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Sample records for accelerating monoenergetic protons

  1. Target shape effects on monoenergetic GeV proton acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Min; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    When a circularly polarized laser pulse interacts with a foil target, there are three stages: pre-hole-boring, hole-boring and the light sail acceleration. We study the electron and ion dynamics in the first stage and find the minimum foil thickness requirement for a given laser intensity. Based on this analysis, we propose to use a shaped foil for ion acceleration, whose thickness varies transversely to match the laser intensity. Then, the target evolves into three regions: the acceleration, transparency and deformation regions. In the acceleration region, the target can be uniformly accelerated producing a mono-energetic and spatially collimated ion beam. Detailed numerical simulations are performed to check the feasibility and robustness of this scheme, such as the influence of shape factors and surface roughness. A GeV mono-energetic proton beam is observed in the three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations when a laser pulse with the focus intensity of 1022W=cm2 is used. The energy conversion efficien...

  2. Monoenergetic proton beams accelerated by a radiation pressure driven shock

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, C A J; Pogorelsky, I; Babzien, M; Dudnikova, G I; Ispiriyan, M; Polyanskiy, M N; Schreiber, J; Shkolnikov, P; Yakimenko, V; Najmudin, Z

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beams (> MeV) generated by intense laser pulses promise to be viable alternatives to conventional ion beam sources due to their unique properties such as high charge, low emittance, compactness and ease of beam delivery. Typically the acceleration is due to the rapid expansion of a laser heated solid foil, but this usually leads to ion beams with large energy spread. Until now, control of the energy spread has only been achieved at the expense of reduced charge and increased complexity. Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) provides an alternative route to producing laser-driven monoenergetic ion beams. In this paper, we show the interaction of an intense infrared laser with a gaseous hydrogen target can produce proton spectra of small energy spread (~ 4%), and low background. The scaling of proton energy with the ratio of intensity over density (I/n) indicates that the acceleration is due to the shock generated by radiation-pressure driven hole-boring of the critical surface. These are the fi...

  3. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  4. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  5. Accelerating monoenergetic protons from ultrathin foils by flat-top laser pulses in the directed-Coulomb-explosion regime

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanov, S. S.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Chvykov, V.; Kalinchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Reed, S; Yanovsky, V.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the effect of laser beam shaping on proton acceleration in the interaction of a tightly focused pulse with ultrathin double-layer solid targets in the regime of directed Coulomb explosion. In this regime, the heavy ions of the front layer are forced by the laser to expand predominantly in the direction of the pulse propagation, forming a moving longitudinal charge separation electric field, thus increasing the effectiveness of acceleration of second-layer protons. The utilization ...

  6. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  7. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  8. Parametric injection for monoenergetic electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, A; Takano, K; Hotta, E; Nemoto, K [Department of Energy Sciences Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta-cho Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8502 Japan (Japan); Zhidkov, A [Central Research Instistute of Electric Power Industry 2-6-1 Nagasaka Yokosuka Kanagawa 240-0196 Japan (Japan); Nakajima, K [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK 1-1 Oho Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: blue-ayu@plasma.es.titech.ac.jp

    2008-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in the laser wakefield (LWFA). This mechanism has been studied by 2D or 3D Particle In Cell simulation. However, how the electrons are injected in the wakefield is not understood. In this paper, we consider about the process of self -injection and propose new scheme. When plasma electron density modulates, parametric resonance of electron momentum is induced. The parametric resonance depends on laser waist modulation. We carried out 2D PIC simulation with the initial condition decided from resonance condition. Moreover, we analyze experimental result that generated 200-250 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with 400TW intense laser in CAEP in China.

  9. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  10. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  11. Simulation of the Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons Generation by Parallel Laser Pulses Interaction with Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Quan; Yin, Yan; Zou, De-Bin; Yu, Tong-Pu; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Han; Yu, Ming-Yang; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Shao, Fu-Qiu

    2014-11-01

    A new scheme of radiation pressure acceleration for generating high-quality protons by using two overlapping-parallel laser pulses is proposed. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the overlapping of two pulses with identical Gaussian profiles in space and trapezoidal profiles in the time domain can result in a composite light pulse with a spatial profile suitable for stable acceleration of protons to high energies. At ~2.46 × 1021 W/cm2 intensity of the combination light pulse, a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam with peak energy ~200 MeV/nucleon, energy spread therapy. The proton beam quality can be controlled by adjusting the incidence points of two laser pulses.

  12. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen plasma cell is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10^7 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1 %) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10^21 W/cm^2.

  13. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Liseykina, Tatyana V. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianxing; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Interactions of linearly and radially polarized frequency-chirped laser pulses with single protons and hydrogen gas targets are studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. First results of laser-proton acceleration with cryogenic hydrogen targets at the POLARIS laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Georg Alexander; Polz, Jens; Kloepfel, Diethard; Ziegler, Wolfgang; Keppler, Sebastian; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Hellwing, Marco [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kalinin, Anton; Costa Fraga, Rui; Grisenti, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Robinson, Alexander [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon., OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kessler, Alexander; Schorcht, Frank; Hornung, Marco [Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, Malte Christoph [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    For the first time on the POLARIS laser system, a laser-driven proton acceleration experiment with cryogenic hydrogen droplets and filaments has been performed. Most laser-driven proton acceleration experiments use target materials including metals, plastics or diamond-like carbon. Due to the multitude of ion species accelerated from such targets, understanding the acceleration processes becomes quite complicated. The use of liquid or frozen hydrogen targets reduces the accelerated species to protons only and additionally produces, due to the mass limited droplets or filaments, a higher acceleration field. The experimental setup and results, including isolated monoenergetic peaks in the high energy range of the proton spectra, are discussed.

  16. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  17. Self-Injection and Acceleration of Monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Highly Relativistic Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Yoshitama; WEN Xian-Lun; WEN Tian-Shu; WU Yu-Chi; ZHANG Bao-San; ZHU Qi-Hua; HUANG Xiao-Jun; AN Wei-Min; HUNG Wen-Hui; TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIN Yu-Zheng; T. Kameshima; WANG Xiao-Dong; CHEN Li-Ming; H. Kotaki; M. Kando; K. Nakajima; GU Yu-Qiu; GUO Yi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Hong-Jie; PENG Han-Sheng; TANG Chuan-Ming; WANG Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Self-injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators are first in-vestigated in the highly relativistic regime, using 100 TW class, 27 fs laser pulses. Quasi-monoenergetic multi-bunched beams with energies as high as multi-hundredMeV are observed with simultaneous measurements of side-scattering emissions that indicate the formation of self-channelling and self-injection of electrons into a plasma wake, referred to as a 'bubble'. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirmed multiple self-injection of electron bunches into the bubble and their beam acceleration with gradient of 1.5 GeV/cm.

  18. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  19. Double-Relativistic-Electron-Layer Proton Acceleration With High-Contrast Circular-Polarization Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Yong-sheng; WANG; Nai-yan; TANG; Xiu-zhang; SHI; Yi-jin

    2012-01-01

    <正>Laser-ion acceleration has been the focus of international research for many years. However, obtaining mono-energetic proton beams larger than 100 MeV is still a challenge. Although the field strength in laser-plasma acceleration is 3-4 orders higher than that in classic accelerators, it quickly decreases to zero in 1-2 pulse durations for target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), which is dominated

  20. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state (Z−2)+ to (Z−1)+]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7×1020 W/cm2 through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe26+) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 1022 W/cm2

  1. The Bubble regime of laser-plasma acceleration: monoenergetic electrons and the scalability

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A E; Kiselev, S; Kostyukhov, Yu

    2004-01-01

    The Bubble regime of electron acceleration in ultra-relativistic laser plasma is considered. It has been shown that the bubble can produce ultra-short dense bunches of electrons with quasi-monoenergetic energy spectra. The first experiment in this regime done at LOA has confirmed the peaked electron spectrum (J. Faure, et al., {\\it submitted}, 2004). The generated electron bunch may have density an order of magnitude higher than that of the background plasma. The bubble is able to guide the laser pulse over many Rayleigh lengths, thus no preformed plasma channel is needed for high-energy particle acceleration in the bubble regime. In the present work we discuss a simple analytical model for the bubble fields as well as the scaling laws.

  2. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  3. VELOCIRAPTOR: An X-band photoinjector and linear accelerator for the production of Mono-Energetic {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.G., E-mail: anderson131@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Albert, F.; Bayramian, A.J.; Beer, G.; Bonanno, R.E.; Cross, R.R.; Deis, G.; Ebbers, C.A.; Gibson, D.J.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; Marsh, R.A.; McNabb, D.P.; Messerly, M.J.; Scarpetti, R.D.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Siders, C.W.; Wu, S.S.; Barty, C.P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Adolphsen, C.E. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); and others

    2011-11-21

    The rf photoinjector and linear accelerator in the Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) facility at LLNL is presented. This machine uses 11.4 GHz rf technology to accelerate a high-brightness electron beam up to 250 MeV to produce MeV {gamma}-rays through Compton scattering with a Joule-class laser pulse. Compton scattering-based generation of high flux, narrow bandwidth {gamma}-rays places stringent requirements on the performance of the accelerator. The component parts of the accelerator are presented and their requirements described. Simulations of expected electron beam parameters and the resulting light source properties are presented.

  4. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  5. The proton engineering frontier project: accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since launched in 2002 to establish an advanced research facility to promote and support core R and D programs by utilizing highly-characterized proton beams, the Proton Engineering Frontier Project has been devoted to developing a high-current 100-MeV, 20 mA proton linac. The upstream part of the proton linac, up to 20 MeV, has been successfully developed, integrated, and commissioned and has delivered proton beams to users under a limited operation license. The high-energy part of the accelerator and beamlines are under development. The architectural and radiation shielding design of the accelerator building and beam experimental hall has been completed. The site preparation and construction works are in progress in cooperation with the municipal government of Gyeongju city. When the project is completed in 2012, as scheduled, the proton accelerator facility will be capable of delivering highly-characterized proton beams to multiple users by satisfying their dedicated requirements.

  6. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: luisarabelo88@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  7. Acceleration of Flare Protons by Langmuir Plasmons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓卿; 张航

    2002-01-01

    We analytically study the turbulent acceleration of solar protons by strong Langmuir plasmons in Cerenkov processes. It is shown that among the wave spectra with self-retained source only the Pelletier spectrum (Wk ∝ k-7/2) can result in the energy spectrum of non-relativistic protons, which gives a good fit to that observed from solarflare events. It is quite possible that strong Langmuir turbulence presents in coronal active region, with three-dimensional, isotropic and stationary spectrum proportional to k-7/2, and is responsible for the acceleration offlare protons.

  8. Proton-driven plasma acceleration at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-based acceleration methods have seen important progress over the last years. Recently, it has been proposed to experimentally study plasma acceleration driven by proton beams, in addition to the established research directions of electron and laser-driven plasmas. This talk presents the planned experiment and the research efforts carried out at CERN.

  9. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  10. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  11. Generation of high-energy monoenergetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; He, X T; McGuffey, C; Beg, F N

    2014-01-01

    A novel radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) regime of heavy ion beams from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils is proposed by self-consistently taking into account the ionization dynamics. In this regime, the laser intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization of high-Z atoms passing the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state $(\\text{Z}-2)^+$ to $(\\text{Z}-1)^+$]. While the target ions in the laser wing region are ionized to low charge states and undergo rapid dispersions due to instabilities, a self-organized, stable RPA of highly-charged heavy ion beam near the laser axis is achieved. It is also found that a large supplement of electrons produced from ionization helps preserving stable acceleration. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a monoenergetic $\\text{Al}^{13+}$ beam with peak energy $1\\ \\text{GeV}$ and energy spread of $5\\%$ is obtained by lasers at intensity $7\\times10^{20}\\ \\text...

  12. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  13. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  14. Detection of laser-accelerated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Sabine

    2012-08-08

    Real-time (Online) detection of laser-accelerated protons is a challenge for any electronic detector system due to the peculiar time structure ({<=} ns) and high intensity ({>=}10{sup 7} p/cm{sup 2}) of the generated ion pulses. Besides considerable saturation effects, problems are expected by an electromagnetic interference pulse (EMP), generated during laser-plasma interaction. In the scope of this work, different detection systems were built-up with regard to specific demands of laser-ion-acceleration at the MPQ ATLAS laser, which allow the quantitative analysis of the generated proton beam. A cell irradiation experiment at the ATLAS laser was accomplished to demonstrate the usability of laser-accelerated protons for radiation therapy. Cells were irradiated with a single shot dose of few Gy for a proton energy of 5 MeV. The following cell analysis required the spatially resolved measurement of the dose distribution. Only radiation-sensitive films were applicable because of the small proton range, although they show significant quenching effects for the used proton energy. This was extensively studied in the 3-200 MeV energy range. A film-based dosimetry protocol for low-energy proton irradiations was developed, making the absolute dose determination in the cell experiment possible. The non-electronic detectors (nuclear track detectors, radiation-sensitive films) are still state of the art in laser-accelerated ion diagnostics, although these detectors only allow a delayed in time (offline) detection. A non-electronic system, based on image plates, was thoroughly characterized and calibrated for ongoing experiments at the ATLAS laser, for the first time. Main objective of this work, though, was the set-up of a real-time detection system, which is urgently required, owing to increasing repetition rate of the laser accelerator (>Hz), to advance the parameter optimisation of the laser-acceleration in an efficient way. Systems based on silicon pixel detectors are

  15. Detection of laser-accelerated protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time (Online) detection of laser-accelerated protons is a challenge for any electronic detector system due to the peculiar time structure (≤ ns) and high intensity (≥107 p/cm2) of the generated ion pulses. Besides considerable saturation effects, problems are expected by an electromagnetic interference pulse (EMP), generated during laser-plasma interaction. In the scope of this work, different detection systems were built-up with regard to specific demands of laser-ion-acceleration at the MPQ ATLAS laser, which allow the quantitative analysis of the generated proton beam. A cell irradiation experiment at the ATLAS laser was accomplished to demonstrate the usability of laser-accelerated protons for radiation therapy. Cells were irradiated with a single shot dose of few Gy for a proton energy of 5 MeV. The following cell analysis required the spatially resolved measurement of the dose distribution. Only radiation-sensitive films were applicable because of the small proton range, although they show significant quenching effects for the used proton energy. This was extensively studied in the 3-200 MeV energy range. A film-based dosimetry protocol for low-energy proton irradiations was developed, making the absolute dose determination in the cell experiment possible. The non-electronic detectors (nuclear track detectors, radiation-sensitive films) are still state of the art in laser-accelerated ion diagnostics, although these detectors only allow a delayed in time (offline) detection. A non-electronic system, based on image plates, was thoroughly characterized and calibrated for ongoing experiments at the ATLAS laser, for the first time. Main objective of this work, though, was the set-up of a real-time detection system, which is urgently required, owing to increasing repetition rate of the laser accelerator (>Hz), to advance the parameter optimisation of the laser-acceleration in an efficient way. Systems based on silicon pixel detectors are applicable for

  16. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this note is to describe the electrical and mechanical properites of particle accelerator rf cavities in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion will be limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common pratice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text

  17. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Masao; Miyajima, Satoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiko; Sutherland, Kenneth L; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Bulanov, Sergei V; Daido, Hiroyuki; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Koga, James; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Tajima, Toshiki

    2008-01-01

    Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. The laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities for the radiation oncologist. It reduces the overall system size and weight by more than one order of magnitude. The characteristics of the particle beams (protons) make them suitable for a class of therapy that might not be possible with the conventional accelerator, such as the ease for changing pulse intensity, the focus spread, the pinpointedness, and the dose delivery in general. A compact, uncluttered system allows a PET device to be located in the vicinity of the patient in concert with the compact gantry. The radiation oncologist may be able to irradiate a localized tumor by scanning with a pencil-like particle...

  18. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  19. Neutron transmission benchmark problems for iron and concrete shields in low, intermediate and high energy proton accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hayashi, Katsumi [and others

    1996-09-01

    Benchmark problems were prepared for evaluating the calculation codes and the nuclear data for accelerator shielding design by the Accelerator Shielding Working Group of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics in JAERI. Four benchmark problems: transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43 MeV and 68 MeV protons through iron and concrete shields at TIARA of JAERI, neutron fluxes in and around an iron beam stop irradiated by 500 MeV protons at KEK, reaction rate distributions inside a thick concrete shield irradiated by 6.2 GeV protons at LBL, and neutron and hadron fluxes inside an iron beam stop irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN are compiled in this document. Calculational configurations and neutron reaction cross section data up to 500 MeV are provided. (author)

  20. Laser driven proton acceleration and beam shaping

    OpenAIRE

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In the race to obtain protons with higher energies, using more compact systems at the same time, laser-driven plasma accelerators are becoming an interesting possibility. But for now, only beams with extremely broad energy spectra and high divergence have been produced. The driving line of this PhD thesis was the study and design of a compact system to extract a high quality beam out of the initial bunch of protons produced by the interaction of a laser pulse with a thin solid target, usi...

  1. Self-truncated ionization injection and consequent monoenergetic electron bunches in laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization-induced injection in laser wakefield acceleration has been recently demonstrated to be a promising injection scheme. However, the energy spread controlling in this mechanism remains a challenge because continuous injection in a mixed gas target is usually inevitable. Here, we propose that by use of certain initially unmatched laser pulses, the electron injection can be constrained to the very front region of the mixed gas target, typically in a length of a few hundreds micrometers determined by the laser self-focusing and the wake deformation. As a result, the produced electron beam has narrow energy spread and meanwhile contains tens of pC in charge. Both multidimensional simulations and theoretical analysis illustrate the effectiveness of this scheme

  2. DESIGN CRITERIA OF A PROTON FFAG ACCELERATOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    There are two major issues that are to be confronted in the design of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, namely: (1) the stability of motion over the large momentum range needed for the beam acceleration, and (2) the compactness of the trajectories over the same momentum range to limit the dimensions of the magnets. There are a numbers of rules that need to be followed to resolve these issues. In particular, the magnet arrangement in the accelerator lattice and the distribution of the bending and focusing fields are to be set properly in accordance with these rules. In this report they describe four of these rules that ought to be applied for the optimum design of a FFAG accelerator, especially in the case of proton beams.

  3. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Büscher, Markus, E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  4. Acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Zeno, K.

    2010-02-25

    The high energy (s{sup 1/2} = 500 GeV) polarized proton beam experiments performed in RHIC, require high polarization of the proton beam. With the AGS used as the pre-injector to RHIC, one of the main tasks is to preserve the polarization of the proton beam, during the beam acceleration in the AGS. The polarization preservation is accomplished by the two partial helical magnets [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] which have been installed in AGS, and help overcome the imperfection and the intrinsic spin resonances which occur during the acceleration of protons. This elimination of the intrinsic resonances is accomplished by placing the vertical tune Q{sub y} at a value close to 8.98, within the spin-tune stop-band created by the snake. At this near integer tune the perturbations caused by the partial helical magnets is large resulting in large beta and dispersion waves. To mitigate the adverse effect of the partial helices on the optics of the AGS, we have introduced compensation quads[2] in the AGS. In this paper we present the beam optics of the AGS which ameliorates this effect of the partial helices.

  5. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavy ion beams via staged shock wave acceleration driven by intense laser pulses in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Huang, T. W.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration potentially offers a compact, cost-effective alternative to conventional accelerators for scientific, technological, and health-care applications. A novel scheme for heavy ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas via staged shock waves driven by intense laser pulses is proposed, where, in front of the heavy ion target, a light ion layer is used for launching a high-speed electrostatic shock wave. This shock is enhanced at the interface before it is transmitted into the heavy ion plasmas. Monoenergetic heavy ion beam with much higher energy can be generated by the transmitted shock, comparing to the shock wave acceleration in pure heavy ion target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic {{{C}}}6+ ion beams with peak energy 168 MeV and considerable particle number 2.1 × {10}11 are obtained by laser pulses at intensity of 1.66 × {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2 in such staged shock wave acceleration scheme. Similarly a high-quality {{Al}}10+ ion beam with a well-defined peak with energy 250 MeV and spread δ E/{E}0=30 % can also be obtained in this scheme.

  6. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  7. Proton external beam in the TANDAR Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An external proton beam has been obtained in the TANDAR accelerator with radiological and biomedical purposes. The protons have excellent physical properties for their use in radiotherapy allowing a very good accuracy in the dose spatial distribution inside the tissue so in the side direction as in depth owing to the presence of Bragg curve. The advantage of the accuracy in the dose localization with proton therapy is good documented (M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983); M.R. Raju, Rad. Res. 145, 391 (1996)). It was obtained external proton beams with energies between 15-25 MeV, currents between 2-10 p A and a uniform transversal sections of 40 mm2 approximately. It was realized dosimetric evaluations with CR39 and Makrofol foliation. The irradiations over biological material contained experiences In vivo with laboratory animals, cellular and bacterial crops. It was fixed the optimal conditions of position and immobilization of the Wistar rats breeding for the In vivo studies. It was chosen dilutions and sowing techniques adequate for the exposition at the cellular and bacterial crops beam. (Author)

  8. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico II and INFN Naples Section University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, LNS, Catania (Italy); Prise, Kevin M., E-mail: k.prise@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Schettino, Giuseppe [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  9. Protons Surfatron acceleration by electromagnetic wave in space plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work fundamental interactions of type wave-particles are discussed. Main object of the investigation is Surfatron accelerations of the protons by single electromagnetic wave. The Surfatron effect of protons acceleration is investigated through numerical simulations, on the basis of nonlinear, nonstationary, second order differential equation for the wave phase at the charged particle’s trajectory. The temporal dynamics of protons Surfatron acceleration for different variants of the initial parameters are studied. The optimal conditions for maximum ultrarelativistic particles Surfatron acceleration by the electromagnetic wave in space plasma are considered. An analytical approximation for protons energy strong growth was done. Key words: Surfatron acceleration, space plasmas, electromagnetic wave, proton, charge trapping

  10. Status Of The Dielectric Wall Accelerator For Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) offers the potential to produce a high gradient linear accelerator for proton therapy and other applications. The current status of the DWA for proton therapy will be reviewed. Recent progress in SiC photoconductive switch development will be presented. There are serious beam transport challenges in the DWA arising from short pulse excitation of the wall. Solutions to these transport difficulties will be discussed.

  11. Enhanced collimated GeV monoenergetic ion acceleration from a shaped foil target irradiated by a circularly polarized laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, M; Yu, T P; Sheng, Z M

    2009-01-01

    Using multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations we study ion acceleration from a foil irradiated by a circularly polarized laser pulse at 1022W/cm^2 intensity. When the foil is shaped initially in the transverse direction to match the laser intensity profile, the center part of the target can be uniformly accelerated for a longer time compared to a usual flat target. Target deformation and undesirable plasma heating are effectively suppressed. The final energy spectrum of the accelerated ion beam is improved dramatically. Collimated GeV quasi-mono-energetic ion beams carrying as much as 18% of the laser energy are observed in multi-dimensional simulations. Radiation damping effects are also checked in the simulations.

  12. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  13. Accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V; Romanenko, A; Valishev, A; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.

  14. Proton linear accelerators: A theoretical and historical introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapostolle, P.M.

    1989-07-01

    From the beginning, the development of linear accelerators has followed a number of different directions. This report surveys the basic ideas and general principles of such machines, pointing out the problems that have led to the various improvements, with the hope that it may also aid further progress. After a brief historical survey, the principal aspects of accelerator theory are covered in some detail: phase stability, focusing, radio-frequency accelerating structures, the detailed calculation of particle dynamics, and space-charge effects at high intensities. These developments apply essentially to proton and ion accelerators, and only the last chapter deals with a few aspects relative to electrons. 134 refs.

  15. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  16. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  17. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  18. Generation of high-energy monoenergetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B.; X. T. He; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-01-01

    A novel radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) regime of heavy ion beams from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils is proposed by self-consistently taking into account the ionization dynamics. In this regime, the laser intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization of high-Z atoms passing the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state $(\\text{Z}-2)^+$ to $(\\text{Z}-1)^+$]. While the target ions in the...

  19. Quasi-monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser-plasma Acceleration by Ionization-induced Injection in Low- density Pure Nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Mengze; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Chen, Liming; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Jie ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    We report a laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams up to 130 MeV from laser-driven 4-mm long nitrogen gas jet. By using a moderate laser intensity (3.5*10^18 W.cm^(-2)) and relatively low plasma densities (0.8*10^18 cm^(-3) to 2.7*10^18 cm^(-3)) we have achieved a stable regime for laser propagation and consequently a stable generation of electron beams. We experimentally studied the dependence of the drive laser energy on the laser-plasma channel and electron beam parameters. The qua...

  20. High proton energies from cone targets: electron acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments in the Trident laser facility (Los Alamos National Laboratory) have shown that hollow conical targets with a flat top at the tip can enhance the maximum energy of proton beams created during the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with the target (Gaillard S A et al 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056710). The proton energies that have been seen in these experiments are the highest energies observed so far in laser-driven proton acceleration. This is attributed to a new acceleration mechanism, direct light pressure acceleration of electrons (DLLPA), which increases the number and energy of hot electrons that drive the proton acceleration. This acceleration process of protons due to a two-temperature sheath formed at the flat-top rear side is very robust and produces a large number of protons per shot, similar to what is regularly observed in target normal sheath acceleration (Hatchett S P et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 2076, Maksimchuk A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 4108, Snavely R A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2945) with flat foils. In this paper, we investigate the electron kinetics during DLLPA, showing that they are governed by two mechanisms, both of which lead to continuous electron acceleration along the inner cone wall. Based on our model, we predict the scaling of the hot electron temperature and ion maximum energy with both laser and target geometrical parameters. The scaling of T=mec02a02/4 with the laser strength parameter a0 leads to an ion energy scaling that surpasses that of some recently proposed acceleration mechanisms such as radiation pressure acceleration (RPA), while in addition the maximum electron energy is found to scale linearly with the length of the cone neck. We find that when optimizing parameters, high proton energies suitable for applications can be reached using compact short-pulse laser systems with pulse durations of only a few tens to hundreds of laser periods. (paper)

  1. Septum magnet for proton extraction system at the IHEP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives a description of the suptum magnet SM for proton slow extraction from the IHEP synchrotron. The SM excitation coil and magnetic core are assembled outside the accelerator vacuum system. The SM is reliable in operation, can be adjusted with a high accuracy with respect to the accelerated beam, moreover it has a low outgassing in the vacuum under residual gas pressure Up to 1.35 10-8. The SM has operated 8 105 cycles

  2. Quasi-monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser-plasma Acceleration by Ionization-induced Injection in Low- density Pure Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Mengze; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Chen, Liming; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We report a laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams up to 130 MeV from laser-driven 4-mm long nitrogen gas jet. By using a moderate laser intensity (3.5*10^18 W.cm^(-2) ) and relatively low plasma densities (0.8*10^18 cm^(-3) to 2.7*10^18 cm^(-3)) we have achieved a stable regime for laser propagation and consequently a stable generation of electron beams. We experimentally studied the dependence of the drive laser energy on the laser-plasma channel and electron beam parameters. The quality of the generated electron beams is discussed within the framework of the ionization-induced injection mechanism.

  3. ISABELLE: A Proposal for Construction of a Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-05-01

    The construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator Facility (ISA or ISABELLE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposed. ISABELLE will permit the exploration of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies continuously variable from 60 to 400 GeV and with luminosities of 1032 to 1033 cm-2 sec-1 over the entire range. An overview of the physics potential of this machine is given, covering the production of charged and neutral intermediate vector bosons, the hadron production at high transverse momentum, searches for new, massive particles, and the energy dependence of the strong interactions. The facility consists of two interlaced rings of superconducting magnets in a common tunnel about 3 km in circumference. The proton beams will collide at eight intersection regions where particle detectors will be arranged for studying the collision processes. Protons of approximately 30 GeV from the AGS will be accumulated to obtain the design current of 10A prior to acceleration to final energy. The design and performance of existing full-size superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles is described. The conceptual design of the accelerator systems and the conventional structures and buildings is presented. A preliminary cost estimate and construction schedule are given. Possible future options such as proton-antiproton, proton-deuteron and electron-proton collisions are discussed.

  4. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (1012 W/cm2) prior to the main pulse (∝ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 μm is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy (∝25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 μm foil irradiated with an intensity of 1019 W/cm2 onto a 60 μm spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and plasma physics group of the Technische Universitat Darmstadt

  5. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) prior to the main pulse ({proportional_to}ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 {mu}m is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy ({proportional_to}25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 {mu}m foil irradiated with an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 60 {mu}m spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and

  6. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Arefiev, Alexey; Fiksel, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The predicted improved characterist...

  7. The joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) agreed to promote the joint project integrating both the Neutron Science Project (NSP) of JAERI and the Japan Hadron Facility Project (JHF) of KEK for comprehensive studies on basic science and technology using high-intensity proton accelerator. This document describes the joint proposal prepared by the Joint Project Team of JAERI and KEK to construct accelerators and research facilities necessary both for the NSP and the JHF at the site of JAERI Tokai Establishment. (author)

  8. The joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) agreed to promote the joint project integrating both the Neutron Science Project (NSP) of JAERI and the Japan Hadron Facility Project (JHF) of KEK for comprehensive studies on basic science and technology using high-intensity proton accelerator. This document describes the joint proposal prepared by the Joint Project Team of JAERI and KEK to construct accelerators and research facilities necessary both for the NSP and the JHF at the site of JAERI Tokai Establishment. (author)

  9. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  10. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as a New Particle Source

    OpenAIRE

    Nürnberg, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. Today's high power, ultrashort pulse laser systems are capable of achieving laser intensities up to 10^21 W/cm^2. When focused onto thin foil targets, extremely high field gradients of the order of TV/m are produced on the rear side of the target resulting in the acceleration of protons to multi-MeV energies with an exponential spectrum including up to 10^13 particles. This a...

  11. Feasibility study on the development of proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ki Hyung; Bang, Hyung Chan; Cho, Yong Sup [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Rak [Church Environment Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam Kung, Won; Cho, Moo Hyun [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Suk [Cartolrik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyung Joo [Nature Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Basic Study Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hun Joo [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Soon Hong; Cho, Nam Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeon Kun [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    A feasibility on the development of a high energy proton accelerator to be used for R and D in the nuclear field of korea was studied. The proposed one is a proton linac with parameters of about 1 GeV, 20 mA which can supply enough neutrons by the spallation reaction to drive a subcritical reactor. It= is expected to solve the intrinsic problem in the nuclear field such as safety, nuclear waste, proliferation and resource. The study was carried out through a multi-institutional cooperation of universities, institute and industry for a national consensus. 5 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs. (author)

  12. Laser Proton acceleration from mass limited silicon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeil, K.; Kraft, S.; Richter, T.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Fuchs, J.; Buffechoux, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present recent studies on laser proton acceleration experiments using mass limited silicon targets. Small micro machined silicon foils with 2 μm thickness and 20x20 μm2 to 100x100μm2 size mounted on very tiny stalks were shot with the 100 TW LULI Laser (long pulse 150 fs) and with the new 150 TW DRACO Laser facility (short pulse 30 fs) of the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf. The experiments were carried out using high contrast levels. Proton spectra have been measured with magnetic spectrometers and radio chromic film stacks.

  13. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  14. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  15. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  16. Measurement and interpretation of laser accelerated protons at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is structured into 7 chapters: - Chapter 2 gives an overview of the ultrashort high intensity laser interaction with matter. The laser interaction with an induced plasma is described, starting from the kinematics of single electron motion, followed by collective electron effects and the ponderamotive motion in the laser focus and the plasma transparency for the laser beam. The three different mechanisms prepared to accelerate and propagate electrons through matter are discussed. The following indirect acceleration of protons is explained by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally some possible applications of laser accelerated protons are explained briefly. - Chapter 3 deals with the modeling of geometry and field mapping of magnetic lens. Initial proton and electron distributions, fitted to PHELIX measured data are generated, a brief description of employed codes and used techniques in simulation is given, and the aberrations at the solenoid focal spot is studied. - Chapter 4 presents a simulation study for suggested corrections to optimize the proton beam as a later beam source. Two tools have been employed in these suggested corrections, an aperture placed at the solenoid focal spot as energy selection tool, and a scattering foil placed in the proton beam to smooth the radial energy beam profile correlation at the focal spot due to chromatic aberrations. Another suggested correction has been investigated, to optimize the beam radius at the focal spot by lens geometry controlling. - Chapter 5 presents a simulation study for the de-neutralization problem in TNSA caused by the fringing fields of pulsed magnetic solenoid and quadrupole. In this simulation, we followed an electrostatic model, where the evolution of both, self and mutual fields through the pulsed magnetic solenoid could be found, which is not the case in the quadrupole and only the growth of self fields could be found. The field mapping of magnetic elements is

  17. Simulation on Buildup of Electron Cloud in Proton Circular Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Kai-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beam are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerator. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detail processes on the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by ...

  18. Acceleration of Thermal Protons By Generic Phenomenological Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-01-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was carried out in Petrosian & East (2008) for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton-electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker-Plank equations and computes the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence nee...

  19. Quasi-monoenergetic electron acceleration in relativistic laser-plasmas; Acceleration par laser d'electrons quasi-monoenergetiques dans les plasmas relativistes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukhov, A.; Gordienko, S.; Seredov, V. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Institut fur Theoretische Physik I, Dusseldorf (Germany); Kostyukov, I. [Institut for Applied Physics RAS (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-15

    Using Particle-in-Cell simulations as well as analytical theory we study electron acceleration in underdense plasmas both in the Bubble regime and in the weakly relativistic periodic wake fields. In the Bubble regime, electron trapping is taken as a function of the propagated distance. The number of trapped electrons depends on the effective phase velocity of the X-point at the rear of the Bubble. For the weakly relativistic periodic wakes, we show that the phase synchronism between the wake and the relativistic electrons can be maintained over very long distances when the plasma density is tapered properly. Moreover, one can use layered plasmas to control and improve the accelerated beam quality. (authors)

  20. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  1. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  2. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  3. Laser-Produced and Accelerated High Energy Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Ultra-low emittance, multi-MeV proton beams have recently been produced by the interaction of high-intensity short-pulse lasers with thin metallic foils [1]. The acceleration process proceeds in two steps. First the laser ponderomotively accelerates huge, MA currents of ˜MeV electrons which propagate through the foil and form a dense relativistic electron sheath on the non-irradiated rear surface. This sheath produces an electrostatic field >10^12 V/m that ionizes the surface atoms almost instantaneously, forming a ˜1 nm thick ion layer which, together with the electron sheath, resembles a virtual cathode. The ions are accelerated initially normal to the foil surface, followed by a diverging plasma expansion phase driven by the electron plasma pressure. By structuring the rear surface of the foil, we have succeeded to produce modulations in the transverse phase space of the ions, which resemble fiducial ``beamlets'' within the envelope of the expanding plasma. This allows one to image the initial accelerating sheath, and map the plasma expansion of the beam envelope, to fully reconstruct the transverse phase space. We find that for protons of 10 MeV, the normalized transverse rms emittance is less than 0.004 π mm.mrad [1], i.e. 100-fold better than typical RF accelerators and at substantially higher ion currents exceeding 10 kA. Recent results will be reported on stripping the electrons while maintaining the low emittance from experiments at the LULI 100 TW laser, and theoretical estimates of the lowest emittance which can be expected based on ion heating mechanisms during the initial sheath formation and ion acceleration processes, will be presented. [1] T.E. Cowan, J. Fuchs, H. Ruhl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004).

  4. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  5. Simulation on Buildup of Electron Cloud in Proton Circular Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beam are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerator. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detail processes on the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron cloud. China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the largest scientific project in building, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H- linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80Mev proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6GeV with a repetition rate 25Hz. During the beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause a serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and dens...

  6. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, Eric [Fermilab; Antipov, Sergey [Chicago U.; Piekarz, Henryk [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  7. Feasibility of using laser ion accelerators in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of using the laser plasma as a source of the high-energy ions for the proton radiation therapy is discussed. The proposal is based on the recent inventions of the effective ions acceleration in the experiments and through numerical modeling of the powerful laser radiation interaction with the gaseous and solid state targets. The principal peculiarity of the dependence of the protons energy losses in the tissues (the Bragg peak of losses) facilities the solution of one of the most important problems of the radiation therapy, which consists in realizing the tumor irradiation by sufficiently high and homogeneous dose with simultaneous minimization of the irradiation level, relative to the healthy and neighbouring tissues and organs

  8. Discovery Mondays "Controlling the accelerators: tracking the protons"

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Le Centre de contrôle des accélérateurs du CERN.Like a train of particles that picks up speed every time it passes a set of points, by the time they collide the protons and ions in the LHC will have followed their path through the six stages of the CERN accelerator complex, picking up speed at each stage. Operating the controls of this huge complex designed to accelerate the infinitesimally small are its peerless controllers. From the CERN Control Centre, they will be on duty day and night to accelerate the "wagon-loads" of particles, ensuring that they stay on track and lining them up for head-on collisions. At the next Discovery Monday you will discover the path taken by the particles through the accelerator chain. You will gain an insight into the complex work performed by those controlling the particles and learn more about the CERN accelerator complex and its Control Centre. Hop on board for a speed-of-light tour of the C...

  9. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  10. Intense high-quality medical proton beams via laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2010-01-01

    Simulations based on the coupled relativistic equations of motion show that protons stemming from laserplasma processes can be efficiently post-accelerated employing crossed pulsed laser beams focused to spot radii on the order of the laser wavelength. We demonstrate that the crossed beams produce quasi-monoenergetic accelerated protons with kinetic energies exceeding 200 MeV, small energy spreads of about 1% and high densities as required for hadron cancer therapy.

  11. Proton external beam in the TANDAR Accelerator; Haz externo de protones en el acelerador TANDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, R.; Schuff, J.A.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Debray, M.E.; Hojman, D.; Kreiner, A.J.; Kesque, J.M.; Saint-Martin, G.; Oppezzo, O.; Bernaola, O.A.; Molinari, B.L.; Duran, H.A.; Policastro, L.; Palmieri, M.; Ibanez, J.; Stoliar, P.; Mazal, A.; Caraballo, M.E.; Burlon, A.; Cardona, M.A.; Vazquez, M.E.; Salfity, M.F.; Ozafran, M.J.; Naab, F.; Levinton, G.; Davidson, M.; Buhler, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, C.P. 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    An external proton beam has been obtained in the TANDAR accelerator with radiological and biomedical purposes. The protons have excellent physical properties for their use in radiotherapy allowing a very good accuracy in the dose spatial distribution inside the tissue so in the side direction as in depth owing to the presence of Bragg curve. The advantage of the accuracy in the dose localization with proton therapy is good documented (M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983); M.R. Raju, Rad. Res. 145, 391 (1996)). It was obtained external proton beams with energies between 15-25 MeV, currents between 2-10 p A and a uniform transversal sections of 40 mm{sup 2} approximately. It was realized dosimetric evaluations with CR39 and Makrofol foliation. The irradiations over biological material contained experiences In vivo with laboratory animals, cellular and bacterial crops. It was fixed the optimal conditions of position and immobilization of the Wistar rats breeding for the In vivo studies. It was chosen dilutions and sowing techniques adequate for the exposition at the cellular and bacterial crops beam. (Author)

  12. The JHP 200-MeV proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takao [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    A 200-MeV proton linear accelerator for the Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) has been designed. It consists of a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole linac (RFQ), a 50-MeV drift tube linac (DTL) and a 200-MeV separated-type drift tube linac (SDTL). A frequency of 324 MHz has been chosen for all of the rf structures. A peak current of 30 mA (H{sup -} ions) of 400 {mu}sec pulse duration will be accelerated at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. A future upgrade plan up to 400 MeV is also presented, in which annular-coupled structures (ACS) of 972 MHz are used in an energy range of above 150 or 200 MeV. One of the design features is its high performance for a beam-loss problem during acceleration. It can be achieved by separating the transition point in the transverse motion from that of the longitudinal motion. The transverse transition at a rather low-energy range decreases the effects of space-charge, while the longitudinal transition at a rather high-energy range decreases the effects of nonlinear problems related to acceleration in the ACS. Coupled envelope equations and equipartitioning theory are used for the focusing design. The adoption of the SDTL structure improves both the effective shunt impedance and difficulties in fabricating drift tubes with focusing magnets. An accurate beam-simulation code on a parallel supercomputer was used for confirming any beam-loss problem during acceleration. (author)

  13. Static Var Compensator for CERN's Proton Synchrotron Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kahle, K

    2004-01-01

    The following paper summarises the design studies for a new 85Mvar 18kV Static Var Compensator (SVC) for CERN’s Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerator. Currently, the PS is supplied using a rotating motor-generator set in order to decouple the pulsating load from the electrical network. A study is undertaken to investigate the replacement of this rotating machine by an SVC. The proposed solution comprises a 85Mvar Thyristor Controlled Reactor and seven harmonic filters with a total power of 75Mvar. The paper gives a detailed description of the project background, system design and control strategy. Finally, the results of the computer studies are presented, showing the expected dynamic performance of the SVC.

  14. Protons energy loss for laser fusion driven ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The anomalous generation of plasma blocks by interaction of petawatt-picosecond laser pulses permits side-on ignition of uncompressed solid fusion fuel following an improved application of the hydrodynamic Chu-model for deuterium-tritium. The new possibility of side-on laser ignition depends on accelerated ions and produced ions beams of high energy particles by the nonlinear ponderomotive force of the laser pulse in the plasma block, a re-evolution of the early hydrodynamic analysis for ignition of inertial fusion by including inhibition factor, collective effect of stopping power of alpha particles and the energy loss rate reabsorb to plasma by the protons of plasma block being reduced by about a factor 40.

  15. New frontier of laser particle acceleration: driving protons to 80 MeV by radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I Jong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Choi, Il Woo; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2014-01-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been considered a challenging task in laser particle acceleration. Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration has attracted considerable interests due to its underlying physics and potential for applications such as high-energy density physics, ultrafast radiography, and cancer therapy. Among critical issues to overcome the biggest challenge is to produce energetic protons using an efficient acceleration mechanism. The proton acceleration by radiation pressure is considerably more efficient than the conventional target normal sheath acceleration driven by expanding hot electrons. Here we report the generation of 80-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 x 1020 W/cm2 to ultrathin targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and 3D-PIC simulations. We expect this fast energy scalin...

  16. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accompli...

  17. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  18. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  19. Laser-driven proton acceleration and applications: recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.A.; Romagnani, L.; Kar, S.; Quinn, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Wilson, P.A. [Belfast Queens Univ., School of Mathematics and Physics, Northern, Ireland (United Kingdom); Toncian, T.; Pipahl, A.; Jung, R.; Amin, M.; Willi, O. [Dusseldorf Heinrich Heine Univ., Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics (Germany); Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E. [LULI, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Univ., 91 - Palaiseau (France); Clarke, R.J.; Notley, M.; Mora, P.; Grismayer, T. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot (United Kingdom); D' Humieres, E. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Sentoku, Y. [University of Nevada, Physics Dept., Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The acceleration of high-energy ion beams following the interaction of short (t < 1 ps) and intense (I{lambda}{sup 2} > 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}*{mu}m{sup 2}) laser pulses with solid targets is a field of research currently attracting high interest in the scientific community, due to some of the unique properties of these ion sources, promising routes toward the optimization of their energy content, and a number of possible, innovative applications in the scientific, technological and medical areas. Work on the characterization and development of these sources has progressed enormously over the past few years, thanks to the contribution of many groups worldwide. This paper will report some recent results, obtained in experiments carried out at the RAL and LULI laboratories, in which we investigated the ion acceleration mechanism, developed a technique to control the ion beam divergence and energy spectrum, and applied a proton radiography technique to investigate electric and magnetic field production following laser-matter interaction. (authors)

  20. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy

  1. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P

    2006-01-01

    Published survival data for V79 cells irradiated by monoenergetic protons, helium-3, carbon, and oxygen ions and for CHO cells irradiated by carbon ions have been analyzed using the probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation. Three different classes of DNA damages formed by traversing particles have been distinguished, namely severe single-track damages which might lead to cell inactivation directly, less severe damages where cell inactivation is caused by their combinations, and damages of negligible severity that can be repaired easily. Probabilities of single ions to form these damages have been assessed in dependence on their linear energy transfer (LET) values. Damage induction probabilities increase with atomic number and LET. While combined damages play crucial role at lower LET values, single-track damages dominate in high-LET regions. The yields of single-track lethal damages for protons have been compared with the Monte Carlo estimates of complex DNA lesions, indicating that lethal events co...

  2. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; I Marshall, Thomas; Perozziello, Francesca M; Manti, Lorenzo; Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona; McMahon, Stephen J; Kavanagh, Joy N.; Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco; Prise, Kevin M.; SCHETTINO, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    iological optimization of proton therapy critically depends on detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the Bragg curve. The clinically accepted RBE value of 1.1 is an oversimplification, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak. We observed significant cell killing RBE variations dependent on beam modulation, intrinsic radiosensitivity, and LET in agreement with the LEM predicted valu...

  3. Screening Approach to the Activation of Soil and Contamination of Groundwater at Linear Proton Accelerator Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, Thomas

    The activation of soil and the contamination of groundwater at proton accelerator sites with the radionuclides 3H and 22Na are estimated with a Monte-Carlo calculation and a conservative soil- and ground water model. The obtained radionuclide concentrations show that the underground environment of future accelerators must be adequately protected against a migration of activation products. This study is of particular importance for the proton driver accelerator in the planned EURISOL facility.

  4. Nuclear design aspect of the Korean high intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Song, Tae-Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusong, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    A plan to construct a high current proton accelerator has been proposed by KAERI. We are presenting the required nuclear design to support the project as well as a brief overview of the proposed proton accelerator. The target and core design is highlighted to show feasibility of incineration of minor actinides from the spent fuel of light water reactors. Radiation shielding and activation analyses are also important for the design and the license of the accelerator. (author)

  5. The accelerator driven transmutation technology - A study on the linac for proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bum Soo; Joh, Ki Hun; Kim, Sung Myun; Park, Heung Gyu; Park, Jong Pil; Kang, Bo Sun [Samsung Heavy Industries, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the manufacturing technology of proton accelerators, and to find the adequate manufacturing technique for construction of such proton accelerators. Review of manufacturing technology for RFQ has been carried out - RFQ machine of other country has been reviewed on the aspects of manufacturing, - Machining of engineering mock-up has been performed based on the designed data, - Brazing technology for RFQ, and brazing test and analysis of Copper specimen. Adequate brazing conditions for RFQ - 1st brazing (vane to section, 950 deg C), Filler metal composition: Cu-20Sn, Brazing conditions: peak temp. 950 deg C (holding time 20min, rising rate 7 deg C/min), Atmosphere: H{sub 2}. - 2nd brazing (section to section, 850 deg C or less), Filler metal: Cu-Sn4%-P7.5%-Ag6%, Brazing conditions: peak temp. 750 deg C (holding time 20min, rising rate 7 deg C/min), Atmosphere: H{sub 2}. 8 refs., (author). 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 1012 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  7. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  8. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Olsen, V.K. Berglyd; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  9. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  10. Dosimetry in radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Silari, M; Theis, C

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry at high-energy proton accelerators is a difficult task because of the complexity of the stray radiation field. A good knowledge of this mixed radiation field is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for routine area monitoring and to choose the personal dosimeter legally required for estimating the effective dose received by individuals. At the same time, the response function of the detectors to the mixed field must be thoroughly understood. A proper calibration of a device, which may involve a complex series of measurements in various reference fields, is needed. Monte Carlo simulations provide a complementary – and sometimes the principal – mean of determining the response function. The ambient dose equivalent rates during operation range from a few hundreds of μSv per year to a few mSv per year. To measure such rates one needs detectors of high sensitivity and/or capable of integrating over long periods. The main challenge...

  11. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, W. P. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, B. W., E-mail: li-baiwen@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qiao, B. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  12. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  13. 160 MeV laser-accelerated protons from CH2 nano-targets for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Hegelich, B M; Albright, B J; Cheung, M; Dromey, B; Gautier, D C; Hamilton, C; Letzring, S; Munchhausen, R; Palaniyappan, S; Shah, R; Wu, H -C; Yin, L; Fernández, J C

    2013-01-01

    Proton (and ion) cancer therapy has proven to be an extremely effective even supe-rior method of treatment for some tumors 1-4. A major problem, however, lies in the cost of the particle accelerator facilities; high procurement costs severely limit the availability of ion radiation therapy, with only ~26 centers worldwide. Moreover, high operating costs often prevent economic operation without state subsidies and have led to a shutdown of existing facilities 5,6. Laser-accelerated proton and ion beams have long been thought of as a way out of this dilemma, with the potential to provide the required ion beams at lower cost and smaller facility footprint 7-14. The biggest challenge has been the achievement of sufficient particle energy for therapy, in the 150-250 MeV range for protons 15,16. For the last decade, the maximum exper-imentally observed energy of laser-accelerated protons has remained at ~60 MeV 17. Here we the experimental demonstration of laser-accelerated protons to energies exceeding 150 MeV, re...

  14. Influence of Laser Prepulse in Ultra-short Laser-Driven Proton Acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Influence of laser prepulse in ultra-short laser-driven proton acceleration was investigated by the differences in spatial distribution and energy spectrum between different foil-targets. The laser system produced pulses having energies of up to

  15. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  16. The R/D of high power proton accelerator technology in China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guan Xialing

    2002-12-01

    In China, a multipurpose verification system as a first phase of our ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton LINAC) and a swimming pool light water subcritical reactor. In this paper the activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described.

  17. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  18. Can supernova remnants accelerate protons up to PeV energies?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S; Zandanel, F

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be the sources of galactic cosmic rays. Within this framework, diffusive shock acceleration must operate in these objects and accelerate protons all the way up to PeV energies. To do so, significant amplification of the magnetic field at the shock is required. The goal of this paper is to investigate the capability of supernova remnants to accelerate PeV protons. We present analytic estimates of the maximum energy of accelerated protons under various assumptions about the field amplification at supernova remnant shocks. We show that acceleration up to PeV energies is problematic in all the scenarios considered. This implies that either a different (more efficient) mechanism of field amplification operates at supernova remnant shocks, or that the sources of galactic cosmic rays in the PeV energy range should be searched somewhere else.

  19. Investigation of longitudinal proton acceleration in exploded targets irradiated by intense short-pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Lévy, A. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC, Paris 06, CNRS, INSP, UMR 7588, F-75005, Paris (France); D' Humières, E.; Beaucourt, C.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, UMR 5107, F-33400 Talence (France); Glesser, M. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Albertazzi, B. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, UMR 5107, F-33400 Talence (France); Chen, S. N.; Dervieux, V.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pépin, H. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Antici, P. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate protons in the forward direction to high energies is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solids. Simulations have revealed that the acceleration process depends on the density gradients of the plasma target. Indeed, under certain conditions, the most energetic protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We report here the results of a recent experiment dedicated to the study of longitudinal ion acceleration in partially exploded foils using a high intensity (∼5 × 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) picosecond laser pulse. We show that protons accelerated using targets having moderate front and rear plasma gradients (up to ∼8 μm gradient length) exhibit similar maximum proton energy and number compared to proton beams that are produced, in similar laser conditions, from solid targets, in the well-known target normal sheath acceleration regime. Particle-In-Cell simulations, performed in the same conditions as the experiment and consistent with the measurements, allow laying a path for further improvement of this acceleration scheme.

  20. Transporting laser-accelerated protons by a pulsed solenoid to a CH- DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates the transporting and focusing of laser-accelerated protons at energies of ten to several tens of MeV, by a pulsed magnetic solenoid with a field gradient up to 18 T. The unique features of the protons distribution like extremely small emittances and high yield of the order of 1013 protons per shot, make them attractive for study. With respect to transit energies further acceleration by matching into rf linac seems adequate. The bunch injection into a proposed CH- structure is under investigation at IAP Frankfurt. Options and simulation tools are presented.

  1. Programmable Power Supply for AC Switching Magnet of Proton Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Seong-Hun; Kang Heung Sik; Lee, Chi-Hwan; Lee, Hong-Gi; Park, Ki-Hyeon; Ryu, Chun-Kil; Sik Han, Hong; Suck Suh, Hyung

    2005-01-01

    The 100-MeV PEFP proton linac has two proton beam extraction lines for user' experiment. Each extraction line has 5 beamlines and has 5 Hz operating frequency. An AC switching magnet is used to distribute the proton beam to the 5 beamlines, An AC switching magnet is powered by PWM-controlled bipolar switching-mode converters. This converter is designed to operate at ±350A, 5 Hz programmable step output. The power supply is employed IGBT module and has controlled by a DSP (Digital Signal Process). This paper describes the design and test results of the power supply.

  2. Technical development of high intensity proton accelerators in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and Technology Agency decided 'Options making extra gains of actinides and fission products (OMEGA)' and to promote the related researches. Also in JAERI, the research on the group separation method for separating transuranic elements, strontium and cesium from high level radioactive wastes has been carried out since the beginning of 1970s. Also the concept of the fast reactors using minor actinide mixture fuel is being established, and the accelerator annihilation treatment utilizing the nuclear spallation reaction by high energy protons has been examined. In this report, from the viewpoint of the application of accelerators to atomic energy field, the annihilation treatment method by the nuclear spallation reaction utilizing high intensity proton accelerators, the plan of the various engineering utilization of proton beam, and the development of accelerators in JAERI are described. The way of thinking on the annihilation treatment of radioactive waste, the system using fast neutrons, the way of thinking on the development of high intensity proton accelerator technology, the steps of the development, the research and development for constructing the basic technology accelerator, 2 MeV beam acceleration test, the basic technology accelerator utilization facility and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  3. A dosimetric system for quantitative cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated dosimetry and cell irradiation system (IDOCIS) with laser-accelerated proton beams was developed, characterized, calibrated and successfully used for systematic in vitro experiments. Due to the broad exponentially shaped energy spectrum, the low-energy range of the protons (<20 MeV) and the high pulse dose, the absolute dosimetry for this beam quality is challenging. Therefore, a dedicated Faraday cup is used as an energy and dose rate independent absolute dosimeter that has been calibrated consistently with three independent methods. A transmission ionization chamber providing online relative dose information is cross-calibrated against the Faraday cup. Providing both online and absolute dose information, the IDOCIS allows for quantitative dosimetric and radiobiological studies at current low-energy laser-accelerated proton beams. Finally, first dosimetric characterizations of a laser-accelerated proton beam with the IDOCIS are presented.

  4. Proton Acceleration with Double-Layer Targets in the Radiation Pressure Dominant Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hai-Yang; WANG Cheng; LIU Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Acceleration of protons by a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiating on a double-layer target is investigated by a theoretical model and particle-in-cell simulations.The target is made up of a heavy ion layer coated with a proton layer on the rear surface.The results show that when the first layer is transparent induced by the hole-boring effect, the whole proton layer is accelerated by the transmitted laser pulse to high energy with low energy spread.The quality of the proton beam generated from a double-layer target is better than that from a single-layer target.The improvement is attributed to the flat top structure of the electrostatic field caused by the electrons injected into the second layer.It is easier to control the spectrum quality by using a double-layer target rather than using a single-layer one when the radiation pressure acceleration is dominant.

  5. Hollow microspheres as targets for staged laser-driven proton acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Burza, M; Genoud, G; Persson, A; Svensson, K; Quinn, M; McKenna, P; Marklund, M; Wahlström, C -G; 10.1088/1367-2630/13/1/013030

    2011-01-01

    A coated hollow core microsphere is introduced as a novel target in ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments. In particular, it facilitates staged laser-driven proton acceleration by combining conventional target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), power recycling of hot laterally spreading electrons and staging in a very simple and cheap target geometry. During TNSA of protons from one area of the sphere surface, laterally spreading hot electrons form a charge wave. Due to the spherical geometry, this wave refocuses on the opposite side of the sphere, where an opening has been laser micromachined. This leads to a strong transient charge separation field being set up there, which can post-accelerate those TNSA protons passing through the hole at the right time. Experimentally, the feasibility of using such targets is demonstrated. A redistribution is encountered in the experimental proton energy spectra, as predicted by particle-in-cell simulations and attributed to transient fields set up by oscilla...

  6. Optimization of laser accelerated proton beams for possible applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization of transported proton beams through a pulsed solenoid in the laser proton experiment LIGHT at GSI has been studied numerically. TraceWin, SRIM and ATIMA codes were employed for this study with an initial distribution generated by MATLAB program fitted to Phelix measured data. Two individual tools have been used to produce protons beam as a later beam source: an aperture located at the solenoid focal spot as energy selection tool; and a scattering foil at a suitable position in the beam path that smoothens the simulated radial energy imprint on the beam profile. The simulation results show that the proton energy spectrum is filtered by the aperture and the radial energy correlation is smoothened.

  7. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  8. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  9. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Capelli, D.; Antici, P. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Levy, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S. [Department of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

  10. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10-11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W/cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions/light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150-500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100-220 MeV energies

  11. Capture and Control of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams: Experiment and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the ongoing studies on the possibilities for transport and RF capture of laser-accelerated proton beams in conventional accelerator structures. First results on the capture of laser-accelerated proton beams are presented, supported by Trace3D, CST particle studio and Warp simulations. Based on these results, the development of the pulsed high-field solenoid is guided by our desire to optimize the output particle number for this highly divergent beam with an exponential energy spectrum. A future experimental test stand is proposed to do studies concerning the application as a new particle source

  12. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulom...

  13. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  14. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  15. Proton-beam writing channel based on an electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapin, A. S.; Rebrov, V. A.; Kolin'ko, S. V.; Salivon, V. F.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We have described the structure of the proton-beam writing channel as a continuation of a nuclear scanning microprobe channel. The problem of the accuracy of positioning a probe by constructing a new high-frequency electrostatic scanning system has been solved. Special attention has been paid to designing the probe-forming system and its various configurations have been considered. The probe-forming system that best corresponds to the conditions of the lithographic process has been found based on solving the problem of optimizing proton beam formation. A system for controlling beam scanning using multifunctional module of integrated programmable logic systems has been developed.

  16. Monoenergetic neutrino beam for long baseline experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an electron capture process by a nucleus, emitted neutrinos are monoenergetic. We study a long baseline experiment with such a completely monoenergetic neutrino beam. This talk is based on Refs. 1 and 2. (author)

  17. Reforming perpendicular shocks in the presence of pickup protons: initial ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Lee

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Acceleration processes associated with the heliospheric termination shock may provide a source of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs. Recent kinetic simulations of supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shocks have yielded time varying shock solutions that cyclically reform on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends upon the plasma parameters which, for the termination shock, are ill defined but believed to be within the time-dependent regime. Here we present results from high phase space resolution particle-in-cell simulations for a three-component plasma (solar wind protons, electrons and pickup protons appropriate for the termination shock. We find reforming shock solutions which generate suprathermal populations for both proton components, with the pickup ions reaching energies of order twenty times the solar wind inflow energy. This suprathermal "injection" population is required as a seed population for subsequent acceleration at the shock which can in turn generate ACRs.

  18. Physics prospects with High Intensity Proton Accelerator (J-PARC) at Tokai

    CERN Document Server

    Nagamiya, S

    2003-01-01

    From Japanese fiscal year JFY01, which started on April 1, 2001, a new accelerator project to provide high-intensity proton beams proceeded into its construction phase. This project, which is now called the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) project, is conducted under a cooperation of two institutions, KEK and JAERI. We set a goal to achieve 1 MW proton beams at 3 GeV and 0.75 MW beams at. The project will be completed within six years, with the anticipated first beams in the spring of 2007. In this article I describe a) the project itself, b) sciences to be pursued at this new accelerator complex and c) the present status and future plans of the project. (5 refs).

  19. Nonlinear laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-10-01

    A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator (PDPWA) using a CO2 laser pulse is presented. The proton beam's envelope equation is used to analytically compare the laser seed with previously suggested seeding methods. Simulations demonstrate that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam with a realistic longitudinal density profile leads to peak accelerating gradients that are comparable to those produced by other seeding methods. The nonlinear BNS damping of the MI is analytically shown to lead to instability saturation. The envelope equation is Fourier expanded into a set of coupled, nonlinear equations that describe the evolution of the beam's Fourier components. Peak beam density and peak accelerating gradient during the beam's evolution are estimated.

  20. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  1. Updated Report Acceleration of Polarized Protons to 120-150 GeV/c at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Courant, E D; Leonova, M A; Lin, A M T; Liu, J; Lorenzon, W; Nees, D A; Raymond, R S; Sivers, D W; Wong, V K; Kourbanis, I; Derbenev, Ya S; Morozov, V S; Crabb, D G; Reimer, P E; O'Fallon, J R; Fidecaro, G; Fidecaro, M; Hinterberger, F; Troshin, S M; Ukhanov, M N; Kondratenko, A M; van Oers, W T H

    2011-01-01

    The SPIN@FERMI collaboration has updated its 1991-95 Reports on the acceleration of polarized protons in Fermilab's Main Injector, which was commissioned by Fermilab. This Updated Report summarizes some updated Physics Goals for a 120-150 GeV/c polarized proton beam. It also contains an updated discussion of the Modifications and Hardware needed for a polarized beam in the Main Injector, along with an updated Schedule and Budget.

  2. The R&D Works on the High Intensity Proton Linear Accelerator for Nuclear Waste Transmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, N; Ino, H; Kawai, M; Kusano, J; Mizumoto, M; Murata, H; Oguri, H; Okumura, Y; Touchi, Y

    1996-01-01

    The R&D works of the 10MeV/10mA proton linear accelerator have been carried out for last four years. A high brightness hydrogen ion source, an RFQ and an RF power source have been developed and examined to achieve 2MeV proton beam. A DTL hot test model was also fabricated and a high power test has been carried out. The present status of the R&D works are described in this paper.

  3. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  4. Collective acceleration of protons by the plasma waves in a counterstreaming electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel advanced accelerator is proposed. The counterstreaming electron beam accelerator relies on the same physical mechanism as that of the plasma accelerator but replaces the stationary plasma in the plasma accelerator by a magnetized relativistic electron beam, drifting antiparallel to the driving source and the driven particles, as the wave supporting medium. The plasma wave in a counterstreaming electron beam can be excited either by a density-ramped driving electron beam or by properly beating two laser beams. The fundamental advantages of the counterstreaming electron beam accelerator over the plasma accelerator are a longer and tunable plasma wavelength, a longer pump depletion length or a larger transformer ratio, and easier pulse shaping for the driving source and the driven beam. Thus the energy gain of the driven particles can be greatly enhanced whereas the trapping threshold can be dramatically reduced so as to admit the possibility for proton acceleration

  5. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  6. Effect of Plasma Density on Proton Acceleration in a Rectangular Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hitendra K. Malik

    2004-01-01

    Analytical studies are made for the proton acceleration during its motion in the fields of the fundamental mode excited by a high-intensity microwave in a rectangular waveguide, when the proton is injected along the propagating direction of the mode. The trajectory of the proton is calculated and the expressions are obtained for the energy gain and acceleration gradient together with the effects of plasma density, microwave frequency and waveguide width. Energy gain of 181 keV is attained by a 50 keV proton in a 0.015m ×0.020 m evacuated waveguide when 0.5times 10[10] W/m2 microwave intensity is used. However, this gain increases to 1387 keV when the waveguide is filled with a plasma having a density of 1.0 × 10 19 m-3. Higher acceleration gradients are achieved when the proton is injected with a higher initial energy and also when the microwave intensity increases. The effects of the microwave frequency and width of the waveguide are found to decrease the acceleration gradient.

  7. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemiére, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Lui, R; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Öttl, S; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seyffert, A S; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; Valerius, K; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Żywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few Peta-electronvolts (1 PeV =$10^\\mathbf{15}$ electron volts). This implies our Galaxy contains PeV accelerators (PeVatrons), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter non-trivial difficulties at exactly these energies. Tens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particle to tens of TeV (1 TeV =$10^\\mathbf{12}$ electron volts) energies were inferred from recent gamma-ray observations. None of the currently known accelerators, however, not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays, have shown the characteristic tracers of PeV particles: power-law spectra of gamma rays extending without a cutoff or a spectral break to tens of TeV. Here we report deep gamma-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the Galactic Centre regions, which show the expected tracer of the presence of PeV particles within the central 10~parsec of the Galaxy. We argue that the ...

  8. Proton acceleration from high-intensity laser interactions with thin foil targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of energetic proton production resulting from the interaction of high-intensity laser pulses with foil targets are described. Through the use of layered foil targets and heating of the target material we are able to distinguish three distinct populations of protons. One high energy population is associated with a proton source near the front surface of the target and is observed to be emitted with a characteristic ring structure. A source of typically lower energy, lower divergence protons originates from the rear surface of the target. Finally, a qualitatively separate source of even lower energy protons and ions is observed with a large divergence. Acceleration mechanisms for these separate sources are discussed

  9. Proposal of experimental facilities for studies of nuclear data and radiation engineering in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, M; Nagai, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2003-01-01

    A proposal is given on the facilities and experiments in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) relevant to the nuclear data and radiation engineering, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear transmutation, accelerator technology and space technology and so on. (3 refs).

  10. Some aspects of radiation protection near high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Tuyn, Jan Willem Nicolaas

    1977-01-01

    The CERN site near Geneva borders Satigny and Meyrin in Switzerland and Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Prevention in France. The 600 MeV proton synchrocyclotron (SC) has been in operation since 1957, the 28 GeV proton synchrotron (PS) since 1960, and the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) since 1971. A fourth large accelerator, the 400 GeV super proton synchrotron (SPS), will soon be in service. The internal and external radiation protection problems caused by these machines, together with the solutions, are reviewed in the light of experience. (5 refs).

  11. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  12. Radiological safety aspects of the operation of proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators are finding increased application in both the fundamental and applied sciences and in industry around the world. Positive ion accelerators are being applied in a host of fields, including radiation damage studies, induced activation and dating measurements, radiography, radiotherapy and fusion research. Because these devices can be potent sources of neutrons, it is important that information concerning their safe operation be widely available. This report is conceived as a source book providing authoritative guidance in radioprotection from an important category of radiation sources. It thus supplements other manuals of the IAEA related to the planning and implementation of radiation protection programmes. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  14. Development of an explosive detection system using a proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Y S; Lee, J H

    2002-01-01

    The technology of explosive detection using radiation had been studied. On the basis that explosives has nitrogen atoms, the proof of principle experiments had been performed with the gamma ray which interacts with nitrogen atoms. The production of the gamma ray had been confirmed and, the scattered gamma ray from nitrogen had been observed in the experiment at Seoul National University. According to the experimental results, the specifications of the accelerator had been determined, 1.8MeV and 10mA. For a long-life time, a TCP type ion source using rf power have been developed. A tandem type accelerator had been chosen, and the important technologies, accelerating column and high voltage power supply, had been developed. On the basis of these technologies, the 1MV tandem accelerator had been constructed. The production process of C-13 film had been developed, and a 20kW water-cooled target had been fabricated. For gamma ray detection, a array detector with 9 BGO had been constructed, and the SW had been deve...

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  16. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  17. High quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangmei; Lotov, Konstantin V; Sosedkin, Alexander P; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have numerically demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the intrinsic strong and radially varying transverse fields, the beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we propose a new accelerating region which is free from both plasma electrons and ions in the proton-driven hollow plasma channel. The high quality electron beam is therefore generated with this scheme without transverse plasma fields. The results show that a 1 TeV proton driver can propagate and accelerate an electron beam to 0.62 TeV with correlated energy spread of 4.6% and well-preserved normalized emittance below 2.4 mm mrad in a single hollow plasma channel of 700 m. More importantly, the beam loading tolerance is significantly improved compared to the uniform plasma case. This high quality an...

  18. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  19. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  20. Feasibility Study on the Development of Proton Accelerator II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Ki Woong [Korea Accelerator and Plasma Research Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    Present status and research trend of KOMAC (Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex)-grade accelerator construction in Europe, Japan, America, and Russia are surveyed in view of basic nuclear technology study in 2nd feasibility study on the KOMAC. KOMAC can be applied to study the increasing of nuclear reactor safety, the Proto-plant of transmutation technology for low cost nuclear fuel, the nuclear data production, the life science, mechanical dynamics, the structure probe, the radioisotope production, the cancer therapy, and the defense industry etc. And also KOMAC structure selection is investigated in point of utilization aims referred from various proposal of LANL and ORNL in USA, Neutron Science Research program in Japan, Energy Amplifier in Europe, and Institute of Theoretical and Experimental physics in Russia. As a result of meeting, study team is approached to the conclusion the KOMAC should be constructed to get the nuclear transmutation technology and the world leadership in future nuclear industry. Member`s opinion of study team agreed new nuclear technology, such as Accelerator Driven Energy Amplifier will be possible to sustain a survival of human being in post 21c. 7 tabs., 10 figs. (author)

  1. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  2. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  3. Deep-penetration calculations in concrete and iron for shielding of proton therapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun, E-mail: rjsheu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Uei-Tyng [Institute of Radiological Sciences, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880 Sec. 2, Chien-Kuo Road, Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-06-01

    Proton accelerators in the energy range of approximately 200 MeV have become increasingly popular for cancer treatment in recent years. These proton therapy facilities usually involve bulky concrete or iron in their shielding design or accelerator structure. Simple shielding data, such as source terms or attenuation lengths for various proton energies and materials are useful in designing accelerator shielding. Understanding the appropriateness or uncertainties associated with these data, which are largely generated from Monte Carlo simulations, is critical to the quality of a shielding design. This study demonstrated and investigated the problems of deep-penetration calculations on the estimation of shielding parameters through an extensive comparison between the FLUKA and MCNPX calculations for shielding against a 200-MeV proton beam hitting an iron target. Simulations of double-differential neutron production from proton bombardment were validated by comparison with experimental data. For the concrete shielding, the FLUKA calculated depth-dose distributions were consistent with the MCNPX results, except for some discrepancies in backward directions. However, for the iron shielding, if FLUKA is used inappropriately then overestimation of neutron attenuation can be expected as shown by this work because of the multigroup treatment for low-energy neutrons in FLUKA. Two neutron energy group structures, three degrees of self-shielding correction, and two iron compositions were considered in this study. Significant variation of the resulting attenuation lengths indicated the importance of problem-dependent multigroup cross sections and proper modeling of iron composition in deep-penetration calculations.

  4. Laser-driven proton beams: Acceleration mechanism, beam optimization, and radiographic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Kar, S.; Wilson, P.A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast (United Kingdom); Cecchetti, C.A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast (United Kingdom); Also with the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, IPCF-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Toncian, T.; Pipahl, A.; Amin, M.; Jung, R.; Osterholz, J.; Willi, O. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf (Germany); Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses LULI, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Antici, P. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses LULI, UMR 7605 CNRS CEA Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Frascati National Laboratories INFN, Frascati (Italy); Nazarov, W. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.J.; Notley, M.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX Didcot (United Kingdom); Mora, P.; Grismayer, T. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Schurtz, G. [Centre d' Etudes des Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 University Bordeaux I-CNRS-CEA, 33 - Talence (France); Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita -La Sapienza-, Rome (Italy); Sentoku, Y.; D' Humieres, E. [Physics Department, MS 220, University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2008-08-15

    This paper reviews recent experimental activity in the area of optimization, control, and application of laser-accelerated proton beams, carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses 100 TW facility in France. In particular, experiments have investigated the role of the scale length at the rear of the plasma in reducing target-normal-sheath-acceleration acceleration efficiency. Results match with recent theoretical predictions and provide information in view of the feasibility of proton fast-ignition applications. Experiments aiming to control the divergence of the proton beams have investigated the use of a laser-triggered micro-lens, which employs laser-driven transient electric fields in cylindrical geometry, enabling to focus the emitted protons and select monochromatic beamlets; out of the broad spectrum beam. This approach could be advantageous in view of a variety of applications. The use of laser-driven protons as a particle probe for transient field detection has been developed and applied to a number of experimental conditions. Recent work in this area has focused on the detection of large-scale self-generated magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas and the investigation of fields associated to the propagation of relativistic electron both on the surface and in the bulk of targets irradiated by high-power laser pulses. (authors)

  5. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG)accelerators and their medical application in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy uses particle beams to irradiate and kill cancer tumors while sparing healthy tissues. Bragg peak shape of the proton energy loss in matter allows a ballistic improvement of the dose deposition compared with X rays. Thus, the irradiated volume can be precisely adjusted to the tumour. This thesis, in the frame of the RACCAM project, aims to the study and the design of a proton therapy installation based on a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator in order to build a spiral sector FFAG magnet for validation. First, we present proton therapy to define medical specifications leading to the technical specifications of a proton therapy installation. Secondly, we introduce FFAG accelerators through their past and on-going projects which are on their way around the world before developing the beam dynamic theories in the case of invariant focusing optics (scaling FFAG). We describe modelling and simulation tools developed to study the dynamics in a spiral scaling FFAG accelerator. Then we explain the spiral optic parameter search which has leaded to the construction of a magnet prototype. Finally, we describe the RACCAM project proton therapy installation starting from the injector cyclotron and ending with the extraction system. (author)

  6. Isochoric heating of matter by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Benuzzi, A.; Brambrink, E.; Esposito, M.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Audebert, P. [Paris-6 Univ., Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Antici, P.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A. [Roma Univ. La Sapienza, Dipt. di Energetica ed INFM (Italy); Schreiber, J. [Munchen Ludwig-Maximilan-Univ., Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik and Physik Dept., Garching (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    We describe an experiment on isochoric heating of matter by intense laser-accelerated protons. The experiment was performed using the LULI 100 TW facility with 15-20 J on target energy and > 10{sup 19} W.cm{sup -2} maximum focused intensity. Focusing the laser on a 10 micron thick Au foil, we accelerated forward a laminar proton beam with a maximum energy of 16 MeV. This proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a variable vacuum gap. The heating was diagnosed by 1- and 2-dimensional time-resolved measurements of the optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface. Detailed results as a function of the Z and the thickness of the secondary target as well as analysis, including a full modelling of the target heating with a 2-dimensional hydro-code (DUED) coupled to a proton energy deposition code, were obtained. We have also studied the efficiency of heating as a function of the primary target topology, i.e. either flat, which results in a diverging proton beam, or curved, which has the ability of focusing partly the proton beam. (authors)

  7. VHEeP: A very high energy electron-proton collider based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Based on current CERN infrastructure, an electron-proton collider is proposed at a centre-of-mass energy of about 9 TeV. A 7 TeV LHC bunch is used as the proton driver to create a plasma wakefield which then accelerates electrons to 3 TeV, these then colliding with the other 7 TeV LHC proton beam. The basic parameters of the collider are presented, which although of very high energy, has integrated luminosities of the order of 1 pb$^{-1}$/year. For such a collider, with a centre-of-mass energy 30 times greater than HERA, parton momentum fractions, $x$, down to about $10^{-8}$ are accessible for $Q^2$ of 1 GeV$^2$ and could lead to effects of saturation or some other breakdown of DGLAP being observed. The total photon-proton cross section can be measured up to very high energies and also at different energies as the possibility of varying the electron beam energy is assumed; this could have synergy with cosmic-ray physics. Other physics which can be pursued at such a collider are contact interaction searches, ...

  8. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential.

  9. Special diagnostic methods and beam loss control on high intensity proton synchrotrons and storage rings Circular proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Warsop, C M

    2002-01-01

    Two topics concerning high intensity, medium energy, circular proton accelerators have been studied: specialist diagnostics and beam loss control. The use of specially configured, low intensity diagnostic beams to help measure, understand and control high intensity beams is described. The ideas are developed and demonstrated on the ISIS 800 MeV, high intensity proton synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. It is shown that these techniques make much new and valuable information available, which is particularly useful in achieving the precise beam optimisation required for low and controlled losses. Beam loss control in the proposed European Spallation Source (ESS) accumulator rings is studied. The expected losses are summarised, and a design for the beam collimation system presented. A new code for the simulation of loss control is outlined, and then used to test the collimation system under most foreseeable conditions. It is expected that the required loss control levels will be achievab...

  10. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  11. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T. [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L. [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, CR-11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Velyhan, A. [Institute of Physics v.v.i. ASCR, Na Slovance 1999, Prague (Czech Republic); Macchi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, research unit “Adriano Gozzini,” Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Sgattoni, A. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, research unit “Adriano Gozzini,” Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Vassura, L. [LULI, UMR7605, CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Paris 6, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Roma (Italy); Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, research unit “Adriano Gozzini,” Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  12. Reliability and availability of high power proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has become increasingly important to address the issues of operational reliability and availability of an accelerator complex early in its design and construction phases. In this context, reliability addresses the mean time between failures and the failure rate, and availability takes into account the failure rate as well as the length of time required to repair the failure. Methods to reduce failure rates include reduction of the number of components and over-design of certain key components. Reduction of the on-line repair time can be achieved by judiciously designed hardware, quick-service spare systems, and redundancy. In addition, provisions for easy inspection and maintainability are important for both reduction of the failure rate as well as reduction of the time to repair. The radiation safety exposure principle of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is easier to comply with when easy inspection capability and easy maintainability are incorporated into the design. Discussions of past experience in improving accelerator availability, some recent developments, and potential R and D items are presented

  13. RF properties of 700 MHz, = 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current proton acceleration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Roy; J Mondal; K C Mittal

    2008-12-01

    BARC is developing a technology for the accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven subcritical system project. We have studied RF properties of 700 MHz, = 0.42 single cell elliptical cavity for possible use in high current proton acceleration. The cavity shape optimization studies have been done using SUPERFISH code. A calculation has been done to find out the velocity range over which this cavity can accelerate protons efficiently and to select the number of cells/cavity. The cavity's peak electric and magnetic fields, power dissipation c, quality factor and effective shunt impedance 2 were calculated for various cavity dimensions using these codes. Based on these analyses a list of design parameters for the inner cell of the cavity has been suggested for possible use in high current proton accelerator.

  14. Tree-code simulations of proton acceleration from laser-irradiated wire targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments using Terawatt lasers to accelerate protons deposited on thin wire targets are modeled with a new type of gridless plasma simulation code. In contrast to conventional mesh-based methods, this technique offers a unique capability in emulating the complex geometry and open-ended boundary conditions characteristic of contemporary experimental conditions. Comparisons of ion acceleration are made between the tree code and standard particle-in-cell simulations for a typical collisionless 'hole boring' scenario in slab geometry. The utility of the gridless approach is emphasized by a series of simulations in 'wire' geometry, in which electrons are permitted to circulate around the target at arbitrary distances from the focal region. The simulations reveal a number of features in common with recent experimental observations, including a disclike emission pattern of the MeV protons accelerated away from the wire

  15. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  16. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  17. Non scaling fixed field gradient accelerator design for proton and carbon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerators became again a subject of great interest in many accelerator physics applications, after more than fifty years of their first appearance. The original FFAG's are the 'scaling' design where particle orbits during acceleration scale with momentum. In Japan a number of scaling FFAG's have been built, or are under construction. The original designs are proposed and used in many applications: proton acceleration in medical field for cancer therapy, electron acceleration for the low (food radiation, electron demonstration ring) and high energies (future e-RHIC 10 GeV), acceleration of muons (the 'PRISM'-project in Japan), proton acceleration for the AGS upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory, etc. There are many advantages of the scaling FFAG with respect to the today common use of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, or linear accelerators-linacs: the magnetic field is fixed, possibility of high repetition rate. Disadvantages of the scaling FFAG are the large required aperture and large circumference. This is due to the scaling law between the orbit and momentum and the relatively large opposite bending field requirement. This proposed non-scaling design had been extensively investigated in many respects. A European proposal to build a non-scaling FFAG electron demonstration ring is in progress. Recent international CYCLOTRON conference had dedicated time for the update on the FFAG acceleration. The non-scaling FFAG's should dramatically reduce required aperture and circumferences. If the fixed magnetic field produces the linear gradient, there is a tune variation during fast acceleration and resonances are a crossed. The small dispersion function and strong focusing in this design reduces the aperture size for almost an order of magnitude with respect to standard scaling FFAG design. We present one of the possible applications of the non-scaling proton and carbon cancer therapy FFAG accelerator. The cancer proton therapy

  18. Reduce proton energy spread by target ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuan; Chen, Jiaer; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    It's shown that, with strong target ablation monoenergetic protons along the laser direction is available during the laser aluminum foil interaction, which is different from the classic TNSA theory. When the laser pre-pulse is too strong that the whole target is vaporized, the energetic electrons generated in the gas preplasma will play an important role for the ion acceleration because the sheath field will not be available. These electrons beam, which is highly directional, will setup triangle envelope acceleration field along the laser direction at the target rear, reducing the ion energy spread.

  19. Scaling of TNSA-accelerated proton beams with laser energy and focal spot size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obst, Lieselotte; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Zeil, Karl; Kraft, Stephan [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the acceleration of high energy proton pulses generated by relativistic laser-plasma interaction. The scope of this work was the systematic investigation of the scaling of the laser proton acceleration process in the ultra-short pulse regime in order to identify feasible routes towards the potential medical application of this accelerator technology for the development of compact proton sources for radiation therapy. We present an experimental study of the proton beam properties under variation of the laser intensity irradiating thin foil targets. This was achieved by employing different parabolic mirrors with various focal lengths. Hence, in contrast to moving the target in and out of focus, the target was always irradiated with an optimized focal spot. By observing the back reflected light of the laser beam from the target front side, pre-plasma effects on the laser absorption could be investigated. The study was performed at the 150 TW Draco Laser facility of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf with ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses of intensities of about 8 . 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Cosmic Ray Protons Accelerated at Cosmological Shocks and Their Impact on Groups and Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, F; Kang, H; Jones, T W; Miniati, Francesco; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the production of cosmic ray (CR) protons at cosmological shocks by performing, for the first time, numerical simulations of large scale structure formation that include directly the acceleration, transport and energy losses of the high energy particles. CRs are injected at shocks according to the thermal leakage model and, thereafter, accelerated to a power-law distribution as indicated by the test particle limit of the diffusive shock acceleration theory. The evolution of the CR protons accounts for losses due to adiabatic expansion/compression, Coulomb collisions and inelastic p-p scattering. Our results suggest that CR protons produced at shocks formed in association with the process of large scale structure formation could amount to a substantial fraction of the total pressure in the intra-cluster medium. Their presence should be easily revealed by GLAST through detection of gamma-ray flux from the decay of neutral pions produced in inelastic p-p collisions of such CR protons with nuclei o...

  1. Warp simulations for capture and control of laser-accelerated proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capture of laser-accelerated proton beams accompanied by co-moving electrons via a solenoid field has been studied with particle-in-cell simulations. The main advantages of the Warp simulation suite that was used, relative to envelope or tracking codes, are the possibility of including all source parameters energy resolved, adding electrons as second species and considering the non-negligible space-charge forces and electrostatic self-fields. It was observed that the influence of the electrons is of vital importance. The magnetic effect on the electrons out balances the space-charge force. Hence, the electrons are forced onto the beam axis and attract protons. Besides the energy dependent proton density increase on axis, the change in the particle spectrum is also important for future applications. Protons are accelerated/decelerated slightly, electrons highly. 2/3 of all electrons get lost directly at the source and 27% of all protons hit the inner wall of the solenoid.

  2. Warp simulations for capture and control of laser-accelerated proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capture of laser-accelerated proton beams accompanied by co-moving electrons via a solenoid field has been studied with particle-in-cell simulations. The main advantages of the Warp simulation suite that we have used, relative to envelope or tracking codes, are the possibility of including all source parameters energy resolved, adding electrons as second species and considering the non-negligible space-charge forces and electrostatic self-fields. It was observed that the influence of the electrons is of vital importance. The magnetic effect on the electrons outbalances the space-charge force. Hence, the electrons are forced onto the beam axis and attract protons. Beside the energy dependent proton density increase on axis, the change in the particle spectrum is also important for future applications. Protons are accelerated/decelerated slightly, electrons highly. 2/3 of all electrons get lost directly at the source and 27% of all protons hit the inner wall of the solenoid.

  3. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  4. Proton acceleration with ultra-high intensity laser: study and application to isochoric heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of ultra-high intensity, ultra-short laser pulses with matter is an interesting source of energetic ions. During this work, we studied the production of energetic protons and their application to isochoric heating using kinetics and hydrodynamics code. We first considered the behavior of the maximum proton kinetic energy with the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism, in the sub-ps interaction regime, as a function of different parameters, especially the laser pulse duration. We showed that stretching the pulse duration, with a constant laser energy, led to the preheating and the expansion of the plasma slab. This expansion can be beneficial or detrimental regarding the maximum proton kinetic energy. The results we obtained helped to explain an experimental study carried out at the Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee. We then developed a semi-analytical model trying to describe the maximum proton kinetic energy that can be produced in the TNSA regime. The results we obtained can retrieve the minimum intensity, of the order of 6.1021 W/cm2, that is required to reach proton energies of 150 MeV with femtosecond, few joules laser pulses. As a final step, we were interested in the use of these proton beams for isochoric heating. We first characterized the proton distribution function produced by targets consisting in an heavy substrate with an hydrogen is deposited at the rear side. By the mean of hydrodynamics simulations, we studied the characteristic expansion time of the heated target by varying several parameters such as the heated sample distance from the proton source, the intensity and focal spot size of the laser, and the areal density of the dot. Finally, we extended the previous study to cylindrical targets and we demonstrated that it is possible to counterbalance the natural divergence of the proton beam and hence, to reach higher temperatures. (author)

  5. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinigardi, Stefano, E-mail: sinigardi@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Bolton, Paul R. [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), Umemidai 8-1-7, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2014-03-11

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15M€. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  6. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15M€. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments

  7. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  8. Employing laser-accelerated proton beams to diagnose high intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarri, G.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Quinn, K.; Norreys, P. A.; Trines, R.; Willi, O.; Fuchs, J.; McKenna, P.; Quinn, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Bulanov, S. V.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR) (Italy); School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Institut fur Laser und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaat, Dusseldorf (Germany); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and INFM, Pisa (Italy); APRC, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-09

    A review of the proton radiography technique will be presented. This technique employs laser-accelerated laminar bunches of protons to diagnose the temporal and spatial characteristic of the electric and magnetic fields generated during high-intensity laser-plasma interactions. The remarkable temporal and spatial resolution that this technique can achieve (of the order of a picosecond and a few microns respectively) candidates this technique as the preferrable one, if compared to other techniques, to probe high intensity laser-matter interactions.

  9. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  10. Enhanced laser-driven proton-acceleration from limited mass targets by high temporal contrast ultra-intense lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffechoux, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Mancic, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P. [UPMC, CNRS, Ecole Polytech, LULI, CEA, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Fourmaux, S.; Pepin, H.; Buffechoux, S. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, Quebec, (Canada); Andreev, A. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zeil, K.; Burris, T.; Cowan, T. [FZD, Rossendorf (Germany); Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Amin, M.; Willi, O. [Institut fur Laser und Plasma Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitat Dusseldorf, Universitatstrasse 1, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Gaillard, S. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tampo, A. [JAEA-KPSI-PRMC, Kizu (Japan); Antici, P. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma -La Sapienza, - Via Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Beam optimization of laser-accelerated protons is required to progress towards the development of applications, e.g. for fast ignition of fusion targets or dense plasma radiography. For this, three areas of improvement need to be pursued: increasing the maximum proton energy, enhancing the laser-to-protons conversion efficiency and reducing the beam divergence. Here we report on the reasoning which led us to envision limited size target to improve protons acceleration. We point out that pre plasma leakage from the target front side is a critical issue to allow efficient acceleration from such limited size targets and show that with very high temporal contrast laser pulses proton acceleration is improved in such targets. (authors)

  11. High Power Proton Accelerator Development at KAERI and its Vacuum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Park, Mi Young; Kim, Kui Young; Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Jun Yeon; Cho, Yong-Sub

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP), approved and launched by the Korean government in July 2002, includes a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) development and programs for its utilization and application. The main goals in the first phase of the project, spanning from 2002 to 2005, were the design of a 100 MeV proton linac and the development of a 20 MeV linac consisting of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20 MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The 50 keV injector and 3 MeV RFQ have been installed and tested, and the 20 MeV DTL is being assembled, tuned and under a beam test. At the same time, the utilization programs using the proton beam have been planned, and some are now under way. The vacuum system of the 20 MeV proton linac and its related issues, especially in operation with a high duty, are discussed in detail.

  12. Application of laser-accelerated high-energy protons for isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Benuzzi, A.; Brambrink, E.; Exposito, M.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Schreiber, J.

    2005-07-01

    We have evaluated the interest of using laser-accelerated protons to heat matter isochorically and compared it to heating by fast electrons. The experiment was performed using the two intense short pulses of the LULI 100 TW facility with 15-20 J energy and> 10- 19 W. cm-2 intensity each. One beam, focused on a 10 micron thick Au foil, generated forward a laminar proton beam with a maximum energy of 16 MeV. this proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a vacuum gap. The heating was diagnosed in three different ways: (i) by 1D and 2D time-resolved measurement of the optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface, (ii) by time-resolved interferometry of a chirped probe beam reflecting on the heated target rear-surface, (iii) by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of the secondary target using a laser produced backlighter. Detailed results as a function of the Z and the thickness of the secondary target as well as analysis, including a full modeling of the target heating with a hydro-code (MULTI) coupled to a proton energy deposition code, will be presented. We have also studied the efficiency of heating as a function of the primary target topology, i. e. either flat, which results in a diverging proton beam, or curved, which has the ability of focusing partly the proton beam. (Author)

  13. What will it take for laser driven proton accelerators to be applied to tumor therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2007-09-01

    After many years on the periphery of cancer therapy, the successes of proton and ion beams in tumor therapy are gradually receiving a higher degree of recognition. The considerable construction and acquisition costs are usually invoked to explain the slow market penetration of this favorable treatment modality. Recently, high-intensity lasers have been suggested as a potential, cost-saving alternative to cyclotrons or synchrotrons for oncology. This article will detail the technical requirements necessary for successful implementation of ion beam therapy (IBT)—the general term for proton and heavier-ion therapy. It will summarize the current state of laser acceleration of protons and will outline the very substantial developments still necessary for this technology to be successfully applied to IBT.

  14. Shock wave acceleration of protons in inhomogeneous plasma interacting with ultrashort intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecz, Zs. [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU Nkft., Szeged (Hungary); Andreev, A. [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU Nkft., Szeged (Hungary); Max-Born Institute, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The acceleration of protons, triggered by solitary waves in expanded solid targets is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The near-critical density plasma is irradiated by ultrashort high power laser pulses, which generate the solitary wave. The transformation of this soliton into a shock wave during propagation in plasma with exponentially decreasing density profile is described analytically, which allows to obtain a scaling law for the proton energy. The high quality proton bunch with small energy spread is produced by reflection from the shock-front. According to the 2D simulations, the mechanism is stable only if the laser pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic development time of the parasitic Weibel instability.

  15. Proton Acceleration and High-Energy Density Physics from Laser Foil Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Norreys, Peter A; Dangor, A E; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, M; Wei, M; Zepf, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Intense laser plasma interactions have long been shown to be a source of very energetic ions - from the first experiments in the 1970's. However, there has been a recent revival of interest in the production of protons and ions from the such plasmas - primarily from the observation of collimated beams of protons and heavier ions which were observed at the rear thin foil targets irradiated by ultra-high intensity laser pulses (such that I > 1018 W/cm2). These ion beams have unique properties which may make them suitable for a variety of applications such as for probing high density plasmas, for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion, as an ion source for subsequent acceleration stages in a particle accelerator or potentially for medical applications. Recent experimental results will be reviewed and the potential for such future applications will be highlighted.

  16. Performance of solenoids vs. quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications - for example in particle therapie or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics - requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. The scaling shows that above a few MeV a solenoid needs to be pulsed or super-conducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remai...

  17. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  18. Core characteristics on a hybrid type fast reactor system combined with proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowata, Yasuki; Otsubo, Akira [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-06-01

    In our study on a hybrid fast reactor system, we have investigated it from the view point of transmutation ability of trans-uranium (TRU) nuclide making the most effective use of special features (controllability, hard neutron spectrum) of the system. It is proved that a proton beam is superior in generation of neutrons compared with an electron beam. Therefore a proton accelerator using spallation reaction with a target nucleus has an advantage to transmutation of TRU than an electron one. A fast reactor is expected to primarily have a merit that the reactor can be operated for a long term without employment of highly enriched plutonium fuel by using external neutron source such as the proton accelerator. Namely, the system has a desirable characteristic of being possible to self-sustained fissile plutonium. Consequently in the present report, core characteristics of the system were roughly studied by analyses using 2D-BURN code. The possibility of self-sustained fuel was investigated from the burnup and neutronic calculation in a cylindrical core with 300w/cc of power density without considering a target material region for the accelerator. For a reference core of which the height and the radius are both 100 cm, there is a fair prospect that a long term reactor operation is possible with subsequent refueling of natural uranium, if the medium enriched (around 10wt%) uranium or plutonium fuels are fully loaded in the initial core. More precise analyses will be planed in a later fiscal year. (author)

  19. How to Produce a Reactor Neutron Spectrum Using a Proton Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K.; Wootan, D.; Gates, R.; Schmitt, B.; Asner, D. M.

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  20. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  1. Physics design of a CW high-power proton Linac for accelerator-driven system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajni Pande; Shweta Roy; S V L S Rao; P Singh; S Kailas

    2012-02-01

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) have evoked lot of interest the world over because of their capability to incinerate the MA (minor actinides) and LLFP (long-lived fission products) radiotoxic waste and their ability to utilize thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel. One of the main subsystems of ADS is a high energy (∼1 GeV) and high current (∼30 mA) CW proton Linac. The accelerator for ADS should have high efficiency and reliability and very low beam losses to allow hands-on maintenance. With these criteria, the beam dynamics simulations for a 1 GeV, 30 mA proton Linac has been done. The Linac consists of normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL) and coupled cavity drift tube Linac (CCDTL) structures that accelerate the beam to about 100 MeV followed by superconducting (SC) elliptical cavities, which accelerate the beam from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. The details of the design are presented in this paper.

  2. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  3. Laser acceleration of protons from near critical density targets for application to radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Pirozhkov, A S; Thomas, A G R; Willingale, L; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A

    2010-01-01

    Laser accelerated protons can be a complimentary source for treatment of oncological diseases to the existing hadron therapy facilities. We demonstrate how the protons, accelerated from near-critical density plasmas by laser pulses having relatively small power, reach energies which may be of interest for medical applications. When an intense laser pulse interacts with near-critical density plasma it makes a channel both in the electron and then in the ion density. The propagation of a laser pulse through such a self-generated channel is connected with the acceleration of electrons in the wake of a laser pulse and generation of strong moving electric and magnetic fields in the propagation channel. Upon exiting the plasma the magnetic field generates a quasi-static electric field that accelerates and collimates ions from a thin filament formed in the propagation channel. Two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that a 100 TW laser pulse tightly focused on a near-critical density target is able to acce...

  4. Final environmental impact statement. Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (ISABELLE), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1978-08-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed research facility (ISABELLE) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is presented. It was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) following guidelines issued for such analyses. In keeping with DOE policy, this statement presents a concise and issues-oriented analysis of the significant environmental effects associated with the proposed action. ISABELLE is a proposed physics research facility where beams of protons collide providing opportunities to study high energy interactions. The facility would provide two interlaced storage ring proton accelerators, each with an energy up to 400 GeV intersecting in six experimental areas. The rings are contained in a tunnel with a circumference of 3.8 km (2.3 mi). The facility will occupy 250 ha (625 acres) in the NW corner of the existing BNL site. A draft Environmental Impact Statement for this proposed facility was issued for public review and comment by DOE on February 21, 1978. The principal areas of concern expressed were in the areas of radiological impacts and preservation of cultural values. After consideration of these comments, appropriate actions were taken and the text of the statement has been amended to reflect the comments. The text was annotated to indicate the origin of the comment. The Appendices contain a glossary of terms and listings of metric prefixes and conversions and symbols and abbreviations.

  5. Injector and beam transport simulation study of proton dielectric wall accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Quantang, E-mail: zhaoquantang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan, P.; Zhang, Z.M.; Cao, S.C [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Shen, X.K. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jing, Y.; Ma, Y.Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu, C.S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Z.P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R.Q.; Zhao, H.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-12-01

    A simulation study of a short-pulsed proton injector for, and beam transport in, a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been carried out using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code Warp. It was shown that applying 'tilt pulse' voltage waveforms on three electrodes enables the production of a shorter bunch by the injector. The fields in the DWA beam tube were simulated using Computer Simulation Technology's Microwave Studio (CST MWS) package, with various choices for the boundary conditions. For acceleration in the DWA, the beam transport was simulated with Warp, using applied fields obtained by running CST MWS. Our simulations showed that the electric field at the entrance to the DWA represents a challenging issue for the beam transport. We thus simulated a configuration with a mesh at the entrance of the DWA, intended to improve the entrance field. In these latter simulations, a proton bunch was successfully accelerated from 130 keV to about 36 MeV in a DWA with a length of 36.75 cm. As the beam bunch progresses, its transverse dimensions diminish from (roughly) 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 cm to 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 0.4 cm. The beam pulse lengthens from 1 cm to 2 cm due to lack of longitudinal compression fields. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pulse proton injector with tilt voltages on the three electrodes was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fields in different part of the DWA were simulated with CST and analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proton beam transport in DWA was simulated with Warp successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simulation can help for designing a real DWA.

  6. An outline of the proton accelerator for the neutron science project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    A research project has been proposed in JAERI aiming at exploring new basic researches and nuclear energy engineering based on a high intensity proton linac with a 1.5 GeV and 8 MW beam. The research complex will be composed of facilities such as the Neutron Scattering Facility for condensed matter physics and the Nuclear Energy Related Facility for engineering test of nuclear waste transmutation. The R and D has been carried out for the components of the low energy part of the accelerator; ion source, RFQ, DTL and RF source. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, the development on a superconducting accelerating cavity as a major option has been performed. The paper will present the summary on a development plan to build the accelerator and the results of conceptual design study and the R and D work. (author)

  7. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelicon, Primož, E-mail: primoz.pelicon@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Podaru, Nicolae C., E-mail: info@highvolteng.com [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands); Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); LOTRIČ Metrology ltd, Selca 163, SI-4227 Selca (Slovenia); Ondračka, Simon [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J.M. [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H{sup −} ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H{sup −} ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1} at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV{sup 1/2}. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of {sup 3}He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1}, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  8. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Firoz, Kazi A. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Miroshnichenko, L. I., E-mail: lic@nju.edu.cn [N. V. Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  9. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  10. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  11. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  12. Shielding calculations for a 250 MeV hospital-based proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Ist. di Ingegneria Nucleare; Arduini, G. [Fondazione Italiana Ricerca sul Cancro, via Corridoni 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Bodei, G. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Ist. di Ingegneria Nucleare; Monti, S. [ENEA, ERG-FISS-FIRE, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Padoani, F. [ENEA, ERG-FISS-FIRE, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Silari, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Tecnologie Biomediche Avanzate, via Ampere 56, I-20131, Milano (Italy); Tinti, R. [ENEA, ERG-FISS-FIRE, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Tromba, G. [Sincrotrone (``ELETTRA``) Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy)

    1996-05-21

    The accelerator shields (250 MeV protons, 400 MeV/u {sup 16}O{sup 8+} ions) and treatment rooms of the Hadrontherapy Centre, a hospital-based facility under design in Italy, were determined by means of Monte Carlo calculations. The LCS and FLUKA codes were employed, together with analytical estimates carried out by making use of empirical formulas from the literature, and the results compared. In the case of 250 MeV protons a 250 cm thick concrete wall ensures an annual dose equivalent lower than 2 mSv in the environments adjacent to the accelerator room. The best ceiling thickness was found to be 200 cm for a unitary occupancy factor. The photon dose equivalent beyond the concrete shield was also estimated using the LCS code. In the case of ions the shield thickness was calculated using empirical formulas from the literature; the concrete thicknesses calculated for protons should ensure the required dose equivalent when some local shields are added. Monte Carlo calculations of the treatment room shielding were also carried out using the FLUKA code. (orig.).

  13. SEE Measurements and Simulations Using Mono-Energetic GeV-Energy Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Alia, Ruben Garcia; Brugger, Markus; Roed, Ketil; Uznanski, Slawosz; Wrobel, Frederic; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Danzeca, Salvatore; Saigne, Frederic; Spiezia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Single Event Upset (SEU) measurements were performed on the ESA SEU Monitor using mono-energetic GeV-energy hadron beams available in the North Experimental Area at CERN. A 400 GeV proton beam in the H4IRRAD test area and a 120 GeV mixed pion and proton beam at the CERN-EU high Energy Reference Field facility (CERF) were used for this purpose. The resulting cross section values are presented and discussed as well as compared to the several hundred MeV case (typical for standard test facilities) from a physical interaction perspective with the intention of providing a more general understanding of the behavior. Moreover, the implications of the cross section dependence with energy above the several hundred MeV range are analyzed for different environments. In addition, analogous measurements are proposed for Single Event Latchup (SEL), motivated by discussed simulation results. Finally, a brief introduction of the future CHARM (CERN High-energy AcceleratoR Mixed facility) test installation is included.

  14. Computer simulation of the three-dimensional regime of proton acceleration in the interaction of laser radiation with a thin spherical target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from particle-in-cell simulations of the three-dimensional regime of proton acceleration in the interaction of laser radiation with a thin spherical target are presented. It is shown that the density of accelerated protons can be several times higher than that in conventional accelerators. The focusing of fast protons created in the interaction of laser radiation with a spherical target is demonstrated. The focal spot of fast protons is localized near the center of the sphere. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast ion energy attains 5%. The acceleration mechanism is analyzed and the electron and proton energy spectra are obtained

  15. Determination of cross sections for the production of low-energy monoenergetic neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a neutron detector, defined as the reading of the device per unit of incident fluence or dose, varies with neutron energy. The experimental determination of this variation, i.e. of the response function of this instrument, has to be performed by facilities producing monoenergetic neutron fields. These neutrons are commonly produced by interaction between accelerated ions (proton or deuteron) onto a thin target composed of a reactive layer deposited on a metallic backing. Using the 7Li(p, n), 3H(p, n), 2H(d, n) and 3H(d, n) reactions, monoenergetic neutrons are obtained between 120 keV and 20 MeV in the ion beam direction (0 deg.). To reach lower neutron energies, the angle of the measuring point with respect to the ion beam direction can be increased. However, this method presents several problems of neutron energy and fluence homogeneities over the detector surface, as well as an important increase of the scattered neutron contribution. Another solution is to investigate other nuclear reactions, as 45Sc(p, n) allowing to extend the neutron energy range down to 8 keV at 0 deg.. A complete study of this reaction and its cross section has been undertaken within the framework of a scientific cooperation between the laboratory of neutron metrology and dosimetry (IRSN, France), two European national metrological institutes, the National Physical Laboratory (UK) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany), and IRMM, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EC). In parallel, other possible reactions have been investigated: 65Cu(p, n), 51V(p, n), 57Fe(p, n), 49Ti(p, n), 53Cr(p, n) and 37Cl(p, n). They were compared in terms of neutron fluence and minimum energy of the produced neutrons. (author)

  16. Accelerating Protons to Therapeutic Energies with Ultra-Intense Ultra-Clean and Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultra-thin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10-11 achieved on Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W/cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the Directed Coulomb e...

  17. Design, fabrication and testing of a large cylindrical vacuum vessel for proton linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with engineering design, fabrication, copper plating and vacuum design and leak testing of the first prototype segment of Alveraz type drift tube Proton Linear Accelerator (DTL) being developed at CAT. The prototype drift tube linac segment is a long horizontal cylindrical vacuum vessel. The cylindrical cavity is internally machined and copper plated from inside and operates at 202 MHz (RF) with a vacuum better than 1 x 10-6 mbar. There are 34 openings provided for vacuum pumps, RF input and monitoring loops, piston tuners etc. and a large openings for insertions of drift tubes from top of the tank. (author)

  18. Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of high power RF source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. O.; Shin, H. M.; Chung, I. Y. [KAPRA, Seoul (Korea); Kim, D. I. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea); Noh, S. J. [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Ko, S. K. [Ulsan University, Ulsan (Korea); Lee, H. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea); Choi, W. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study was performed with objective to design and develop the KOMAC proton accelerator RF system. For the development of the high power RF source for CCDTL(coupled cavity drift tube linac), the medium power RF system using the UHF klystron for broadcasting was integrated and with this RF system we obtained the basic design data, operation experience and code-validity test data. Based on the medium power RF system experimental data, the high power RF system for CCDTL was designed and its performed was analyzed. 16 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  19. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  20. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  1. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy; Progetto di acceleratore compatto per terapia oncologica con protoni (TOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A. [ENEA, Cntro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione

    1995-04-01

    The status of the sub-project `Compact Accelerator` in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated `Compact Accelerator` and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources.

  2. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  3. Study and optimization of a LINAC drift tube for high intensity proton acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High intensity proton accelerators lead to specific problems related to the need to limit beam losses. The problem is more acute in the low energy part (up to 20 MeV) where the beam transport is the most difficult. The drift tube linac (DTL) remains the reference structure for energies of a few MeV to a few dozens MeV despite the arising of some new cavity types. This thesis purpose is to design such a DTL for a high intensity proton accelerator. Until now, no such continuous wave cavity has ever been operated. To ensure the viability of such an accelerator, a short four cells prototype is designed, built and tested under nominal RF conditions. This prototype is fully representative of a complete machine except for its length. The design complexity comes from the combination of RF electromagnetism, thermal exchanges, mechanics, ultra-vacuum engineering and manufacturing constraints. More specifically, the electromagnets alignment is a primary factor, and reliability, despite being usually of secondary importance in particles accelerator science, is here a major concern considering potential industrial applications of this machine. The prototype design includes the cavity itself, but also quadrupole electromagnets whose feasibility is a limiting factor, considering the very small space available to them. Two different magnet types and associated drift tubes are studied and manufactured, to be tested in the prototype cavity. The experimental part is focused on mechanical and thermal aspects. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also checked. As a conclusion of this thesis, technical and conceptual improvements as suggested by the manufacturing and experimental phases are presented, to be implemented in a complete cavity. (author)

  4. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons. PMID:23410447

  5. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengzheng, E-mail: liuz@frib.msu.edu; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-11

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR), to be implemented upstream of each FRIB cryomodule, as part of the direct loss monitoring system to fulfill the needs of machine protection. - Highlights: • Traditional BLM is not effective for beam loss monitoring at FRIB low energy linac segments. • We developed LMR to intercept a small portion of beam loss and output voltage signals. • We made a prototype LMR and demonstrated its functionality to monitor small beam losses. • The LMR is very sensitive for small beam losses and is independent of beam current. • The LMR is especially useful for loss monitoring at low energy ion/proton accelerators.

  6. A conceptual design of the DTL-SDTL for the JAERI high intensity proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroshi; Kabeya, Zenzaburo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Chishiro, Etsuji; Ouchi, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1998-08-01

    A high intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam power of 8 MW has been proposed for the Neutron Science Project (NSP) at JAERI. This linac starts with radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, which is followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL), separated-type DTL (SDTL), and a superconducting structure. In this report, we focus on the DTL and SDTL part of the accelerator. The DTL accelerates the beam from 2 to 51 MeV, and SDTL accelerates the beam from 51 to 10 MeV. Since the main features of the requirement for the DTL-SDTL are high peak current ({approx}30 mA) and a high-duty factor ({approx}CW), the conceptual design should be determined not only based on the result of a beam-dynamics calculation, but by careful study of the cooling problems. The design processes of the DTL-SDTL and the matching sections (RFQ to DTL, CW-Pulse merge section, and SDTL to SCC) and the result of a heat transfer analysis of DTL are described. (author)

  7. Investigation of polyethylene detector and adiabatic calorimeter in the radiation filds of proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results on investigation of the absorbed energy detectors used at IHEP, i. e., polyethylene detector (PD)-based on hydrogen release from polymer under effect of ionizing radiation and adiabatic calorimeter (AC) are presented. The sensitivity function for these detectors for 6 MeV-3000 GeV hadrons have been calculated. The PD and AC readings have been measured and calculated for the radiation fields near the IHEP proton synchrotron vacuum chamber. The dependence of the calorimeter readings on the working medium has been studied. The PD has been calibrated with the AC. It is ahown that in the hadron spectra the calorimeter readings do not depend on the working medium in the limit of 8%. The PD calibration enchanced the accuracy of radiation dose measuring in the accelerator radiation mixed field. The sensitivity function calculations showed that detectors studied applied for measuring absorved dose have the energy threshold, so for PD it is equal 18 MEV for protons, 6 MeV for charged poins. Results of investigations showed the possibility of PD utilization for measuring absorbed dose in different structural materials operating in mixed radiation fields of accelerators

  8. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  9. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  10. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  11. Experimental study of proton acceleration with ultra-high intensity, high contrast laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports experimental work in the domain of laser-matter interaction to study the production of energetic proton beams. The ion beams accelerated by laser have been increasing in quality, in energy and in repeatability as laser technology keeps improving. The presence of the pedestal before the high peak laser pulse introduces many unknowns in the accelerating conditions that are created on the front and on the rear surface of the target. The first part of the experimental activities is focused to a better comprehension and the experimental validation of the interaction of a 'pedestal-like', moderate intensity, laser pulse on Aluminum targets. The developed interferometric technique proved to be reliable and produced a complete set of maps of the early stages of the plasma expansion. The reflectometry experiment stresses the importance of the quality of the metallic targets and underlines some obscure points on the behaviour of the rear surface of the illuminated foil. For instance the reflectometry measurements on the thicker targets are significantly different from what is foreseen by the simulations about the timescale of the shock break out. In the second part, the XPW laser pulse is used in ion acceleration from thin metal foils. The laser and target parameters are varied to put in evidence the dependence of the ion beam to the experimental condition. In conclusion I can say that first, during the variation of the target thickness, an optimum is put in evidence. Secondly, the correlation between the laser pulse duration and the proton cutoff energy is qualitatively different between thicker (15 μm) and thinner (1.5 μm, 3 μm) targets. For the first, an optimal pulse duration exists while for the seconds, no variation is found - in the searched space - from the monotonic decreasing of the cutoff energy with the peak intensity. The experimental results put however in evidence some points that are not completely understood. (A.C.)

  12. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA case.

  13. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhou, C. T., E-mail: zcangtao@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Qiao, B., E-mail: bqiao@pku.edu.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030006 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Ruan, S. C. [College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  14. Development of a monoenergetic neutron beam (Theoretical aspects, experimental developments and applications)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the use of a neutron time of flight system at the Tandem Accelerator of the National Nuclear Research Institute; with neutrons provided by means of the 2 H(d, n) 3 He we intend to use the associated particle technique in order to have monoenergetic neutrons. This neutron beam will be used both in basic and applied research. (Author)

  15. Development of a monoenergetic neutron beam (Theoretical aspects, experimental developments and applications)

    CERN Document Server

    Varela-G, A

    2003-01-01

    By the use of a neutron time of flight system at the Tandem Accelerator of the National Nuclear Research Institute; with neutrons provided by means of the sup 2 H(d, n) sup 3 He we intend to use the associated particle technique in order to have monoenergetic neutrons. This neutron beam will be used both in basic and applied research. (Author)

  16. Study of technical issues on proton beam line tunnel in material/life science experimental facility of high intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Shinichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Konno, Chikara [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    The so called NM Tunnel, which is a specific proton beam line space for the muon experiment and the spallation neutron source, is placed in the Material/Life Science Experimental Facility under the JAERI-KEK Joint project on the High Intensity Proton Accelerator. The group relevant to the NM tunnel has studied extensively technical issues associated from various aspects since last year. As a result, a basic structure of the NM Tunnel has been established as the initial phase. In viewing the importance for the facility design, this report summaries studies done by members of the group. (author)

  17. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF FAST KICKER SYSTEMS FOR HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the specific issues related to the design of the Fast Kicker Systems for high intensity proton accelerators. To address these issues in the preliminary design stage can be critical since the fast kicker systems affect the machine lattice structure and overall design parameters. Main topics include system architecture, design strategy, beam current coupling, grounding, end user cost vs. system cost, reliability, redundancy and flexibility. Operating experience with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection and extraction kicker systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory and their future upgrade is presented. Additionally, new conceptual designs of the extraction kicker for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility at Los Alamos are discussed

  18. Enhancement on Laser Intensity and Proton Acceleration Using Micro-tube Plasma Lens Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Joseph; Akli, Kramer

    2016-01-01

    A hollow cylindrical micron-scale structure is proposed to enhance and manipulate the laser plasma interaction. It is shown through 3-D particle-in-cell simulations that the incident laser pulse intensity is enhanced within the tube. A detailed study of the intensification optimizes the tube dimensions and provides a characterization of the in-tube intensity. By coupling the micro-tube plasma lens to a traditional flat interface, we show an increase in on-target intensity. We detail proton energy enhancement as a potential application of the micro-tube plasma lens target, where the tube structure acts to focus the light and provide additional electrons that enhance the accelerating sheath field.

  19. Performance of solenoids vs. quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications - for example in particle therapie or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics - requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. The scaling shows that above a few MeV a solenoid needs to be pulsed or super-conducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. The transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al.\\cite{yan2009}.

  20. Beyond the CMSSM without an accelerator: proton decay and direct dark matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, TH Division, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Luo, Feng [CERN, TH Division, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nagata, Natsumi [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Sandick, Pearl [University of Utah, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We consider two potential non-accelerator signatures of generalizations of the well-studied constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM). In one generalization, the universality constraints on soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are applied at some input scale M{sub in} below the grand unification (GUT) scale M{sub GUT}, a scenario referred to as 'sub-GUT'. The other generalization we consider is to retain GUT-scale universality for the squark and slepton masses, but to relax universality for the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the masses of the Higgs doublets. As with other CMSSM-like models, the measured Higgs mass requires supersymmetric particle masses near or beyond the TeV scale. Because of these rather heavy sparticle masses, the embedding of these CMSSM-like models in a minimal SU(5) model of grand unification can yield a proton lifetime consistent with current experimental limits, and may be accessible in existing and future proton decay experiments. Another possible signature of these CMSSM-like models is direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter. The direct dark matter scattering rate is typically below the reach of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment if M{sub in} is close to M{sub GUT}, but it may lie within its reach if M{sub in} proton lifetimes. (orig.)

  1. Beyond the CMSSM without an accelerator: proton decay and direct dark matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King’s College London, Strand, WC2R 2LS, London (United Kingdom); TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Evans, Jason L. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Luo, Feng [TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nagata, Natsumi [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, University of Tokyo, 277-8583, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sandick, Pearl, E-mail: sandick@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 84112, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-01-05

    We consider two potential non-accelerator signatures of generalizations of the well-studied constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM). In one generalization, the universality constraints on soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are applied at some input scale M{sub in}below the grand unification (GUT) scale M{sub GUT}, a scenario referred to as ‘sub-GUT’. The other generalization we consider is to retain GUT-scale universality for the squark and slepton masses, but to relax universality for the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the masses of the Higgs doublets. As with other CMSSM-like models, the measured Higgs mass requires supersymmetric particle masses near or beyond the TeV scale. Because of these rather heavy sparticle masses, the embedding of these CMSSM-like models in a minimal SU(5) model of grand unification can yield a proton lifetime consistent with current experimental limits, and may be accessible in existing and future proton decay experiments. Another possible signature of these CMSSM-like models is direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter. The direct dark matter scattering rate is typically below the reach of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment if M{sub in} is close to M{sub GUT}, but it may lie within its reach if M{sub in}≲10{sup 11} GeV. Likewise, generalizing the CMSSM to allow non-universal supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs offers extensive possibilities for models within reach of the LZ experiment that have long proton lifetimes.

  2. Development of hybrid gas detectors for monitoring neutrons induced from the Large Intensity Proton Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research is developments of new hybrid-neutron detectors to measure neutron fluxes where proton accelerators are operated for the purpose of neutron therapy or various industrial applications. The framework of the R and D based upon GEANT simulations was developed for 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillation detectors. The simulation results were applied to design the detector structures and to determine the proper test method where neutron sources were used. The detector response functions for the 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillators were measured by proper calibrations by using neutrons emitted from a 0.5 Ci 252Cf isotope. Furthermore, the detector characteristics were obtained by the comparisons of the neutron signals with those of the gamma-rays emitted from the 137Cs and 60Co sources. We have performed a feasibility study for the future applications of the 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillators to medical imaging of the thermal neutron fields for neutron-beam therapies. A radiation hardness tested for the Resistive Plate Chamber of the CMS/LHC experiment was performed by using the fast neutrons produced by the M50 proton cyclotron in KIRAMS and a 10 mm thick beryllium target. Four tests with cosmic muons have been carried out before and after the neutron irradiation to investigate the effects on the characteristics of the detectors. No significant degradation of the detector characteristics due to the effect, equivalent to 45 Gy, has been observed

  3. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  4. Global numerical modeling of energetic proton acceleration in a coronal mass ejection traveling through the solar corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration of protons and electrons to high (sometimes GeV/nucleon) energies by solar phenomena is a key component of space weather. These solar energetic particle (SEP) events can damage spacecraft and communications, as well as present radiation hazards to humans. In-depth particle acceleration simulations have been performed for idealized magnetic fields for diffusive acceleration and particle propagation, and at the same time the quality of MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has improved significantly. However, to date these two pieces of the same puzzle have remained largely decoupled. Such structures may contain not just a shock but also sizable sheath and pileup compression regions behind it, and may vary considerably with longitude and latitude based on the underlying coronal conditions. In this work, we have coupled results from a detailed global three-dimensional MHD time-dependent CME simulation to a global proton acceleration and transport model, in order to study time-dependent effects of SEP acceleration between 1.8 and 8 solar radii in the 2005 May 13 CME. We find that the source population is accelerated to at least 100 MeV, with distributions enhanced up to six orders of magnitude. Acceleration efficiency varies strongly along field lines probing different regions of the dynamically evolving CME, whose dynamics is influenced by the large-scale coronal magnetic field structure. We observe strong acceleration in sheath regions immediately behind the shock.

  5. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, Alexey; Sosedkin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  6. Development of a Compton Camera for Online Range Monitoring of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams via Prompt-Gamma Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thirolf, P.G.; Lang, C.; Aldawood, S.; Van der Kolff, H.G.; Maier, L.; Schaart, D.R.; Parodi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Presently large efforts are conducted in Munich towards the development of proton beams for bio-medical applications, generated via the technique of particle acceleration from high-power, short-pulse lasers. While so far mostly offline diagnostics tools are used in this context, we aim at developing

  7. Laser-driven proton and deuteron acceleration from a pure solid-density H2/D2 cryogenic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongjin; Gauthier, Maxence; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Goyon, Clement; Williams, Jackson; Kerr, Shaun; Ruby, John; Propp, Adrienne; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Pak, Art; Hazi, Andy; Glenzer, Siegfried; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration has become of tremendous interest for the fundamental science and the potential applications in tumor therapy and proton radiography. We have developed a cryogenic liquid hydrogen jet, which can deliver a self-replenishing target of pure solid-density hydrogen or deuterium. This allows for a target compatible with high-repetition-rate experiments and results in a pure hydrogen plasma, facilitating comparison with simulations. A new modification has allowed for the formation of jets with rectangular profiles, facilitating comparison with foil targets. This jet was installed at the Titan laser and driven by laser pulses of 40-60 J of 527 nm laser light in 1 ps. The resulting proton and deuteron spectra were measured in multiple directions with Thomson parabola spectrometers and RCF stacks. The spectral and angular information suggest contribution from both the TNSA and RPA acceleration mechanisms.

  8. Effects of nanosecond-scale prepulse on generation of high-energy protons in target normal sheath acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulse cleaner based on noncollinear optical-parametric amplification and second-harmonic generation processes is used to improve the contrast of a laser of peak intensity ∼2 × 1019 W/cm2 to ∼1011 at 100 ps before the peak of the main pulse. A 7 MeV proton beam is observed when a 2.5 μm-thick Al foil is irradiated by this high-contrast laser. The maximum proton energy decreases to 2.9 MeV when a low-contrast (∼108) laser is used. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations combined with MULTI simulations show that the maximum proton energy sensitively relies on the detecting direction. The ns-time-scale prepulse can bend a thin target before the main pulse arrives, which reduces maximum proton energy in the target normal sheath acceleration.

  9. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-05-01

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  10. SU-E-T-528: Robustness Evaluation for Fiducial-Based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L; Rana, S; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of the proton treatment plans in the presence of rotational setup error when patient is aligned with implanted fiducials. Methods: Five Stage I invasive breast cancer patients treated with the APBP protocol (PCG BRE007-12) were studied. The rotational setup errors were simulated by rotating the original CT images around the body center clockwise and counterclockwise 5 degrees (5CW and 5CCW). Manual translational registration was then performed to match the implanted fiducials on the rotated images to the original dataset. Patient contours were copied to the newly created CT set. The original treatment plan was applied to the new CT dataset with the beam isocenter placed at the geometrical center of PTV. The dose distribution was recalculated for dosimetric parameters comparison. Results: CTV and PTV (D95 and V95) coverages were not significantly different between the two simulated plans (5CW and 5CCW) and the original plan. PTV D95 and CTV D95 absolute difference among the three plans were relatively small, with maximum changes of 0.28 CGE and 0.15 CGE, respectively. PTV V95 and CTV V95 absolute differences were 0.79% and 0.48%. The dosage to the thyroid, heart, contralateral breast and lung remained zero for all three plans. The Dmax and Dmean to the volume of ipsilateral breast excluding CTV were compared, with maximum difference values of 1.02 CGE for Dmax and 3.56 CGE for Dmean. Ipsilateral lung Dmean maintained no significant changes through the three plan comparison, with the largest value 0.32 CGE. Ipsilateral lung Dmax was the most sensitive parameter to this simulation study, with a maximum difference at 20.2 CGE. Conclusion: Our study suggests that fiducial-based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy is robust with respect to +/− 5 degree patient setup rotational errors, as long as the internal fiducial markers are used for patient alignment.

  11. Guiding and collimation of laser-accelerated proton beams using thin foils followed with a hollow plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed that guided and collimated proton acceleration by intense lasers can be achieved using an advanced target—a thin foil followed by a hollow plasma channel. For the advanced target, the laser-accelerated hot electrons can be confined in the hollow channel at the foil rear side, which leads to the formation of transversely localized, Gaussian-distributed sheath electric field and resultantly guiding of proton acceleration. Further, due to the hot electron flow along the channel wall, a strong focusing transverse electric field is induced, taking the place of the original defocusing one driven by hot electron pressure in the case of a purely thin foil target, which results in collimation of proton beams. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that collimated proton beams with energy about 20 MeV and nearly half-reduced divergence of 26° are produced at laser intensities 1020 W/cm2 by using the advanced target

  12. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  13. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platform at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE / E ∼ 4 %) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating that monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. These results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.

  14. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  15. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  16. Design and construction of the clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to design, construction and evaluation of clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly. The design conditions o Class : 1,000(1,000 ea ft3), o Flow Rate : 200 m3/h m2, o Temperature : 22 deg C±2, o Humidity : 55%±5. The main design results are summarized as follows: o Air-handling unit : Cooling Capacity : 13,500 kcal/h, Heating Capacity : 10,300 kcal/h, Humidity Capacity : 4 kg/h, Flow Rate : 150 CMM o Air Shower : Flow Rate : 35 CMM, Size : 1500 x 1000 x 2200, Material : In-steel, Out-SUS304, Filter : PRE + HEPA, AIR Velocity : 25 m/s o Relief Damper : Size : Φ250, Casing : SS41, Blade : AL, Shaft : SUS304, Weight Ring : SS41, Grill : AL o HEPA Filter Box : Filter Box Size : 670 x 670 x 630, Filter Size : 610 x 610 x 150, Frame: Poly Wood, Media : Glass Fiber, Filter Efficiency : 0.3μm, 99.97%, Separator : AL, Flow Rate : 17 CMM, Damper Size : Φ300 Following this report will be used important data for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of the clean room, for high precision apparatus assembly laboratory

  17. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  18. Hydraulic characteristics of sedimentary deposits at the J-PARC proton-accelerator, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marui Atsunao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic characteristics of sediments were investigated at J-PARC for the purpose of site characterization in relation with the construction of Japan's largest proton-accelerator. A total of 340 samples extracted from 9 exploratory wells were examined by standard laboratory tests and complemented with statistical analyses to quantitatively determine the main terrain attributes. Two main hydro-geological units were recognized, although a number of embedded layers defined a
    multilevel aquifer. Grain-size distribution derived from sieve analysis and the coefficient of uniformity showed that soils are poorly sorted. On the other hand, hydraulic conductivity was measured by a
    number of parameters such as a log-normal distribution. Conductivity was also predicted by empirical formulas, yielding values up to three orders of magnitude higher. Discrepancies were explained in
    terms of soil anisotropy and intrinsic differences in the calculation methods. Based on the Shepherd's approach, a power relationship between permeability and grain size was found at 2 wells. Hydraulic
    conductivity was also correlated to porosity. However, this  nterdependence was not systematic and therefore, properties at many parts of the profile were considered to be randomly distributed. Finally,
    logs of electrical conductivity suggested that variations of soil hydraulic properties can be associated to changes in water quality. In spite of the remaining uncertainties, results yielded from the study are useful to better understand the numerical modelling of the subsurface system in the site.

  19. Recommendation for a injector-cyclotron and ion sources for the acceleration of heavy ions and polarized protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was decided to accelerate both heavy and light ions with the open-sector cyclotron. The injector SPS1, was used for light ions and SPS2 for heavy ions. Provision was also made for the acceleration of polarized neutrons. To enable this, the injector must have an axial injection system. The working of a source of polarized ions and inflectors for an axial injection system is discussed. The limitations of the open-sector cyclotron on the acceleration of heavy ions are also dealt with. The following acceleration/ion source combinations are discussed: i) The open-sector cyclotron and a k=40 injector cyclotron with a Penning ion source, and a stripper between the injector and the open-sector cyclotron and also a source of polarized protons and deuterons; ii) The acceleration/ion source combination with the addition of electron beam ion sources; iii) The open-sector cyclotron and a k=11 injector cyclotron with a electron beam ion source and a source of polarized protons and deuterons

  20. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q., E-mail: wuq@impcas.ac.cn; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  1. Development of the integrated control system for the microwave ion source of the PEFP 100-MeV proton accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Gi; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Ji-Ho; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2012-07-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 20-MeV proton linear accelerator is currently operating at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac needs at least a 100-hour operation time. To meet the goal, we have developed a microwave ion source that uses no filament. For the ion source, a remote control system has been developed by using experimental physics and the industrial control system (EPICS) software framework. The control system consists of a versa module europa (VME) and EPICS-based embedded applications running on a VxWorks real-time operating system. The main purpose of the control system is to control and monitor the operational variables of the components remotely and to protect operators from radiation exposure and the components from critical problems during beam extraction. We successfully performed the operation test of the control system to confirm the degree of safety during the hardware performance.

  2. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  3. Free standing diamond-like carbon thin films by PLD for laser based electrons/protons acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thema, F.T.; Beukes, P.; Ngom, B.D. [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: mani@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMCH), Chrompet, Bharath University, Chennai, 600044 (India); Maaza, M., E-mail: maaza@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-05

    This study we reports for the first time on the synthesis and optical characteristics of free standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto graphene buffer layers for ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. The fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations indicate that the suitability of such free standing DLC thin-films within the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range and hence their appropriateness for the targeted applications. - Highlights: • We report for the first time synthesis of free standing diamond-like carbon. • Pulsed laser deposition onto graphene buffer layers. • Fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations. • Ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. • This material's suitable for the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range.

  4. Free standing diamond-like carbon thin films by PLD for laser based electrons/protons acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study we reports for the first time on the synthesis and optical characteristics of free standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto graphene buffer layers for ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. The fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations indicate that the suitability of such free standing DLC thin-films within the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range and hence their appropriateness for the targeted applications. - Highlights: • We report for the first time synthesis of free standing diamond-like carbon. • Pulsed laser deposition onto graphene buffer layers. • Fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations. • Ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. • This material's suitable for the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range

  5. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Mantha; A K Mohanty; P Satyamurthy

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically ∼ 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth-eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of ∼ 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  6. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  7. Accelerating Protons to Therapeutic Energies with Ultra-Intense Ultra-Clean and Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Stepan S; Bychenkov, Valery Yu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultra-thin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10-11 achieved on Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W/cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the Directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultra-thin double-layer (heavy ions / light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 microns (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the ma...

  8. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  9. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  10. Filamentation control and collimation of laser accelerated MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, B.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that the proton beam filamentation in dense plasma can be controlled in multi-layered (Al-CH-Al) sandwich targets. We observe up to three-fold reduction in the MeV proton beam divergence (~12°) from these targets as a result of decrease in filamentary structures in the proton beam profile. Strong self-generated resistive magnetic fields in targets with a high-Z transport layer are mainly responsible for this observed effect. Enhancement in the proton flux and energy is also observed from these targets. Supported by a matching 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that these targets can be very effectively implemented to collimate proton beams useful for ion oncology applications or advanced fast igniter approach of inertial confinement fusion (ICF).

  11. Control of proton energy in ultra-high intensity laser-matter interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimchuk, A; Bulanov, S S; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Kalintchenko, G; Matsuoka, T; Reed, S; Yanovsky, V; Krushelnick, K [FOCUS Center and Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109 (United States); Brantov, A; Bychenkov, V Yu [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Litzenberg, D, E-mail: tolya@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in short pulse laser technology resulted in (i) generation of ultra-high intensity (2x10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}) and (ii) ultra-high contrast (10{sup -11}) short pulses at the Hercules facility of the University of Michigan, which has created the possibility of exploring a new regime of ion acceleration - the regime of Directed Coulomb Explosion (DCE). In this regime of sufficiently high laser intensities and target thicknesses approaching the relativistic plasma skin depth it is possible to expel electrons from the target focal volume by the laser's ponderomotive force allowing for direct laser ion acceleration combined with a Coulomb explosion. That results in greater than 100 MeV protons with a quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum. The utilization of beam shaping, namely, the use of flat-top beams, leads to more efficient proton acceleration due to the increase of the longitudinal field. According to the results of 2D PIC simulations a 500 TW laser pulse with a super-Gaussian beam profile interacting with 0.1 micron aluminium-hydrogen foil is able to produce monoenergetic protons with the energy up to 240 MeV.

  12. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 1016 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH3 coatings on 5 μm gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 ± 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020 W/cm2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and

  13. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators. PMID:25811254

  14. Development of a Compton Camera for Online Range Monitoring of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams via Prompt-Gamma Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Presently large efforts are conducted in Munich towards the development of proton beams for bio-medical applications, generated via the technique of particle acceleration from high-power, short-pulse lasers. While so far mostly offline diagnostics tools are used in this context, we aim at developing a reliable and accurate online range monitoring technique, based on the position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays emitted from nuclear reactions between the proton beam and the biological sample. For this purpose, we develop a Compton camera, designed to be able to track not only the Compton scattering of the primary photon, but also to detect the secondary Compton electron, thus reducing the Compton cone to an arc segment and by this increasing the source reconstruction efficiency. Design specifications and the status of the protype system are discussed.

  15. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Maekawa, Fujio; Takada, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated. (author)

  16. Study and optimization of a LINAC drift tube for high intensity proton acceleration; Etude et optimisation d'un LINAC a tubes de glissement pour acceleration de forts courants de protons en continu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernaudin, P.E

    2002-09-01

    High intensity proton accelerators lead to specific problems related to the need to limit beam losses. The problem is more acute in the low energy part (up to 20 MeV) where the beam transport is the most difficult. The drift tube linac (DTL) remains the reference structure for energies of a few MeV to a few dozens MeV despite the arising of some new cavity types. This thesis purpose is to design such a DTL for a high intensity proton accelerator. Until now, no such continuous wave cavity has ever been operated. To ensure the viability of such an accelerator, a short four cells prototype is designed, built and tested under nominal RF conditions. This prototype is fully representative of a complete machine except for its length. The design complexity comes from the combination of RF electromagnetism, thermal exchanges, mechanics, ultra-vacuum engineering and manufacturing constraints. More specifically, the electromagnets alignment is a primary factor, and reliability, despite being usually of secondary importance in particles accelerator science, is here a major concern considering potential industrial applications of this machine. The prototype design includes the cavity itself, but also quadrupole electromagnets whose feasibility is a limiting factor, considering the very small space available to them. Two different magnet types and associated drift tubes are studied and manufactured, to be tested in the prototype cavity. The experimental part is focused on mechanical and thermal aspects. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also checked. As a conclusion of this thesis, technical and conceptual improvements as suggested by the manufacturing and experimental phases are presented, to be implemented in a complete cavity. (author)

  17. Study of a plasma created by an accelerated proton beam for the characterization of a nuclear pumped laser medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes leading to laser effect in nuclear induced plasmas can be studied with simulation experiments using charged particles beams. Such an experiment has been performed with a proton beam (2 MeV, 2 μA/cm2) produced by a Van de Graaff accelerator. This beam is an excitation and ionisation source quite comparable to the laser medium source of a reactor experiment. The plasma created in a Ne target (about 100 torrs) containing N2 impurities has been studied: - experimentally using R.F. diagnostics and spectroscopy; - theoretically by calculating the electronic distribution function in the low and medium energy region

  18. Measurement of DNA Double-Strand Break Yield in Human Cancer Cells by High-Current, Short-Duration Bunches of Laser-Accelerated Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Akifumi; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Maeda, Takuya; Sakaki, Hironao; Hori, Toshihiko; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Bolton, Paul R.; Kawanishi, Shunichi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the radiobiological effects of high dose rates that are attributed to high current, short bunch beam generation with laser-dreven ion acceleration, we have developed an experimental setup that uses laser-accelerated protons. In-vitro human lung cancer cells: A549 pulmonary adenocarcinoma are irradiated with a laser-accelerated proton bunches with a duration of 2×10-8 s and flux of ˜1015 cm-2 s-1, amounting to single bunch absorbed dose at the 1 Gy level. The double-strand break (DSB) yield in cell DNA is analyzed for the laser-accelerated proton beam at an average LET of 41 keV/µm.

  19. Proton injector acceptance tests for a Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA):characterisation of Advanced Injection System of Light Ions (AISLI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S.X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H.T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, Z.Y.; Chen, J.E.

    2014-11-01

    To demonstrate the acceleration capability of a Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a proton injector has been developed at Peking University (PKU). It is composed of a compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (PKU PMECRIS) associated with a LEBT of two electrostatic Einzel lenses [1]. This injector is named as Advanced Injector System of Light Ions (AISLI). The acceptance tests have been performed with a 40 keV–55 mA hydrogen beam successfully passing through a ϕ 10 mm aperture diaphragm. This diaphragm is located 200 mm downstream the plasma emission hole at the location of the future DWA entrance flange. The beam rms emittance reached about 0.10 π mm mrad in pulsed mode. This article describes the AISLI experimental setup, the measurement principle and the obtained beam characteristics.

  20. Measurements and modeling of gamma absorbed doses due to releases from a linear proton accelerator: experimental design and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation levels due to positron annihilation radiation from 11C, 13N, and 15O released by the 800 MeV linear proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) have been monitored at a fence-line location both by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and high pressure ionization chambers (HPICs). The accelerator is located in irregular terrain consisting of mesas and canyons. Fifteen-minute, accumulated external radiation levels were recorded with the HPICs. Instruments on a nerby meteorological tower concurrently measured wind speed and direction at three levels, temperature at two levels, solar radiation, and rainfall. Real-time radionuclide release rates and stack velocities were measured at the release point with in-stack monitors. This paper presents analyses of short-term radiation levels using HPICs and long-term levels using TLDs. Work being done to develop a computer model to predict external radiation levels based on meteorological data is also discussed

  1. Characterization of Monoenergetic Neutron Reference Fields with a High Resolution Diamond Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zimbal, A; Nolte, R; Schuhmacher, H

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiation detector based on an artificial single crystal diamond was used to characterize in detail the energy distribution of neutron reference fields at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and their contamination with charged particles. The monoenergetic reference fields at PTB in the neutron energy range from 1.5 MeV up to 19 MeV are generated by proton and deuteron beams impinging on solid and gas targets of tritium and deuterium. The energy of the incoming particles and the variation of the angle under which the measurement is performed produce monoenergetic reference fields with different mean energies and line shapes. In this paper we present high resolution neutron spectrometry measurements of different monoenergetic reference fields. The results are compared with calculated spectra taking into account the actual target parameters. Line structures in the order of 80 keV for a neutron energy of 9 MeV were resolved. The shift of the mean energy and the increasing of the width of the ...

  2. Development of 650 MHz solid state RF amplifier for proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and development of 30 kW high powers RF source at 650 MHz, using solid RF state technology, has been initiated at RRCAT. The indigenous technology development efforts will be useful for the proposed high power proton accelerators for SNS/ADS applications. In this 650 MHz amplifier scheme, 30 kW CW RF power will be generated using modular combination of 8 kW amplifier units. Necessary studies were carried out for device selection, choice of amplifier architecture and design of high power combiners and dividers. Presently RF amplifier delivering 250 W at 650 MHz has been fabricated and tested. Towards development of high power RF components, design and engineering prototyping of 16-port power combiner, directional coupler and RF dummy loads has been completed. The basic 8 kW amplifier unit is designed to provide power gain of 50 dB, bandwidth of 20 MHz and spurious response below 30 dB from fundamental signal. Based on the results of circuit simulation studies and engineering prototyping of amplifier module, two RF transistor viz. MRF3450 and MRF 61K were selected as solid state active devices. Impedance matching network in amplifier module is designed using balanced push pull configuration with transmission line BALUN. Due to high circulating current near drain side, metal clad RF capacitors were selected which helps in avoiding hot spot from output transmission path, ensuring continuous operation at rated RF power without damage to RF board. 350 W circulator is used to protect the RF devices from reflected power. Based on the prototype design and measured performance, one of these RF transistors will be selected to be used as workhorse for all amplifier modules. Two amplifier modules are mounted on water cooled copper heat-sink ensuring proper operating temperature for reliable and safe operation of amplifier. Also real time control system and data logger has been developed to provide DAQ and controls in each rack. For power combining and power measurement

  3. Observation of gaseous nitric acid production at a high-energy proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Y; Nakajima, H

    2005-01-01

    High-energy protons and neutrons produce a variety of radionuclides as well as noxious and oxidative gases, such as ozone and nitric acid, in the air mainly through the nuclear spallation of atmospheric elements. Samples were collected from the surfaces of magnets, walls, and floors in the neutrino beamline tunnel and the target station of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron facility by wiping surfaces with filter paper. Considerably good correlations were found between the amounts of nitrate and tritium and between those of nitrate and /sup 7/Be. This finding gives evidence that at high-energy proton facilities, nitric acid is produced in the radiolysis of air in beam- loss regions. Also, the nitric acid on the surfaces was found to be desorbed and tended to be more uniform throughout the tunnel due to air circulation. The magnitude of diminishing from the surfaces was in the order of tritium>nitrate>/sup 7/Be1).

  4. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  5. A conceptual design of the RF system for the NSP high intensity proton accelerator at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project which aims at exploring the fields of basic science and nuclear technology using a high power spallation neutron source. The neutron source will be driven by a high intensity linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam current of 5.33 mA and beam power of 8 MW. The RF system for the accelerator consists of a high-energy accelerator part and a low energy accelerator part. The maximum RF power requirements at the high and low energy accelerator parts are 25 MW and 8.3 MW, respectively. In this report, we describe the conceptual design of the RF system. In the low energy accelerator part, we estimated the requirement for the high-power amplifier tube and made the basis design for RF components. In the high energy accelerator part, we studied the effect of tuning errors, Lorentz forces and microphonics in the superconducting cavity. We calculated the klystron efficiency and supply power in the arrangement of where one klystron distributes the RF power to four cavities. We also considered an IOT RF system. Finally, we describe the electrical capacity and quantity of cooling water in the RF system. (author)

  6. Fast neutron dosimetry for radioprotection near large accelerators. Application to the proton synchrotron Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described that are used for the measurement of a neutron flux, and of the corresponding energy flux and dose absorbed. The methods are checked experimentally by the use of neutron sources of known energy distribution. The conditions of use of a proportional counter for recoil protons are described. The experimental results obtained with the synchrotron SATURNE at Saclay are described. (author)

  7. Proton acceleration and its energy spectra during coalescence of two parallel current loops

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Kazuaki; Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the plasma dynamics during coalescence of two parallel current loops by using a resistive MHD code. We investigate the orbit of many protons in the electromagnetic fields obitained from the MHD simunations. We investigate two cases of the coalescence precess: as the original loop current for both cases of co-helicity and counter-helicity.

  8. Producing Mono-energetic Neutrons for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepeal, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Free neutrons are seldom produced in nature and are unstable, decaying back to protons with a mean life of 881s. The only natural sources are spontaneous fission of actinides and cosmic ray interactions, both of which are rare processes. The detection of neutrons indicates unusual nuclear activity, allowing neutron detection the roll of the ``smoking gun'' for seeking potential nuclear terrorism. Recently, there has been a push for the development of new neutron detectors, ideally sufficiently inexpensive that a detector can be carried by all first responders such as police and fire fighters. One promising new material is the inorganic scintillator CLYC, a crystal of chlorine, lithium, yttrium and cesium. CLYC has a high energy resolution not only for gamma rays, but also for fast neutrons. At the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, CLYC is being developed in collaboration with local industrial companies. To evaluate its response to neutrons, in to 500 keV to 4 MeV energy range, the CN Van de Graaff generator is used to produce neutrons, via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. However, the important energy regime of 4--10 MeV is currently inaccessible. This current project is to build a gas-cell target to enable the D(d,n)3He reaction and produce neutrons of energy up to 9 MeV, an approach that has been used successfully at the University of Kentucky. The project involves some mechanical engineering management, then chamber construction, vacuum testing, developing thin window technology, and finally commissioning of the gas cell using accelerated beams. The commissioning will be physics rich in quantifying the flux and energy resolution of the neutron beam produced. Free neutrons are seldom produced in nature and are unstable, decaying back to protons with a mean life of 881s. The only natural sources are spontaneous fission of actinides and cosmic ray interactions, both of which are rare processes. The detection of neutrons indicates unusual nuclear activity, allowing

  9. The use of ionization electron columns for space-charge compensation in high intensity proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  10. Shielding properties of iron at high energy proton accelerators studied by a Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding properties of a lateral iron shield and of iron and concrete shields at angles between 5deg and 30deg are studied by means of the Monte Carlo program FLUNEV (DESY-D3 version of the FLUKA code extended for emission and transport of low energy neutrons). The following quantities were calculated for a high energy proton beam hitting an extended iron target: total and partial dose equivalents, attenuation coefficients, neutron spectra, star densities (compared also with the CASIM code) and quality factors. The dependence of the dose equivalent on the energy of primary protons, the effect of a concrete layer behind a lateral iron shielding and the total number of neutrons produced in the target were also estimated. (orig.)

  11. Isochoric heating of matter by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julien; Mancic, Ana; Robiche, Jerome; Antici, Patrizio; Lancia, Livia; Audebert, Patrick; Combis, Patrick; Renaudin, Patrick; Kimura, Tomoaki; Kodama, Ryosuke; Nakatsutsumi, Motoaki

    2008-04-01

    Producing matter at a high temperature (1-25 eV) and solid density is of prime interest for fundamental plasma physics or ICF. The use of laser-based high energy proton beams to achieve such state of matter is interesting since they are short (LULI 100 TW facility, experiments to characterize the achieved state of matter, coupled to a detailed hydro-modeling. A laser-generated proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a vacuum gap. Three diagnostics were used: (i) 1D time-resolved optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface at two wavelengths, (ii) time-resolved interferometry of a chirped probe beam reflecting off the heated target rear-surface, (iii) x-ray absorption spectroscopy through the heated target using a laser-produced backlighter detecting its Kα-edge softening.

  12. Characterization of warm dense matter produced by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A.; Robiche, J.; Renaudin, P.; Combis, P.; Dorchies, F.; Harmand, M.; Maynard, G.; Vassaux, J.; Mora, P.; Antici, P.; Fourmaux, S.; Audebert, P.

    2008-11-01

    Producing warm dense plasmas (WDM: solid density, few eV ˜ few 10s eV) is of interest for fundamental plasma physics or ICF. Laser-produced proton heating is of interest since they are short (LULI 100 TW facility to create and characterize WDM. We used, (i) 2D time-resolved optical self-emission of the heated target, (ii) surface expansion velocity measurement through phase measurements of a reflecting probe beam, and (iii) x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We showed that we could produce quasi-uniform heating of solids, as suited for e.g. EoS measurements. Time-resolved solid-liquid-plasma transition has been measured, as well as energy-loss of MeV protons in warm dense plasmas.

  13. Experimental study on neutronics in bombardment of thick targets by high energy proton beams for accelerator-driven sub-critical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental study on neutronics in the target region of accelerator-driven sub-critical system is carried out by using the high energy accelerator in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. The experiments with targets U(Pb), Pb and Hg bombarded by 0.533, 1.0, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV proton beams show that the neutron yield ratio of U(Pb) to Hg and Pb to Hg targets is (2.10 +- 0.10) and (1.76 +- 0.33), respectively. Hg target is disadvantageous to U(Pb) and Pb targets to get more neutrons. Neutron yield drops along 20 cm thick targets as the thickness penetrated by protons increases. The lower the energy of protons, the steeper the neutron yield drops. In order to get more uniform field of neutrons in the targets, the energy of protons from accelerators should not be lower than 1 GeV. The spectra of secondary neutrons produced by different energies of protons are similar, but the proportion of neutrons with higher energy gradually increases as the proton energy increases

  14. Testing universality of cosmic-ray acceleration with proton/helium data from AMS and Voyager-1

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The AMS experiment has recently measured the proton and helium spectra in cosmic rays (CRs) in the GeV-TeV energy region. The two spectra are found to progressively harden at rigidity $R = pc/Z >\\,$200 GV, while the p/He ratio is found to fall off steadily as $p/He\\sim\\,R^{-0.08}$. The p/He decrease is often interpreted in terms of particle-dependent acceleration, which is in contrast with the universal nature of DSA mechanisms. A different explanation is that the p-He anomaly reflects a flux transition between two components: a sub-TeV flux component (L) provided by hydrogen-rich supernova remnants with soft acceleration spectra, and a multi-TeV component (G) injected by younger sources with amplified magnetic fields and hard spectra. In this scenario the universality of particle acceleration is not violated because both sources provide composition-blind injection spectra. The present work is aimed at testing this model using the low-energy CR flux which is expected to be L-dominated. However, at $E\\sim\\,$0....

  15. Decursin was Accelerated Human Lung Cancer Cell Death Caused by Proton Beam Irradiation via Blocking the p42/44 MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Ra, Se Jin; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Decursin, which is one of the extract of Angelica gigas Nakai root, has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine as a tonic and for treatment of anemia and other common diseases. There are some reports about the pharmacological properties of decursin showing anti-bacterial and anti-amnestic effect, depression of cardiac contraction, antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity. Cell death induced by proton beam is identified as apoptosis. The study investigated that genes involved in apoptosis are checked by RT-PCR and used LET instead of SPBP of proton beam. Apoptosis is the tight regulated by multi-protein action in physiological cell death program. Proton therapy is an attractive approach for the treatment of deep-seated tumor. Recently, many researchers tried to new therapeutic strategy, combination of proton therapy and chemotherapy, in order to increase therapeutic effect. In this study, we investigate whether decursin can accelerate effect of human lung cell apoptosis in proton irradiated cancer cells

  16. A Data-Driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-Scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kozarev, Kamen A

    2016-01-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona (Kozarev et al. 2015), using remote observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory's Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front's surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model's performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate ...

  17. DTL cavity design and beam dynamics for a TAC linear proton accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, A.; Yılmaz, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 30 mA drift tube linac (DTL) accelerator has been designed using SUPERFISH code in the energy range of 3-55 MeV in the framework of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project. Optimization criteria in cavity design are effective shunt impedance (ZTT), transit-time factor and electrical breakdown limit. In geometrical optimization we have aimed to increase the energy gain in each RF gap of the DTL cells by maximizing the effective shunt impedance (ZTT) and the transit-time factor. Beam dynamics studies of the DTL accelerator have been performed using beam dynamics simulation codes of PATH and PARMILA. The results of both codes have been compared. In the beam dynamical studies, the rms values of beam emittance have been taken into account and a low emittance growth in both x and y directions has been attempted.

  18. DTL cavity design and beam dynamics for a TAC linear proton accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Caliskan; M. Yi1maz

    2012-01-01

    A 30 mA drift tube linac (DTL) accelerator has been designed using SUPERFISH code in the energy range of 3-55 MeV in the framework of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project.Optimization criteria in cavity design are effective shunt impedance (ZTT),transit-time factor and electrical breakdown limit.In geometrical optimization we have aimed to increase the energy gain in each RF gap of the DTL cells by maximizing the effective shunt impedance (ZTT) and the transit-time factor.Beam dynamics studies of the DTL accelerator have been performed using beam dynamics simulation codes of PATH and PARMILA.The results of both codes have been compared.In the beam dynamical studies,the rms values of beam emittance have been taken into account and a low emittance growth in both x and y directions has been attempted.

  19. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  20. Study of response of {sup 3}He detectors to monoenergetic neutrons; Etude des reponses des detecteurs a {sup 3}He par des neutrons monoenergetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Andriamonje, S.; Arnould, H.; Barreau, G.; Bercion, M. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Del Moral, R. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Gonzales, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Lacoste, V.; Pdemay, G.; Pravikoff, M.S. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); TARC Collaboration under leadership of C. Rubbia

    1997-06-01

    In the search of a hybrid system (the coupling of the particle accelerator to an under-critical reactor) for radioactive waste transmutation the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) program has been developed. Due to experimental limitations, the time-energy relation at higher neutron energies, particularly, around 2 MeV, which is an important domain for TARC, cannot be applied. Consequently the responses of the {sup 3}He ionization neutron detector developed for TARC experiment have been studied using a fast monoenergetic neutron source. The neutrons were produced by the interaction of the proton delivered by Van de Graaff accelerator of CENBG. The originality of the detector consists in its structure of three series of electric conductors which are mounted around the anode: a grid ensuring the detector proportionality, a cylindrical suit of alternating positive voltage and grounded wires aiming at eliminating the radial end effects, serving as veto and two cylinders serving as end plugs to eliminate the perpendicular end effects. Examples of anode spectra conditioned (in anticoincidence) by the mentioned vetoes are given. One can see the contribution of the elastic scattering from H and {sup 3}He. By collimating the neutron beam through a borated polyethylene system it was possible to obtain a mapping of the detector allowing the study of its response as a function of the irradiated zones (anode and grid) 2 refs. This paper is related to TRN FR9810178

  1. Use of a Van de Graaff proton accelerator for neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron radiographic capability has been established at the Pantex ERDA Plant. A 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator is being used to make neutron radiographs in order to observe defects of explosives encased in metal containers and ''O'' ring integrity

  2. Use of a Van de Graaff proton accelerator for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, J.P.

    1976-12-01

    A neutron radiographic capability has been established at the Pantex ERDA Plant. A 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator is being used to make neutron radiographs in order to observe defects of explosives encased in metal containers and ''O'' ring integrity.

  3. Evidence of resonant surface wave excitation in the relativistic regime through measurements of proton acceleration from grating targets

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccotti, T; Sgattoni, A; Bigongiari, A; Raynaud, M; Riconda, C; Heron, A; Baffigi, F; Labate, L; Gizzi, L A; Vassura, L; Fuchs, J; Passoni, M; Kveton, M; Novotny, F; Possolt, M; Prokupek, J; Proska, J; Psikal, J; Stolcova, L; Velyhan, A; Bougeard, M; D'Oliveira, P; Tcherbakoff, O; Reau, F; Martin, P; Macchi, A

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with thin grating targets, having a periodic groove at the irradiated surface, has been experimentally investigated. Ultrahigh contrast ($\\sim 10^{12}$) pulses allowed to demonstrate an enhanced laser-target coupling for the first time in the relativistic regime of ultra-high intensity $>10^{19} \\mbox{W/cm}^{2}$. A maximum increase by a factor of 2.5 of the cut-off energy of protons produced by Target Normal Sheath Acceleration has been observed with respect to plane targets, around the incidence angle expected for resonant excitation of surface waves. A significant enhancement is also observed for small angles of incidence, out of resonance.

  4. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Harjo, Stefanus; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hemmi, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Umeno, Takahiro [Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 306-2611 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  5. Design of 7 MeV drift tube linac as injector of proton accelerator for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 324 MHz drift-tube linac(DTL) is designed for proton cancer therapy. The design demands low power dissipation and short tank. The DTL accelerates beam from 2.5 MeV to 7 MeV, with RF power of 265 kW and total length of 1.9 m. The DTL uses permanent-quadrupole magnet(PQM) inside the drift tubes arranged in an FODO lattice. A new matching method is designed. In stead of the traditional beam transport line, the first four cells in DTL are designed as matching section. It causes the beam ellipse from radio-frequency quadrupole linac(RFQ) to satisfy conditions specified by the DTL periodic structure. The dynamics simulation was performed with PARMILA, and almost no emittance growth has been found. (authors)

  6. STEREO/SEPT observations of upstream particle events: almost monoenergetic ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klassen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of Almost Monoenergetic Ion (AMI events in the energy range of 100–1200 keV detected with the Solar Electron and Proton Telescope (SEPT onboard both STEREO spacecraft. The energy spectrum of AMI events contain 1, 2, or 3 narrow peaks with the relative width at half maximum of 0.1–0.7 and their energy maxima varies for different events from 120 to 1200 keV. These events were detected close to the bow-shock (STEREO-A&B and to the magnetopause at STEREO-B as well as unexpectedly far upstream of the bow-shock and far away from the magnetotail at distances up to 1100 RE (STEREO-B and 1900 RE (STEREO-A. We discuss the origin of AMI events, the connection to the Earth's bow-shock and to the magnetosphere, and the conditions of the interplanetary medium and magnetosphere under which these AMI bursts occur. Evidence that the detected spectral peaks were caused by quasi-monoenergetic beams of protons, helium, and heavier ions are given. Furthermore, we present the spatial distribution of all AMI events from December 2006 until August 2007.

  7. Search for monoenergetic γ rays from psi (3684) decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported of a search for monoenergetic γ rays with energies above 50 MeV from psi (3684) decay using large NaI(Tl) spectrometers. No clear evidence for emission of such radiation was found

  8. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-06

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the {mu}m range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, {lambda}=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C{sup 6+} energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH{sub 2} targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C{sup 6+} (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil

  9. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the μm range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, λ=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C6+ energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH2 targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C6+ (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil targets at Trident with an

  10. Calibration of activation detectors in a monoenergetic neutron beam. Contribution to criticality dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation detectors have been calibrated for critical dosimetry applications. Measurements are made using a monoenergetic neutron flux. 14 MeV neutrons obtained par (D-T) reaction are produced by 150 kV accelerator. Neutron flux determined by different methods leads us to obtain an accuracy better than 6%. The present dosimetric system (Activation Neutron Spectrometer - SNAC) gives few informations in the (10 keV - 2 MeV) energetic range. The system has been improved and modified so that SNAC detectors must be read out by gamma spectrometer

  11. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm3 and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45 000

  12. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  13. Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  14. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  15. Characterization techniques for fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators and beam studies using the KURRI 150 MeV proton FFAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, S. L.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Rogers, C.; Prior, C. R.; Volat, L.; Haj Tahar, M.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Uesugi, T.; Mori, Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe the methods and tools used to characterize a 150 MeV proton scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Many of the techniques used are unique to this class of machine and are thus of relevance to any future FFAG accelerator. For the first time we detail systematic studies undertaken to improve the beam quality of the FFAG. The control of beam quality in this manner is crucial to demonstrating high power operation of FFAG accelerators in future.

  16. Tests of a Compton imaging prototype in a monoenergetic 4.44 MeV photon field—a benchmark setup for prompt gamma-ray imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C.; Bemmerer, D.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Hueso-González, F.; Pausch, G.; Römer, K.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Wagner, L.; Kormoll, T.

    2016-06-01

    The finite range of a proton beam in tissue opens new vistas for the delivery of a highly conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy. However, the actual particle range, and therefore the accurate dose deposition, is sensitive to the tissue composition in the proton path. Range uncertainties, resulting from limited knowledge of this tissue composition or positioning errors, are accounted for in the form of safety margins. Thus, the unverified particle range constrains the principle benefit of proton therapy. Detecting prompt γ-rays, a side product of proton-tissue interaction, aims at an on-line and non-invasive monitoring of the particle range, and therefore towards exploiting the potential of proton therapy. Compton imaging of the spatial prompt γ-ray emission is a promising measurement approach. Prompt γ-rays exhibit emission energies of several MeV. Hence, common radioactive sources cannot provide the energy range a prompt γ-ray imaging device must be designed for. In this work a benchmark measurement-setup for the production of a localized, monoenergetic 4.44 MeV γ-ray source is introduced. At the Tandetron accelerator at the HZDR, the proton-capture resonance reaction 15N(p,α γ4.439)12C is utilized. This reaction provides the same nuclear de-excitation (and γ-ray emission) occurrent as an intense prompt γ-ray line in proton therapy. The emission yield is quantitatively described. A two-stage Compton imaging device, dedicated for prompt γ-ray imaging, is tested at the setup exemplarily. Besides successful imaging tests, the detection efficiency of the prototype at 4.44 MeV is derived from the measured data. Combining this efficiency with the emission yield for prompt γ-rays, the number of valid Compton events, induced by γ-rays in the energy region around 4.44 MeV, is estimated for the prototype being implemented in a therapeutic treatment scenario. As a consequence, the detection efficiency turns out to be a key parameter for prompt

  17. Potential and energy of the monoenergetic electrons in an alternative ellipsoid bubble model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron acceleration in the bubble regime is considered during the intense laser-plasma interaction. The presented ellipsoid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical model, and it explains the monoenergetic electron trajectory more accurately. At the relativistic region, the maximum energy of electrons in the ellipsoid model is about 24% more than the spherical model, and this is confirmed by PIC and the measured experimental results reported here. The electron energy spectrum is also calculated, and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons ΔE/E for the ellipsoid model in the here reported condition is about 11% which is less than the one third that of the spherical model. It is in good agreement with the experimentally measured value in the same condition. In this regime, the parameters of the quasi-monoenergetic electrons output beam can be described more appropriately. In this work, 10 TW from 16.6 TW, 500 mJ, and 30-fs laser pulse was focused on the best matched point above a 2-mm-diameter pulsed He gas jet to obtain a stable ellipsoid bubble. Laser intensity of 1.42x1019 W cm-2 corresponding to a normalized vector potential of a0=2.6 focused in a 100-μm2 spot at the focal point and 1 mm above the edge of the gas jet with an electron density of 1x1019 cm-3 accelerates electrons to the relativistic velocities. The obtained monoenergetic electron energy spectrum is properly explained by the ellipsoid model introduced here.

  18. Development of a monoenergetic neutron beam (Theoretical aspects, experimental developments and applications); Desarrollo de un haz de neutrones monoenergeticos (Aspectos teoricos, desarrollos experimentales y aplicaciones)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela G, A

    2003-07-01

    By the use of a neutron time of flight system at the Tandem Accelerator of the National Nuclear Research Institute; with neutrons provided by means of the {sup 2} H(d, n) {sup 3} He we intend to use the associated particle technique in order to have monoenergetic neutrons. This neutron beam will be used both in basic and applied research. (Author)

  19. Transport of a high brightness proton beam through the Munich tandem accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, M., E-mail: marcus.moser@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Carli, W. [Beschleunigerlabor MLL, 85478 Garching (Germany); Peeper, K.; Reichart, P.; Urban, B.; Vallentin, T. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Dollinger, G., E-mail: guenther.dollinger@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Basic requirement for ion microprobes with sub-μm beam focus is a high brightness beam to fill the small phase space usually accepted by the ion microprobe with enough ion current for the desired application. We performed beam transport simulations to optimize beam brightness transported through the Munich tandem accelerator. This was done under the constraint of a maximum ion current of 10 μA that is allowed to be injected due to radiation safety regulations and beam power constrains. The main influence of the stripper foil in conjunction with intrinsic astigmatism in the beam transport on beam brightness is discussed. The calculations show possibilities for brightness enhancement by using astigmatism corrections and asymmetric filling of the phase space volume in the x- and y-direction.

  20. ActiWiz – optimizing your nuclide inventory at proton accelerators with a computer code

    CERN Document Server

    Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    When operating an accelerator one always faces unwanted, but inevitable beam losses. These result in activation of adjacent material, which in turn has an obvious impact on safety and handling constraints. One of the key parameters responsible for activation is the chemical composition of the material which often can be optimized in that respect. In order to facilitate this task also for non-expert users the ActiWiz software has been developed at CERN. Based on a large amount of generic FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations the software applies a specifically developed risk assessment model to provide support to decision makers especially during the design phase as well as common operational work in the domain of radiation protection.

  1. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O' Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  2. Electron and proton acceleration during the first ground level enhancement of solar cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Li, C; Sun, L P; Miroshnichenko, L I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 +/- 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 +/- 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active r...

  3. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.;

    2012-01-01

    and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage......We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons...

  4. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  5. Measurement of Neutron Yield Varing With Proton Energy in keV Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Wei; CHEN; Jun; LI; Chun-juan; LIU; Yi-na; WANG; Zhi-qiang; LUO; Hai-long; ZHANG; Wei-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>Because of the reaction of 45Sc(p, n)45Ti exhibits a series of resonance peaks, and the resonance width is very narrow. For producing monoenergetic neutron the thin target is used and the proton energy

  6. Numerical Study of Injection Mechanisms for Generation of Mono-Energetic Femtosecond Electron Bunch from the Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Takeru; Zhidkov, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration gradients of up to the order of 100GV/m and mono-energetic electron bunch up to 200MeV have recently been observed in several plasma cathode experiments. However, mechanisms of self-injection in plasma are not sufficiently clarified, presently. In this study, we carried out 2D PIC simulation to reveal the mechanisms of mono-energetic femtosecond electron bunch generation. We found two remarkable conditions for the generation: electron density gradient at vacuum-plasma interface and channel formation in plasma. Steep electron density gradient (~ plasma wave length) causes rapid injection and produces an electron bunch with rather high charge and less than 100fs duration. The channel formation guides an injected laser pulse and decreases the threshold of laser self-focusing, which leads to high electric field necessary for wave-breaking injection.

  7. Foundation of an analytical proton beamlet model for inclusion in a general proton dose calculation system

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, W

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a model for proton depth dose and lateral distributions based on Monte Carlo calculations (GEANT4) and an integration procedure of the Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE). The model accounts for the transport of primary and secondary protons, the creation of recoil protons and heavy recoil nuclei as well as lateral scattering of these contributions. The buildup, which is experimentally observed in higher energy depth dose curves, is modeled by inclusion of two different origins: 1. Secondary reaction protons with a contribution of ca. 65 % of the buildup (for monoenergetic protons). 2. Landau tails as well as Gaussian type of fluctuations for range straggling effects. All parameters of the model for initially monoenergetic proton beams have been obtained from Monte Carlo calculations or checked by them. Furthermore, there are a few parameters, which can be obtained by fitting the model to measured depth dose curves in order to describe individual characteristics of the beamline - the most important b...

  8. Suppression of multiple ion bunches and generation of monoenergetic ion beams in laser foil-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shan; Xie Bai-Song; Hong Xue-Ren; Wu Hai-Cheng; Aimierding Aimidula; Zhao Xue-Yan; Liu Ming-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, this paper shows that the formation of multiple ion bunches is disadvantageous to the generation of monoenergetic ion beams and can be suppressed by choosing an optimum target thickness in the radiation pressure acceleration mechanism by a circularly polarised laser pulse. As the laser pulse becomes intense, the optimum target thickness obtained by a non-relativistic treatment is no longer adequate. Considering the relativistic Doppler-shifted pressure, it proposes a relativistic formulation to determine the optimum target thickness. The theoretical predictions agree with the simulation results well. The model is also valid for two-dimensional cases. The accelerated ion beams can be compelled to be more stable by choosing the optimum target thickness when they exhibit some unstable behaviours.

  9. Nonlinear Alfvén waves, discontinuities, proton perpendicular acceleration, and magnetic holes/decreases in interplanetary space and the magnetosphere: intermediate shocks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Tsurutani

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Alfvén waves, discontinuities, proton perpendicular acceleration and magnetic decreases (MDs in interplanetary space are shown to be interrelated. Discontinuities are the phase-steepened edges of Alfvén waves. Magnetic decreases are caused by a diamagnetic effect from perpendicularly accelerated (to the magnetic field protons. The ion acceleration is associated with the dissipation of phase-steepened Alfvén waves, presumably through the Ponderomotive Force. Proton perpendicular heating, through instabilities, lead to the generation of both proton cyclotron waves and mirror mode structures. Electromagnetic and electrostatic electron waves are detected as well. The Alfvén waves are thus found to be both dispersive and dissipative, conditions indicting that they may be intermediate shocks. The resultant 'turbulence' created by the Alfvén wave dissipation is quite complex. There are both propagating (waves and nonpropagating (mirror mode structures and MDs byproducts. Arguments are presented to indicate that similar processes associated with Alfvén waves are occurring in the magnetosphere. In the magnetosphere, the 'turbulence' is even further complicated by the damping of obliquely propagating proton cyclotron waves and the formation of electron holes, a form of solitary waves. Interplanetary Alfvén waves are shown to rapidly phase-steepen at a distance of 1AU from the Sun. A steepening rate of ~35 times per wavelength is indicated by Cluster-ACE measurements. Interplanetary (reverse shock compression of Alfvén waves is noted to cause the rapid formation of MDs on the sunward side of corotating interaction regions (CIRs. Although much has been learned about the Alfvén wave phase-steepening processfrom space plasma observations, many facets are still not understood. Several of these topics are discussed for the interested researcher. Computer simulations and theoretical developments will be particularly useful in making further progress in

  10. Implementation of a mass spectrometer operating in the external beam of a proton accelerator. Application to the study of short-lived isotopes produced by uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation and use of a mass spectrometer operating directly in the external beam of a proton accelerator has proven to be a very fruitful way to study short-lived nuclides in both areas covered: measuring production cross sections and nuclear spectroscopy. The results obtained in this work are only a first step and can be developed in different directions in which the study was discussed and an extension to elements other than alkali may be considered. (author)

  11. The precise energy spectra measurement of laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and protons using CR-39 detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasaki, M.; Jinno, S.; Sakaki, H.; Kondo, K.; Oda, K.; Yamauchi, T.; Fukuda, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis method, using a combination of a permanent magnet and CR-39 track detectors, has been developed to separately measure the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and that of MeV protons. The main role of magnet is separating between high-Z ions and protons, not for the usual energy spectrometer, while ion energy was precisely determined from careful analysis of the etch pit shapes and the etch pit growth behaviors in the CR-39. The method was applied to laser-driven ion acceleration experiments using CO2 clusters embedded in a background H2 gas. Ion energy spectra with uncertainty ΔE  =  0.1 MeV n‑1 for protons and carbon/oxygen ions were simultaneously obtained separately. The maximum energies of carbon/oxygen ions and protons were determined as 1.1  ±  0.1 MeV and 1.6  ±  0.1 MeV n‑1, respectively. The sharp decrease around 1 MeV n‑1 observed in the energy spectrum of carbon/oxygen ions could be due to a trace of the ambipolar hydrodynamic expansion of CO2 clusters. Thanks to the combination of the magnet and the CR-39, the method is robust against electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

  12. Novel recoil nuclei detectors to qualify the AMANDE facility as a Standard for mono-energetic neutron fields

    OpenAIRE

    Allaoua, A.; Guillaudin, O.; Higueret, S.; Husson, D.; Lebreton, L.; Mayet, F.; Nourreddine, M.; Santos, D.; Trichet, A.

    2008-01-01

    The AMANDE facility at IRSN-Cadarache produces mono-energetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV with metrological quality. To be considered as a standard facility, characteristics of neutron field i.e fluence distribution must be well known by a device using absolute measurements. The development of new detector systems allowing a direct measurement of neutron energy and fluence has started in 2006. Using the proton recoil telescope principle with the goal of increase the efficiency, two sy...

  13. Directional Searches at DUNE for Sub-GeV Monoenergetic Neutrinos Arising from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Rott, Carsten; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider the use of directionality in the search for monoenergetic sub-GeV neutrinos arising from the decay of stopped kaons, which can be produced by dark matter annihilation in the core of the Sun. When these neutrinos undergo charged-current interactions with a nucleus at a neutrino detector, they often eject a proton which is highly peaked in the forward direction. The direction of this track can be measured at DUNE, allowing one to distinguish signal from background by comparing on-source and off-source event rates. We find that directional information can enhance the signal to background ratio by up to a factor of 5.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals neuroprotection by oral minocycline in a nonhuman primate model of accelerated NeuroAIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Ratai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders continue to be a significant problem. In efforts to understand and alleviate neurocognitive deficits associated with HIV, we used an accelerated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV macaque model of NeuroAIDS to test whether minocycline is neuroprotective against lentiviral-induced neuronal injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven rhesus macaques were infected with SIV, depleted of CD8+ lymphocytes, and studied until eight weeks post inoculation (wpi. Seven animals received daily minocycline orally beginning at 4 wpi. Neuronal integrity was monitored in vivo by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and post-mortem by immunohistochemistry for synaptophysin (SYN, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2, and neuronal counts. Astrogliosis and microglial activation were quantified by measuring glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA-1, respectively. SIV infection followed by CD8+ cell depletion induced a progressive decline in neuronal integrity evidenced by declining N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr, which was arrested with minocycline treatment. The recovery of this ratio was due to increases in NAA, indicating neuronal recovery, and decreases in Cr, likely reflecting downregulation of glial cell activation. SYN, MAP2, and neuronal counts were found to be higher in minocycline-treated animals compared to untreated animals while GFAP and IBA-1 expression were decreased compared to controls. CSF and plasma viral loads were lower in MN-treated animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, oral minocycline alleviates neuronal damage induced by the AIDS virus.

  15. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  16. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S; Wuerl, M; Assmann, W; Parodi, K [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Garching, DE (Germany); Greubel, C [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Neubiberg, DE (United States); Wilkens, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, DE (Germany); Hillbrand, M [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, DE (Germany); Mairani, A [Medical Physics Unit CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET being almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence

  17. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    CERN Document Server

    Perinati, E; Kendziorra, E; Santangelo, A; Tenzer, C; Jochum, J; Bugiel, S; Srama, R; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Rubini, A; Rachevski, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Rashevskaya, I; Vacchi, A; Azzarello, P; Bozzo, E; Herder, J -W den; Zane, S; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; Leutenegger, M A; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Meidinger, N; Strüder, L; Cordier, B; Götz, D; Fraser, G W; Osborne, J P; Dennerl, K; Freyberg, M; Friedrich, P

    2012-01-01

    We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper-velocity dust tests respectively. We present the experimental set-up adopted to perform the tests, status of the activities...

  18. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  19. Study of a spoke-type superconducting cavity for high power proton accelerators; Etude d'une cavite acceleratrice supraconductrice Spoke pour les accelerateurs de protons de forte intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olry, G

    2003-04-01

    Since a few years, a lot of projects (especially dedicated to transmutation, radioactive beams production, spallation neutron sources or neutrinos factories) are based on high power proton linear accelerators. It has been demonstrated, thanks to their excellent RF performances, that superconducting elliptical cavities represent the best technological solution for the high energy part of these linacs (proton energy from typically 100 MeV). On the contrary, between 5 and 100 MeV, nothing is clearly settled and intensive studies on low-beta cavities are under progress. The main objective of this thesis is the study of a new low-beta cavity, called 'spoke', which could be used in the low energy part of European XADS (experimental accelerator driven system) and EURISOL (European isotope separation on-line) accelerators projects. A complete study of a beta 0.35 spoke cavity has been done: from its electromagnetic and mechanical optimization to warm and, above all, cold experimental tests: an accelerating field of 12.2 MV/m has been reached at T=4.2 K, that is to say one of the best value among the spoke cavities performances in the world. It has been shown that the specific ratio of a third, between the spoke bar diameter and the cavity length, led to optimize the surface electromagnetic fields. Moreover, spoke cavities can be used without any trouble, in the low energy part, due to their good rigidity. The experimental measurements performed on the cavity have confirmed the theoretical calculations, especially, concerning the expected frequency and mechanical behavior. Another study, performed on elliptical cavities, gave an explanation of the discrepancies between the measured and calculated frequencies thanks to a precise 3-dimensional geometrical control. (author)

  20. Thermalization of monoenergetic neutrons in a concrete room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez, M.P.; Martin M, A. [Universidad de Valladolid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The thermalization of neutrons from monoenergetic neutron sources in a concrete room has been studied. During calibration of neutron detectors it is mandatory to make corrections due to neutron scattering produced by the room walls, therefore this factor must be known in advance. The scattered neutrons are thermalized and produce a neutron field that is directly proportional to source strength and inversely proportional to room total wall-surfaces, the proportional coefficient has been calculated for neutrons whose energy goes from 1 eV to 20 MeV. This coefficient was calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 150, 200 and 300 cm-radius spherical cavity, where monoenergetic neutrons were located at the center, along the spherical cavity radius neutron spectra were calculated at several source-to-detector distances inside the cavity. The obtained coefficient is almost three times larger than the factor normally utilized. (Author)

  1. A 0.5 to 3.0 MeV monoenergetic positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adjustable, 0.5--3 MeV monoenergetic positron beam has been constructed at Brookhaven. Currently a 22Na source with a W(100) foil transmission moderator produces a 1.1 mm FWHN beam with an intensity of 3/times/105 e+/sec at a target located downstream from the accelerator. The divergence of the beam is less than 0.1/degree/ at 2.2 MeV energy. A SOA gun with 2 lens transport system brings the beam to a focus at the entrance of an electrostatic 3 MeV Dynamitron accelerator. The post acceleration beam transport system comprises 3 focusing solenolds, 4 sets of steering magnets and a 90/degree/ double focusing bending magnet. The beam energy spread at the target is <1 keV FWHN deduced from the beam size. Below we describe the positron extraction optics and acceleration, the construction of the beamline and the beam diagnostic devices. The salient beam parameters are listed at the end of this paper. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. The Monte Carlo SRNA code as the engine in ISTAR proton dose planning software for the tesla accelerator installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the application of SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material composition. SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The compound nuclei decay was simulated by our own and the Russian MSDM models using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in the combinatorial geometry and SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of proton beam characterization by Multi-Layer Faraday Cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by SRNA-2KG code, and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate the immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumor. (author)

  3. The Monte Carlo srna code as the engine in istar proton dose planning software for the tesla accelerator installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material composition. SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The compound nuclei decay was simulated by our own and the Russian MSDM models using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in the combinatorial geometry and SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield’s data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of proton beam characterization by Multi-Layer Faraday Cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by SRNA-2KG code, and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate the immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in SRNA pack age, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumor.

  4. MCNP6 Simulation of Quasi-Monoenergetic 7Li(p,n) Neutron Sources below 150 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of MCNP6 to simulate quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources from interactions of proton beams with energies below 150 MeV on thick 7Li targets have been studied. Neutron spectra at zero degrees from a 2-mm 7Li layer backed by a 12-mm carbon beam stopper in an Al flange bombarded with protons of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 MeV have been calculated with MCNP6 using the recent Los Alamos data library as well as using the Bertini+Dresner and CEM03.03 event generators. A comparison with the experimental neutron spectra shows that the event generators do not do well in describing such reactions, while MCNP6 using the LANL data library simulates production of neutrons from p + 7Li in good agreement with the measured data.

  5. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather

  6. Nuclear reaction and penetration through matter of neutrons above 20 MeV using p-Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields above 20 MeV have been developed from Li(p,n) reaction at three laboratories in Japan (INS-SF cyclotron. CYRIC-AVF cyclotron and TIARA-AVF cyclotron) and are evaluated based on the measurement of the energy spectra. Penetration of 40.5 MeV monoenergetic neutrons (43 MeV proton energy) at TIARA through iron and concrete was investigated and the result agreed well with calculation with MORSE code using the cross section of DLC-119/HILO 86. Measurements of neutron activation and nuclear spallation cross section were carried out at INS and TIARA and the results were examined. (T.H.)

  7. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  8. Radiation environment in the tunnel of a high-energy proton accelerator at energies near 1 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron energy spectra, fluence distributions and rates in the FNAL Tevatron tunnel are summarized. This work has application to radiation damage to electronics and research equipment at high energy accelerators, as well as to radiological protection. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. Enabling pulse compression and proton acceleration in a modular ICF driver for nuclear and particle physics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Terranova, F.; Bulanov, S. V.; Collier, J L; Kiriyama, H.; Pegoraro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The existence of efficient ion acceleration regimes in collective laser-plasma interactions opens up the possibility to develop high-energy physics facilities in conjunction with projects for inertial confinement nuclear fusion (ICF) and neutron spallation sources. In this paper, we show that the pulse compression requests to make operative these acceleration mechanisms do not fall in contradiction with current technologies for high repetition rate ICF drivers. In particular, we discuss expli...

  10. Development of Laser-Driven Proton and Electron Sources Using APRI 100-TW Ti:Sapphire Laser System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI) in Korea, we have a Ti:sapphire laser system which delivers laser pulses of 100-TW peak power and 32-fs pulse duration at the repetition rate of 10 Hz. This laser facility is being used to develop compact laser-driven proton and electron sources. Energetic protons are produced by irradiating the laser pulse on a thin foil target made of copper and polyimide via the target normal sheath acceleration. Proton beam with maximum energy of up to 4 MeV was generated from a polyimide target, and showed high energy conversion efficiency from laser to proton energy. Generation of high-energy electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration was performed by focusing the laser pulses onto a 4 mm-long He-gas jet. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy of 45 MeV and maximum energy of 130 MeV was produced. The quality and characteristics of electron beams are strongly dependent on the laser-plasma interaction length which depends on focal length of the focusing optics

  11. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  12. Effects of density profile and multi-species target on laser-heated thermal-pressure-driven shock wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shock wave acceleration of ions driven by laser-heated thermal pressure is studied through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and analysis. The generation of high-energy mono-energetic protons in recent experiments (D. Haberberger et al., 2012 Nat. Phys. 8 95) is attributed to the use of exponentially decaying density profile of the plasma target. It does not only keep the shock velocity stable but also suppresses the normal target normal sheath acceleration. The effects of target composition are also examined, where a similar collective velocity of all ion species is demonstrated. The results also give some reference to future experiments of producing energetic heavy ions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. Self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations of proton acceleration in coronal shocks: Effect of anisotropic pitch-angle scattering of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Context. Solar energetic particles observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced by the CME-driven shock waves. The acceleration of particles is considered to be due to diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Aims. We aim at a better understanding of DSA in the case of quasi-parallel shocks, in which self-generated turbulence in the shock vicinity plays a key role. Methods. We have developed and applied a new Monte Carlo simulation code for acceleration of protons in parallel coronal shocks. The code performs a self-consistent calculation of resonant interactions of particles with Alfv\\'en waves based on the quasi-linear theory. In contrast to the existing Monte Carlo codes of DSA, the new code features the full quasi-linear resonance condition of particle pitch-angle scattering. This allows us to take anisotropy of particle pitch-angle scattering into account, while the older codes implement an approximate resonance condition leading to isotropic scattering.We performed simulations with...

  14. On the gamma-ray spectra radiated by protons accelerated in SNR shocks near molecular clouds: The case of SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    CERN Document Server

    Malkov, M A; Sagdeev, R Z

    2005-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) are thought to be accelerated in SNRs. The most favorable situation for proving that the main, hadronic CR component is accelerated there is when CRs interact with dense gases, such as molecular clouds (MC) which surround the SN shock. Here, a new mechanism of spectrum formation in partially ionized gases near SNRs is proposed. Using an analytic model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration, we calculate the spectra of protons and estimate the resulting $\\gamma$-ray emission occurring when the SNR shock approaches a MC. We show that the spectrum develops a break in the TeV range and that its GeV component is suppressed. These modifications to the standard theory occur because of the proximity of the partially ionized MC-gas and because of the physics of particle and Alfven wave propagation inside the gas. Possible applications of the new spectra to the recent CANGAROO and HESS observations of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of internal and external doses from $^{11}C$ produced in the air in high energy proton accelerator tunnels

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Kanda, Y; Oishi, T; Kondo, K

    2001-01-01

    Air has been irradiated with high energy protons at the 12 GeV proton synchrotron to obtain the following parameters essential for the internal dose evaluation from airborne /sup 11/C produced through nuclear spallation reactions: the abundance of gaseous and particulate /sup 11/C, chemical forms, and particle size distribution. It was found that more than 98% of /sup 11/C is present as gas and the rest is aerosol. The gaseous components were only /sup 11/CO and /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ and their proportions were approximately 80% and 20%, respectively. The particulate /sup 11/C was found to be sulphate and/or nitrate aerosols having a log-normal size distribution; the measurement using a diffusion battery showed a geometric mean radius of 0.035 mu m and a geometric standard deviation of 1.8 at a beam intensity of 6.8*10/sup 11/ proton.pulse /sup -1/ and an irradiation time of 9.6 min. By taking the chemical composition and particle size into account, effective doses both from internal and from external exposures pe...

  16. Fusion Energy and Stopping Power in a Degenerate DT Pellet Driven by a Laser-Accelerated Proton Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrangiz, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Jafari, S.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have improved the fast ignition scheme in order to have more authority needed for high-energy-gain. Due to the more penetrability and energy deposition of the particle beams in fusion targets, we employ a laser-to-ion converter foil as a scheme for generating energetic ion beams to ignite the fusion fuel. We find the favorable intensity and wavelength of incident laser by evaluating the laser-proton conversion gain. By calculating the source-target distance, proton beam power and energy are estimated. Our analysis is generalized to the plasma degeneracy effects which can increase the fusion gain several orders of magnitude by decreasing the ion-electron collisions in the plasma. It is found that the wavelength of 0.53 μm and the intensity of about 1020 W/cm2, by saving about 10% conversion coefficient, are the suitable measured values for converting a laser into protons. Besides, stopping power and fusion burn calculations have been done in degenerate and non-degenerate plasma mediums. The results indicate that in the presence of degeneracy, the rate of fusion enhances. Supported by the Research Council of University of Guilan

  17. Enabling pulse compression and proton acceleration in a modular ICF driver for nuclear and particle physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, F; Collier, J L; Kiriyama, H; Pegoraro, F

    2005-01-01

    The existence of efficient ion acceleration regimes in collective laser-plasma interactions opens up the possibility to develop high-energy physics facilities in conjunction with projects for inertial confinement nuclear fusion (ICF) and neutron spallation sources. In this paper, we show that the pulse compression requests to make operative these acceleration mechanisms do not fall in contradiction with current designs for an ICF driver. In particular, we discuss explicitly a solution that exploits optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and the intrinsic modularity of ICF power plants.

  18. Response of BGO sectors to protons up to 170 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to monoenergetic protons of 24 cm long pyramidal BGO sectors, designed for a 4π spectrometer, was measured up to 173 MeV by scattering 200 MeV protons off a polyethylene target. The experimental results are compared with lower energy results and Monte Carlo calculations performed with a modified version of the GEANT code. (orig.)

  19. N-V-related fluorescence of the monoenergetic high-energy electron-irradiated diamond nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Z. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Kladno (Czech Republic); Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha (Czech Republic). Institute of Physics; Micova, J. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Kladno (Czech Republic); Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha (Czech Republic). Institute of Physics; Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krist, P.; Chvatil, D. [Czech Academy of Sciences, Rez (Czech Republic). Department of Accelerators; Effenberg, R. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Nesladek, M. [Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research, Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Fluorescent diamond nanoparticles (FND) have recently been introduced as promising luminescent probes for bioimaging to compete with more commonly used fluorophores and quantum dots. In this work, we investigate the formation of NV color centers in diamond nanocrystallites using monoenergetic electrons. A large quantity (1.4 g) of FNDs has been irradiated in the cyclic relativistic electron accelerator (Microtron) with the surface charge up to 3C/cm{sup 2} using collimated accelerated electrons extracted with monochromatic energies 6-25 MeV. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have been activated by the high temperature vacuum annealing followed by the oxidation and sonification to remove sp2 carbon from the surface and to form stable colloid solutions with the concentration 1 mg/ml and the electro-kinetic (zeta) potential about -35 mV. The steady state fluorescence spectra show that the fluorescence yield increases linearly with the surface charge irradiation. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. N-V-related fluorescence of the monoenergetic high-energy electron-irradiated diamond nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent diamond nanoparticles (FND) have recently been introduced as promising luminescent probes for bioimaging to compete with more commonly used fluorophores and quantum dots. In this work, we investigate the formation of NV color centers in diamond nanocrystallites using monoenergetic electrons. A large quantity (1.4 g) of FNDs has been irradiated in the cyclic relativistic electron accelerator (Microtron) with the surface charge up to 3C/cm2 using collimated accelerated electrons extracted with monochromatic energies 6-25 MeV. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have been activated by the high temperature vacuum annealing followed by the oxidation and sonification to remove sp2 carbon from the surface and to form stable colloid solutions with the concentration 1 mg/ml and the electro-kinetic (zeta) potential about -35 mV. The steady state fluorescence spectra show that the fluorescence yield increases linearly with the surface charge irradiation. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Production yield of produced radioisotopes from 100 MeV proton beam on lead target for shielding analysis of large accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oranj, Leila Mokhtari; Oh, Joo Hee; Jung, Nam Suk; Bae, O Ryun; Lee, Hee Seock [Div. of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the production yield of major shielding material, a lead, was investigated using 100 MeV protons of KOMAC accelerator facility. For the analysis of the experimental data, the activity has been calculated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and analytical methods. The cross section data and the stopping power in the irradiated assembly were calculated by TALYS and SRIM codes in the analytical method, respectively. Consequently, the experimental production yield of produced radioisotopes was compared with the data that are based on Monte Carlo calculations and analytical studies. In this research, the {sup nat}Pb(p, x) reaction was studied using experimental measurements, Monte Carlo simulations and analytical methods. Rereading to the experimental measurements, we demonstrate that both Monte Carlo simulation and analytical methods could be useful tools for the estimation of production yield of this reaction.

  2. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Logan, B. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Lund, S. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bellei, C.; Cohen, R. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California 94551 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kim, J. [University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Alexander, N. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Aurand, B.; Brabetz, C.; Neumayer, P. [GSI-Darmstadt, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Roth, M. [TU-Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz 5, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure (“lens”) consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt “PHELIX” laser user facility (E = 100 J, Δt = 400 fs, λ = 1062 nm) at the “Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung–GSI” in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  3. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at the location of the target. Here, a comparison between the measured and calculated eigenvalues reveals a relative difference of around 10% in C/E values. A special mention is made of the fact that the reaction rate analyses in the subcritical systems demonstrate apparently the actual effect of moving the tungsten target into the core on neutron multiplication. A series of further ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons needs to be carried out to evaluate the accuracy of subcritical multiplication parameters.

  4. Implementation of the networked computer based control system for PEFP 100MeV proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Gi; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The 100MeV Radio Frequency (RF) linac for the pulsed proton source is under development in KAERI. The main systems of the linac, such as the general timing control, the high power RF system, the control system of klystrons, the power supply system of magnets, the vacuum subsystem, and the cooling system, should be integrated into the control system of PEFP. Various subsystems units of the linac are to be made by other manufacturers with different standards. The technical integration will be based upon Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software framework. The network attached computers, such as workstation, server, VME, and embedded system, will be applied as control devices. This paper is discussed on integration and implementation of the distributed control systems using networked computer systems.

  5. Laboratory Report (LR) to the paper Foundation of an analytical proton beamlet model for inclusion in a general proton dose calculation system [arXiv:1009.0832

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, W

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a model for proton depth dose and lateral distributions based on Monte Carlo calculations (GEANT4) and an integration procedure of the Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE). The model accounts for the transport of primary and secondary protons, the creation of recoil protons and heavy recoil nuclei as well as lateral scattering of these contributions. The buildup, which is experimentally observed in higher energy depth dose curves, is modeled by inclusion of two different origins: 1. Secondary reaction protons with a contribution of ca. 65 % of the buildup (for monoenergetic protons). 2. Landau tails as well as Gaussian type of fluctuations for range straggling effects. All parameters of the model for initially monoenergetic proton beams have been obtained from Monte Carlo calculations or checked by them. Furthermore, there are a few parameters, which can be obtained by fitting the model to measured depth dose curves in order to describe individual characteristics of the beamline - the most important b...

  6. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sattarian; Sh.Rahmatallahpur; T.Tohidi

    2013-01-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived.The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately,especially at the relativistic region.The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model.The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons △E/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions.As a result,the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model.

  7. Beam Matching Study of High Current Proton Accelerator%强流质子加速器束流匹配研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓英; 李宏昭; 马晓燕; 傅世年

    2009-01-01

    A high current proton accelerator requires very low beam losses in order to minimize the induced radioactivity to an acceptable level. Beam matching between the different accelerator sections is one of the key points to reduce the beam losses and emittance growth. A matching design study has been performed for the beam lines between the different types of normalconducting accelerating structures. In this paper, we will present the beamline design by TRACE3D code and multiparticle simulations of the beam behavior in different matching conditions. The results show that the beam halo and emittance growth have been well controlled with the matched design of the beam lines in both transversal and longitudinal directions.%为了使感生放射性降低到可以接受的水平,强流质子加速器必须减少束流损失.不同加速段间的束流匹配是减少束流损失和发射度增长的关键之一.研究了一台常温加速结构不同段间的束流传输线的匹配设计问题.采用TRACE3-D软件以及其他多粒子模拟软件,研究了在不同匹配状态下的束流特性.结果表明,设计所采用的横向和纵向匹配手段,能够有效地控制束晕产生和束流发射度的增长.

  8. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  9. Use of a 3-MV proton accelerator for study of noble gases, including laser ionization of excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a pulsed 3-MV accelerator to study energy pathways in the noble gases is described. The objectives of pathways research are to obtain (1) information on the spectrum of excited states produced by a charged particle in a noble gas, (2) the rate of decay of the various states through various channels as a function of gas pressure, and (3) the modification of the decay channels due to the introduction of foreign species. A new energy pathways model is presented for helium as a general illustration. A method for the study of excited states, using a laser ionization technique is reported. Use is made of a laser which is tuned to a resonance transition between the desired excited state and some higher excited state. Photons in the same pulse photoionize the higher excited state; thus the ionization current vs photon wavelength has a resonance structure. Absolute yields of selected excited states can be obtained whenever the photon fluence per pulse is large enough to saturate the ionization current. A general summary is given of experimental facilities which include a 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, electronics for measuring radiation lifetimes, vacuum ultraviolet spectrometers, and a pulsed laser facility for direct study of excited states. Finally, the relevance of pathways research to (1) the interaction of radiation with matter, (2) the development of gas lasers, and (3) methods of ultrasensitive elemental analysis is pointed out

  10. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitzer, C; Kronberger, M; Lettry, J; Sanchez-Arias, J; Störi, H

    2012-02-01

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H(-) volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e(-) and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H(-) ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H(-) ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed. PMID:22380224

  11. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Albert, Felicie; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Bayramian, Andy; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Cross, R.; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; McNabb, Dennis; /LLNL, Livermore; Messerly, Michael; /LLNL, Livermore; Shverdin, Miroslav; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  12. A PHOTOEMISSIVE MONOENERGETIC ELECTRON SOURCE FOR CALIBRATING THE BETA—MAGNETIC SPECTROMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志才; 孙汉城; 等

    1994-01-01

    A new kind of electron source,the photoemissive monoenergetic electron source has been inverted for calibrating the beta-magnetic spectrometer.It produces electrons in the form of simulating a radioactive monoenergetic electron source and can be made in any shape and size according to the demands of experiments.In this paper.the principles and basic constructions of the photoemissive monoenergetic electron source are listed.a new way for determining resolution function of experimental system in the resarch of neutrino rest mass has been posed and one of its actual applications is also given.

  13. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity

  14. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity.

  15. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10-3 eV up to 107 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  16. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p,α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd⁎, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e(ϕ,γ)e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV≤mϕ≤2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10−11≤gegp≤10−7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the “proton charge radius puzzle”, thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities

  17. Developement of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of low energy high current beam transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Cho, M. H.; Kim, K. N.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Shim, K. Y. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    We have designed the beam transport system to connect the ion source and the RFQ. In this design, we have finalized the positions of solenoids and various beam diagnostic device. We have finalize the physical and mechanical designs of solenoids, and these designs are already adopted to produce the actual solenoids. We have also studied about EPICS, Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System, to control a stepper motor as a tuner of the RFQ designed for KOMACEPICS is a real time control system for a large scale system such as accelerators and tokamaks. The purpose of this thesis is to establish a test system based on the EPICS. A Sun UtraSPARC 5 workstation is used as the Operator Interface(OPI) console, and a VME chassis contained a Motorola MVME162 single board computer is used as the Input/Output Controller(IOC). A stepper motor controller is connected to the IOC via an RS-232C as a field bus. The EPICS base, extensions, and the real time OS vxWorks are installed on the workstation. The real time OS image can be downloaded to the IOC via the FTP when the test station is started. We have installed an IOC application as a device and driver support layer for the serial communication with an RS-232C on the workstation. We have designed the IOC database configuration files and a graphic user interface style OPI panel which was programmed by the MEDM. With this OPI, we can control the stepper motor using EPICS. 17 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  18. Performance degradation studies on an poly 2,5-benzimidazole high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell using an accelerated degradation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Guo-Bin; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Yan, Wei-Mon

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the performance degradation of a poly 2,5-benzimidazole (ABPBI) based high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) was examined using an accelerated degradation technique (ADT). Experiments using an ADT with 30 min intervals were performed by applying 1.5 V to a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with hydrogen and nitrogen feeding to the anode and cathode, respectively, to simulate the high voltage generated during fuel cell shutdown and restart. The characterization of the MEAs was performed using in-situ and ex-situ electrochemical methods, such as polarization curves, AC impedance, and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and TEM imaging before and after the ADT experiments. The measured results demonstrated that the ADT testing could be used to dramatically reduce the duration of the degradation. The current output at 0.4 V decreased by 48% after performing ADT testing for 30 min. From the AC impedance, CV and RTGA measurements, the decline in cell performance was found to be primarily due to corrosion and thinning of the catalyst layer (or carbon support) during the first 30 min, leading to the dissolution and agglomeration of the platinum catalyst.

  19. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  20. Laser driven particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation summarizes the last ten years of research at the Laboratory of Applied Optics on laser-plasma based electron acceleration. The main result consists of the development and study of a relativistic electron source with unique properties: high energy (100-300 MeV) in short distances (few millimeters), mono-energetic, ultra-short (few fs), stable and tunable. The manuscript describes the steps that led to understanding the physics, and then mastering it in order to produce this new electron source. Non linear propagation of the laser pulse in the plasma is first presented, with phenomena such as non linear wakefield excitation, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing in the short pulse regime, self-compression. Acceleration and injection of electrons are then reviewed from a theoretical perspective. Experimental demonstrations of self-injection in the bubble regime and then colliding pulse injection are then presented. These experiments were among the first to produce monoenergetic, high quality, stable and tunable electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator. The last two chapters are dedicated to the characterization of the electron beam using transition radiation and to its applications to gamma radiography and radiotherapy. Finally, the perspectives of this research are presented in the conclusion. Scaling laws are used to determine the parameters that the electron beams will reach using peta-watt laser systems currently under construction. (author)

  1. Pulsed SC Proton Linac

    OpenAIRE

    Ouchi, N.; Chishiro, E.; Tsukishima, C.; Mukugi, K.

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) proton linac is proposed in the JAERI/KEK Joint Project for a high-intensity proton accelerator in the energy region from 400 to 600 MeV. Highly stable fields in the SC cavities are required under the dynamic Lorentz force detuning. A new model describing the dynamic Lorentz detuning has been developed and the validity has been confirmed experimentally. The model has been applied successfully to the rf control simulation of the SC proton linac.

  2. The proton microquasar

    OpenAIRE

    Vila, Gabriela S.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for high-energy emission in microquasars where the energy content of the jets is dominated by relativistic protons. We also include a primary leptonic component. Particles are accelerated up to relativistic energies in a compact region located near the base of the jet, where most of the emission is produced. We calculate the production spectrum due to proton and electron synchrotron radiation and photohadronic interactions. The target field for proton-photon collisions is p...

  3. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  4. Monoenergetic computed tomography reconstructions reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzmann, Paul; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Schwendener, Nicole; Alkadhi, Hatem; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of monoenergetic computed tomography (CT) images to reduce beam hardening artifacts in comparison to standard CT images of dental restoration on dental post-mortem CT (PMCT). Thirty human decedents (15 male, 58 ± 22 years) with dental restorations were examined using standard single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT). DECT data were used to generate monoenergetic CT images, reflecting the X-ray attenuation at energy levels of 64, 69, 88 keV, and at an individually adjusted optimal energy level called OPTkeV. Artifact reduction and image quality of SECT and monoenergetic CT were assessed objectively and subjectively by two blinded readers. Subjectively, beam artifacts decreased visibly in 28/30 cases after monoenergetic CT reconstruction. Inter- and intra-reader agreement was good (k = 0.72, and k = 0.73 respectively). Beam hardening artifacts decreased significantly with increasing monoenergies (repeated-measures ANOVA p < 0.001). Artifact reduction was greatest on monoenergetic CT images at OPTkeV. Mean OPTkeV was 108 ± 17 keV. OPTkeV yielded the lowest difference between CT numbers of streak artifacts and reference tissues (-163 HU). Monoenergetic CT reconstructions significantly reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations and improve image quality of post-mortem dental CT.

  5. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  6. Foundation of an analytical proton beamlet model for inclusion in a general proton dose calculation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, W.; Schaffner, B.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a model for proton depth dose and lateral distributions based on Monte Carlo calculations (GEANT4) and an integration procedure of Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE). The model accounts for the transport of primary and secondary protons, the creation of recoil protons and heavy recoil nuclei as well as lateral scattering of these contributions. The buildup, which is experimentally observed in higher energy depth dose curves, is modeled by an inclusion of two different origins: (1) secondary reaction protons with a contribution of ca. 65% of the buildup (for monoenergetic protons). (2) Landau tails as well as Gaussian type of fluctuations for range straggling effects. All parameters of the model for initially monoenergetic proton beams have been obtained from Monte Carlo calculations or checked by them. Furthermore, there are a few parameters, which can be obtained by fitting the model to the measured depth dose curves in order to describe individual characteristics of the beamline—the most important being the initial energy spread. We find that the free parameters of the depth dose model can be predicted for any intermediate energy from a couple of measured curves.

  7. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  8. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  9. 飞秒激光中高能质子的产生与加速的研究%Study of high energy protons generate and accelerate in femtosecond laser interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昌军; 王光昶; 王亚平; 张建炜; 郑志坚

    2014-01-01

    To study the generation and the acceleration mechanisms of high energy protons in the interac-tion of femtosecond laser with solid targets ,the high energy protons behavior at the normal direction of the rear surface of the target produced from ultraintense pulse laser irradiated Cu thin film solid targets is explored on SILEX-I laser facility .The solid nuclear detector CR39 and Thomson spectrum are used to detect the spatial distribution ,energy spectrum and yields of protons .T he result show that the pro-tons are emitted from the normal direction of target -back ,protons have the circular annular space dis-tribution and there is a solid angle in them ,the protons have a certain cut -off energy w hich depends up-on the thickness of the target .It is found that the high -energy proton generation and acceleration are due to the sum of a variety of mechanisms of joint action .Among them ,the electrostatic field TNSA ac-celeration mechanism is dominant .%为了探索飞秒激光与固体靶相互作用中高能质子的产生和加速机制,在超短超强激光装置“SI-L EX-I”上进行了飞秒激光与平面固体薄膜C u靶的相互作用中高能质子空间分布、能谱和产额的实验研究。实验采用固体核径迹探测器CR39和Thomson离子谱仪相结合的方式,在固体靶背表面法线方向测量了质子空间分布、能谱和产额。实验结果表明:质子沿着靶背法线方向发射,质子空间分布呈圆环状,存在一定的立体角;质子在一定能量处出现截断;截断能量的大小与靶厚度有关。经分析,高能离子的产生和加速是多种作用机制共同作用的结果,其中静电场中的T NSA加速机制则占主导地位。

  10. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    OpenAIRE

    Carbajo, Sergio; Nanni, Emilio A.; Wong, Liang Jie; Moriena, Gustavo; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008)]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London) 43...

  11. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO(2) lasers for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Shkolnikov, P. Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C.A.J.; Dover, N.P.; Oliva, P; Carpinelli, M.

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO{sub 2} lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle-sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO{sub 2} lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO{sub 2} laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO{sub 2} laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-{mu}m ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO{sub 2} gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO{sub 2} lasers in medicine and other areas.

  12. Is it Possible To Generate nC, Mono-Energetic Electron Beams at 1GeV and Beyond Using Existing or Near Term Lasers via LWFA?

    CERN Document Server

    Tzoufras, Michail; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; Shih Yu Tsung, Frank; Silva, Luis O

    2005-01-01

    Recently, several groups around the world observed mono-energetic beams between 80 MeV and 170 MeV using ~15 TW lasers. We have begun a comprehensive study of the acceleration of electrons by the interaction of ultra-intense short and ultra-short laser pulses with underdense plasma. We concentrate our parameter space to existing and near term laser parameters, i.e., laser parameters between 30 and 100 TW. We use 3D particle in cell simulations using the code OSIRIS. The goal is to show that the generation of mono-energetic beams with energy beyond 1GeV with current and near future laser systems is possible without the need for any external injection. In this ultra-relativistic regime the laser blows out all the electrons forming an almost spherical cavity. Some electrons are self-injected in the blowout region and accelerated by the laser wakefield to ultrahigh energy. In order to maximize the energy gain, the beam charge and quality, we need an improved understanding of the wakefield generation as well as of...

  13. The cross-section data from neutron activation experiments on niobium in the NPI p-7Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honusek, M.; Bém, P.; Fischer, U.; Götz, M.; Novák, J.; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, E.

    2010-10-01

    The reaction of protons on 7Li target produces the high-energy quasi- monoenergetic neutron spectrum with the tail to lower energies. Proton energies of 19.8, 25.1, 27.6, 30.1, 32.6, 35.0 and 37.4 MeV were used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with energies of 18, 21.6, 24.8, 27.6, 30.3, 32.9 and 35.6 MeV, respectively. Nb cross-section data for neutron energies higher than 22.5 MeV do not exist in the literature. Nb is the important material for fusion applications (IFMIF) as well. The variable-energy proton beam of NPI cyclotron is utilized for the production of neutron field using thin lithium target. The carbon backing serves as the beam stopper. The system permits to produce neutron flux density about 109 n/cm2/s in peak at 30 MeV neutron energy. The niobium foils of 15 mm in diameter and approx. 0.75 g weight were activated. The nuclear spectroscopy methods with HPGe detector technique were used to obtain the activities of produced isotopes. The large set of neutron energies used in the experiment allows us to make the complex study of the cross-section values. The reactions (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,4n), (n,He3), (n,α) and (n,2nα) are studied. The cross-sections data of the (n,4n) and (n,2nα) are obtained for the first time. The cross-sections of (n,2n) and (n,α) reactions for higher neutron energies are strongly influenced by low energy tail of neutron spectra. This effect is discussed. The results are compared with the EAF-2007 library.

  14. The cross-section data from neutron activation experiments on niobium in the NPI p-7Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov S.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of protons on 7Li target produces the high-energy quasi- monoenergetic neutron spectrum with the tail to lower energies. Proton energies of 19.8, 25.1, 27.6, 30.1, 32.6, 35.0 and 37.4 MeV were used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with energies of 18, 21.6, 24.8, 27.6, 30.3, 32.9 and 35.6 MeV, respectively. Nb cross-section data for neutron energies higher than 22.5 MeV do not exist in the literature. Nb is the important material for fusion applications (IFMIF as well. The variable-energy proton beam of NPI cyclotron is utilized for the production of neutron field using thin lithium target. The carbon backing serves as the beam stopper. The system permits to produce neutron flux density about 109  n/cm2/s in peak at 30 MeV neutron energy. The niobium foils of 15 mm in diameter and approx. 0.75 g weight were activated. The nuclear spectroscopy methods with HPGe detector technique were used to obtain the activities of produced isotopes. The large set of neutron energies used in the experiment allows us to make the complex study of the cross-section values. The reactions (n,2n, (n,3n, (n,4n, (n,He3, (n,α and (n,2nα are studied. The cross-sections data of the (n,4n and (n,2nα are obtained for the first time. The cross-sections of (n,2n and (n,α reactions for higher neutron energies are strongly influenced by low energy tail of neutron spectra. This effect is discussed. The results are compared with the EAF-2007 library.

  15. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  16. Hadron accelerators in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaldi, U. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). Accelerator School; Silari, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadron-therapy Project is then described in some detail, with reference ro both the National Centre for Oncological Hadron-therapy and the design of different types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large umber of hospitals. (author) 28 refs.

  17. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Proton Therapy Proton therapy delivers radiation to tumor tissue ... feel during and after the procedure? What is proton therapy and how is it used? Protons are ...

  18. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  19. Mono-Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth,Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Cary, John R.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Nieter, Chet

    2005-05-09

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L'OASIS laser, the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200 pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at< 2pi-mm-mrad were produced. Data and simulations (VORPAL code) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was guided without trapping, potentially providing a platform for controlled injection. The plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, with high gradients and high beam quality.

  20. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  1. Experimental study on scintillation efficiency of ZnO:In to proton response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liang; OUYANG Xiao-Ping; ZHANG Zhong-Bing; XIA Liang-Bin; LIU Jin-Liang; ZHANG Xian-Peng; LIU Lin-Yue

    2011-01-01

    Film ZnO:In crystal is a good candidate for a scintillation recoil proton neutron detection system and the response of ZnO:In to protons is a crucial point.The energy response of ZnO:In to mono-energetic protons in the range of 10 keV-8 MeV was measured.The experiment was carried out in current mode,and Au foil scattering was employed,where the forward scattering protons were used for exciting the sample,and the backward scattering protons were used for monitoring the beam intensity.According to the result,the yield of light non-linearly depends on proton energy,and drops significantly when proton energy is low.The scintillation efficiency as a function of proton energy was obtained,which is very useful for researching the scintillation recoil proton neutron detection system.

  2. A Solid state accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible, but channeling radiation limits the maximum attainable energy to 105 TeV for protons. Beam dechanneling due to multiple scattering is substantially reduced by the high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed

  3. Scanning of irradiated silicon detectors using $\\alpha$ particles and low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Kohout, Z; Konícek, J; Lemeilleur, F; Leroy, C; Linhart, V; Mares, J J; Pospísil, S; Roy, P; Sopko, B; Sinor, M; Svejda, J; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    In a spectroscopic study of non-irradiated and proton-irradiated silicon diodes, the detectors were illuminated from the front side and from the rear side by various alpha particle sources (mainly ThC') and by monoenergetic protons with energies from 1.0 to 2.5~MeV. Their response characteristics have been studied as a function of the incoming particle energy and the applied bias voltage. The charge collection efficiency was determined as a function of fluence

  4. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn

  5. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Atlas of photoneutron cross sections obtained with monoenergetic photons. Final edition, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the need for a comprehensive compilation of photoneutron cross-section data, these monoenergetic-photon data are gathered together here and presented in a uniform format. This compilation updates and supersedes the earlier editions of this Atlas. A more complete compilation is being assembled by the photonuclear group at the National Bureau of Standards. 15 refs., 174 figs

  7. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  8. Proton beams in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoroshkov, V.S.; Minakova, E.I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    A branch of radiology, proton therapy employs fast protons as a tool for the treatment of various, mainly oncological, diseases. The features of tissue ionization by protons (Bragg peak) facilitate a further step towards solving the principal challenge in radiology: to deliver a sufficiently high and homogeneous dose to virtually any tumour, while sparing healthy neighbouring tissues, organs and structures. The state of the art of proton therapy is described, as well as the main technical, physics and clinical results gained since the 1950s at high-energy physics centres worldwide. The future of proton therapy is connected with the construction of hospital-based facilities with dedicated medical accelerators and modern technical instrumentation. (author)

  9. drift tube for linear accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    A drift tube from the Linac 1. This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  10. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  11. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  12. Design and demonstration of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, T H; Mozin, V; Norman, E B; Sorensen, P; Foxe, M; Bench, G; Bernstein, A

    2014-01-01

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the $^{7}$Li(p,n)$^{7}$Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative filters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of different materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  13. 紫外超短激光驱动铜薄膜靶产生质子的实验研究%Experiment on Proton Acceleration Using Ultraviolet Ultra-short Laser Interaction With Copper Thin Foil Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路建新; 兰小飞; 戴辉; 黄永盛; 席晓峰; 王雷剑; 杨大为; 汤秀章

    2013-01-01

    Proton acceleration induced by ultraviolet laser interaction with a thin foil was studied on an ultra-short KrF laser amplifier called LLG50 in CIAE. The energy spectrum was recorded by a Thomson ion spectrometer. The ultraviolet laser system generated ultra-short pulses with energy of 30 mj and pulse duration of 500 fs, and the peak focal intensity is 1. 2×1017 W/cm2. The maximal energy of protons recorded in the target normal direction is higher than 300 keV, and fast electrons were generated by vacuum heating or resonance absorption. The advantages of ultraviolet laser proton acceleration are high contrast in the laser pulse and high absorption rate.%在中国原子能科学研究院的放电泵浦的紫外KrF超短脉冲激光放大装置上,开展了紫外超短脉冲激光与铜薄膜靶相互作用加速产生质子束的实验研究.紫外超短脉冲激光输出能量为30 mJ、波长为248 nm、脉冲宽度为500 fs,采用离轴抛物面镜聚焦获得激光聚焦功率密度为1.2×1017 W/cm2.激光以45°入射5μm厚的铜薄膜靶,质子最大能量超过300 keV.紫外超短脉冲激光的高对比度和高吸收效率是紫外激光加速的优点.

  14. The Proton Blazar

    OpenAIRE

    Mannheim, Karl

    1993-01-01

    Considering shock-accelerated protons in addition to electrons in a synchrotron radio jet naturally produces the observed X- through gamma ray continuum emission of flat-spectrum radio-loud AGN, whereas the corresponding shock-accelerated electrons produce the infrared through optical continuum. All of these emission components are rapidly variable on short time scales which can be accounted for by a common origin of the blazar emission in a relativistic sub-parsec scale jet. Moreover, neutri...

  15. Workplace characterisation in mixed neutron-gamma fields, specific requirements and available methods at high-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A good knowledge of the radiation field present outside the shielding of high-energy particle accelerators is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for area monitoring and the type of personal dosemeter required for estimating the doses received by individuals. Around high-energy electron and proton accelerators the radiation field is usually dominated by neutrons and photons, with minor contributions from other charged particles. Under certain circumstances, muon radiation in the forward beam direction may also be present. Neutron dosimetry and spectrometry are of primary importance to characterise the radiation field and thus to correctly evaluate personnel exposure. Starting from the beam parameters important for radiation monitoring, the paper first briefly reviews the stray radiation fields encountered around high-energy accelerators and then addresses the relevant techniques employed for their monitoring. Recent developments to increase the response of neutron measuring devices beyond 10-20 MeV are illustrated. Instruments should be correctly calibrated either in reference monoenergetic radiation fields or in a field similar to the field in which they are used (workplace calibration). The importance of the instrument calibration is discussed and available neutron calibration facilities are briefly reviewed. (authors)

  16. Simultaneous generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron and betatron X-rays from nitrogen gas via ionization injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon the interaction of 60 TW Ti: sapphire laser pulses with 4 mm long supersonic nitrogen gas jet, a directional x-ray emission was generated along with the generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beams having a peak energy of 130 MeV and a relative energy spread of ∼ 20%. The betatron x-ray emission had a small divergence of 7.5 mrad and a critical energy of 4 keV. The laser wakefield acceleration process was stimulated in a background plasma density of merely 5.4 × 1017 cm−3 utilizing ionization injection. The non-self-focusing and stable propagation of the laser pulse in the pure nitrogen gaseous plasma should be responsible for the simultaneous generation of the high-quality X-ray and electron beams. Those ultra-short and naturally-synchronized beams could be applicable to ultrafast pump-probe experiments

  17. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  18. On the possibility of sourcing a mono-energetic $\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Orme, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the possibility of using fully stripped ions that can decay through bound beta decay to compliment electron capture long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments is qualitatively analysed. After a brief review of the bound beta decay process, some exploratory simulations of a so-called `CP-even' beam are presented. The possible uses and disadvantages of such a source are discussed through consideration of the technological challenges faced and the energy resolution required from the detector. In view of the rigid demands likely to be put on both the accelerator chain and the detector, an alternative route to a CP-even beam is mentioned that would use of an anti-neutrino run using either $^{6}$He or $^{6}$Li.

  19. Spectral flux of the p-7Li(C Q-M neutron source measured by proton recoil telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov S.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cyclotron-based fast neutron source at NPI produces mono-energetic neutron fields up to 35 MeV neutron energy using the p + 7Li(carbon backing reactions. To be applied for activation cross-section measurements, not only the intensity of neutron peak, but also the contribution of low-energy continuum in the spectra must be well determined. Simulations of the spectral flux from present source at a position of irradiated samples were performed using CYRIC TOF-data validated in the present work against LA150h by calculations with the transport Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Simulated spectra were tested by absolute measurements using a proton-recoil telescope technique. The recoil-proton spectrometer consisted of a shielded scattering chamber with polyethylene and carbon radiators and the ΔE1-ΔE2-E telescope of silicon-surface detectors located to the neutron beam axis at 45° in the laboratory system. Si-detectors were handled by usual data acquisition system. Dead-time – and pulse-overlap losses of events were determined from the count rate of pulse generator registered during duty cycle of accelerator operation. The proton beam charge and data were taken in the list mode for later replay and analysis. The calculations for 7Li(p,n and 12C(p,n reactions reasonably reproduce CYRIC TOF neutron source spectra. The influence of neutron source set-up (proton beam dimensions, 7Li-foil, carbon stopper, cooling medium, target support/chamber and the geometry-arrangement of irradiated sample on the spectral flux is discussed in details.

  20. EDITORIAL: Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009 Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Bob; Muggli, Patric

    2011-01-01

    The Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop 2009 was part of a very successful series of international workshops which were conceived at the 1985 Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop in Malibu, California. Since its inception, the workshop has been held in Asia and in Europe (Kardamyli, Kyoto, Presqu'ile de Giens, Portovenere, Taipei and the Azores). The purpose of the workshops is to bring together the most recent results in laser wakefield acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, laser-driven ion acceleration, and radiation generation produced by plasma-based accelerator beams. The 2009 workshop was held on 22-26 June in Kardamyli, Greece, and brought together over 80 participants. (http://cfp.ist.utl.pt/lpaw09/). The workshop involved five main themes: • Laser plasma electron acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Computational methods • Plasma wakefield acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Laser-driven ion acceleration • Radiation generation and application. All of these themes are covered in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The topic and application of plasma accelerators is one of the success stories in plasma physics, with laser wakefield acceleration of mono-energetic electrons to GeV energies, of ions to hundreds of MeV, and electron-beam-driven wakefield acceleration to 85 GeV. The accelerating electric field in the wake is of the order 1 GeV cm-1, or an accelerating gradient 1000 times greater than in conventional accelerators, possibly leading to an accelerator 1000 times smaller (and much more affordable) for the same energy. At the same time, the electron beams generated by laser wakefield accelerators have very good emittance with a correspondingly good energy spread of about a few percent. They also have the unique feature in being ultra-short in the femtosecond scale. This makes them attractive for a variety of applications, ranging from material science to ultra-fast time

  1. Polarized protons and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RHIC, the heavy ion collider being built at Brookhaven, offers an exciting opportunity to collide highly polarized protons at high energy and luminosity. This new facility would combine the existing AGS polarized proton capability with the new Booster/Accumulator and spin rotators to achieve collisions between intense beams of polarized protons at a collision energy of 500 GeV. At this energy and the expected luminosity of 2 x 1032 cm2/second physics probes will include high PT jets, direct photons, Drell-Yan, W±, and heavy quarks. The accessible physics includes study of the spin content of the proton, particularly gluon and antiquark polarization, study of large PQCD-predicted asymmetries for parton-parton subprocesses, and parity violation studies and searches. The proton spin direction at a RHIC crossing can be longitudinal or transverse and can alternate bunch-to-bunch giving exquisite control of systematic errors. At RHIC double spin experiments can be done with pure beams and the energy and luminosity open a new domain for probing the physics of spin. An international collaboration is forming which proposes to exploit the unique physics available from a polarized RHIC. Important steps, leading to a polarized RHIC, have been taken. The AGS has already accelerated polarized protons. A new Booster/Accumulator has been commissioned. A beautiful series of machine experiments at Indian University have verified that spin rotators indeed remove spin resonance behavior, which is the key to achieving polarized proton acceleration to high energy. E880, an accelerator experiment which will build, install, and test a Siberian Snake in the AGS, was approved by the Brookhaven PAC in August 1991. The snake will be installed in the AGS in the summer of 1993. RHIC construction has started, with heavy ion experiments to begin in 1997

  2. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  3. First polarized proton collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180 deg. about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV

  4. FIRST POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180o about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV

  5. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  6. Development of the in vivo measurement system of bone mineral content using monoenergetic gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system, developed for in vivo measurement of bone mineral content (BMC) using monoenergetic gamma-rays of 241 Am, is described. It presents a discussion of the theoretical and practical aspects of the technique, with details of acquisition and data processing and also discusses the calibration procedure used. The results obtained with in vivo measurements are presented and BMC values of clinically normal subjects and chronic renal patients are compared. (author)

  7. Two-Colour Free Electron Laser with Wide Frequency Separation using a Single Monoenergetic Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, L T; Reiche, S

    2014-01-01

    Studies of a broad bandwidth, two-colour FEL amplifier using one monoenergetic electron beam are presented. The two-colour FEL interaction is achieved using a series of undulator modules alternately tuned to two well-separated resonant frequencies. Using the broad bandwidth FEL simulation code Puffin, the electron beam is shown to bunch strongly and simultaneously at the two resonant frequencies. Electron bunching components are also generated at the sum and difference of the resonant frequencies.

  8. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.B., E-mail: prose6@gatech.edu; Erickson, A.S., E-mail: anna.erickson@me.gatech.edu

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in {sup 11}B(d,n-γ){sup 12}C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example {sup 232}Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  9. Magnetic quadrupoles lens for hot spot proton imaging in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Chen, J.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Tan, F.; Hong, W.; Zhang, B. H.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of DD-produced protons from an implosion hot spot region by miniature permanent magnetic quadrupole (PMQ) lens is proposed. Corresponding object-image relation is deduced and an adjust method for this imaging system is discussed. Ideal point-to-point imaging demands a monoenergetic proton source; nevertheless, we proved that the blur of image induced by proton energy spread is a second order effect therefore controllable. A proton imaging system based on miniature PMQ lens is designed for 2.8 MeV DD-protons and the adjust method in case of proton energy shift is proposed. The spatial resolution of this system is better than 10 μm when proton yield is above 109 and the spectra width is within 10%.

  10. Value of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) for artefact reduction from metallic orthopedic implants in post-mortem studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Guggenberger, Roman; Winklhofer, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to assess the performance of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) reconstructions to reduce metal artefacts in bodies with orthopedic devices in comparison with standard single-energy CT (SECT) examinations in forensic imaging. Forensic and clinical impacts of this study are also discussed. Thirty metallic implants in 20 consecutive cadavers with metallic implants underwent both SECT and DECT with a clinically suitable scanning protocol. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the corresponding SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visual rating and measurements of attenuation changes induced by streak artefact. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed statistically significant differences between monoenergetic DECT extrapolated images and SECT, with improvements in diagnostic assessment in monoenergetic DECT at higher monoenergies. The mean value of OPTkeV was 137.6 ± 4.9 with a range of 130 to 148 keV. This study demonstrates that monoenergetic DECT images extrapolated at high energy levels significantly reduce metallic artefacts from orthopedic implants and improve image quality compared to SECT examination in forensic imaging. (orig.)

  11. Extending laser plasma accelerators into the mid-IR spectral domain with a next-generation ultra-fast CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Skaritka, J.; Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.; Lu, W.; Cook, N.; Ting, A.; Chen, Y.-H.

    2016-03-01

    Expanding the scope of relativistic plasma research to wavelengths longer than the λ/≈   0.8-1.1 μm range covered by conventional mode-locked solid-state lasers would offer attractive opportunities due to the quadratic scaling of the ponderomotive electron energy and critical plasma density with λ. Answering this quest, a next-generation mid-IR laser project is being advanced at the BNL ATF as a part of the user facility upgrade. We discuss the technical approach to this conceptually new 100 TW, 100 fs, λ  =   9-11 μm CO2 laser BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) that encompasses several innovations applied for the first time to molecular gas lasers. BESTIA will enable new regimes of laser plasma accelerators. One example is shock-wave ion acceleration (SWA) from gas jets. We review ongoing efforts to achieve stable, monoenergetic proton acceleration by dynamically shaping the plasma density profile from a hydrogen gas target with laser-produced blast waves. At its full power, 100 TW BESTIA promises to achieve proton beams at an energy exceeding 200 MeV. In addition to ion acceleration in over-critical plasma, the ultra-intense mid-IR BESTIA will open up new opportunities in driving wakefields in tenuous plasmas, expanding the landscape of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) studies into the unexplored long-wavelength spectral domain. Simple wavelength scaling suggests that a 100 TW CO2 laser beam will be capable of efficiently generating plasma ‘bubbles’ a thousand times greater in volume compared with a near-IR solid state laser of an equivalent power. Combined with a femtosecond electron linac available at the ATF, this wavelength scaling will facilitate the study of external seeding and staging of LWFAs.

  12. Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams (ECLOUD'02) organized by the SL Accelerator Physics Group at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    This workshop was organized by the SL Accelerator Physics group at CERN from 15 to 18 April 2002. More than 60 participants from 17 institutes reflect the great worldwide interest in the electron-cloud phenomenon, which presently limits the performance of several storage rings and has become a concern for the LHC.

  13. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  14. Longitudinal instability of a bunched beam resulting from current loading of the accelerating system in an ultrahigh-energy proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, S V

    1981-01-01

    Collective effects in the acceleration and storage of particles have recently attracted considerable interest. The authors discuss the theory of the longitudinal multipole instabilities of coupled modes of a bunched beam. Up to now, there has been no electrodynamic calculation of the excitation of the resonant elements around the beam, so that only impedances of a simple resonator type are used (the variations in the longitudinal component of the electric field on the resonator axis are not taken into account). Furthermore, and particularly significantly, elements of a waveguide nature have been ignored (the accelerating systems of the CERN SPS synchrotron in the working frequency band are examples of such elements). The authors' intention is to correct these deficiencies of the theory. (7 refs).

  15. A DC arc plasma beam source for thermal hydraulic simulation of target - proton beam interaction for accelerator driven sub critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on accelerator driven sub critical (ADS) nuclear reactors have taken a new dimension due to their extremely high safety level and incredible potential in terms of both thorium utilization as well as nuclear waste transmutation. This paper presents the design and operational data of the plasma source including V-I characteristics, electro thermal efficiency and the heat source spatial distribution on the target

  16. Simulation of Laser Wake Field Acceleration using a 2.5D PIC Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, W. M.; Hua, J. F.; Huang, W. H.; Tang, Ch. X.; Lin, Y. Z.

    2006-11-01

    A 2.5D PIC simulation code is developed to study the LWFA( Laser WakeField Acceleration ). The electron self-injection and the generation of mono-energetic electron beam in LWFA is briefly discussed through the simulation. And the experiment of this year at SILEX-I laser facility is also introduced.

  17. Until the interior of the proton. A science slam through the world of the elementary particles, the accelerators, and supernerds; Bis(s) ins Innere des Protons. Ein Science Slam durch die Welt der Elementarteilchen, der Beschleuniger und Supernerds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmer, Boris

    2014-06-01

    There where's becomes small the world suddenly becomes suddenly totally crazy: From pure energy particles are produced, matter particles get siblings of antimatter, particles, which actually should not exist, are created from scratch. The nature borrows energy, which is actually not there. Forces act, which behave completely differently than anything, what we know from everyday life. This is the world of particle physics. Particle physicist build the largest experiments of all time, in order to study the smallest particles of the universe. They go to the limits of the technically feasible and exceed thereby the limits of our countries. Who finds that all also so exciting - as the particle physicists - is heartily invited to read this book. Who believes that without a study of particle physics nothing is understood, also. Quantum field theories, particle accelerators, Higgs mechanisms etc. are instead by nasty formulas explained by means of monkeys, ants, hedgehogs, beavers, and illustrative pictures. And by means of linked videos in can be directly submerged into the world of CERN, the LHC particle accelerator, and the ATLAS experiment.

  18. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Raby, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  19. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  20. 高能质子能谱特征在日冕物质抛射影响预报中的应用%The application of spectrum of energetic protons accelerated by CME in the geomagnetic storm forecast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛炳森

    2012-01-01

    日冕物质抛射(CME)的规模和对地有效性是地磁暴预报中重点关注的特征.本项研究的目的是通过对行星际高能质子通量和能谱的特征与演化规律的分析,得到CME对粒子的加速能力,评估CME可能对地磁场造成的影响.在工作中,统计分析了ACE/EPAM的1998-2010年的质子数据,对质子能谱进行了拟合,得到了能谱指数,并对能谱指数及其变化特征所对应的CME和地磁暴进行了相关统计.通过研究发现:(1)能谱指数随着太阳活动水平而变化,高年最大,达到-2.6,而且涨落幅度也达到±0.4,而在太阳活动低年则稳定在-3.0左右;(2)CME对粒子的加速对应着能谱指数的升高,幅度达到20%时,CME引起地磁暴的可能性较大;(3)冕洞高速流到达地球时,高能质子通量也会升高,但能谱指数同时会有下降;(4)以2004年全年的能谱指数为例,对能谱指数在地磁暴预报中的应用进行了评估,结论认为,能谱指数的升高是CME引发地磁暴的必要条件,可以作为地磁暴预报的参数使用.%The character of CME is crucial in the forecast of geomagnetic storm. In this work, the flux and spectrum of interplanetary energetic proton, together with the particularity of their evolution, were investigated to get the judgment of the acceleration process occurred in CME and evaluate the effect of the CME on geomagnetic field. The proton flux data from ACE/EPAM during 1998 to 2010 was employed and a so-called spectrum index was derived by modeling the data. Through the statistic work on the proton flux, spectrum and relative CME and geomagnetic disturbance, following conclusion was found: (l)The background of spectrum index was -2. 6 while its fluctuation reached I 0. 4 in the high period of solar activity and it was stable in low period of solar activity with a value of - 3. 0; (2) The elevating of the spectrum usually corresponds to the acceleration process in CME, and 20% or more increasing in

  1. Report on Proton and Ion Beam measurements at the Matter in Extreme Condition (MCC) end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Roedel, C.; Galtier, E.; Glenzer, S.H.; /SLAC

    2016-02-16

    We report on MeV ion beams produced with high-repetition rates of 1 Hz at the MEC end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These data were obtained during the commissioning beam time of the new 30TW laser. After describing the experimental set-up, the laser conditions and the target diagnostics, ion beam spectra measured for different foil thicknesses and laser intensities will be presented and discussed. These results are subsequently compared with results from cryogenic hydrogen jets at MEC in January 2015.

  2. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, Aafke C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Cappucci, F; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Retico, A; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2014-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the beta+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 x 10 cm^2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the beta+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  3. RF system for the super conducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we introduce the several types of RF sources used for proton liner accelerators. Also we discus the undesirable characteristics of super-conducting cavities, and the influence of the large beam loading for an accelerating field. We propose the RF system for the super-conducting proton linear accelerators using the Diacrode or IOT taking these effects into account. (author)

  4. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  5. Theoretical methods for the calculation of Bragg curves and 3D distributions of proton beams

    OpenAIRE

    Ulmer, Waldemar; Matsinos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    The well-known Bragg-Kleeman rule RCSDA = A dot E0p has become a pioneer work in radiation physics of charged particles and is still a useful tool to estimate the range RCSDA of approximately monoenergetic protons with initial energy E0 in a homogeneous medium. The rule is based on the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA). It results from a generalized (nonrelativistic) Langevin equation and a modification of the phenomenological friction term. The complete integration of this equatio...

  6. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  7. Present status and future needs of nuclear data for high energy accelerator shielding design calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increasing application of high energy accelerators, their shielding design study has become very important. The present study discusses the current status of nuclear data, especially inclusive neutron production cross sections (thin target yields), thick target yields, neutron transmission through shield and cross sections, and activation and spallation cross sections of neutrons and protons. Their experimental and theoretical data are compared and further needs of basic nuclear data for shielding design calculation are described. Nuclear data in high energy regions above 20 MeV, such as double differential neutron production cross section, double differential neutron yield and neutron reaction cross section, are very poor both in number and in accuracy at the present stage. The shielding design calculation requires the comprehensive data set of these cross sections and/or the more accurate computer code to calculate these quantities. Further effort is expected to carry out shielding and cross section experiments using the monoenergetic neutron beam line which is under construction in Takasaki Branch of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). (N.K.)

  8. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  9. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  10. Simulations of radiation pressure ion acceleration with the VEGA Petawatt laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach Petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 :1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022 W cm-2 impinging normally on 20 - 60 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure-dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  11. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  12. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  13. Determination of scatter factor parameters and electron disequilibrium for monoenergetic photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, J; Bloch, P; Bjärngard, B E

    1999-02-01

    The tissue-phantom-ratio (TPR) is expressed as the product of the phantom scatter factor (SF), an electron disequilibrium factor, and an attenuation factor, equal to the zero-area TPR. The scatter factor, as a function of depth d and field size s, has been described by two parameters a and w, SF(d,s) = 1 + asd/(ws + d). We have determined the parameters a and w for 20 monoenergetic photon beams between 1 and 20 MeV. Pencil-beam energy-deposition kernels were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The kernels were used to calculate broad-beam depth-dose data, which were converted to TPR and fitted to the equation above using an iterative search over a-w space. The parameter a is nearly equal to the attenuation coefficient for all energies while the parameter w increases with energy. The resulting a and w compare favorably to values determined for clinical photon beams, as a function of the measured attenuation coefficient. With the scatter factor determined, we isolated the electron disequilibrium factor for each monoenergetic beam. It can be characterized as a quadratic function of the depth. The coefficients of the quadratic function can be related to the range of the most energetic secondary electron produced. PMID:10076974

  14. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    , S Mangles, L O Silva, R Fonseca and P A Norreys Electro-optic shocks from blowout laser wakefields D F Gordon, A Ting, M H Helle, D Kaganovich and B Hafizi Onset of self-steepening of intense laser pulses in plasmas J Vieira, F Fiúza, L O Silva, M Tzoufras and W B Mori Analysis of laser wakefield dynamics in capillary tubes N E Andreev, K Cassou, F Wojda, G Genoud, M Burza, O Lundh, A Persson, B Cros, V E Fortov and C-G Wahlstrom Characterization of the beam loading effects in a laser plasma accelerator C Rechatin, J Faure, X Davoine, O Lundh, J Lim, A Ben-Ismaïl, F Burgy, A Tafzi, A Lifschitz, E Lefebvre and V Malka Energy gain scaling with plasma length and density in the plasma wakefield accelerator P Muggli, I Blumenfeld, C E Clayton, F J Decker, M J Hogan, C Huang, R Ischebeck, R H Iverson, C Joshi, T Katsouleas, N Kirby, W Lu, K A Marsh, W B Mori, E Oz, R H Siemann, D R Walz and M Zhou Generation of tens of GeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a moving double layer formed by ultraintense lasers at intensity 1021-1023Wcm-2 Lu-Le Yu, Han Xu, Wei-Min Wang, Zheng-Ming Sheng, Bai-Fei Shen, Wei Yu and Jie Zhang Carbon ion acceleration from thin foil targets irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast, ultraintense laser pulses D C Carroll, O Tresca, R Prasad, L Romagnani, P S Foster, P Gallegos, S Ter-Avetisyan, J S Green, M J V Streeter, N Dover, C A J Palmer, C M Brenner, F H Cameron, K E Quinn, J Schreiber, A P L Robinson, T Baeva, M N Quinn, X H Yuan, Z Najmudin, M Zepf, D Neely, M Borghesi and P McKenna Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse S Y Kalmykov, S A Yi, A Beck, A F Lifschitz, X Davoine, E Lefebvre, A Pukhov, V Khudik, G Shvets, S A Reed, P Dong, X Wang, D Du, S Bedacht, R Zgadzaj, W Henderson, A Bernstein, G Dyer, M Martinez, E Gaul, T Ditmire and M C Downer Effects of laser prepulses on laser-induced proton generation D Batani, R Jafer, M Veltcheva, R Dezulian, O Lundh, F Lindau, A

  15. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  16. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  17. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron energy spectra for 246 and 389 MeV (7)Li(p,n) reactions at angles from 0 degrees to 300 degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakashima, H; Mares, V; Itoga, T; Matsumoto, T; Nakane, Y; Feldbaumer, E; Jaegerhofer, L; Pioch, C; Tamii, A; Satoh, D; Masuda, A; Sato, T; Iwase, H; Yashima, H; Nishiyama, J; Hagiwara, M; Hatanaka, K; Sakamoto, Y

    2011-01-01

    The authors measured the neutron energy spectra of a quasi-monoenergetic (7)Li(p,n) neutron source with 246 and 389 MeV protons set at seven angles (0 degrees, 2.5 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees, 20 degrees and 30 degrees), using a time-of-flight (TOF) method employing organic scintillators NE213 at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) of Osaka University. The energy spectra of the source neutrons were precisely deduced down to 2 MeV at 0 degrees and 10 MeV at other angles. The cross-sections of the peak neutron production reaction at 0 degrees were on the 35-40 mb line of other experimental data, and the peak neutron angular distribution agreed well with the Taddeucci formula. Neutron energy spectra below 100 MeV at all angles were comparable, but the shapes of the continuum above 150 MeV changed considerably with the angle. In order to consider the correction required to derive the response in the peak region from the measured total response for high-energy neutron monitors such as DAR...

  18. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, Thomas C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sahai, Aakash A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  19. Beam loss caused by edge focusing of injection bump magnets and its mitigation in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchi, H.; Tani, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Harada, H.; Kato, S.; Okabe, K.; Saha, P. K.; Tamura, F.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, transverse injection painting is utilized not only to suppress space-charge induced beam loss in the low energy region but also to mitigate foil scattering beam loss during charge-exchange injection. The space-charge induced beam loss is well minimized by the combination of modest transverse painting and full longitudinal painting. But, for sufficiently mitigating the foil scattering part of beam loss, the transverse painting area has to be further expanded. However, such a wide-ranging transverse painting had not been realized until recently due to beta function beating caused by edge focusing of pulsed injection bump magnets during injection. This beta function beating additionally excites random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice superperiodicity, and its resultant deterioration of the betatron motion stability causes significant extra beam loss when expanding the transverse painting area. To solve this issue, we newly installed pulse-type quadrupole correctors to compensate the beta function beating. This paper presents recent experimental results on this correction scheme for suppressing the extra beam loss, while discussing the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms with the corresponding numerical simulations.

  20. Study of Intensity Proton Accelerator Beam Loss Readout System%强流质子加速器的束流损失读出系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓媛; 雷革; 徐韬光

    2012-01-01

    It introduces the research on the Beam - Loss - Readout system, which is part of the Beam - Loss -Monitoring system of the intensity proton accelerator. The hardware scheme of BLR system use ADC sampling e-quipment based on VME bus protocol. The software design is built on the Linux platform using EPICS control system. With the device driver, device support and record support program, the system gets control of the device and reads out the data. It turns out to meet the requirements of the project target.%介绍了强流质子加速器束流损失监测系统中束流损失读出系统的研究.束损读出系统硬件使用基于VME总线协议的ADC设备,软件设计采用EPICS控制软件框架.作者编写设备驱动、设备支持、记录支持程序,实现了对硬件的控制和数据的读取,并满足工程要求的性能指标.

  1. Protonated nitrosamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Øgaard Madsen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The protonated nitrosamide, NH3NO+, has been generated by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Although a direct search for this species in ammonia flames has proved negative, fast proton transfer to major flame constituents is supported experimentally as well as by MO calculations....

  2. Research on quality testing for active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator%主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程金生; 袁继龙; 李明生

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the quality testing of dose delivery system of the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator,in order to provide the reference for the quality control of related equipment.Methods In the four therapy rooms,both 0.6 cc chambers and Gafchromic EBT3 films were used,respectively,to test the accelerator for dose reproducibility,dose linearity,dose stability,depth dose distribution,beam scanning position deviation and radiation field uniformity in each therapy room.Results Dose reproducibility variation coefficients are all less than 1.5%,dose linearity's maximum deviations less than 2%,dose stability's deviations less than 2%,depth dose distribution stability within 2%,beam scanning position deviation less than 1 mm,consistency of irradiation field's deviation less than 2 mm,and flatness within ± 5%.Conclusions The indicators about quality testing for the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator are all in line with the requirements of IEC standards draft.%目的 对主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器剂量传输系统进行质量检测,为相关设备质量检测研究提供参考.方法 在4个治疗室中,分别采用0.6 CC指型电离室和辐射胶片测量质子重离子加速器在每间治疗室的输出剂量重复性、剂量线性、剂量日稳定性、深度剂量分布、束流扫描位置偏差和射野的一致性.结果 4个治疗室分别对应的4个终端的剂量重复性变异系数均<1.5%,剂量线性最大偏差均<2%,剂量日稳定性偏差均<2%,深度剂量分布稳定性均在2%之内,束流扫描位置偏差均<1 mm,射野一致性中射野大小偏差均<2 mm,射野平坦度均<±5%.结论 本研究涉及的主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测的各项指标均符合国际电工委员会(IEC)相关标准草案的要求.

  3. Proton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  4. Production of monoenergetic neutrons with energies between a few hundred keV and 40 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various modes of production of monoenergetic neutrons with energies between a few hundred keV and 40 MeV are presented. Required characteristics for the neutron sources, source reactions - 7Li+p, 3H+p, 2H+d, 3H+d, 9Be+p - and targets are described

  5. Native cation vacancies in Si-doped AlGaN studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uedono, A.; Tenjinbayashi, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Shimahara, Y.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.; Ishibashi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Native defects in Si-doped AlGaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and positron lifetimes were measured, and these were compared with results obtained using first-principles calculation. For Si-doped AlxGa1-xN (4 × 1017 Si/cm3), the vacancy-type defects were introduced at above x = 0.54, and this was attributed to the transition of the growth mode to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism from the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism. For Si-doped Al0.6Ga0.4N, the vacancy concentration increased with increasing Si concentration, and the major defect species was identified as Al vacancies. A clear correlation between the suppression of cathodoluminescence and the defect concentration was obtained, suggesting the cation vacancies act as nonradiative centers in AlGaN.

  6. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$\\Delta m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Axani, S; Conrad, JM; Shaevitz, MH; Spitz, J; Wongjirad, T

    2015-01-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  7. Project X: Accelerator Reference Design

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, S D; Chase, B; Gollwitzer, K; Johnson, D; Kaducak, M; Klebaner, A; Kourbanis, I; Lebedev, V; Leveling, A; Li, D; Nagaitsev, S; Ostroumov, P; Pasquinelli, R; Patrick, J; Prost, L; Scarpine, V; Shemyakin, A; Solyak, N; Steimel, J; Yakovlev, V; Zwaska, R

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". Part 1 contains the volume Preface and a description of the conceptual design for a high-intensity proton accelerator facility being developed to support a world-leading program of Intensity Frontier physics over the next two decades at Fermilab. Subjects covered include performance goals, the accelerator physics design, and the technological basis for such a facility.

  8. Proton Radiobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Tommasino; Marco Durante

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming...

  9. Accelerators for America's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  10. Propagation of an ultra intense laser pulse in an under dense plasma: production of quasi monoenergetic electron beams and development of applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study concerns the generation of electron beams with original properties. These electrons beams originate from the interaction of an ultra-intense and short laser pulse with a gas jet. Previously, these electron beams had a large divergence and a broad spectrum. A major improvement in this field was achieved when an electron beam with low divergence (10 mrad) and a peaked spectrum (170 MeV) was observed during this thesis, using a new single shot electron spectrometer. A parametric study of the interaction allowed to observe the evolution of the electron beam. Experiments have been carried out to deepen the characterization of the electron beam. The observation of transition radiation generated by the electrons at an interface shows that the electron beam interacts with the laser pulse during the acceleration. Radial oscillations of the electron beam around the laser axis, named betatron oscillations, were also observed on the electron spectra. Such a quasi-monoenergetic spectrum is essential for many applications. In order to justify the interest of this electron beam, several applications are presented: a sub-milli-metric gamma-ray radiography of dense objects, a dose profile of the electron beam comparable to present capabilities of photon sources for radiotherapy, a very short temporal profile useful for water radiolysis and the generation of a bright X-ray source with low divergence. (author)

  11. Matching a laser driven proton injector to a CH-drift tube linacs

    OpenAIRE

    Almomani, Ali; Droba, Martin; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Hofmann, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical predictions in laser acceleration of protons achieved energies of ten to several tens of MeV. The LIGHT project (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport) is proposed to use the PHELIX laser accelerated protons and to provide transport, focusing and injection into a conventional accelerator. This study demonstrates transport and focusing of laser-accelerated 10 MeV protons by a pulsed 18 T magnetic solenoid. The effect of co-moving electrons on the bea...

  12. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei, E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei, E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  13. Space charge effects in proton linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space charge difficulties are relatively well known because of the inconveniences they cause, but the physical mechanisms by which they operate are obscure; an attempt was made to explain some of these mechanisms. The method chosen involves a numerical simulation of the beam; computer programs describing beam dynamics with space charge are presented; they are used to check results obtained elsewhere. A series of experiments was performed demonstrating that coupling phenomena produce an equalization of r. m. s. velocities in the 3 directions; new quantity (sort of hyper-emittance) is introduced: its growth between the input and output of a given linac is proportional to the beam intensity. (author)

  14. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, M B; Arendse, G J; Cowley, A A; Richter, W A; Lawrie, J J; Newman, R T; Pilcher, J V; Smit, F D; Steyn, G F; Koen, J W; Stander, J A

    1999-01-01

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  15. Status of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project

    CERN Document Server

    Choi Byung Ho

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) approved and launched by the Korean government in July 2002 includes a 100MeV proton linear accelerator development and a program for its utilization. The first phase of the project, running from 2002 to 2005, was the design of a 100MeV proton linear accelerator and a part of development to 20 MeV. This consists of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The 50 keV injector and the 3 MeV RFQ has been installed and tested, and the 20 MeV DTL is being assembled and tuned for beam tests. At the same time, the utilization programs using the proton beam have been planned, and some are now under way. The status and progress of the project are reported in detail.

  16. KEK digital accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  17. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  18. Proton scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanner is based on the nuclear scattering of high energy protons by the nucleons (protons and neutrons) included in the atomic nuclei. Because of the wide scattering angle, three coordinates in space of the interaction point can be computed, giving directly three dimensional radiographs. Volumic resolution is of about a few cubic-millimeters. Because the base interaction is the strong nuclear force, the atomic dependence of the information obtained is different from that of the X-ray scanner, for which the base interaction is electro-magnetic force. (orig./VJ)

  19. Beta-Decay Study of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb: Candidates for a Monoenergetic Neutrino Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez Aguado, M. E. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Algora, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Rubio, B. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Bernabeu, J. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Nacher, E. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Tain, J. L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Gadea, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Agramunt, J. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Burkard, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hueller, W. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Collatz, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hellstrom, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Cano-Ott, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Gierlik, M. [University of Warsaw; Plochocki, A. [University of Warsaw; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Batist, L. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Moroz, F. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Wittman, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Blazhev, A. [University of Cologne; Valiente, J. J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Espinoza, C. [CFPT-IST, Lisbon

    2011-01-01

    The beta decays of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied, the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  20. Compact pulsed accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of fast pulses from a current charged transmission line and opening switch is described. By employing a plasma focus as an opening switch and diode in the prototype device, a proton beam of peak energy 250 keV is produced. The time integrated energy spectrum of the beam is constructed from a Thomson spectrograph. Applications of this device as an inexpensive and portable charged particle accelerator are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Successful Registration of Proton Tracks With Bubble Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Doke; J.Kikuchi; M.Komiyama

    2001-01-01

    A study of registration of proton tracks with T-15 type of bubble detectors is carried out. The bubble detectors are made in China Institute of Atomic Energy. 210 MeV proton beam used to irradiate the bubble detectors is accelerated by the cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research(RIKEN) in Wako, Japan. The study shows that T-15 type of bubble detectors can be used to record proton tracks directly. A proton track is composed of a few bubbles because of the short recordable range of proton in the detectors, Successful registration of proton tracks will extend the

  2. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  3. Nonidentical protons

    CERN Document Server

    Mart, T

    2013-01-01

    We have calculated the proton charge radius by assuming that the real proton radius is not unique and the radii are randomly distributed in a certain range. This is performed by averaging the elastic electron-proton differential cross section over the form factor cut-off. By using a dipole form factor and fitting the middle value of the cut-off to the low $Q^2$ Mainz data, we found the lowest $\\chi^2/N$ for a cut-off $\\Lambda=0.8203\\pm 0.0003$ GeV, which corresponds to a proton charge radius $r_E=0.8333\\pm 0.0004$ fm. The result is compatible with the recent precision measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen as well as recent calculations using more sophisticated techniques. Our result indicates that the relative variation of the form factor cut-off should be around 21.5%. Based on this result we have investigated effects of the nucleon radius variation on the symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the neutron star matter (NSM) by considering the excluded volume effect in our calculation. The mass-radius ...

  4. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  5. Dark Matter Searches for Monoenergetic Neutrinos Arising from Stopped Meson Decay in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Rott, Carsten; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov...

  6. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University,Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Jason [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Hawai’i,Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Yaylali, David [Department of Physics, University of Arizona,Tucson, AZ, 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD, 20742 (United States)

    2015-11-24

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  7. Properties and applications of mono-energetic gamma-rays from laser-Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Anderson, Gerry; Betts, Shawn; Gibson, David; Hagmann, Christian; Johnson, Micah; Messerly, Mike; Shverdin, Miroslav; Hartemann, Frederic; Siders, Craig; McNabb, Dennis; Barty, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    Properties of a Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering source are presented. It produces 0.1 MeV-0.9 MeV photons. Its experimental key parameters are: its size (0.01 mm^2), divergence (10x6 mrad^2), duration (ps), spectrum (15% bandwidth) and intensity (10^5 photons/shot), which yield an on-axis peak brightness of ˜10^15 photons/mm^2/mrad^2/s/0.1% bandwidth at 0.478 MeV. We detected the 0.478 MeV nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) line of ^7Li. A LiH sample was in the beam path, and the NRF scattered photons were detected by a germanium detector oriented at 90^o with respect to the incident beam axis. The resulting spectrum shows the 0.478 MeV line of ^7Li, with several characteristic lines from the interaction. With this experiment, we have shown that MEGa-Ray sources will provide a unique specific isotope detection capability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Approximate One-Dimensional Models for Monoenergetic Neutral Particle Transport in Ducts with Wall Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Arnulfo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monoenergetic neutral particle transport in a duct, where particles travel inside the duct walls, is treated using an approximate one-dimensional model. The one-dimensional model uses three-basis functions, as part of a previously derived weighted-residual procedure, to account for the geometry of particle transport in a duct system (where particle migration into the walls is not considered). Our model introduces two stochastic parameters to account for particle-wall interactions: an albedo approximation yielding the fraction of particles that return to the duct after striking the walls, and a mean-distance travelled in the walls transverse to the duct by particles that re-enter the duct. Our model produces a set of three transport equations with a non-local scattering kernel. We solve these equations using discrete ordinates with source iteration. Numerical results for the reflection and transmission probabilities of neutron transport in ducts of circular cross section are compared to Monte Ca...

  9. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  10. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses

  11. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  12. Exploring new features of neutrino oscillations with very low energy monoenergetic neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergados, J.D., E-mail: Vergados@cc.uoi.g [University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 45110 (Greece); Novikov, Yu.N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we propose to study neutrino oscillations employing sources of monoenergetic neutrinos following electron capture by the nucleus. Since the neutrino energy is very low the smaller of the two oscillation lengths, L{sub 23}, appearing in this electronic neutrino disappearance experiment can be so small that the full oscillation can take place inside the detector and one may determine very accurately the neutrino oscillation parameters. Since in this case the oscillation probability is proportional to sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}, one can measure or set a better limit on the unknown parameter {theta}{sub 13}. This is quite important, since, if this mixing angle vanishes, there is not going to be CP violation in the leptonic sector. The best way to detect it is by measuring electron recoils in neutrino-electron scattering. One, however, has to pay the price that the expected counting rates are very small. Thus one needs a very intensive neutrino source and a large detector with as low as possible energy threshold and high energy and position resolution. Both spherical gaseous and cylindrical liquid detectors are studied. Different source candidates are considered.

  13. Critical analysis of soil hydraulic conductivity determination using monoenergetic gamma radiation attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three soil samples of different textures: LVA (red yellow latosol), LVE (dark red latosol) and LRd (dystrophic dark red latosol) were utilized for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K(θ) measurements. Soil bulk densities and water contents during internal water drainage were measured by monoenergetic gamma radiation attenuation, using homogeneous soil columns assembled in the laboratory. The measurements were made with a collimated gamma beam of 0.003 m in diameter using a Nal(Tl) (3'' x 3 '') detector and a 137Cs gamma source of 74 X 108 Bq and 661.6 KeV. Soil columns were scanned with the gamma beam from 0.01 to 0.20 m depth, in 0.01m steps, for several soil water redistribution times. The results show a great variability of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relation K(θ), even though homogeneous soils were used. The variability among methods is significantly smaller in relation to variability in space. The assumption of unit hydraulic gradient during redistribution of soil water utilized in the methods of Hillel, Libardi and Sisson leads to hydraulic conductivity values that increase in depth. The exponential character of the K(θ) relationship, is responsible for the difficulty of estimating soil hydraulic conductivity, which is a consequence of small variations in the porous arrangement, even in samples supposed to be homogeneous. (author)

  14. Efficient accumulation of antiprotons and positrons, production of slow mono-energetic beams, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) project, particularly the antiproton trapping and slow antiproton production, is discussed. An RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) installed in the ASACUSA beam line has an excellent deceleration efficiency of 25% providing 10-130keV antiprotons, which improves the final accumulation efficiency at least one and half orders of magnitude. The decelerated antiprotons are then injected in a large volume multiring trap, stored, and electron-cooled. About 1 million antiprotons are successfully accumulated per one AD shot and 10-500eV antiprotons are extracted as a mono-energetic beam. A UHV compatible positron accumulation is newly developed combining electron plasma and an ion cloud, which yields an accumulation rate as high as 400e **+s/mCi, two and a half orders of magnitude higher than other UHV compatible schemes. A new scheme to synthesize a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam is also discussed, which will play a vit...

  15. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs

    CERN Document Server

    Pomp, S; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Rottger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-01-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  16. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  17. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 x 1032/cm2/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined

  18. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  19. Test Ion Acceleration in the Field of Expanding Planar Electron Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Basko, M. M.

    2006-01-01

    New exact results are obtained for relativistic acceleration of test positive ions in the non-Boltzmann laminar zone of a planar electron sheath evolving from an initially mono-energetic electron distribution. The electron dynamics is analyzed against the background of motionless foil ions. The limiting gamma-factor of accelerated ions is shown to be determined primarily by the values of the ion-electron charge-over-mass ratio and the initial gamma-factor of the accelerated electrons: there e...

  20. The miniature accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The image that most people have of CERN is of its enormous accelerators and their capacity to accelerate particles to extremely high energies. But thanks to some cutting-edge studies on beam dynamics and radiofrequency technology, along with innovative construction techniques, teams at CERN have now created the first module of a brand-new accelerator, which will be just 2 metres long. The potential uses of this miniature accelerator will include deployment in hospitals for the production of medical isotopes and the treatment of cancer. It’s a real David-and-Goliath story.   Serge Mathot, in charge of the construction of the "mini-RFQ", pictured with the first of the four modules that will make up the miniature accelerator. The miniature accelerator consists of a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), a component found at the start of all proton accelerator chains around the world, from the smallest to the largest. The LHC is designed to produce very high-intensity beams ...