our data suggest that admission insulin resistance might be used as an early outcome predictor.

  14. Patterns of structural head injury in children younger than 3 years: a ten-year review of 519 patients.

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    John, Simon Mathew; Kelly, Patrick; Vincent, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Abusive head injury is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in infants and toddlers, but data comparing patterns of injury in corroborated accidental trauma and confessed child abuse are scarce. This is a retrospective review of head injuries with abnormal neuroimaging in children younger than 3 years during a 10-year period in Auckland, New Zealand. Histories were assumed to be true. Results were analyzed for incongruity then compared with data on confessed abuse and corroborated accidental injury. Five hundred nineteen cases were analyzed. Most cases were congruent with the history, and their pattern was consistent with the literature on accidental head trauma in childhood. However, a spike of subdural hemorrhage was seen in the first 6 months of life, explained neither by mechanism nor by published data on birth trauma. The age distribution of retinal hemorrhage was also inconsistent with published data on birth trauma. In infants younger than 6 months, retinal and subdural hemorrhages were associated with the absence of a history of trauma. In older children (6 months-3 years), subdural hemorrhage was more common after minor falls (2 m, 20%) (p = 0.002). We conclude that when a young child (particularly an infant younger than 6 months) presents with traumatic intracranial pathology and either no history of trauma or a history of a minor fall, it must be seriously considered that the history is false. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  15. Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Landon A. Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant health concern. While 70-90% of TBI cases are considered mild, decision-making regarding imaging can be difficult. This survey aimed to assess whether clinicians’ decision-making was consistent with the most recent American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP clinical recommendations regarding indications for a non-contrast head computed tomography (CT in patients with mild TBI. Methods: We surveyed 2 academic emergency medicine departments. Six realistic clinical vignettes were created. The survey software randomly varied 2 factors: age (30, 59, or 61 years old and presence or absence of visible trauma above the clavicles. A single important question was asked: “Would you perform a non-contrast head CT on this patient?” Results: Physician decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in only 62.8% of total vignettes. By age group (30, 59, and 61, decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in 66.7%, 47.4%, and 72.7% of cases, respectively. This was a statistically-significant difference when comparing the 59- and 61-year-old age groups. In the setting of presence/absence of trauma above the clavicles, respondents were consistent with the guidelines in 57.1% of cases. Decision-making consistent with the guidelines was significantly better in the absence of trauma above the clavicles. Conclusion: Respondents poorly differentiated the “older” patients from one another, suggesting that respondents either inappropriately apply the guidelines or are unaware of the recommendations in this setting. No particular cause for inconsistency could be determined, and respondents similarly under-scanned and over-scanned in incorrect vignettes. Improved dissemination of the ACEP clinical policy and recommendations is a potential solution to this problem.

  16. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

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    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  17. Plantar talar head contusions and osteochondral fractures: associated findings on ankle MRI and proposed mechanism of injury

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    Gorbachova, Tetyana; Wang, Peter S.; Hu, Bing [Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horrow, Jay C. [Drexel University, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the significance of plantar talar head injury (PTHI) in predicting osseous and soft tissue injuries on ankle MRI. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study group consisted of 41 ankle MRIs with PTHI that occurred at our institution over a 5 1/2 year period. Eighty MRIs with bone injuries in other locations matched for age, time interval since injury, and gender formed a control group. Injuries to the following structures were recorded: medial malleolus, lateral malleolus/distal fibula, posterior malleolus, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, lateral, medial and syndesmotic ligaments, spring ligament complex, and extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle. Twenty separate logistic regressions determined which injuries PTHI predicted, using the Holm procedure to control for family-wise alpha at 0.05. PTHI strongly predicted the occurrence of injuries involving the anterior process of the calcaneus [24 % of cases, odds ratio (OR) 12.66], plantar components of the spring ligament (27 %, OR 9.43), calcaneal origin of the EDB and attachment of the dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligament (22 %, OR 7.22), cuboid (51 %, OR 6.58), EDB (27 %, OR 5.49), anteromedial talus (66 %, OR 4.78), and posteromedial talus (49 %, OR 4.48). PTHI strongly predicted lack of occurrence of syndesmotic ligament injury (OR 19.6). The PTHI group had a high incidence of lateral ligamentous injury (78 %), but not significantly different from the control group (53 %). PTHI is strongly associated with injury involving the transverse tarsal joint complex. We hypothesize it results from talo-cuboid and/or talo-calcaneal impaction from a supination injury of the foot and ankle. (orig.)

  18. MARESIN 1 PREVENTS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED NEUTROPHIL SURVIVAL AND ACCELERATES RESOLUTION OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Liu, Hong; Wu, Jing; Qi, Hong; Wu, Zhou-Yang; Shu, Hua-Qing; Li, Hong-Bin; Chen, Lin; Wang, Ya-Xin; Li, Bo; Tang, Min; Ji, Yu-Dong; Yuan, Shi-Ying; Yao, Shang-Long; Shang, You

    2015-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by lung inflammation and diffuse infiltration of neutrophils. Neutrophil apoptosis is recognized as an important control point in the resolution of inflammation. Maresin 1 (MaR1) is a new docosahexaenoic acid-derived proresolving agent that promotes the resolution of inflammation. However, its function in neutrophil apoptosis is unknown. In this study, isolated human neutrophils were incubated with MaR1, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to determine the mechanism of neutrophil apoptosis. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. In addition, mice were treated with MaR1 intravenously at the peak of inflammation and administered z-VAD-fmk intraperitoneally. We found that culture of isolated human neutrophils with LPS dramatically delayed neutrophil apoptosis through the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK, and p38 to upregulate the expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2, which was blocked by pretreatment with MaR1 in vitro. In mice, MaR1 accelerated the resolution of inflammation in LPS-induced ALI through attenuation of neutrophil accumulation, pathohistological changes, and pulmonary edema. Maresin 1 promoted resolution of inflammation by accelerating caspase-dependent neutrophil apoptosis. Moreover, MaR1 also reduced the LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and upregulated the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. In contrast, treatment with z-VAD-fmk inhibited the proapoptotic action of MaR1 and attenuated the protective effects of MaR1 in LPS-induced ALI. Taken together, MaR1 promotes the resolution of LPS-induced ALI by overcoming LPS-mediated suppression of neutrophil apoptosis.

  19. Study the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs on brain physiological properties during focal head injury using optical spectroscopy data analysis

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    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel

    2016-03-01

    We present a comparative evaluation of five different neuroprotective drugs in the early phase following focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mouse intact head. The effectiveness of these drugs in terms of changes in brain tissue morphology and hemodynamic properties was experimentally evaluated through analysis of the optical absorption coefficient and spectral reduced scattering parameters in the range of 650-1000 nm. Anesthetized male mice (n=50 and n=10 control) were subjected to weight drop model mimics real life focal head trauma. Monitoring the effect of injury and neuroprotective drugs was obtained by using a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system utilizing independent source-detector separation and location. Result indicates that administration of minocycline improve hemodynamic and reduced the level of tissue injury at an early phase post-injury while hypertonic saline treatment decrease brain water content. These findings highlight the heterogeneity between neuroprotective drugs and the ongoing controversy among researchers regarding which drug therapy is preferred for treatment of TBI. On the other hand, our results show the capability of optical spectroscopy technique to noninvasively study brain function following injury and drug therapy.

  20. Head, Face, and Neck Injuries During Operation Iraqi Freedom II: Results From the US Navy and Marine Corps Combat Trauma Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-12

    injuries at Navy–Marine Corps military medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Examples of Navy–Marine Corps MTFs include battalion aids stations (ie...incident details, injuries , treatment , and outcomes is collected by the patient’s medical provider(s) in the form of a clinical record. Clinical...and mouth; and neck injuries included trauma to cervical area and cervical spine. Head, Face, and Neck Injuries During OIF-II 7 Descriptive

  1. Validity of the Wonderlic Personnel Test as a brief measure of intelligence in individuals referred for evaluation of head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J; Strauss, E; Hunter, M; Spellacy, F

    1998-10-01

    Some have argued that the Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT) may represent a brief and efficient measure of intellectual functioning (e.g., Dodrill, 1980). The present study investigated the validity of the WPT as such a measure, in individuals with head injury. The findings suggested that, although the WPT showed relatively high agreement with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) in the whole group, it did not have good agreement with WAIS-R scores on an individual case basis. Since clinical practice typically seeks to evaluate individual performance, it is suggested that the WPT is not a suitable tool for psychological assessment of individuals with known or suspected head injury.

  2. Role of a dentist in comprehensive management of a comatose patient with post traumatic head injury and neuropathological chewing

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    Sunanda Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury of the head and neck region can result in substantial morbidity. Comprehensive management of such patients requires team work of several specialties, including dentists. A young female patient with extensive loss of cranium and associated pathological chewing was referred to the dental department. The lost cranium was replaced by a custom-made, hand-fabricated cranioplast. Trauma due to pathological mastication was reduced by usage of a custom-made mouthguard. Favorable results were seen in the appearance of the patient and after insertion of the mouthguard as evidenced in good healing response.The intricate role of a dental specialist in the team to manage a patient with post traumatic head injury has been highlighted. The take away message is to make the surgical fraternity aware of the scope of dentistry in the comprehensive management of patients requiring special care.

  3. Eletrencefalograma nos traumatismos cranio-encefalicos The value of electroencephalogram in head injuries

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    Lineu Corrêa Fonseca

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available São analisados 551 eletrencefalogramas de 387 pacientes com traumatismo crânio-encefálico. Os achados eletrencefalográficos são correlacionados aos seguintes dados clínicos: idade, tempo após o trauma, duração da perda de consciência, presença de sinais focais ao exame neurológico, existência de traumatismo crânio-encefálico aberto ou hematoma, líquido cefalorraqueano hemorrágico ou fratura de crânio e aparecimento de convulsões. O autor chega às seguintes conclusões: 1 — há nítida correlação entre as anormalidades eletrencefalográficas e o grau de lesão cerebral, caracterizado pelo tempo de perda de consciência, presença de sinais focais ao exame neurológico, presença de líquido cefalorraqueano hemorrágico e epilepsia pós-traumática; 2 — as anormalidades lentas contínuas focais parietoccipitais são mais freqüentes na faixa etária com menos de 10 anos; 3 — há uma queda de proporção de eletrencefalogramas anormais particularmente entre o 6.° e o 12.° mês após o trauma; 4 — as anormalidades lentas contínuas difusas ou focais têm sua proporção diminuída particularmente após o primeiro mês depois do trauma; 5 — as anormalidades paroxísticas aumentam, em proporção, de modo nítido, após o 6.° mês depois do trauma; 6 — os pacientes com hematoma intracraniano apresentam grande proporção de anormalidades, particularmente as depressões. Todos esses dados mostram a importância do eletrencefalograma na complementação do estudo clínico dos pacientes com traumatismo crânio-encefálico, principalmente quando é feita seqüência eletrencefalográfica, desde os primeiros dias após o trauma.The 551 electroencephalograms of 387 patients with head injury are analysed. The electroencephalographic findings are correlated to the following clinical data: age, time after the trauma, duration of unconsciousness, presence of localizing neurological signs, existence of open wounds or hematoma

  4. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries.

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    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden. Severity of head, abdominal, and lung injuries also influence rib fracture outcomes.

  5. Repeat cranial tomography in patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination - a perspective from a developing country

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadaf Nasir; Manzar Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of altered findings on repeat cranial tomography (CT) in patients with mild head injury along with stable neurological examination at tertiary care hospital.Methods: Cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Radiology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi from January 2008 to September 2010. All patients with mild head injury in terms of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) who underwent repeat scan without clinical or neurological deterioration in the emergency department of a tertiary care centre were included. The collected data were accordingly entered and analyzed by the principal investigator using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0.Results: In all 275 patients, only 17 (6%) of the patients were found worseing on repeat CT, 120 (43.63%)scans improved, 138 (50.18%) unchanged and 17 (6.18%)worsened. None of these patients showed signs of clinical deterioration.Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination, only 6% of them show deterioration on repeat CT, especially when patients' GCS is below 13.

  6. Successful renal transplantation from a brain-dead deceased donor with head injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation and deranged renal functions

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    P P Ghuge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deceased donors (DDs with the brain death due to head injury are the major source of organs for transplantation. The incidence of post-head injury disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC ranges from 24% to 50%. Many centers do not accept organs from donors with DIC due to increased risk of primary graft non-function and/or high chances of morbidity/mortality. We performed two successful renal transplants from a DD with head injury with DIC and deranged renal function. One of the recipients developed transient thrombocytopenia, but there was no evidence of DIC or delayed graft functions in either of the recipients. Over a follow-up of 1 month, both are doing well with stable graft function and hematological profile. Thus, a carefully selected DD with severe DIC even with deranged renal function is not a contraindication for organ donation if other risk factors for primary non-function are excluded. This approach will also help in overcoming organ shortage.

  7. The Effect of Pycnogenol® on Spatial Learning and Memory in Rats with Experimental Closed Head Injury

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    Afşin Emre Kayıpmaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trauma is a leading cause of emergency admissions. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pycnogenol® on spatial learning and memory (SLM function in rats subjected to closed head injury. Methods: The study was a randomized, experimental study of four groups, each containing six rats. Pycnogenol® was administered to rats in two groups (group three and four daily for five days starting on day one. A Barnes maze was used to test SLM in the rats in all four groups. Group 1: These rats did not have a closed head injury and were not administered Pycnogenol®. Group 2: On the day three, closed head trauma was inflicted. Group 3: Pycnogenol® was administered to the rats. On day three, closed head trauma was inflicted. Group 4: Only Pycnogenol® was administered. At the end of day five, the brain tissue of the 24 rats was removed. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in mean SLM durations on days one through five. No significant differences were detected in the pathological examination between of the four groups. Conclusion: Future studies that employ biochemical markers and free radical levels in the brain are needed.

  8. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

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    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  9. Minor head injury in anticoagulated patients: a 6-year retrospective analysis in an emergency department

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    Alessandro Riccardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate management of minor head injury (MHI in patients receiving oral anticoagulant (OAC is unclear. In this retrospective study, we focused on elderly patients (>65 years treated with OAC, presented to our emergency department with MHI between 2004 and 2010. Three hundred and six patients with MHI were taking OAC: we documented 7.19% hemorrhages at the first computed tomography (C; 18.19% deaths; 50.1% spontaneous reabsorptions; 22.73% deteriorations of intracranial bleeding without surgical intervention (for clinical comorbidity, and 4.55% neurosurgical interventions. We documented a second positive CT scan in 2 patients (1.51% who had no symptoms and remained asymptomatic during observation. In both cases, intracranial bleeding resolved spontaneously. The mean international normalized ratio (INR value was 2.26, higher in the group of patients with bleeding (2.74 than in the group without bleeding (2.19. We found a significant increased risk in patients with posttraumatic loss of consciousness [odds ratio (OR 28.3], diffuse headache (OR 14.79, vomiting (OR 14.2 and neurological signs (OR 5.27. We did not reach significance in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Our data confirm the need for a CT scan of any patients on OAC with MHI. None of our patients developed any symptoms or signs during observation, and only 2 patients developed an intracranial hemorrhage in the second CT scan with a favorable evolution. Our data need to be confirmed with an observational study, but we suggest that the second CT could be reserved for patients developing symptoms and signs during observation. We also underline the role of the INR in the stratification of risk.

  10. Deficiency of complement receptors CR2/CR1 in Cr2⁻/⁻ mice reduces the extent of secondary brain damage after closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Miriam D; Rich, Megan C; Keene, Chesleigh N; Weckbach, Sebastian; Bolden, Ashley L; Losacco, Justin T; Patane, Jenée; Flierl, Michael A; Kulik, Liudmila; Holers, V Michael; Stahel, Philip F

    2014-05-24

    Complement activation at the C3 convertase level has been associated with acute neuroinflammation and secondary brain injury after severe head trauma. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that Cr2-/- mice, which lack the receptors CR2/CD21 and CR1/CD35 for complement C3-derived activation fragments, are protected from adverse sequelae of experimental closed head injury. Adult wild-type mice and Cr2-/- mice on a C57BL/6 genetic background were subjected to focal closed head injury using a standardized weight-drop device. Head-injured Cr2-/- mice showed significantly improved neurological outcomes for up to 72 hours after trauma and a significantly decreased post-injury mortality when compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the Cr2-/- genotype was associated with a decreased extent of neuronal cell death at seven days post-injury. Western blot analysis revealed that complement C3 levels were reduced in the injured brain hemispheres of Cr2-/- mice, whereas plasma C3 levels remained unchanged, compared to wild-type mice. Finally, head-injured Cr2-/- had an attenuated extent of post-injury C3 tissue deposition, decreased astrocytosis and microglial activation, and attenuated immunoglobulin M deposition in injured brains compared to wild-type mice. Targeting of these receptors for complement C3 fragments (CR2/CR1) may represent a promising future approach for therapeutic immunomodulation after traumatic brain injury.

  11. Combined internal uncusectomy and decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of severe closed head injury: experience with 80 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibbaro, Salvatore; Salvatore, Chibbaro; Marsella, Marco; Marco, Marsella; Romano, Antonio; Antonio, Romano; Ippolito, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ippolito; Benericetti, Eugenio; Eugenio, Benericetti

    2008-01-01

    Transtentorial brain herniation is a major cause of morbidity and death following severe closed head injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selective uncoparahippocampectomy and tentorial splitting as an adjuvant method of treating otherwise uncontrollable elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) while attempting to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences caused by transtentorial herniation. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from a series of 80 consecutive cases of severe closed head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score caused by blunt trauma with signs of acute and/or progressive increased ICP causing downward transtentorial herniation. Fifty-eight patients were male and 22 were female with a mean age of 35 years and a mean preoperative GCS score of 5. Based on the current American Association of Neurological Surgeons guidelines for head trauma, an intraparenchymal ICP device (Camino, Integra) was placed in all patients who had a GCS score 20 cm H2O. Whenever possible, risks and benefits were explained to family members, and then surgery was performed within 3-16 hours (median 6 hours). At a mean follow-up of 30 months, the outcome was favorable (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score of 4 or 5) in 60 patients (75%) and unfavorable (GOS score of 3) in 8 (10%), whereas the remaining 12 patients (15%) died at some point during the postoperative course. There was no survivor patient in a vegetative state. A younger age had a significant effect on positive outcome (p 0.05, respectively). A selective uncoparahippocampectomy with a tentorial edge incision and a wide decompressive craniectomy with duraplasty can be an effective adjuvant form of aggressive treatment to improve outcome in patients with severe closed head injury, especially in those who are younger if they are treated promptly.

  12. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT.

  13. Recruitment properties and significance of short latency reflexes in neck and eye muscles evoked by brief lateral head accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, James G; Dennis, Danielle L; Govender, Sendhil; Chen, Peggy; Todd, Neil P McAngus

    2014-09-01

    Short lateral head accelerations were applied to investigate the recruitment properties of the reflexes underlying the earliest ocular and cervical electromyographic reflex responses to these disturbances. Components of both reflexes are vestibular dependent and have been termed "ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials" and "cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials", respectively. Previous investigations using a unilateral vestibular stimulus have indicated that some but not all these vestibular-dependent reflexes show a simple power law relationship to stimulus intensity. In particular, crossed otolith-ocular reflexes showed evidence of an inflection separating two types of behaviour. The present stimulus acts bilaterally, and only the earliest crossed otolith-ocular reflex, previously shown to have a strictly unilateral origin, showed evidence of an inflection. Reflex changes in ocular torsion could, in principle, correct for the changes associated with translation for an elevated eye, but our findings indicated that the responses were consistent with previous reports of tilt-type reflexes. For the neck, both vestibular and segmental (muscle spindle) reflexes were evoked and followed power law relationships, without any clear separation in sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence of "tilt-like" reflexes evoked by lateral acceleration and suggest that the departure from a power law occurs as a consequence of a unilateral crossed pathway. For the neck, responses to transients are likely to always consist of both vestibular and non-vestibular (segmental) components. Most of the translation-evoked ocular and cervical reflexes appear to follow power law relationship to stimulus amplitude over a physiological range.

  14. A seven-year study on head injury in infants, Iran —— the changing pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakharian Esmaeil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Head injury (HI is the leading cause of mortality and life-long disability in infants. Infants have different anatomical and pathophysiological brain structures from other age groups. The aim of this study was to survey infant HI patients admitted to Shahid Behest Hospital in Kashan, Iran from 2004 to 2010, and to identify the causes of HIs in this age group. Methods: In this retrospective study, all HI patients under the age of two who were hospitalized for more than 24 hours between January 2004 and January 2010 were enrolled in the study. Demographic, etiologic, and injury data were collected and a descriptive analysis was performed. Results: Infants comprised 20.8% of all children (under 15 years old with HIs and 65.1% of the injuries occurred in the home. Falls were the most common cause of injury (63.4%. In hospital mortality was 6.6 per 100 000 infants. A decreasing trend was seen in home events, but HIs caused by traffic accidents were increasing during the study period. The amount of HI infants resulting from car accidents has tripled from the years 2004 to 2010. Conclusion: Although home events and falling are the main causes of infant HIs and need attention, our study showed an increase of HIs caused by road traffic accidents, especially by car accidents, thus legislation for the implementation of protective equipment such as child safety seats and programs is urgently needed. Key words: Infant; Brain injuries; Epidemiology

  15. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  16. Mild head injury and sympathetic arousal: investigating relationships with decision-making and neuropsychological performance in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordt, Stefon; Good, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between neuropsychological performance, physiological arousal and decision-making in university students who have or have not reported a history of mild head injury (MHI). Forty-four students, 18 (41%) reporting a history of MHI, performed a design fluency task and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) while electrodermal activity (EDA) was recorded. General cognitive ability and overall choice outcomes did not differ between groups. However, self-reported MHI severity predicted decision-making performance such that the greater the neural indices of trauma, the more disadvantageous the choices made by participants. As expected, both groups exhibited similar base levels of autonomic arousal and physiological responses to reward and punishment outcomes; however, those reporting MHI produced significantly lower levels of EDA during the anticipatory stages of decision-making. Overall, these findings encourage the acceptance of head injury as being on a continuum of brain injury severity, as MHI can emulate neurophysiological and neuropsychological features of more traumatic cases and may be impacting mechanisms which sustain adaptive social decision-making.

  17. Closed head injury causes hyperexcitability in rat hippocampal CA1 but not in CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, Désirée; Mautes, Angelika M

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury frequently elicits epileptic seizures hours or days after the impact. The mechanisms on cellular level are poorly understood. Because posttraumatic epilepsy appears in many cases as a temporal-lobe epilepsy which originated the hippocampus, we studied trauma-induced hyperexcitability on the cellular level in this brain area. We used the model of closed head injury to analyse the electrophysiological changes in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and in interneurones of the CA1 field, which is extremely sensitive to ischemia. We found that morphologically closed head injury (CHI) led to a gradual progressive, cell type specific time course in neuronal degeneration. To analyse electrophysiological impairment we measured resting membrane potential, recorded spontaneous action potentials and induced action potentials by current pulses at different times after CHI. We found a dramatic increase in the frequency of spontaneous action potentials of CA1 but not of CA3 pyramidal cells after CHI. This hyperexcitability was maximal at 2 h (4.5-fold higher than sham), was also observed at 24 h after CHI and disappeared after 3 days. We found that CA1 interneurones responded by a much weaker increase of AP frequency after CHI. We conclude that the strong hyperexcitability after CHI is cell-type specific and transient. The understanding of the complex neuronal interactions probably offers a promising possibility for pharmacological intervention to prevent posttraumatic epilepsy.

  18. Dynamic biomechanics of the human head in lateral impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2009-10-01

    The biomechanical responses of human head (translational head CG accelerations, rotational head accelerations, and HIC) under lateral impact to the parietal-temporal region were investigated in the current study. Free drop tests were conducted at impact velocities ranging from 2.44 to 7.70 m/s with a 40 durometer, a 90 durometer flat padding, and a 90 durometer cylinder. Specimens were isolated from PMHS subjects at the level of occipital condyles, and the intracranial substance was replaced with brain simulant (Sylgard 527). Three tri-axial accelerometers were instrumented at the anterior, posterior, and vertex of the specimen, and a pyramid nine accelerometer package (pNAP) was used at the contra-lateral site. Biomechanical responses were computed by transforming accelerations measured at each location to the head CG. The results indicated significant "hoop effect" from skull deformation. Translational head CG accelerations were accurately measured by transforming the pNAP, the vertex accelerations, or the average of anterior/posterior acceleration to the CG. The material stiffness and structural rigidity of the padding changed the biomechanical responses of the head with stiffer padding resulting in higher head accelerations. At the skull fracture, HIC values were more than 2-3x higher than the frontal skull fracture threshold (HIC=1000), emphasizing the differences between frontal and lateral impact. Rotational head accelerations up to 42.1 krad/s(2) were observed before skull fracture, indicating possible severe brain injury without skull fracture in lateral head impact. These data will help to establish injury criteria and threshold in lateral impacts for improved automotive protection and help clinicians understand the biomechanics of lateral head impact from improved diagnosis.

  19. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  20. CT evidence for subchondral trabecular injury of the femoral head in transient osteoporosis of the hip: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Lae; Nam, Kwang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hee Joong

    2010-01-01

    A 28-yr-old woman presented with both hip pain that started sequentially during the peripartum period. Diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) was made based on typical findings of plain radiographs and magnetic resonance images. The subchondral trabeculae of the femoral head were evaluated on serially taken coronal multiplanar reformation computerized tomogram images. At 4 weeks after pain onset, marked decrease in the sclerotic density with irregular discontinuation was observed in the primary compression trabeculae. At 12 weeks, a focal area of irregular thickening of trabeculae was observed. At 20 weeks, sclerotic density of trabeculae recovered markedly and the focal area of irregular trabecular thickening disappeared. At 1 yr, subchondral trabeculae recovered almost completely. The evidence of subchondral trabecular injury was observed in the femoral heads of TOH.

  1. Incidence of combined cranial and cervical spine injuries in patients with blunt minor trauma: are combined CT examinations of the head and cervical spine justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahldiek, Janis L; Thieme, Stefan; Hamm, Bernd; Niehues, Stefan M

    2017-07-01

    Background The use of computed tomography (CT) scans of the head and cervical spine has markedly increased in patients with blunt minor trauma. The actual likelihood of a combined injury of head and cervical spine following a minor trauma is estimated to be low. Purpose To determine the incidence of such combined injuries in patients with a blunt minor trauma in order to estimate the need to derive improved diagnostic guidelines. Material and Methods A total of 1854 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All cases presented to the emergency department and in all patients combined CT scans of head and cervical spine were conducted. For the following analysis, only 1342 cases with assured blunt minor trauma were included. Data acquisition covered age, sex, and presence of a head injury as well as presence of a cervical spine injury or both. Results Of the 1342 cases, 46.9% were men. The mean age was 65.6 years. CT scans detected a head injury in 116 patients; of these, 70 cases showed an intracranial hemorrhage, 11 cases a skull fracture, and 35 cases an intracranial hemorrhage as well as a skull fracture. An injury of the cervical spine could be detected in 40 patients. A combined injury of the head and cervical spine could be found in one patient. Conclusion The paradigm of the coincidence of cranial and cervical spine injuries should be revised in patients with blunt minor trauma. Valid imaging decision algorithms are strongly needed to clinically detect high-risk patients in order to save limited resources.

  2. The Toronto prehospital hypertonic resuscitation-head injury and multi organ dysfunction trial (TOPHR HIT - Methods and data collection tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreira Tyrone

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating the use of hypertonic saline in the treatment of hypovolemia and head trauma suggest no survival superiority over normal saline; however subgroup analyses suggest there may be a reduction in the inflammatory response and multiorgan failure which may lead to better survival and enhanced neurocognitive function. We describe a feasibility study of randomizing head injured patients to hypertonic saline and dextran vs. normal saline administration in the out of hospital setting. Methods/Design This feasibility study employs a randomized, placebo-controlled design evaluating normal saline compared with a single dose of 250 ml of 7.5% hypertonic saline in 6% dextran 70 in the management of traumatic brain injuries. The primary feasibility endpoints of the trial were: 1 baseline survival rates for the treatment and control group to aid in the design of a definitive multicentre trial, 2 randomization compliance rate, 3 ease of protocol implementation in the out-of-hospital setting, and 4 adverse event rate of HSD infusion. The secondary objectives include measuring the effect of HSD in modulating the immuno-inflammatory response to severe head injury and its effect on modulating the release of neuro-biomarkers into serum; evaluating the role of serum neuro-biomarkers in predicting patient outcome and clinical response to HSD intervention; evaluating effects of HSD on brain atrophy post-injury and neurocognitive and neuropsychological outcomes. Discussion We anticipate three aspects of the trial will present challenges to trial success; ethical demands associated with a waiver of consent trial, challenging follow up and comprehensive accurate timely data collection of patient identifiers and clinical or laboratory values. In addition all the data collection tools had to be derived de novo as none existed in the literature. Trial registration number NCT00878631

  3. Current controversies in the interpretation of non-accidental head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspan, Tim [Imaging Centre, University Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    The field of non-accidental injury (NAI) has been the subject of a number of theories and hypotheses of variable merit. Concerning injuries that occur within the intracranial compartment, much research has been undertaken to investigate the cause of SDH and parenchymal brain injury. Much, however, remains contentious, particularly regarding the medicolegal aspects of suspected child abuse. Issues that present the greatest challenges will be addressed. (orig.)

  4. Vestibular Balance Deficits Following Head Injury: Recommendations Concerning Evaluation and Rehabilitation in the Military Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    to the stump of an amputee in order to help get rid of phantom limb sensation, which he granted is not an ambulatory application, per se. No...projectiles). Injuries and syndromes associated with IED exposure have been described by a complicated set of overlapping constructs, including Traumatic...Brain Injury (TBI), concussion, post-concussion syndrome , labyrinthine concussion, whiplash injury, and vestibular migraine (Lawson & Rupert, 2010

  5. Effect of midazolam versus propofol sedation on markers of neurological injury and outcome after isolated severe head injury: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ghori, Kamran A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Midazolam and propofol are sedative agents commonly administered to patients with brain injury. We compared plasma concentrations of glial cell S100beta protein and nitric oxide (NO) between patients who received midazolam and those who received propofol sedation after severe brain injury, and investigated the association between S100beta and NO concentrations and neurological outcome. DESIGN: 28 patients with severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Score <9) who required sedation and ventilation were randomly assigned to receive midazolam (n =15) or propofol (n = 13) based sedation. Blood samples were drawn daily for 5 days for estimation of S100beta and NO concentrations. Neurological outcome was assessed 3 months later as good (Glasgow Outcome Score [GOS], 4-5) or poor (GOS, 1-3). RESULTS: A good neurological outcome was observed in 8\\/15 patients (53%) in the midazolam group and 7\\/13 patients (54%) in the propofol group. Patients with a poor outcome had higher serum S100beta concentrations on ICU admission and on Days 1-4 in the ICU than those with a good outcome (mean [SD] on Day 1, 0.99 [0.81] v 0.41 [0.4] microg\\/L; Day 2, 0.80 [0.81] v 0.41 [0.24] microg\\/L; Day 3, 0.52 [0.55] v 0.24 [0.25] microg\\/L; and Day 4, 0.54 [0.43] v 0.24 [0.35] microg\\/L; P<0.05). There was no significant difference on Day 5. Plasma NO concentrations were not associated with outcome. In subgroup analysis, there was no difference in S100beta and NO concentrations between patients with a good outcome versus those with a poor outcome in either the midazolam or propofol group. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma concentrations of markers of neurological injury in patients with severe head injury were similar in those who received midazolam sedation and those who received propofol. Patients who had a poor neurological outcome at 3 months had consistently higher serum S100beta concentrations during the initial 4 days after injury than patients who had a good outcome.

  6. The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: a rejoinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, Chris

    2012-03-01

    This paper challenges the conclusion of a recent paper by Walter et al. (Accident Analysis and Prevention 2011, doi:10.1016/j.aap.2011.05.029) reporting that despite numerous data limitations repealing the helmet legislation in Australia could not be justified. This conclusion is not warranted because of the limited time period used in their analysis and the lack of data beyond a few years before the introduction of legislation, the failure to adequately account for the effect of the phasing in of the legislation, the effect of the marked reduction in child cyclists, and the non-comparability of the pedestrian and cycling injuries and related lack of consideration of the severity of head injuries. The extent to which helmet legislation deters people from cycling is discussed.

  7. Decay accelerating factor (CD55 protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsokos George C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated complement system is known to mediate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration following exposure to hypoxic-ischemic insults. Therefore, inhibition of the complement activation cascade may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for the management of ischemic brain injury. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55 inhibits complement activation by suppressing the function of C3/C5 convertases, thereby limiting local generation or deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9 production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured neuronal cells subjected to sodium cyanide (NaCN-induced hypoxia from degeneration and apoptosis. Methods Cultured primary cortical neurons from embryonic Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned one of four groups: control, DAF treatment alone, hypoxic, or hypoxic treated with DAF. Hypoxic cultures were exposed to NaCN for 1 hour, rinsed, followed by 24 hour exposure to 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF in normal medium. Human DAF was used in the present study and it has been shown to effectively regulate complement activation in rats. Neuronal cell function, morphology and viability were investigated by measuring plateau depolarization potential, counting the number dendritic spines, and observing TUNEL and MTT assays. Complement C3, C3a, C3a receptor (R production, C3a-C3aR interaction and MAC formation were assessed along with the generation of activated caspase-9, activated caspase-3, and activated Src. Results When compared to controls, hypoxic cells had fewer dendritic spines, reduced plateau depolarization accompanied by increased apoptotic activity and accumulation of MAC, as well as up-regulation of C3, C3a and C3aR, enhancement of C3a-C3aR engagement, and elevated caspase and Src activity. Treatment of hypoxic cells with 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF resulted in attenuation of neuronal apoptosis and exerted

  8. Tendon mineralization is accelerated bilaterally and creep of contralateral tendons is increased after unilateral needle injury of murine achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Etienne John Ogilvy; Shrive, Nigel G; Rosvold, Joshua M; Thornton, Gail M; Frank, Cyril B; Hart, David A

    2013-10-01

    Heterotopic mineralization may result in tendon weakness, but effects on other biomechanical responses have not been reported. We used a needle injury, which accelerates spontaneous mineralization of murine Achilles tendons, to test two hypotheses: that injured tendons would demonstrate altered biomechanical responses; and that unilateral injury would accelerate mineralization bilaterally. Mice underwent left hind (LH) injury (I; n = 11) and were euthanized after 20 weeks along with non-injured controls (C; n = 9). All hind limbs were examined by micro computed tomography followed by biomechanical testing (I = 7 and C = 6). No differences were found in the biomechanical responses of injured tendons compared with controls. However, the right hind (RH) tendons contralateral to the LH injury exhibited greater static creep strain and total creep strain compared with those LH tendons (p ≤ 0.045) and RH tendons from controls (p ≤ 0.043). RH limb lesions of injured mice were three times larger compared with controls (p = 0.030). Therefore, despite extensive mineralization, changes to the responses we measured were limited or absent 20 weeks postinjury. These results also suggest that bilateral occurrence should be considered where tendon mineralization is identified clinically. This experimental system may be useful to study the mechanisms of bilateral new bone formation in tendinopathy and other conditions. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Oxidative injury to blood vessels and glia of the pre-laminar optic nerve head in human glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilchenfeld, Zac; Yücel, Yeni H; Gupta, Neeru

    2008-11-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible world blindness. Oxidative damage and vascular injury have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine in human primary open angle glaucoma whether oxidative injury occurs in pre-laminar optic nerve blood vessels and glial cells. Following IRB approval, sections from post-mortem primary open angle glaucoma eyes (n=5) with mean age of 77 +/- 9 yrs (+/-SD) were compared to normal control eyes (n=4) with mean age 70 +/- 9 yrs (Eye Bank of Canada). Immunostaining with nitrotyrosine, a footprint for peroxynitrite-mediated injury, was performed and sections were double-labeled with markers for vascular endothelial cells, perivascular smooth muscle cells, and astrocytes with CD34, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. Immunostaining was captured in a masked fashion using confocal microscopy, and defined regions of interest for blood vessels and glial tissue. Intensity measurements of supra-threshold area in pixels as percent of the total number of pixels were calculated using ImageJ (NIH) and compared using two-tailed Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests between glaucoma and control groups. Colocalization coefficients with cell-specific markers were determined and compared with random coefficients of correlation. Increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in pre-laminar optic nerve head blood vessels of primary open angle glaucoma eyes compared to controls and this difference was statistically significant (1.35 +/- 1.11% [+/-SD] vs. 0.01 +/- 0.01%, P=0.016). NT-immunoreactivity was also increased in the glial tissue surrounding the pre-laminar optic nerve head in the glaucoma group and compared to controls, and this difference was statistically significant (18.37 +/-12.80% vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04%, P=0.016). Colocalization studies demonstrated nitrotyrosine staining in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, in addition to

  10. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahari Taha; Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan; Iskandar Hasanuddin

    2015-08-01

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model consists of a mass–spring–damper system, in which the skull, the brain and the soccer ball are modelled as a mass and the neck modelled as a spring–damper system. The proposed model was compared with previous dynamic model for soccer ball-to-head impact. Moreover, it was also validated against drop ball experiment on an instrumented dummy skull and also compared with head acceleration data from previous studies. Comparison shows that our proposed model is capable of describing both the skull and brain accelerations qualitatively and quantitatively. This study shows that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on the kinematics of human skull and brain during a ball-to-head impact. The model can be used to investigate the important parameters during soccer heading that affect the brain displacement and acceleration, thus providing better understanding of the mechanics behind it.

  11. Early tracheostomy in closed head injuries: experience at a tertiary center in a developing country – a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyambada Binita

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important factor contributing to the high mortality in patients with severe head trauma is cerebral hypoxia. The mechanical ventilation helps both by reduction in the intracranial pressure and hypoxia. Ventilatory support is also required in these patients because of patient's inability to protect the airway, persistence of excessive secretions, and inadequacy of spontaneous ventilation. Prolonged endotracheal intubation is however associated with trauma to the larynx, trachea, and patient discomfort in addition to requirement of sedatives. Tracheostomy has been found to play an integral role in the airway management of such patients, but its timing remains subject to considerable practice variation. In a developing country like India where the intensive care facilities are scarce and rarely available, these critical patients have to be managed in high dependency cubicles in the ward, often with inadequately trained nursing staff and equipment to monitor them. An early tracheostomy in the selected group of patients based on Glasgow Coma Score(GCS may prove to be life saving.Against this background a prospective study was contemplated to assess the role of early tracheostomy in patients with isolated closed head injury. Methods The series consisted of a cohort of 50 patients admitted to the surgical emergency with isolated closed head injury, that were not considered for surgery by the neuro-surgeon or shifted to ICU, but had GCS score of less than 8 and SAPS II score of more than 50. First 50 case records from January 2001 that fulfilled the criteria constituted the control group. The patients were managed as per ATLS protocol and intubated if required at any time before decision to perform tracheostomy was taken. These patients were serially assessed for GCS (worst score of the day as calculated by senior surgical resident and SAPS scores till day 15 to chart any changes in their status of head injuries and predictive

  12. A Targeted Inhibitor of the Alternative Complement Pathway Accelerates Recovery From Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, Alex; Jones, Bryan W.; Williamson, Tucker; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Morphologic and genetic evidence exists that an overactive complement system driven by the complement alternative pathway (AP) is involved in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Smoking is the only modifiable risk factor for AMD. As we have shown that smoke-related ocular pathology can be prevented in mice that lack an essential activator of AP, we ask here whether this pathology can be reversed by increasing inhibition in AP. Methods Mice were exposed to either cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 6 months). Smoke-exposed animals were then treated with the AP inhibitor (CR2-fH) or vehicle control (PBS) for the following 3 months. Spatial frequency and contrast sensitivity were assessed by optokinetic response paradigms at 6 and 9 months; additional readouts included assessment of retinal morphology by electron microscopy (EM) and gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The CS mice treated with CR2-fH showed significant improvement in contrast threshold compared to PBS-treated mice, whereas spatial frequency was unaffected by CS or pharmacologic intervention. Treatment with CR2-fH in CS animals reversed thinning of the retina observed in PBS-treated mice as analyzed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and reversed most morphologic changes in RPE and Bruch's membrane seen in CS animals by EM. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that AP inhibitors not only prevent, but have the potential to accelerate the clearance of complement-mediated ocular injury. Improving our understanding of the regulation of the AP is paramount to developing novel treatment approaches for AMD. PMID:27064393

  13. Impaired cerebral autoregulation during head up tilt in patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography...

  14. Head Start and Unintended Injury: The Use of the Family Map Interview to Document Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Johnson, Danya; Aitken, Mary M.; Bokony, Patti A.; Conners-Burrow, Nicola; McKelvey, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Much is known about how to provide safe environments for preschool children (3-5 years-of-age); however, many preschool children still experience preventable injuries--particularly children living in poverty. This study examined the use of an assessment tool used to identify children at risk for unintended injury in two large, federally funded…

  15. Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0594 TITLE: Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head...30Sep2014-29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head...was to determine the pattern of inflammation-induced sensitization of the central trigeminal pain neurons, and if sensitization is detectable by

  16. Survivors of self-inflicted gunshot wounds to the head: characterization of ocular injuries and health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Amit K; Baker, Meredith S; Sobel, Rachel K; Whelan, David A; Carter, Keith D; Allen, Richard C

    2014-06-01

    Suicides and attempted suicides are major public health issues in the United States and around the world. Self-inflicted gunshot wounds (SIGSWs) are a common method of attempting suicide, the head being the most commonly injured body region; however, the literature lacks an overview of the orbital and ocular injuries as well as outcomes associated with SIGSWs. To characterize the ocular and orbital injuries and outcomes of patients presenting with SIGSWs and to examine the cost associated with these injuries. Retrospective medical record review was performed of all patients who presented to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics between 2003 to 2013 with the admitting diagnosis of self-inflicted injuries via firearms. Patients with no periorbital or ocular injuries and/or those who did not survive for at least 2 months following the incident were excluded. Ocular injuries and outcomes and health care costs and reimbursements, which were generated by a financial report obtained from the hospital finance department that included data from both the hospital billing and cost accounting systems. All patients in this study (n = 18) were men with a mean age of 47.2 years. Eight patients (44.4%) displayed submental missile entry points, 7 (38.9%) displayed intraoral entry points, and 3 (16.7%) displayed pericranial entry points. Patients with pericranial entries sustained more severe ocular injuries and had poorer ocular outcomes. Seven patients (38.9%) were found at final follow-up to have visual acuity of 20/40 or better in each eye and all showed missile trajectories in the sagittal plane. The mean cost of treatment of these patients totaled $117,338 while the mean reimbursement amount was $124,388. Data regarding ocular injuries and outcomes may assist ophthalmologists in the treatment of patients with SIGSWs in the future. Many patients had extremely functional vision at final follow-ups, which highlights the importance of specialists conducting examinations

  17. Emergency Department Triage of Traumatic Head Injury Using a Brain Electrical Activity Biomarker: A Multisite Prospective Observational Validation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Daniel; Prichep, Leslie S; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Huff, J Stephen; Naunheim, Rosanne; Garrett, John; Jones, Elizabeth B; Wright, David W; O'Neill, John; Badjatia, Neeraj; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Curley, Kenneth C; Chiacchierini, Richard; O'Neil, Brian; Hack, Dallas C

    2017-05-01

    A brain electrical activity biomarker for identifying traumatic brain injury (TBI) in emergency department (ED) patients presenting with high Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) after sustaining a head injury has shown promise for objective, rapid triage. The main objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of an automated classification algorithm to determine the likelihood of being computed tomography (CT) positive, in high-functioning TBI patients in the acute state. Adult patients admitted to the ED for evaluation within 72 hours of sustaining a closed head injury with GCS 12 to 15 were candidates for study. A total of 720 patients (18-85 years) meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled in this observational, prospective validation trial, at 11 U.S. EDs. GCS was 15 in 97%, with the first and third quartiles being 15 (interquartile range = 0) in the study population at the time of the evaluation. Standard clinical evaluations were conducted and 5 to 10 minutes of electroencephalogram (EEG) was acquired from frontal and frontal-temporal scalp locations. Using an a priori derived EEG-based classification algorithm developed on an independent population and applied to this validation population prospectively, the likelihood of each subject being CT+ was determined, and performance metrics were computed relative to adjudicated CT findings. Sensitivity of the binary classifier (likely CT+ or CT-) was 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 87.8%-95.5%) for detection of any intracranial injury visible on CT (CT+), with specificity of 51.6% (95% CI = 48.1%-55.1%) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.0% (95% CI = 93.2%-97.9%). Using ternary classification (likely CT+, equivocal, likely CT-) demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to traumatic hematomas (≥1 mL of blood), 98.6% (95% CI = 92.6%-100.0%), and NPV of 98.2% (95% CI = 95.5%-99.5%). Using an EEG-based biomarker high accuracy of predicting the likelihood of being CT+ was obtained, with

  18. Pilot study of the effects of mixed light touch manual therapies on active duty soldiers with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and injury to the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lauren; Hanson, Brenda; Gilliam, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head.

  19. Recovery of speed of information processing in closed-head-injury patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaagstra, R.; Schmidt, I; Vanier, M

    1996-01-01

    After severe traumatic brain injury, patients almost invariably demonstrate a slowing of reaction time, reflecting a slowing of central information processing. Methodological problems associated with the traditional method for the analysis of longitudinal data (MANOVA) severely complicate studies on

  20. Child abuse. Non-accidental head injury; Kindesmisshandlung. Nicht akzidentelle Kopfverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klee, Dirk; Schaper, Joerg [Universitaetsklinik Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-12-15

    Knowledge of the radiological appearances that are the result of child abuse is an integral part of prevention of further, potentially life-threatening, injury. Radiologists must have un understanding of typical injury patterns of the skeletal system, visceral and intra-cranial structures, which should ideally be ordered chronologically. Necessary radiological investigations follow guidelines with specific criteria that are pointed out in this review. In equivocal cases of abuse, the opinion of a second (paediatric) radiologist should be sought. (orig.)

  1. Acromioclavicular joint acceleration-deceleration injury as a cause of persistent shoulder pain: Outcome after arthroscopic resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Atoun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain in general and acromioclavicular joint (ACJ pain specifically is common after acceleration-deceleration injury following road traffic accident (RTA. The outcome of surgical treatment in this condition is not described in the literature. The aim of the present study was to report the outcome of arthroscopic resection of the ACJ in these cases. Materials and Methods: Nine patients with localized ACJ pain, resistant to nonoperative treatment were referred on an average 18 months after the injury. There were 3 male and 6 females. The right shoulder was involved in seven patients and the left in two. The average age was 38.9 years (range 29-46 years. All presented with normal X-rays but with torn acromioclavicular joint disc and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Arthroscopic ACJ excision arthroplasty was performed in all patients. Results: At a mean followup of 18 month, all patients had marked improvement. The Constant score improved from 36 to 81, the pain score from 3/15 to 10/15 and the patient satisfaction improved from 3.5/10 to 9.3/10. Conclusion: Arthroscopic ACJ excision arthroplasty, gives good outcomes in patients not responding to conservative management in ACJ acceleration-deceleration injury.

  2. Chronic angiotensin (1-7) injection accelerates STZ-induced diabetic renal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying SHAO; Ming HE; Li ZHOU; Tai YAO; Yu HUANG; Li-min LU

    2008-01-01

    ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic rat renal injury; on the contrary, it accelerated the progressive diabetic nephropathies.

  3. Pulse wave velocity in patients with severe head injury a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, S; McKelvey, T; Rydenhag, B; Ritzén, C Eriksson

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the potential of pulse wave velocity measurements to reflect changes in compliant cerebral arteries/arterioles in head injured patients. The approach utilizes the electrocardiogram and intracranial pressure signals to measure the wave transit time between heart and cranial cavity. Thirty five clinical records of nineteen head injured patients, with different levels of cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity response, were investigated through the study. Results were compared with magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac frequency. In patients with intact cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity, magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac component was found to be highly correlated with pulse wave transit time.

  4. Diaphragmatic rupture causing repeated vomiting in a combined abdominal and head injury patient: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symeonidis Dimitrios

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diaphragmatic rupture after blunt abdominal injury is a rare trauma condition. Delayed diagnosis is not uncommon especially in the emergency room setting. Associated injuries often shift diagnosis and treatment priorities towards other more life-threatening conditions. Case presentation We present a challenging case of a young male with combined abdominal and head trauma. Repeated episodes of vomiting dominated on clinical presentation that in the presence of a deep scalp laceration and facial bruising shifted differential diagnosis towards a traumatic brain injury. However, a computed tomography scan of the brain ruled out any intracranial pathology. Finally, a more meticulous investigation with additional imaging studies confirmed the presence of diaphragmatic rupture that justified the clinical symptoms. Conclusions The combination of diaphragmatic rupture with head injury creates a challenging trauma scenario. Increased level of suspicion is essential in order to diagnose timely diaphragmatic rupture in multiple trauma patients.

  5. Study of the effects of mild hypothermia on cerebral PO2, PCO2 and pH and body temperature in patients with acute severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Jun; LIN Yuan-quan; LIU Wen-feng; ZHONG Tian-an; ZHANG Jun; YE Yu; XU Yi-qun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of mild hypothermia on cerebral oxygen partial pressure, carbon dioxide partial pressure, pH and body temperature (PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT) in patients with acute severe head injury.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with acute severe head injury were treated with mild hypothermia, meantime PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT were monitored in order to study the changes of PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT.Results: In patients with acute head injury, mild hypothermia obviously increased PbrO2, decreased PbrCO2 and CO2 accumulation and acidosis in brain tissue. BT was 1℃-1.5℃ higher than rectal temperature(RT) after injury. The BT and RT were decreased when the patients were treated with mild hypothermia, but at the same time the difference between BT and RT was increased.Conclusions: In patients with acute severe head injury the direct monitoring of PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT was safe and reliable, and is helpful in estimating prognosis and mild hypothermia therapy.

  6. March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

  7. A Preliminary Investigation of Traumatically Induced Axonal Injury in a Three-Dimensional (3-D) Finite Element Model (FEM) of the Human Head During Blast-Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    injury (22). 5 A fixed boundary condition was applied to the entirety of the body below the T1 vertebra , so that the head and neck were free to...protective systems that might alter the inertial response. 13 Although active muscles have an effect on the response of the cervical spine in...although this remains questionable without experimental validation. Also, cervical spine modeling has been extensively studied for automobile injury

  8. El trauma cráneo encefálico como causa de muerte violenta en Costa Rica en el año 2004 Head injury as a cause of violent death in Costa Rica in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel Vargas Sanabria

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Es bien sabido que el trauma cráneo encefálico es un importante contribuyente dentro de las causas de muertes traumáticas, sin embargo en Costa Rica no existen estadísticas actualizadas al respecto. En este trabajo se analizaron las muertes provocadas por este tipo de trauma en el año 2004 para determinar sus características demográficas, ubicación temporal y geográfica, etiología médico legal y las lesiones específicas que provocaron la muerte. Se concluyó, después del análisis de los datos obtenidos, que la mayoría de muertes son prevenibles (accidentes de tránsito, heridas por proyectil de arma de fuego, que las lesiones más frecuentes son las producidas por traumatismos sin objeto animado (non missile injuries, que las lesiones anotadas como causa ulterior de muerte son predominantemente la contusión y laceración cerebral, pero que existe un subdiagnóstico de lesiones letales como el daño axonal difuso, por dificultades técnicas. No obstante el resto del perfil epidemiológico de las víctimas (masculino, de edad laboralmente productiva y habitante de ciudad coinciden con la bibliografía más reciente revisada.It’s a well-known fact the importance of head injury as causes of death on violent deaths around the world; however in Costa Rica there’re not current statistics about this phenomenon. In this paper we analyzed this kind of violent deaths in 2004 for to define its demographic, geographic and chronological characteristics. Also, for analyzing its medico-legal etiology and its specific lethal injury. The conclusions of this paper were: in most cases lethal injury was subject to prevention, because they were caused by traffic accidents or gunshots. The non missile injury, the head experiments a suddenly acceleration, it was the main mechanism involved in lethal injuries. Principal injuries notated as main cause of death in the final autopsy report were brain contusion and lacerations, however there were a sub

  9. Head injury management algorithm as described in Hippocrates' "peri ton en cephali traumaton".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Vassilios G; Machinis, Theofilos G; Fountas, Kostas N; Robinson, Joe S

    2005-12-01

    HIPPOCRATIC WORKS LEND themselves still today to the modern physician for further analysis of his approach to the diagnosis and treatment of various pathological conditions. We present an attempt to systematize his methodology regarding the management of head trauma and present it in the format of a modern-era algorithm.

  10. Looking for Fruit in the Jungle: Head Injury, Multimodal Theatre, and the Politics of Visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Andrew; Franks, Anton; Nicholson, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Describes a collaborative piece of theatre made by members of Headway, a charity working with head-injured people, and students and staff at Parkside Community College, an 11-16 school in Cambridge, England. Considers how the piece employs multimodal forms of expression and representational resources to challenge the invisibility of disability,…

  11. Porcine head response to blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eShridharani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposed porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110-740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3-6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. The bulk head acceleration and the pressure at the surface of the head and in the cranial cavity were measured. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within thirty seconds and the remaining two recovered within 8 minutes following bagging and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80-685 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385-3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2=0.90. One standard deviation corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure, and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for

  12. Direct hits to the head during amateur boxing is associated with a rise in serum biomarkers for brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M R; Myers, T; Evans, P; Davies, B; Cooper, S M; Bhattacharya, K; Grace, F M; Baker, J S

    2011-01-01

    Boxing exposes participants to the physiological response to high intensity exercise and also to direct body and brain trauma. Amateur boxing is increasing and females have also been included in the Olympics. The aim of this study is to assess the stress response and possible brain injury incurred during a match by measuring serum biomarkers associated with stress and cellular brain injury before and after combat. Sixteen male amateur boxers were studied retrospectively. The study population was divided into two groups: (a) a group that received predominantly punches to the head (PTH) and (b) a group that received predominantly punches to the body (PTB). Blood samples were taken before and five minutes after each contest. They were analysed for S-100B, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), creatine kinase (CK) and cortisol. The PTH group received direct contacts to the head (not blocked, parried or avoided) and to the body (n=8, age: 17.6 ± 5.3, years; height: 1.68 ± 0.13, meters; mass: 65.4 ± 20.3, kg). The PTB group received punches to the body including blocked and parried punches, but received no direct punches to the head, (n=8, mean ± SD, age: 19.1 ± 3.2 years; height: 1.70 ± 0.75, meters; mass: 68.5 ± 15 kg). Significant increases (P<0.05) were observed between pre- and post-combat serum concentrations in serum concentrations in PTH of S-100B (0.35 ± 0.61 vs. 0.54 ± 0.73, μg.L-1) NSE (19.7 ± 14 vs.31.1 ± 26.6, ng.ml-1) and cortisol (373 ± 202 vs. 756 ± 93, nmol.L-1). Significant increases (P<0.05) of creatine kinase were recorded in both groups. This study demonstrates significant elevations in neurochemical biomarkers in boxers who received direct blows to the head. However, further work is required to quantify this volumetric brain damage and long term clinical sequelae.

  13. Psychosis, psychedelic substance misuse and head injury: A case report and 23 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Musa; Piggott, Katie; Coysh, Claire; Fialho, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the case of a 57 year old gentleman with a previous severe brain injury who developed a severe psychotic disorder 19 years after the injury. This appears to have been precipitated by heavy psychedelic substance use, including cannabis, salvia divinorum, ketamine, LSD, cocaine and DMT amongst others. The psychosis remained in the absence of drug intoxication and was associated with prominent apathy, lack of concern and abulia. This study discusses the heavy psychedelic substance misuse possibly potentiating a transition to psychosis in this individual. Little work has been undertaken in this area as substance misuse has traditionally been an exclusion criteria for investigating psychosis in this patient group. It is suggested that psychedelic substance misuse should be investigated as a risk factor for psychotic illness in patients with brain injury, as this case clearly suggests.

  14. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome as a delayed manifestation of head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Bhat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available After traumatic brain injury (TBI, the most disabling problems are generally related to neuropsychiatric sequelae, including personality change and cognitive impairment, rather than neurophysical sequelae. Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS is a rare neurobehavioral condition, first described in 1937 as an experimental neurobehavioral syndrome in monkeys with bitemporal brain lesions. The syndrome in man was subsequently observed to be transient or permanent in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders and after traumatic, nontraumatic and infectious brain injury. However, partial KBS may occur in the absence of the classic bilateral temporal lesion, though rare. Pharmacological treatment of post-TBI neuropsychiatric sequelae consists of symptomatic, functional and hypothetical approaches. Specific pharmacological treatment consists of antipsychotics, anti-kindling anticonvulsants or a combination thereof. A case of partial KBS presenting as delayed manifestation of traumatic brain injury that improved with carbamazapine and antipsychotics is presented.

  15. Results of phase II levetiracetam trial following acute head injury in children at risk for posttraumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; McCarter, Robert; McGavin, Colleen L; Yu, Yuezhou; Sandoval, Fabian; Trzcinski, Stacey; Atabaki, Shireen M; Tsuchida, Tammy; van den Anker, John; He, Jianping; Klein, Pavel

    2013-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures develop in up to 20% of children following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Children ages 6-17 years with one or more risk factors for the development of posttraumatic epilepsy, including presence of intracranial hemorrhage, depressed skull fracture, penetrating injury, or occurrence of posttraumatic seizure were recruited into this phase II study. Treatment subjects received levetiracetam 55 mg/kg/day, b.i.d., for 30 days, starting within 8 h postinjury. The recruitment goal was 20 treated patients. Twenty patients who presented within 8-24 h post-TBI and otherwise met eligibility criteria were recruited for observation. Follow-up was for 2 years. Forty-five patients screened within 8 h of head injury met eligibility criteria and 20 were recruited into the treatment arm. The most common risk factor present for pediatric inclusion following TBI was an immediate seizure. Medication compliance was 95%. No patients died; 19 of 20 treatment patients were retained and one observation patient was lost to follow-up. The most common severe adverse events in treatment subjects were headache, fatigue, drowsiness, and irritability. There was no higher incidence of infection, mood changes, or behavior problems among treatment subjects compared to observation subjects. Only 1 (2.5%) of 40 subjects developed posttraumatic epilepsy (defined as seizures >7 days after trauma). This study demonstrates the feasibility of a pediatric posttraumatic epilepsy prevention study in an at-risk traumatic brain injury population. Levetiracetam was safe and well tolerated in this population. This study sets the stage for implementation of a prospective study to prevent posttraumatic epilepsy in an at-risk population. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Arthroscopic evaluation and treatment of biceps brachii long head tendon injuries: A survey of the MOON shoulder group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Injuries to the biceps brachii long head tendon commonly occur in conjunction with tears in the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum. Consensus on treatment of varying levels of severity is undetermined. Settings and Design: We surveyed members of the Multicenter Orthopedic Outcomes Network (MOON Shoulder Group, to determine a consensus on arthroscopic grading and treatment. Aims: We hypothesized that the Lafosse classification system would show a high level of inter- and intraobserver agreement regarding grading/treatment. Materials and Methods: Arthroscopic videos of 30 patients determined to have biceps brachii long head tendon injuries were viewed by 13 surgeons. The surgeons graded the severity of the injury macrostructure based on the Lafosse classification system and chose from a list of treatment options. Four months later the same surgeons viewed the same videos and repeated the survey. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis with weighted and non-weighted Kappa values was performed to determine intra- and interobserver reliability for severity grading and to determine the preferred treatments for each level of severity. Results: Intraobserver reliability testing for the Lafosse system showed substantial agreement after two rounds (81.28%, K=0.7006. Interobserver testing demonstrated substantial agreement for Grade 0 (K=0.7152, fair agreement for Grade 1 (K=0.3803, and moderate agreement for Grade 2 (K=0.5156. Combined responses recommended no surgical treatment for 95.4% of the lesions classified as grade 0 (62/65. No surgical treatment was recommended for Grade 1 lesions in 24.1% of the cases (35/145, debridement in 38.6% (56/145, and tenotomy or tenodesis in 37.2% (54/145. Evaluators preferred tenotomy or tenodesis for 98.3% of the Grade 2 lesions (177/180. Conclusions: Analysis of the Lafosse system indicated substantial intraobserver reliability for all grades. As Grades 1 and 2 showed only fair and moderate agreement, a need for a

  17. Prediction of time trends in recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Kay; Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Wilsgaard, Tom

    2009-01-01

    change. RESULTS: A Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15, traumatic brain injury demonstrated with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and serum S-100B greater than 0.14 microg/L predicted impaired cognitive performance both at baseline and after 6 months; APOE genotype did not...

  18. The impact of compulsory helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: a response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Scott R; Olivier, Jake; Churches, Tim; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2013-03-01

    This article responds to criticisms made in a rejoinder (Accident Analysis and Prevention 2012, 45: 107-109) questioning the validity of a study on the impact of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales, Australia. We systematically address the criticisms through clarification of our methods, extension of the original analysis and discussion of new evidence on the population-level effects of MHL. Extensions of our analysis confirm the original conclusions that MHL had a beneficial effect on head injury rates over and above background trends and changes in cycling participation. The ongoing debate around MHL draws attention away from important ways in which both safety and participation can be improved through investment in well-connected cycling infrastructure, fostering consideration between road users, and adequate legal protection for vulnerable road users. These are the essential elements for providing a cycling environment that encourages participation, with all its health, economic and environmental benefits, while maximising safety.

  19. Interaction of Blast and Head Impact in the Generation of Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    supported during the acceleration phase in order to eliminate the neck flexion /extension prior to impact. The NDTs were implanted into two columns...al. (1999). Relationship Between Localized Spine Deformation and Cervical Vertebral Motions for Low Speed Rear Impacts Using Human Volunteers. In: Ir

  20. Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    2 in Head Trauma : Studies on Inflammation and Pain Mid-Atlantic Pharmacology Society, Thursday, October 22, 2015, Cooper Medical School Rowan...p. 1523‐30. 2. Amenta, P.S., et al., Cannabinoid receptor type‐2 stimulation, blockade, and deletion alters the vascular  inflammatory responses to

  1. Appropriate Treatment of Head Injuries by Surgeons During the Civil War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    surgeon’s evaluation it was discovered that the suture line at the top of his head was extremely wide, indicating a fracture and depression along the suture...the bodies of both superior maxillaries , both lachrymal bones, the body of the ethmoid, with the turbinated bones, the left great wing of the sphenoid...and forming the top and sides of the cranium Periosteum. A dense fibrous membrane covering the surface of bones Second intention. Wound site is not

  2. Dexanabinol (HU-211) in the treatment of severe closed head injury: a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoller, Nachshon; Levi, Leon; Shoshan, Igal; Reichenthal, Eli; Razon, Nissim; Rappaport, Zvi H; Biegon, Anat

    2002-03-01

    To establish the safety of intravenous dexanabinol in severe head injury. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo- (vehicle) controlled, multicenter, escalating dose study of a single administration of drug (48 or 150 mg) or vehicle (1 or 3 mL). All Israeli neurosurgical intensive care units (a total of six units). Sixty-seven patients, aged 16-65 yrs, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4-8, injured within 6 hrs of treatment. Intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured continuously in the intensive care unit. Adverse medical events were recorded and clinical outcome was assessed by the Glasgow outcome scale throughout a 6-month follow-up period. A highly significant reduction in the percentage of time with intracranial pressure >25, cerebral perfusion pressure <50, and systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg was observed in the drug-treated group. The nature and incidence of adverse medical events were similar in the two groups. The percentage of patients achieving good neurologic outcome on the Glasgow outcome scale was 21% and 14% higher in the drug-treated group at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Statistical analysis of these differences by a logistic model using dose, entry Glasgow coma scale score, and computed tomograph as covariates yielded p values for the effect of treatment of .03 and .14 at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Dexanabinol was safe and well tolerated in severe head injury. The treated patients achieved significantly better intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure control without jeopardizing blood pressure. A trend toward faster and better neurologic outcome was also observed.

  3. Theoretical study of the effect of ball properties on impact force in soccer heading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Robin M; Weinhold, Paul S; Kirkendall, Donald T; Yu, Bing

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to theoretically model, based on the Hertz contact theory, the impact force and contact time, as well as the linear and angular head accelerations during heading in children using two neck stiffness conditions (infinite and negligible stiffness). The following mathematical model inputs were obtained: elastic modulus and mass of size three, four, and five balls at inflation pressures of 10, 12, and 14 psi, head modulus, head mass, head length, head and trunk moment of inertia, and the precontact ball velocity. The model outputs consisted of linear and angular head acceleration, impact force, contact time between the ball and head, and head impact criteria (HIC) all at the point of impact. Head mass and length were obtained as a percentage of body weight and height, respectively, based on age. With an increase in head mass, there is a decrease in the linear and angular head acceleration. With an increase in ball size, for the same head mass, there is an increase in the contact time between the head and the ball. Changing ball inflation pressure has little effect on the impact characteristics. Infinite neck stiffness decreased linear and angular head acceleration and HIC. Head mass and ball size have an effect on linear and angular head acceleration and contact time, respectively, whereas ball inflation pressure has a minimal effect on the impact characteristics. These results indicate that children should be restricted to using the appropriate ball for their age. Smaller head size within an age group is an underemphasized though important identifier of a player's injury risk.

  4. Mental fatigue after very severe closed head injury: Sustained performance, mental effort, and distress at two levels of workload in a driving simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Hoedemaeker, M.; Brouwer, W.H.; Mulder, L.J.M.; Cremer, R.; Veldman, J.B.P.

    1999-01-01

    In patients with very severe closed head injury (CHI), returning to work is often problematic. The present study focuses on a persistent complaint of these patients, viz. mental fatigue. To study this, the effect of sustained workload is assessed in a continuous dynamic divided attention task. Three

  5. Clinical evaluation of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer with concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (CBDCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    From May 1994 to May 1996, 39 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total tumor dose to 70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (30 mg/body). The average age was 64.2 years (38-85). The median follow-up period was 16.4 months with a range of 2-36 months. Complete response rate was 66.7%. The organ preservation rates were almost acceptable in advanced cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis, but no therapeutic interruption was observed. Grade 4 laryngeal late sequelae was observed in 2 cases. We think this method is effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer but total dose should be reduced to 67.2 Gy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  6. [Organisation of care and initial management of severe head injury in Spain: Results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanes, Vicente

    The main objective of the study is to obtain knowledge about the organisation of care for severe head trauma as well as the initial management of these patients in Neurosurgical Departments in Spain. A 22-item questionnaire was designed and sent to 59 Neurosurgical Departments. The aim of the questionnaire was to collect data regarding the general profile of the patients with a severe head injury, the general characteristics of the hospitals, the initial care of these patients, the monitoring techniques used, and the measures used to control Intracranial pressure (ICP). Of the 59 Neurosurgical Departments identified, 29 (49.2%) completed the questionnaire. There was a wide variability in the number of patients treated per year between the different departments. The leadership of care often fell (58.6%) on the intensive care specialist. Many (69%) of the departments did not have a neurosurgeon specially dedicated to the management and monitoring of these patients. The initial care in the Emergency department usually fell (51.7%) on the general medicine practitioner. The availability of computed tomography (CT) was universal. The use of telemedicine was highly variable. ICP monitoring was performed on more than 75% of patients in most (89.7%) of departments, but there was limited use of other monitoring techniques. Most Departments followed the recommendations of the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) guidelines for the control of ICP. The organisation of care and the initial management of severe head trauma in Spain is very similar to its neighbouring countries. However, there are shortcomings, such as low participation by a neurosurgeon in the initial management of these patients, insufficient use of telemedicine, and the low implementation of certain brain monitoring techniques (SjO2, PtiO2, and Doppler). Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase-plane analysis of gaze stabilization to high acceleration head thrusts: a continuum across normal subjects and patients with loss of vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Grace C Y; Zee, David S; Minor, Lloyd B

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during high-acceleration, yaw-axis, head rotations in 12 normals and 15 patients with vestibular loss [7 unilateral vestibular deficient (UVD) and 8 bilateral vestibular deficient (BVD)]. We analyzed gaze stabilization within a 200-ms window after head rotation began, using phase planes, which allowed simultaneous analysis of gaze velocity and gaze position. These "gaze planes" revealed critical dynamic information not easily gleaned from traditional gain measurements. We found linear relationships between peak gaze-velocity and peak gaze-position error when normalized to peak head speed and position, respectively. Values fell on a continuum, increasing from normals, to normals tested with very high acceleration (VHA = 10,000-20,000 degrees/s2), to UVD patients during rotations toward the intact side, to UVD patients during rotations toward the lesioned side, to BVD patients. We classified compensatory gaze corrections as gaze-position corrections (GPCs) or gaze-velocity error corrections (GVCs). We defined patients as better-compensated when the value of their end gaze position was low relative to peak gaze position. In the gaze plane this criterion corresponded to relatively stereotyped patterns over many rotations, and appearance of high velocity (100-400 degrees/s) GPCs in the gaze plane ending quadrant (150-200 ms after head movement onset). In less-compensated patients, and normals at VHA, more GVCs were generated, and GPCs were generated only after gaze-velocity error was minimized. These findings suggest that challenges to compensatory vestibular function can be from vestibular deficiency or novel stimuli not previously experienced. Similar patterns of challenge and compensation were observed in both patients with vestibular loss and normal subjects.

  8. A Prediction of Response of the Head and Neck of the U.S. Adult Military Population to Dynamic Impact Acceleration from Selected Dynamic Test Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    concussion in whiplash . However, Hodgson (13), Gurdjian (12) and others contend that other factors such as resultant intracranial pressure gradients may...degree of head-neck hyperextension. This disagreement among researchers as to the mecha- nisms of injury in hdad impact and whiplash is also seen in...results were obtained after some 62 42 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ > _ _ _ _ _ fi 4 ae I4 *0 &AeJ s- C9. d -- q a 3 1 8 £ 3 36 3’ U) L) 4’ U- 4-) i d

  9. A population-based study of survival and discharge status for survivors after head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Teasdale, T W

    2004-01-01

    -Meier survival functions were calculated for these two categories. Hospital records for a random sample of 389 survivors in 1997 after cranial fracture, acute brain lesion or chronical subdural haematoma, which occurred in 1982, 1987 and 1992 in patients aged 15 years or more at injury, were reviewed. Survivors...... the decreasing incidence with time, the point prevalence of survivors in 1997 after brain lesions occurring in 1982, 1987 or 1992 was nearly the same, averaging 8.4 per 100 000 of the population above age 14. Half of them were severe, as defined by initial Glasgow Coma Score ... and cerebral lesion was described quantitatively through Kaplan-Meier survival distributions. Besides, patterns of severity, neurophysical and mental sequelae among survivors 5, 10 and 15 years post-injury were described. It was shown by examples how the study has been useful already for the planning...

  10. Citicoline protects brain against closed head injury in rats through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ke; Gu, Yi; Zhao, Yumei; Li, Zhenzong; Sun, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Citicoline, a natural compound that functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, is essential for membrane integrity and repair. It has been reported to protect brain against trauma. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of citicoline on closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Citicoline (250 mg/kg i.v. 30 min and 4 h after CHI) lessened body weight loss, and improved neurological functions significantly at 7 days after CHI. It markedly lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid. Moreover, citicoline suppressed the activities of calpain, and enhanced the levels of calpastatin, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. Also, it attenuated the axonal and myelin sheath damage in corpus callosum and the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. These data demonstrate the protection of citicoline against white matter and grey matter damage due to CHI through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation, providing additional support to the application of citicoline for the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

  11. Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol Abuse . Injury Int. J. Care Injured. 2001;32:353-356. Sherwood D, et al. Anatomical manifestations of primary blast ocular trauma observed in a...percentile male, 3- and 6-year-old child , and a 6-, 12- and 18-month infant. Each of these ATDs is instrumented with a single six degree of freedom load cell...1996. NHTSA Child Protection Team. Techniques for Developing Child Dummy Protection Reference Values. NHTSA, Docket No. 74-14, Notice 97, Item 069

  12. Evaluating