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  1. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases pose a significant problem for the healthcare system, doctors, and patients. With an aging population, more and more individuals are developing neurodegenerative diseases and there are few treatment options at the present time. Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform. There is increasing research evidence to support the application of meditation techniques to help improve cognition and memory in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the current data on meditation, memory, and attention, and the potential applications of meditation techniques in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Driving and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Uc, Ergun Y.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The proportion of elderly in the general population is rising, resulting in greater numbers of drivers with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). These neurodegenerative disorders impair cognition, visual perception, and motor function, leading to reduced driver fitness and greater crash risk. Yet medical diagnosis or age alone is not reliable enough to predict driver safety or crashes, or revoke the driving privileges of these drivers. Dri...

  3. Sleep in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of sleep are an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases and include insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness that may be manifested as persistent somnolence or sudden onset of sleep episodes, obstructive and central sleep apnea, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless legs syndrome. The origin of these sleep disorders is multifactorial including degeneration of the brain areas that modulate sleep, the symptoms of the disease, and the effect of medications. Treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative diseases should be individualized and includes behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, melatonin, hypnotics, waking-promoting agents, and continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26972029

  4. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Ceruloplasmin in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Vadim; Harris, Zena Leah; Zatta, Paolo

    2005-11-01

    For decades, abnormalities in ceruloplasmin (Cp) synthesis have been associated with neurodegenerative disease. From the early observation that low circulating serum ceruloplasmin levels served as a marker for Wilson's disease to the recent characterization of a neurodegenerative disorder associated with a complete lack of serum ceruloplasmin, the link between Cp and neuropathology has strengthened. The mechanisms associated with these different central nervous system abnormalities are very distinct. In Wilson's disease, a defect in the P-type ATPase results in abnormal hepatic copper accumulation that eventually leaks into the circulation and is abnormally deposited in the brain. In this case, copper deposition results in the neurodegenerative phenotype observed. Patients with autosomal recessive condition, aceruloplasminemia, lack the ferroxidase activity inherent to the multi-copper oxidase ceruloplasmin and develop abnormal iron accumulation within the central nervous system. In the following review ceruloplasmin gene expression, structure and function will be presented and the role of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism will be discussed. The molecular events underlying the different forms of neurodegeneration observed will be presented. Understanding the role of ceruloplasmin within the central nervous system is fundamental to further our understanding of the pathology observed. Is the ferroxidase function more essential than the antioxidant role? Does Cp help maintain nitrosothiol stores or does it oxidize critical brain substrates? The answers to these questions hold the promise for the treatment of devastating neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. It is essential to further elucidate the mechanism of the neuronal injury associated with these disorders.

  6. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the de-velopment of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. How-ever, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegen-erative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Hunt-ington’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig’s disease.

  7. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, LingLing; Hong, Tao

    2008-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington' disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  8. Stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU LingLing; HONG Tao

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, which are important to specific physiological functions. With the development of old-aging society, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases is on the increase. However, it is difficult to diagnose for most of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, there are too few effective therapies. Advances in stem cell biology have raised the hope and possibility for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, stem cells have been widely attempted to treat neurodegenerative diseases of animal model. Here we review the progress and prospects of various stem cells,including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cell and neural stem cells and so on, for the treatments of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease.

  9. Molecular chaperones and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates that result from conformational changes in proteins. These diseases may result from an imbalance between the production of misfolded proteins and normal chaperone capacity. Molecular chaperones provide a first line of defence against misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins and are, therefore, promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Johri, Ashu; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyo...

  11. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  12. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating and often lead to severe morbidity and even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Braak staging study, the progressionof PD starts in the medulla oblongata......, which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... Medicine to assess the sleep disturbances. The aim of this PhD dissertation was to: 1) Develop a method to investigate autonomic changes during sleep in neurodegenerative diseases, and apply this method on PD, iRBD and narcolepsy patients to evaluate the autonomic function in these diseases. 2) Validate...

  13. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  14. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  15. Hyperhomocysteinemia: Impact on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Tiwari, Manisha; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are the diseases of the central nervous system with various aetiology and symptoms. Dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and autism are some examples of neurodegenerative diseases. Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is considered to be an independent risk factor for numerous pathological conditions under neurodegenerative diseases. Along with genetic factors that are the prime cause of homocysteine (Hcy) imbalance, the nutritional and hormonal factors are also contributing to high Hcy levels in the body. Numerous clinical and epidemiological data confirm the direct correlation of Hcy levels in the body and generation of different types of central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and others. Till now, it is difficult to say whether homocysteine is the cause of the disease or whether it is one of the impacts of the diseases. However, Hhcy is a surrogate marker of vitamin B deficiency and is a neurotoxic agent. This Mini Review will give an overview of how far research has gone into understanding the homocysteine imbalance with prognostic, causative and preventive measures in treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26036286

  16. Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Mara Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, increases with age, and the number of affected patients is expected to increase worldwide in the next decades. Accurately understanding the etiopathogenic mechanisms of these diseases is a crucial step for developing disease-modifying drugs able to preclude their emergence or at least slow their progression. Animal models contribute to increase the knowledge on the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. These models reproduce different aspects of a given disease, as well as the histopathological lesions and its main symptoms. The purpose of this review is to present the main animal models for AD, PD, and Huntington's disease.

  17. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, M.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Brooks, D.J. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Aarhus University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [{sup 18}F]THK523, [{sup 18}F]THK5117, [{sup 18}F]THK5105 and [{sup 18}F]THK5351, [{sup 18}F]AV1451(T807) and [{sup 11}C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. (orig.)

  19. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  20. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueping; Guo, Chunyan; Kong, Jiming

    2012-02-15

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2 (-)) and hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  1. GSK-3 in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 regulates multiple cellular processes, and its dysregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases. In this paper we will focus on the dysfunction of GSK-3 in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Specifically, GSK-3 is known to interact with tau, β-amyloid (Aβ, and α-synuclein, and as such may be crucially involved in both diseases. Aβ production, for example, is regulated by GSK-3, and its toxicity is mediated by GSK-induced tau phosphorylation and degeneration. α-synuclein is a substrate for GSK-3 and GSK-3 inhibition protects against Parkinsonian toxins. Lithium, a GSK-3 inhibitor, has also been shown to affect tau, Aβ, and α-synuclein in cell culture, and transgenic animal models. Thus, understanding the role of GSK-3 in neurodegenerative diseases will enhance our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these disorders and also facilitate the identification of new therapeutic avenues.

  2. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  4. Sirtuin deacetylases in neurodegenerative diseases of aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adrianna Z Herskovits; Leonard Guarente

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin enzymes are a family of highly conserved protein deacetylases that depend on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) for their activity.There are seven sirtuins in mammals and these proteins have been linked with caloric restriction and aging by modulating energy metabolism,genomic stability and stress resistance.Sirtuin enzymes are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of human diseases including cancer,diabetes,inflammatory disorders and neurodegenerative disease.Modulation of sirtuin activity has been shown to impact the course of several aggregate-forming neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease,Parkinson's disease,Huntington's disease,amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.Sirtuins can influence the progression of neurodegenerative disorders by modulating transcription factor activity and directly deacetylating proteotoxic species.Here,we describe sirtuin protein targets in several aggregate-forming neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of compounds that modulate sirtuin activity in these disorders.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Spindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal models, studies of mitochondria from patients, identification of genetic defects in patients with neurodegenerative disease, and measurements of markers of oxidative stress. Studies of in vitro models of neuronal toxicity and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects of CoQ10. With this data in mind, several clinical trials of CoQ10 have been performed in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with equivocal findings. CoQ10 is widely available in multiple formulations and is very well tolerated with minimal adverse effects, making it an attractive potential therapy. Phase III trials of high-dose CoQ10 in large sample sizes are needed to further ascertain the effects of CoQ10 in neurodegenerative diseases.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

  6. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Visual Spatial Cognition in Neurodegenerative Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Possin, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Visual spatial impairment is often an early symptom of neurodegenerative disease; however, this multi-faceted domain of cognition is not well-assessed by most typical dementia evaluations. Neurodegenerative diseases cause circumscribed atrophy in distinct neural networks, and accordingly, they impact visual spatial cognition in different and characteristic ways. Anatomically-focused visual spatial assessment can assist the clinician in making an early and accurate diagnosis. This article will...

  8. Metal attenuating therapies in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mot, Alexandra I; Wedd, Anthony G; Sinclair, Layla; Brown, David R; Collins, Steven J; Brazier, Marcus W

    2011-12-01

    The clinical and pathological spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases is diverse, although common to many of these disorders is the accumulation of misfolded proteins, with oxidative stress thought to be an important contributing mechanism to neuronal damage. As a corollary, transition metal ion dyshomeostasis appears to play a key pathogenic role in a number of these maladies, including the most common of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, studies spanning a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders are presented with their involvement of transition metals compared and contrasted, including more detailed treatise in relation to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases. For each of these diseases, a discussion of the evolving scientific rationale for the development of therapies aimed at ameliorating the detrimental effects of transition metal dysregulation, including results from various human trials, is then provided.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Henchcliffe, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal model...

  10. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity. PMID:24727531

  11. Autophagy and its neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Gu; Avaneesh Jakkoju; Mingwei Wang; Weidong Le

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that protein misfolding and aggregation contribute significantly to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Misfolded and aggregated proteins are cleared by ubiquitin proteasomal system (UPS) and by both Micro and Macro autophagy lysosomal pathway (ALP). Autophagosomal dysfunction has been implicated in an increasing number of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Autophagy is a cellular self-eating process that plays an important role in neuroprotection as well as neuronal injury and death. While a decrease in autophagic activity interferes with protein degradation and possibly organelle turnover, increased autophagy has been shown to facilitate the clearance of aggregation-prone proteins and promote neuronal survival in a number of disease models. On the other hand, too much autophagic activity can be detrimental, suggesting the regulation of autophagy is critical in dictating cell fate. In this review paper, we will discuss various aspects of ALP biology and its dual functions in neuronal cell death and survival. We will also evaluate the role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, we will explore the therapeutic potential of autophagy modifiers in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Ergurhan Kiroglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are almost incurable, debilitating, and they might be fatal, because of limited neurogenesis in nervous system, presence of inhibitory substances and inhibition of recovery due to development of glial scar. Despite many treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases no full cure has been achieved. The successful results for mesenchymal stem cells applications on muscles, heart and liver diseases and the application of these cells to the damaged area in particular, hypoxia, inflammation and apoptosis promise hope of using them for neurodegenerative diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells applications constitute a vascular and neuronal phenotype in Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimers disease. Stem cells release bioactive agents that lead to suppression of local immune system, reduction of free radicals, increase in angiogenesis, inhibition of fibrosis, and apoptosis. In addition, tissue stem cells, increase neuronal healing, stimulate proliferation and differentiation. These findings show that stem cells might be a hope of a cure in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and intensive work on this issue should continue.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Xiao, Shi-Fu

    2011-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, are characterized by idiopathic neuron loss in different regions of the central nervous system, which contributes to the relevant dysfunctions in the patients. The application of cell replacement therapy using human embryonic stem (hES) cells, though having attracted much attention, has been hampered by the intrinsic ethical problems. It has been demonstrated that adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the embryonic state, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. It is soon realized that iPS cells may be an alternative source for cell replacement therapy, because it raises no ethical problems and using patient-specific iPS cells for autologous transplantation will not lead to immunological rejection. What's more, certain types of neurons derived from patient-specific iPS cells may display disease-relevant phenotypes. Thus, patient-specific iPS cells can provide a unique opportunity to directly investigate the pathological properties of relevant neural cells in individual patient, and to study the vulnerability of neural cells to pathogenic factors in vitro, which may help reveal the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, the recent development in cellular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using iPS cells was summarized, and the potential value of iPS cells in the modeling of neurodegenerative disease was discussed.

  14. Mitochondrial Medicine for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are key cytoplasmic organelles, responsible for generating cellular energy, regulating intracellular calcium levels, altering the reduction-oxidation potential of cells, and regulating cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria play a central role in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Freidriech ataxia. Further, several lines of evidence suggest that mi...

  15. Mitochondrial drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in neurodegenerative diseases. Given the fact that mitochondria participate in diverse cellular processes, including energetics, metabolism, and death, the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuronal cells are inevitable. In fact, new strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction are emerging as potential alternatives to current treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on mitochondrial proteins that are directly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We also examine recently identified small molecule modulators of these mitochondrial targets and assess their potential in research and therapeutic applications.

  16. Studying neurodegenerative diseases in culture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes C.M. Schlachetzki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are pathological conditions that have an insidious onset and chronic progression. Different models have been established to study these diseases in order to understand their underlying mechanisms and to investigate new therapeutic strategies. Although various in vivo models are currently in use, in vitro models might provide important insights about the pathogenesis of these disorders and represent an interesting approach for the screening of potential pharmacological agents. In the present review, we discuss various in vitro and ex vivo models of neurodegenerative disorders in mammalian cells and tissues.

  17. Circulating microRNAs in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Margherita; Piscopo, Paola; Crestini, Alessio; Confaloni, Annamaria; Denti, Michela A

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are caused by a combination of events that impair normal neuronal function. Although they are considered different disorders, there are overlapping features among them from the clinical, pathological, and genetic points of view. Synaptic dysfunction and loss, neurite retraction, and the appearance of other abnormalities such as axonal transport defects normally precede the neuronal loss that is a relatively late event. The diagnosis of many neurodegenerative diseases is mainly based on patient's cognitive function analysis, and the development of diagnostic methods is complicated by the brain's capacity to compensate for neuronal loss over a long period of time. This results in the late clinical manifestation of symptoms, a time when successful treatment is no longer feasible. Thus, a noninvasive diagnostic method based on early events detection is particularly important. In the last years, some biomarkers expressed in human body fluids have been proposed. microRNAs (miRNAs), with their high stability, tissue- or cell type-specific expression, lower cost, and shorter time in the assay development, could constitute a good tool to obtain an early disease diagnosis for a wide number of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases. The possibilities and challenges of using these small RNA molecules as a signature for neurodegenerative disorders is a highly promising approach for developing minimally invasive screening tests and to identify new therapeutic targets.

  18. What can pluripotent stem cells teach us about neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichterle, Hynek; Przedborski, Serge

    2010-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a growing public health challenge. Current medications treat symptoms, but none halt or retard neurodegeneration. The recent advent of pluripotent cell biology has opened new avenues for neurodegenerative disease research. The greatest potential for induced pluripotent cells derived from affected individuals is likely to be their utility for modeling and understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes, and for searching for new treatments, including cell replacement therapies. However, much work remains to be done before pluripotent cells can be used for preclinical and clinical applications. Here we discuss the challenges of generating specific neural cell subtypes from pluripotent stem cells, the use of pluripotent stem cells to model both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms of neurodegeneration, whether adult-onset neurodegeneration can be emulated in short-term cultures and the hurdles of cell replacement therapy. Progress in these four areas will substantially accelerate effective application of pluripotent stem cells.

  19. Neuroimaging diagnosis in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementia affects about 8% of people age 65 years and older. Identification of dementia is particularly difficult in its early phases when family members and physicians often incorrectly attribute the patients symptoms to normal aging. The most frequently occurring ailments that are connected with neuro degeneration are: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. A variety of powerful techniques that have allowed visualization of organ structure and function with exact detail have been introduced in the last twenty-five years. One such neuroimaging technique is positron emission tomography (PET), which measures in detail the functioning of distinct areas of the human brain and as a result plays a critical role in clinical and research applications. Radiotracer-based functional imaging provides a sensitive means of recognizing and characterizing the regional changes in brain metabolism and receptor binding associated with cognitive disorders. The next functional imaging technique widely used in the diagnosis of cognitive disorders is single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). New radiotracers are being developed and promise to expand further the list of indications for PET. Prospects for developing new tracers for imaging other organ diseases also appear to be very promising. In this review, we present current opportunities of neuroimaging techniques in the diagnosis and differentiation of neuro degenerative disorders. (authors)

  20. Apocynin, a Low Molecular Oral Treatment for Neurodegenerative Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; Copray, Sjef; Philippens, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators secreted by activated resident or infiltrated innate immune cells have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This may imply that patients affected by a neurodegenerative disease may benefit from treatment wi

  1. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Transgenic nonhuman primates for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models that represent human diseases constitute an important tool in understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases, and in developing effective therapies. Neurodegenerative diseases are complex disorders involving neuropathologic and psychiatric alterations. Although transgenic and knock-in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD have been created, limited representation in clinical aspects has been recognized and the rodent models lack true neurodegeneration. Chemical induction of HD and PD in nonhuman primates (NHP has been reported, however, the role of intrinsic genetic factors in the development of the diseases is indeterminable. Nonhuman primates closely parallel humans with regard to genetic, neuroanatomic, and cognitive/behavioral characteristics. Accordingly, the development of NHP models for neurodegenerative diseases holds greater promise for success in the discovery of diagnoses, treatments, and cures than approaches using other animal species. Therefore, a transgenic NHP carrying a mutant gene similar to that of patients will help to clarify our understanding of disease onset and progression. Additionally, monitoring disease onset and development in the transgenic NHP by high resolution brain imaging technology such as MRI, and behavioral and cognitive testing can all be carried out simultaneously in the NHP but not in other animal models. Moreover, because of the similarity in motor repertoire between NHPs and humans, it will also be possible to compare the neurologic syndrome observed in the NHP model to that in patients. Understanding the correlation between genetic defects and physiologic changes (e.g. oxidative damage will lead to a better understanding of disease progression and the development of patient treatments, medications and preventive approaches for high risk individuals. The impact of the transgenic NHP model in understanding the role which

  3. Biomarker-based dissection of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Bob; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hampel, Harald; Blennow, Kaj

    2011-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases within neurology and psychiatry are hampered by the difficulty in getting biopsies and thereby validating the diagnosis by pathological findings. Biomarkers for other types of disease have been readily adopted into the clinical practice where for instance troponins are standard tests when myocardial infarction is suspected. However, the use of biomarkers for neurodegeneration has not been fully incorporated into the clinical routine. With the development of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers that reflect pathological events within the central nervous system (CNS), important clinical diagnostic tools are becoming available. This review summarizes the most promising biomarker candidates that may be used to monitor different types of neurodegeneration and protein inclusions, as well as different types of metabolic changes, in living patients in relation to the clinical phenotype and disease progression over time. Our aim is to provide the reader with an updated lexicon on currently available biomarker candidates, how far they have come in development and how well they reflect pathogenic processes in different neurodegenerative diseases. Biomarkers for specific pathogenetic processes would also be valuable tools both to study disease pathogenesis directly in patients and to identify and monitor the effect of novel treatment strategies.

  4. Ketogenic Diet in Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of data demonstrate the utility of ketogenic diets in a variety of metabolic diseases as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In regard to neurological disorders, ketogenic diet is recognized as an effective treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy but emerging data suggests that ketogenic diet could be also useful in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease, and some mitochondriopathies. Although these diseases have different pathogenesis and features, there are some common mechanisms that could explain the effects of ketogenic diets. These mechanisms are to provide an efficient source of energy for the treatment of certain types of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal brain hypometabolism; to decrease the oxidative damage associated with various kinds of metabolic stress; to increase the mitochondrial biogenesis pathways; and to take advantage of the capacity of ketones to bypass the defect in complex I activity implicated in some neurological diseases. These mechanisms will be discussed in this review.

  5. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  6. Neurodegenerative diseases: exercising towards neurogenesis and neuroregeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Tat Ang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDD such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD despite intensive research and on-going clinical trials. Collectively, these diseases account for the bulk of health care burden associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. There is therefore an urgent need to further research into the molecular pathogenesis, histological differentiation, and clinical management of NDD. Importantly, there is also an urgency to understand the similarities and differences between these two diseases so as to identify the common or different upstream and downstream signaling pathways. In this review, the role iron play in NDD will be highlighted, as iron is key to a common underlying pathway in the production of oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence to suggest that oxidative stress predisposed cells to undergo damage to DNA, protein and lipid, and as such a common factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. The challenge then is to minimize elevated and uncontrolled oxidative stress levels while not affecting basal iron metabolism, as iron plays vital roles in sustaining cellular function. However, overload of iron results in increased oxidative stress due to the Fenton reaction. We discuss evidence to suggest that sustained exercise and diet restriction may be ways to slow the rate of neurodegeneration, by perhaps promoting neurogenesis or antioxidant-related pathways. It is also our intention to cover NDD in a broad sense, in the context of basic and clinical sciences to cater for both clinician’s and the scientist’s needs, and to highlight current research investigating exercise as a therapeutic or preventive measure.

  7. THE MITOCHONDRIAL DERANGEMENTS IN NEURONAL DEGENER ATION AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue, Qi-ming; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qin-tang

    2000-01-01

    @@There are diverse concepts on the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and the neurodegenerative diseases. Among them there are different factors which might influence the initiation of neuronal degeneration as well as the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, motor neuron disease, and so on.

  8. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  9. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Multifactorial Conformational Diseases and Their Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are multifactorial debilitating disorders of the nervous system that affect approximately 30 millionindividuals worldwide. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis diseases are the consequence of misfolding and dysfunctional trafficking of proteins. Beside that, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and/or environmental factors strongly associated with age have also been implicated in causing neurodegeneration. After years of intensive research, considerable evidence has accumulated that demonstrates an important role of these factors in the etiology of common neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the extensive efforts that have attempted to define the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration, many aspects of these pathologies remain elusive. However, in order to explore the therapeutic interventions directed towards treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neuroscientists are now fully exploiting the data obtained from studies of these basic mechanisms that have gone awry. The novelty of these mechanisms represents a challenge to the identification of viable drug targets and biomarkers for early diagnosis of the diseases. In this paper, we are reviewing various aspects associated with the disease and the recent trends that may have an application for the treatment of the neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Effects of Ashwagandha (roots of Withania somnifera) on neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases commonly induce irreversible destruction of central nervous system (CNS) neuronal networks, resulting in permanent functional impairments. Effective medications against neurodegenerative diseases are currently lacking. Ashwagandha (roots of Withania somnifera Dunal) is used in traditional Indian medicine (Ayurveda) for general debility, consumption, nervous exhaustion, insomnia, and loss of memory. In this review, we summarize various effects and mechanisms of Ashwagandha extracts and related compounds on in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injury.

  11. microRNAs and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lifeng; Tan, Eng King; Zeng, Li

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that through imperfect base-pairing with complementary sequences of target mRNA molecules, typically cleave target mRNA, causing subsequent degradation or translation inhibition. Although an increasing number of studies have identified misregulated miRNAs in the neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which suggests that alterations in the miRNA regulatory pathway could contribute to disease pathogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological implications of misregulated miRNA expression and the regulation of the key genes involved in NDDs remain largely unknown. In this chapter, we provide evidence of the function and regulation of miRNAs and their association with the neurological events in NDDs. This will help improve our understanding of how miRNAs govern the biological functions of key pathogenic genes in these diseases, which potentially regulate several pathways involved in the progression of neurodegeneration. Additionally, given the growing interest in the therapeutic potential of miRNAs, we discuss current clinical challenges to developing miRNA-based therapeutics for NDDs.

  12. The Role of Copper in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Francis M.

    My research concerns the fundamental atomistic mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and the methodologies by which they may be discerned. This thesis consists of three primary parts. The introductory material is the raison d'etre for this work and a critical overview of the specific physics, mathematics and algorithms used in this research. The methods are presented along with specific details in order to facilitate future replication and enhancement. With the groundwork of mechanisms and methods out of the way, we then explore a nouveau atomistic mechanism describing the onset of Parkinson's disease, a disease that has been closely linked to misfolded metalloproteins. Further exploration of neurodegeneration takes place in the following chapter, where a remedial approach to Alzheimer's disease via a simulated chelation of a metalloprotein is undertaken. Altogether, the methods and techniques applied here allow for simulated exploration of both the atomistic mechanisms of neurodegeneration and their potential remediation strategies. The beginning portion of the research efforts explore protein misfolding dynamics in the presence a copper ion. Misfolding of the human alpha-synuclein (aS) protein has been implicated as a central constituent in neurodegenerative disease. In Parkinson's disease (PD) in particular, aS is thought to be the causative participant when found concentrated into neuritic plaques. Here we propose a scenario involving the metal ion Cu2+ as the protein misfolding initiator of fibrillized aS, the chief component of neuritic plaques. From experimental results we know these misfolded proteins have a rich beta--sheet signature, a marker that we reproduce with our simulated model. This model identifies a process of structural modifications to a natively unfolded alpha-synuclein resulting in a partially folded intermediate with a well defined nucleation site. It serves as a precursor to the fully misfolded protein. Understanding the nucleation

  13. Resurrection of Neurodegenerative diseases via Stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siranjeevi Nagaraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs are complex disorders that degenerates central nervous system. To this end, we have achieved only palliative treatments and their success is limited. Emerging studies suggest stem cells could be an alternative to recover lost neural network. Transplanting stem cells for replacing damaged neurons is a pivotal step in cell replacement therapies. In this article, NDDs and their pathology, current methods of combating NDDs and potentiality of stem cells in treating NDDs have been reviewed briefly. In addition to this , technical issues that hamper clinical applications of stem cells in creating cellular models and grafted cells for neuron resurrection have been discussed. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(7.000: 699-706

  14. Neurodegenerative disease. Genetic discrimination in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2009-10-01

    A survey conducted in Canada examined the prevalence of perceived genetic discrimination against patients with Huntington disease. The respondents reported discrimination not only by insurance or mortgage companies, but also in family and social contexts. Discrimination was more frequently attributed to family history than to genetic test results. PMID:19794509

  15. Epigenetics and etiology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata M. Gruber

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Determination of specific gene profile expression is essential for morphological and functional differentiation of cells in the human organism. The human genome consists of 25–30 thousands genes but only some of them are expressed in each cell. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modifications or non-coding RNA functions are also responsible for the unique gene expression patterns. It is suggested that transcriptional gene activation is related to hypomethylation and the transcriptionally non-active sequences are hypermethylated. Covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation are correlated and interacting. Chromatin modeling is regulated not only by specific enzymes but also by protein kinases or phosphatases and coactivators, such as CBP. Such interaction makes the “histone code” which with the chromatin proteins determines gene expression patterns as the response to external agents. Evidence of a major role for epigenetic modifications in neurological disease has come from three converging lines of enquiry: high conservation throughout evolution of the histone residues that are the target for epigenetic modifications; association between mutations in epigenetic components and multisystem disease syndrome in the nervous system; and broad efficacy of small-molecule epigenetic modulators, e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors, in models of neurological diseases incurable up to now, such as Huntington’s disease, (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This article is a survey of the literature concerning the characterization of gene expression patterns correlated with some neurodegenerative diseases. The processes of DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation are emphasized. The histone deacetylases are indicated as the basis for design of potential drugs.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Relevance to Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Hroudová; Namrata Singh; Zdeněk Fišar

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and rea...

  17. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea T Grinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  18. Mitochondria as a Therapeutic Target for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Reddy, Tejaswini P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles responsible for life and death. Extensive evidence from animal models, postmortem brain studies of and clinical studies of aging and neurodegenerative diseases suggests that mitochondrial function is defective in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Several lines of research suggest that mitochondrial abnormalities, including defects in oxidative ...

  19. Recent advances in using Drosophila to model neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bingwei

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. Most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause. The identification of genes associated with familial cases of these diseases has enabled the development of animal models to study disease mechanisms. The model organism Drosophila has been successfully used to study pathogenic mechanisms of a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent g...

  20. Human DNA methylomes of neurodegenerative diseases show common epigenomic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mut, J V; Heyn, H; Vidal, E; Moran, S; Sayols, S; Delgado-Morales, R; Schultz, M D; Ansoleaga, B; Garcia-Esparcia, P; Pons-Espinal, M; de Lagran, M M; Dopazo, J; Rabano, A; Avila, J; Dierssen, M; Lott, I; Ferrer, I; Ecker, J R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative disorders often show similar lesions, such as the presence of amyloid plaques, TAU-neurotangles and synuclein inclusions. The genetically inherited forms are rare, so we wondered whether shared epigenetic aberrations, such as those affecting DNA methylation, might also exist. The studied samples were gray matter samples from the prefrontal cortex of control and neurodegenerative disease-associated cases. We performed the DNA methylation analyses of Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer-like neurodegenerative profile associated with Down's syndrome samples. The DNA methylation landscapes obtained show that neurodegenerative diseases share similar aberrant CpG methylation shifts targeting a defined gene set. Our findings suggest that neurodegenerative disorders might have similar pathogenetic mechanisms that subsequently evolve into different clinical entities. The identified aberrant DNA methylation changes can be used as biomarkers of the disorders and as potential new targets for the development of new therapies. PMID:26784972

  1. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argye E. Hillis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We review rationale, challenges, study designs, reported results, and future directions in the use of transcranial direct cranial stimulation (tDCS in neurodegenerative disease, focusing on treatment of spelling in primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Rationale Evidence from both animal studies and human studies indicates that anodal and cathodal tDCS over the brain result in a temporary change in membrane potentials, reducing the threshold for long-term potentiation of neurons in the affected area. This may allow unaffected brain regions to assume functions of diseased regions. Challenges Special challenges in treating individuals with progressive conditions include altered goals of treatment and the possibility that participants may accumulate new deficits over the course of the treatment program that interfere with their ability to understand, retain, or cooperate with aspects of the program. The most serious challenge – particularly for single case designs - is that there may be no stable baseline against which to measure change with treatment. Thus, it is essential to demonstrate that treatment results in a statistically significant change in the slope of decline or improvement. Therefore, demonstration of a significant difference between tDCS and control (sham requires either a large number of participants or a large effect size. Designs The choice of a treatment design reflects these limitations. Group studies with a randomized, double-blind, sham control trial design (without cross-over provide the greatest power to detect a difference between intervention and control conditions, with the fewest participants. A cross-over design, in which all participants (from 1 to many receive both active and sham conditions, in randomized order, requires a larger effect size for the active condition relative to the control condition (or little to no maintenance of treatment gains or carry-over effect to show significant differences between treatment

  2. Therapeutic induction of autophagy to modulate neurodegenerative disease progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Warren E HOCHFELD; Shirley LEE; David C RUBINSZTEIN

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that aggregating,misfolded proteins may have an impact on autophagic function,suggesting that this could be a secondary pathological mechanism in many diseases.In this review,we focus on the role of autophagy in four major neurodegenerative diseases:Alzheimer disease (AD),Huntington's disease (HD),Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotropic lateral sclerosis.

  3. Neural substrates of spontaneous narrative production in focal neurodegenerative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Gola (Kelly A.); A. Thorne (Avril); L.D. Veldhuisen (Lisa D.); C.M. Felix (Cordula M.); S. Hankinson (Sarah); J. Pham (Julie); T. Shany-Ur (Tal); G.P. Schauer (Guido P.); C.M. Stanley (Christine M.); S. Glenn (Shenly); B.L. Miller (Bruce L.); K.P. Rankin (Katherine P.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractConversational storytelling integrates diverse cognitive and socio-emotional abilities that critically differ across neurodegenerative disease groups. Storytelling patterns may have diagnostic relevance and predict anatomic changes. The present study employed mixed methods discourse and

  4. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selvaraju Subash; Musthafa Mohamed Essa; Samir Al-Adawi; Mushtaq A.Memon; hTamilarasan Manivasagam; Mohammed Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical research has demonstrated that berry fruits can prevent age-related neurodegen-erative diseases and improve motor and cognitive functions. The berry fruits are also capable of modulating signaling pathways involved in inflammation, cell survival, neurotransmission and enhancing neuroplasticity. The neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases are related to phytochemicals such as anthocyanin, caffeic acid, catechin, quercetin, kae-mpferol and tannin. In this review, we made an attempt to clearly describe the beneifcial effects of various types of berries as promising neuroprotective agents.

  6. NSAIDs and cardiovascular drugs in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.M. Haag (Mendel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNeurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases are frequent in elderly populations and comprise primarily of dementia (mainly Alzheimer disease (AD)), Parkinson disease (PD) and stroke. The prevalence of these neurological disorders rises with older age. From 55 years to 90 years and abo

  7. Redox Imbalance and Viral Infections in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential molecules for many physiological functions and act as second messengers in a large variety of tissues. An imbalance in the production and elimination of ROS is associated with human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. In the last years the notion that neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by chronic viral infections, which may result in an increase of neurodegenerative diseases progression, emerged. It is known in literature that enhanced viral infection risk, observed during neurodegeneration, is partly due to the increase of ROS accumulation in brain cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of viral infection, occurring during the progression of neurodegeneration, remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge regarding the role of influenza, herpes simplex virus type-1, and retroviruses infection in ROS/RNS-mediated Parkinson’s disease (PD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  8. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury. Cell replacement therapy has provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells, and extensive efforts by investigators to develop stem cell-based brain transplantation therapies have been carried out. We review here notable previously published experimental and preclinical studies involving stem cell-based cell for neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the future prospects for stem cell therapy of neurological disorders in the clinical setting. Steady and solid progress in stem cell research in both basic and preclinical settings should support the hope for development of stem cell-based cell therapies for neurological diseases.

  9. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine. PMID:21422516

  10. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. Studies in both humans and rodent models revealed that brain NPY levels are altered in some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease. In this review, we will focus on the roles of NPY in the pathological mechanisms of these disorders, highlighting NPY as a neuroprotective agent, as a neural stem cell proliferative agent, as an agent that increases trophic support, as a stimulator of autophagy and as an inhibitor of excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Moreover, the effect of NPY in some clinical manifestations commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease, such as depressive symptoms and body weight loss, are also discussed. In conclusion, this review highlights NPY system as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Absence of consensus in diagnostic criteria for familial neurodegenerative diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2012-04-01

    A small proportion of cases seen in neurodegenerative conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson\\'s disease and Alzheimer disease are familial. These familial cases are usually clinically indistinguishable from sporadic cases. Identifying familial cases is important both in terms of clinical guidance for family members and for gene discovery.

  12. The Use of Proteomics in Biomarker Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Davidsson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases should reflect the central pathogenic processes of the diseases. The field of clinical proteomics is especially well suited for discovery of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, which reflects the proteins in the brain under healthy conditions as well as in several neurodegenerative diseases. Known proteins involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases are, respectively, normal tau protein, β-amyloid (1-42, synaptic proteins, amyloid precursor protein (APP, apolipoprotein E (apoE, which previously have been studied by protein immunoassays. The objective of this paper was to summarize results from proteomic studies of differential protein patterns in neurodegenerative diseases with focus on Alzheimer's disease (AD. Today, discrimination of AD from controls and from other neurological diseases has been improved by simultaneous analysis of both β-amyloid (1-42, total-tau, and phosphorylated tau, where a combination of low levels of CSF-β-amyloid 1-42 and high levels of CSF-tau and CSF-phospho-tau is associated with an AD diagnosis. Detection of new biomarkers will further strengthen diagnosis and provide useful information in drug trials. The combination of immunoassays and proteomic methods show that the CSF proteins express differential protein patterns in AD, FTD, and PD patients, which reflect divergent underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and neuropathological changes in these diseases.

  13. Typical Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Bartels, Anna L.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Eshuis, Silvia A.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative brain diseases on clinical grounds is difficult, especially at an early disease stage. Several studies have found specific regional differences of brain metabolism applying [F-18]-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), suggesting t

  14. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanan Maiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, tauopathies, and Huntington’s diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  15. RNA processing-associated molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anna Y

    2016-08-01

    Dysfunctions of RNA processing and mutations of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. To elucidate the function of RNA processing and RBPs mutations in neuronal cells and to increase our understanding on the pathogenic mechanisms of neurodegeneration, I have reviewed recent advances on RNA processing-associated molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, including RBPs-mediated dysfunction of RNA processing, dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA)-based regulation of gene expression, and oxidative RNA modification. I have focused on neurodegeneration induced by RBPs mutations, by dysfunction of miRNA regulation, and by the oxidized RNAs within neurons, and discuss how these dysfunctions have pathologically contributed to neurodegenerative diseases. The advances overviewed above will be valuable to basic investigation and clinical application of target diagnostic tests and therapies.

  16. Neural stem cell-based treatment for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung U; Lee, Hong J; Kim, Yun B

    2013-10-01

    Human neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by a loss of neurons and glia in the brain or spinal cord. Neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs), and stem cell-based cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases have been developed. A recent advance in generation of a new class of pluripotent stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from patients' own skin fibroblasts, opens doors for a totally new field of personalized medicine. Transplantation of NSCs, neurons or glia generated from stem cells in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including PD, HD, ALS and AD, demonstrates clinical improvement and also life extension of these animals. Additional therapeutic benefits in these animals can be provided by stem cell-mediated gene transfer of therapeutic genes such as neurotrophic factors and enzymes. Although further research is still needed, cell and gene therapy based on stem cells, particularly using neurons and glia derived from iPSCs, ESCs or NSCs, will become a routine treatment for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases and also stroke and spinal cord injury.

  17. The role of mitochondria in inherited neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jennifer Q; Beal, M Flint; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2006-06-01

    In the past decade, the genetic causes underlying familial forms of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, dominant optic atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A, neuropathy ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa, and Leber's hereditary optic atrophy have been elucidated. However, the common pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal death are still largely unknown. Recently, mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as a potential 'lowest common denominator' linking these disorders. In this review, we discuss the body of evidence supporting the role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the principal features of genetic diseases caused by abnormalities of mitochondrial proteins encoded by the mitochondrial or the nuclear genomes. We then address genetic diseases where mutant proteins are localized in multiple cell compartments, including mitochondria and where mitochondrial defects are likely to be directly caused by the mutant proteins. Finally, we describe examples of neurodegenerative disorders where mitochondrial dysfunction may be 'secondary' and probably concomitant with degenerative events in other cell organelles, but may still play an important role in the neuronal decay. Understanding the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to neurodegeneration and its pathophysiological basis will significantly impact our ability to develop more effective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16805775

  18. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott SM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are often accompanied by neurodegenerative or neurotransmitter changes. However, in addition to being a symptom of the underlying neurodegenerative condition, there is also emerging evidence that sleep disturbance itself may contribute to the development and facilitate the progression of several of these disorders. Due to its impact both as an early symptom and as a potential factor contributing to ongoing neurodegeneration, the sleep–wake cycle is an ideal target for further study for potential interventions not only to lessen the burden of these diseases but also to slow their progression. In this review, we will highlight the sleep phenotypes associated with some of the major neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on the circadian disruption associated with Alzheimer’s disease, the rapid eye movement behavior disorder and sleep fragmentation associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the insomnia and circadian dysregulation associated with Huntington’s disease. Keywords: sleep, neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease

  19. Apocynin, a Low Molecular Oral Treatment for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert A. ‘t Hart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators secreted by activated resident or infiltrated innate immune cells have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This may imply that patients affected by a neurodegenerative disease may benefit from treatment with selective inhibitors of innate immune activity. Here we review the therapeutic potential of apocynin, an essentially nontoxic phenolic compound isolated from the medicinal plant Jatropha multifida. Apocynin is a selective inhibitor of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase Nox2 that can be applied orally and is remarkably effective at low dose.

  20. Role of autophagy in prion protein-induced neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yao; Deming Zhao; Sher Hayat Khan; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,characterized by spongiform degeneration and the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated PrPSc in the central nervous system,are one of fatal neurodegenerative and infectious disorders of humans and animals.In earlier studies,autophagy vacuoles in neurons were frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's,Parkinson's,and Huntington's diseases as well as prion diseases.Autophagy is a highly conserved homeostatic process by which several cytoplasmic components (proteins or organelles) are sequestered in a doublemembrane-bound vesicle termed 'autophagosome' and degraded upon their fusion with lysosome.The pathway of intercellular self-digestion at basal physiological levels is indispensable for maintaining the healthy status of tissues and organs.In case of prion infection,increasing evidence indicates that autophagy has a crucial ability of eliminating pathological PrPSc accumulated within neurons.In contrast,autophagy dysfunction in affected neurons may contribute to the formation of spongiform changes.In this review,we summarized recent findings about the effect of mammalian autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders,particularly in prion diseases.We also summarized the therapeutic potential of some small molecules (such as lithium,rapamycin,Sirtuin 1 and resveratrol) targets to mitigate such diseases on brain function.Furthermore,we discussed the controversial role of autophagy,whether it mediates neuronal toxicity or serves a protective function in neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallarda, B W; Lledo, P-M

    2012-12-01

    The olfactory system is unique in many respects-two of which include the process of adult neurogenesis which continually supplies it with newborn neurons, and the fact that neurodegenerative diseases are often accompanied by a loss of smell. A link between these two phenomena has been hypothesized, but recent evidence for the lack of robust adult neurogenesis in the human olfactory system calls into question this hypothesis. Nevertheless, model organisms continue to play a critical role in the exploration of neurodegenerative disease. In part one of this review we discuss the most promising recent technological advancements for studying adult neurogenesis in the murine olfactory system. Part two continues by looking at emerging evidence related to adult neurogenesis in neurodegenerative disease studied in model organisms and the differences between animal and human olfactory system adult neurogenesis. Hopefully, the careful application of advanced research methods to the study of neurodegenerative disease in model organisms, while taking into account the recently reported differences between the human and model organism olfactory system, will lead to a better understanding of the reasons for the susceptibility of olfaction to disease.

  2. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hueng-Chuen Fan; Ching-Shiang Chi; Shin-Nan Cheng; Hsiu-Fen Lee; Jeng-Dau Tsai; Shinn-Zong Lin; Horng-Jyh Harn

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD), and Alzheimer’s d...

  3. Mitochondria, calcium-dependent neuronal death and neurodegenerative disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Duchen, M R

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of neuronal dysfunction and death represents a major frontier in contemporary medicine, involving the acute cell death in stroke, and the attrition of the major neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Motoneuron diseases. A growing body of evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction as a key step in the pathogenesis of all these diseases, with the promise that mitochondrial processes represent valuable potential therapeut...

  4. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  5. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  6. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what׳s wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to

  7. Quality control of the proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuechao Gao; Hongyu Hu

    2008-01-01

    Most neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer'sdisease,Parkinson's disease,Huntington's disease and other polyglutamine diseases are associated with degeneration and death of specific neuronal populations due to misfolding or aggregation of certain proteins.These aggregates often contain ubiquitin that is the signal for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system,and chaperone proteins that are involved in the assistance of protein folding.Here we review the role of protein quality control systems in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases,and aim to learn more from the cooperation between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system responding to cellular protein aggregates,in order to find molecular targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  9. Summary of cerebrospinal fluid routine parameters in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Sarah; Brettschneider, Johannes; Süssmuth, Sigurd D; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard G; von Arnim, Christine A F; Ludolph, Albert C; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2011-06-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF) is predominantly performed to exclude inflammatory diseases and to perform a risk assessment in dementive disorders by measurement of tau proteins and amyloid beta peptides. However, large scale data on basic findings of CSF routine parameters are generally lacking. The objective of the study was to define a normal reference spectrum of routine CSF parameters in neurodegenerative diseases. Routine CSF parameters (white cell count, lactate and albumin concentrations, CSF/serum quotients of albumin (Q (alb)), IgG, IgA, IgM, and oligoclonal IgG bands (OCB)) were retrospectively analyzed in an academic research setting. A total of 765 patients (Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), vascular dementia (VD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multisystem atrophy (MSA), motor neuron diseases (MND), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Huntington's disease (HD)) and non-demented control groups including a group of patients with muscular disorders (MD). The main outcome measures included statistical analyses of routine CSF parameters. Mildly elevated Q (alb) were found in a small percentage of nearly all subgroups and in a higher proportion of patients with PSP, MSA, VD, PDD, and MND. With the exception of 1 MND patient, no intrathecal Ig synthesis was observed. Isolated OCBs in CSF were sometimes found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases without elevated cell counts; lactate levels were always normal. A slightly elevated Q (alb) was observed in a subgroup of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and does not exclude the diagnosis. Extensive elevation of routine parameters is not characteristic and should encourage a re-evaluation of the clinical diagnosis.

  10. ETHICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS REGARDING PRESYMPTOMATIC TESTING FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozaru, Georgeta Camelial; Aşchie, Mariana; Mitroi, Anca Florentina; Poinăreanu, I; Gorduza, E V

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's dementia, Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease or spinocerebellar ataxia, manifests into adulthood with an insidious onset, slowly of progressive symptoms. All of these diseases are characterized by presimptomatic stages that preceded with many years of clinical debut. In Parkinson's disease, more than half of the dopaminergic neurons of the black substance are lost before the advent of motor characteristic manifestations. In Huntington's chorea, the progressive neurodegenerative disease could be diagnose prenatal and presymptomatic by analyse of the number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene. A similar mechanism represented by expansion of trinucleotide repeats during hereditary transmission from parents to children was identified in fragile X syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia, spinal muscular and bulbar atrophy, or myotonic dystrophy. Presymptomatic diagnosis in all these progressive diseases raise many ethical issues, due to the psychological impact that can cause the prediction of a disease for which there is currently no curative treatment. Therefore, a positive result can produce serious psychological trauma and major changes in the lifestyle of the individual, instead, a negative result can bring joy and tranquillity. But the problem arises if presymptomatic testing in these neurodegenerative diseases brings greater benefits compared to the possible psychological damage, which can add the risk of stigmatization or discrimination. PMID:27125067

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  12. Quantitative analysis on electrooculography (EOG) for neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Pardalos, Panos M.; Seref, Onur; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Sackellares, J. C.; Skidmore, Frank M.

    2007-11-01

    Many studies have documented abnormal horizontal and vertical eye movements in human neurodegenerative disease as well as during altered states of consciousness (including drowsiness and intoxication) in healthy adults. Eye movement measurement may play an important role measuring the progress of neurodegenerative diseases and state of alertness in healthy individuals. There are several techniques for measuring eye movement, Infrared detection technique (IR). Video-oculography (VOG), Scleral eye coil and EOG. Among those available recording techniques, EOG is a major source for monitoring the abnormal eye movement. In this real-time quantitative analysis study, the methods which can capture the characteristic of the eye movement were proposed to accurately categorize the state of neurodegenerative subjects. The EOG recordings were taken while 5 tested subjects were watching a short (>120 s) animation clip. In response to the animated clip the participants executed a number of eye movements, including vertical smooth pursued (SVP), horizontal smooth pursued (HVP) and random saccades (RS). Detection of abnormalities in ocular movement may improve our diagnosis and understanding a neurodegenerative disease and altered states of consciousness. A standard real-time quantitative analysis will improve detection and provide a better understanding of pathology in these disorders.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Tanmay; Sachan, Vatsal

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) have long been viewed as a potent tool for regenerative cell therapy. MSCs are easily accessible from both healthy donor and patient tissue and expandable in vitro on a therapeutic scale without posing significant ethical or procedural problems. MSC based therapies have proven to be effective in preclinical studies for graft versus host disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune disorders and many other conditions and are currently undergoing clinical trials at a number of centers all over the world. MSCs are also being extensively researched as a therapeutic tool against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MSCs have been discussed with regard to two aspects in the context of neurodegenerative diseases: their ability to transdifferentiate into neural cells under specific conditions and their neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects. When transplanted into the brain, MSCs produce neurotrophic and growth factors that protect and induce regeneration of damaged tissue. Additionally, MSCs have also been explored as gene delivery vehicles, for example being genetically engineered to over express glial-derived or brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain. Clinical trials involving MSCs are currently underway for MS, ALS, traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and stroke. In the present review, we explore the potential that MSCs hold with regard to the aforementioned neurodegenerative diseases and the current scenario with reference to the same.

  14. Olfaction in Neurologic and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy, Maria Dantas Costa Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Loss of smell is involved in various neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. However, the olfactory test is usually neglected by physicians at large. Objective The aim of this study was to review the current literature about the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases. Data Synthesis Twenty-seven studies were selected for analysis, and the olfactory system, olfaction, and the association between the olfactory dysfunction and dementias were reviewed. Furthermore, is described an up to date in olfaction. Conclusion Otolaryngologist should remember the importance of olfaction evaluation in daily practice. Furthermore, neurologists and physicians in general should include olfactory tests in the screening of those at higher risk of dementia.

  15. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Panchanan Maiti; Jayeeta Manna; Shobi Veleri; Sally Frautschy

    2014-01-01

    The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of...

  16. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other dementias, Parkinson’s disease (PD and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND, Huntington’s disease (HD, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, is mainly addressed to motor and cognitive impairment, with special care to vital functions as breathing and feeding. Many of these patients complain of painful symptoms though their origin is variable, and their presence is frequently not considered in the treatment guidelines, leaving their management to the decision of the clinicians alone. However, studies focusing on pain frequency in such disorders suggest a high prevalence of pain in selected populations from 38 to 75% in AD, 40% to 86% in PD, and 19 to 85% in MND. The methods of pain assessment vary between studies so the type of pain has been rarely reported. However, a prevalent nonneuropathic origin of pain emerged for MND and PD. In AD, no data on pain features are available. No controlled therapeutic trials and guidelines are currently available. Given the relevance of pain in neurodegenerative disorders, the comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and predisposing factors, the application and validation of specific scales, and new specific therapeutic trials are needed.

  17. Stem cell challenges in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

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    Feng, Zhongling; Gao, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases result from the gradual and progressive loss of neural cells and lead to nervous system dysfunction. The rapidly advancing stem cell field is providing attractive alternative options for fighting these diseases. Results have provided proof of principle that cell replacement can work in humans with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, three clinical studies of cell transplantation were published that found no net benefit, while patients in two of the studies developed dyskinesias that persisted despite reductions in treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have major potential advantages because patient-specific neuroblasts are suitable for transplantation, avoid immune reactions, and can be produced without the use of human ES cells (hESC). Although iPSCs have not been successfully used in clinical trials for PD, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were treated with autologous stem cells and, though they had some degree of decline one year after treatment, they were still improved compared with the preoperative period or without any drug therapy. In addition, neural stem cells (NSCs), via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have been shown to ameliorate complex behavioral deficits associated with widespread Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in a transgenic mouse model of AD. So far, the FDA lists 18 clinical trials treating multiple sclerosis (MS), but most are in preliminary stages. This article serves as an overview of recent studies in stem cell and regenerative approaches to the above chronic neurodegenerative disorders. There are still many obstacles to the use of stem cells as a cure for neurodegenerative disease, especially because we still don't fully understand the true mechanisms of these diseases. However, there is hope in the potential of stem cells to help us learn and understand a great deal more about the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    , about 15 years after the original reports, it is clear that amyloids are special structures that occur in nature under several different guises, some good, some evil [3]. The number of diseases associated with misfolding and fibrillogenesis has steadily increased. Examples of fairly common pathologies associated with fibre formation include Alzheimer's disease (currently one of the major threats for human health in our increasingly aging world), Parkinson's disease and several rare, but not less severe, pathologies. On the other hand, it is also clear that amyloid formation is a convenient mechanism for storing peptides and/or proteins in a compact and resistant way. The number of organisms/tissues in which amyloid deposits are found is thus increasing. It is also not too far-fetched to expect that the mechanical properties of amyloids could be used in biotechnology to design new materials. Because of the importance of this topic in so many scientific fields, we have dedicated this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter to the topic of protein aggregation and disease. In the following pages we have collected two reviews and five articles that explore new and interesting developments in the field. References [1] Olby R 1994 The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (New York: Dover) [2] Dobson C M 2004 Principles of protein folding, misfolding and aggregation Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 15 3-16 [3] Hammer N D, Wang X, McGuffie B A, Chapman M R 2008 Amyloids: friend or foe? J. Alzheimers Dis. 13 407-19 Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases contents Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?Annalisa Pastore and Pierandrea Temussi Alzheimer's disease: biological aspects, therapeutic perspectives and diagnostic toolsM Di Carlo, D Giacomazza and P L San Biagio Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregatesC Corsale, R Carrotta, M R Mangione, S Vilasi, A Provenzano, G Cavallaro, D Bulone and P L San Biagio Elemental micro

  19. Protein Modification by Dicarbonyl Molecular Species in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Wesley M. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration results from abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and energy balance within neurons, astrocytes, microglia, or microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. In Alzheimer's disease, -amyloid is considered the primary contributor to neuropathology and neurodegeneration. It now is believed that certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, can contribute to neurodegeneration through the effects of chronic hyperglycemia/insulin resistance resulting in protein glycation, oxidative stress and inflammation within susceptible brain regions. Here, we present an overview of research focusing on the role of protein glycation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the neurodegenerative process. Of special interest in this paper is the effect of methylglyoxal (MGO, a cytotoxic byproduct of glucose metabolism, elevated in neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes mellitus, on cerebral protein function and oxidative stress. How MGO interacts with amino acid residues within -amyloid, and small peptides within the brain, is also discussed in terms of the affect on protein function.

  20. Searching for MIND: MicroRNAs in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Christian Barbato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In few years our understanding of microRNA (miRNA biogenesis, molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, and the functional roles of miRNAs has been expanded. Interestingly, numerous miRNAs are expressed in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in the nervous system, suggesting that their posttrascriptional regulation may be particularly relevant in neural development and function. MiRNA studies in neurobiology showed their involvement in synaptic plasticity and brain diseases. In this review ,correlations between miRNA-mediated gene silencing and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurodegenerative diseases will be discussed. Molecular and cellular neurobiological studies of the miRNAs in neurodegeneration represent the exploration of a new Frontier of miRNAs biology and the potential development of new diagnostic tests and genetic therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Searching for MIND: microRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Christian; Ruberti, Francesca; Cogoni, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    In few years our understanding of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, and the functional roles of miRNAs has been expanded. Interestingly, numerous miRNAs are expressed in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in the nervous system, suggesting that their posttrascriptional regulation may be particularly relevant in neural development and function. MiRNA studies in neurobiology showed their involvement in synaptic plasticity and brain diseases. In this review ,correlations between miRNA-mediated gene silencing and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurodegenerative diseases will be discussed. Molecular and cellular neurobiological studies of the miRNAs in neurodegeneration represent the exploration of a new Frontier of miRNAs biology and the potential development of new diagnostic tests and genetic therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Neurofilament proteins in axonal regeneration and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Wang; Minfei Wu; Chuanjun Zhan; Enyuan Ma; Maoguang Yang; Xiaoyu Yang; Yingpu Li

    2012-01-01

    Neurofilament protein is a component of the mature neuronal cytoskeleton, and it interacts with the zygosome, which is mediated by neurofilament-related proteins. Neurofilament protein regulates enzyme function and the structure of linker proteins. In addition, neurofilament gene expression plays an important role in nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that neurofilament gene transcriptional regulation is crucial for neurofilament protein expression, especially in axonal regeneration and degenerative diseases. Post-transcriptional regulation increased neurofilament protein gene transcription during axonal regeneration, ultimately resulting in a pattern of neurofilament protein expression. An expression imbalance of post-transcriptional regulatory proteins and other disorders could lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or other neurodegenerative diseases. These findings indicated that after transcription, neurofilament protein regulated expression of related proteins and promoted regeneration of damaged axons, suggesting that regulation disorders could lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. cNEUPRO: Novel Biomarkers for Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Philipp Spitzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available “clinical NEUroPROteomics of neurodegenerative diseases” (cNEUPRO is a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP within the sixth framework program of the European Commission dedicated to the search for novel biomarker candidates for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. The ultimate goal of cNEUPRO is to identify one or more valid biomarker(s in blood and CSF applicable to support the early and differential diagnosis of dementia disorders. The consortium covers all steps required for the discovery of novel biomarker candidates such as acquisition of high quality CSF and blood samples from relevant patient groups and controls, analysis of body fluids by various methods, and finally assay development and assay validation. Here we report the standardized procedures for diagnosis and preanalytical sample-handling within the project, as well as the status of the ongoing research activities and some first results.

  4. Stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Dantuma, Elise; Merchant, Stephanie; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2010-12-10

    Stem cells offer an enormous pool of resources for the understanding of the human body. One proposed use of stem cells has been as an autologous therapy. The use of stem cells for neurodegenerative diseases has become of interest. Clinical applications of stem cells for Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis will increase in the coming years, and although great care will need to be taken when moving forward with prospective treatments, the application of stem cells is highly promising.

  5. Neural substrates of spontaneous narrative production in focal neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Kelly A; Thorne, Avril; Veldhuisen, Lisa D; Felix, Cordula M; Hankinson, Sarah; Pham, Julie; Shany-Ur, Tal; Schauer, Guido P; Stanley, Christine M; Glenn, Shenly; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2015-12-01

    Conversational storytelling integrates diverse cognitive and socio-emotional abilities that critically differ across neurodegenerative disease groups. Storytelling patterns may have diagnostic relevance and predict anatomic changes. The present study employed mixed methods discourse and quantitative analyses to delineate patterns of storytelling across focal neurodegenerative disease groups, and to clarify the neuroanatomical contributions to common storytelling characteristics. Transcripts of spontaneous social interactions of 46 participants (15 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 7 semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), 12 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 12 healthy older normal controls (NC)) were analyzed for storytelling frequency and characteristics, and videos of the interactions were rated for patients' level of social attentiveness. Compared to controls, svPPAs told more stories and autobiographical stories, and perseverated on aspects of self during the interaction, whereas ADs told fewer autobiographical stories than NCs. svPPAs and bvFTDs were rated as less attentive to social cues. Aspects of storytelling were related to diverse cognitive and socio-emotional functions, and voxel-based anatomic analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed that temporal organization, narrative evaluations patterns, and social attentiveness correlated with atrophy corresponding to known intrinsic connectivity networks, including the default mode, limbic, salience, and stable task control networks. Differences in spontaneous storytelling among neurodegenerative groups elucidated diverse cognitive, socio-emotional, and neural contributions to narrative production, with implications for diagnostic screening and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26485159

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk for Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Richelin V. Dye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been a significant amount of research investigating the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with regards to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review basic science studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, and discuss the putative neuroprotective effects of HRT in the context of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Findings to date suggest a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and improved cognitive functioning of postmenopausal women who use 17β-estradiol. With regards to Parkinson’s disease, there is consistent evidence from basic science studies for a neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol; however, results of clinical and epidemiological studies are inconclusive at this time, and there is a paucity of research examining the association between HRT and Parkinson’s-related neurocognitive impairment. Even less understood are the effects of HRT on risk for frontotemporal dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Limits to the existing research are discussed, along with proposed future directions for the investigation of HRT and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Mitochondrial Quality Control: Decommissioning Power Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Rukmini Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell has an intricate quality control system to protect its mitochondria from oxidative stress. This surveillance system is multi-tiered and comprises molecules that are present inside the mitochondria, in the cytosol, and in other organelles like the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These molecules cross talk with each other and protect the mitochondria from oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a fundamental part of early disease pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders also damage the cellular quality control machinery that protects the cell against oxidative stress. This exacerbates the oxidative damage and causes extensive neuronal cell death that is characteristic of neurodegeneration.

  8. Bioinformatics Mining and Modeling Methods for the Identification of Disease Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Martin Hofmann-Apitius

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the decoding of the Human Genome, techniques from bioinformatics, statistics, and machine learning have been instrumental in uncovering patterns in increasing amounts and types of different data produced by technical profiling technologies applied to clinical samples, animal models, and cellular systems. Yet, progress on unravelling biological mechanisms, causally driving diseases, has been limited, in part due to the inherent complexity of biological systems. Whereas we have witnessed progress in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the area of neurodegenerative diseases has proved to be very challenging. This is in part because the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s disease or Parkinson´s disease is unknown, rendering it very difficult to discern early causal events. Here we describe a panel of bioinformatics and modeling approaches that have recently been developed to identify candidate mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases based on publicly available data and knowledge. We identify two complementary strategies—data mining techniques using genetic data as a starting point to be further enriched using other data-types, or alternatively to encode prior knowledge about disease mechanisms in a model based framework supporting reasoning and enrichment analysis. Our review illustrates the challenges entailed in integrating heterogeneous, multiscale and multimodal information in the area of neurology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. We conclude, that progress would be accelerated by increasing efforts on performing systematic collection of multiple data-types over time from each individual suffering from neurodegenerative disease. The work presented here has been driven by project AETIONOMY; a project funded in the course of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI; which is a public-private partnership of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations

  9. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

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    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  10. Pathogenic protein seeding in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucker, Mathias; Walker, Lary C

    2011-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins is a seminal occurrence in a remarkable variety of neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer disease (the most prevalent cerebral proteopathy), the two principal aggregating proteins are β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. The abnormal assemblies formed by conformational variants of these proteins range in size from small oligomers to the characteristic lesions that are visible by optical microscopy, such as senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Pathologic similarities with prion disease suggest that the formation and spread of these proteinaceous lesions might involve a common molecular mechanism-corruptive protein templating. Experimentally, cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by exposure to dilute brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ seeds. The amyloid-inducing agent probably is Aβ itself, in a conformation generated most effectively in the living brain. Once initiated, Aβ lesions proliferate within and among brain regions. The induction process is governed by the structural and biochemical nature of the Aβ seed, as well as the attributes of the host, reminiscent of pathogenically variant prion strains. The concept of prionlike induction and spreading of pathogenic proteins recently has been expanded to include aggregates of tau, α-synuclein, huntingtin, superoxide dismutase-1, and TDP-43, which characterize such human neurodegenerative disorders as frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Parkinson/Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our recent finding that the most effective Aβ seeds are small and soluble intensifies the search in bodily fluids for misfolded protein seeds that are upstream in the proteopathic cascade, and thus could serve as predictive diagnostics and the targets of early, mechanism-based interventions. Establishing the clinical implications of corruptive protein templating will require further mechanistic and epidemiologic investigations

  11. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  12. The role of the Wnt canonical signaling in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Rosaliana; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin or Wnt canonical pathway controls multiple biological processes throughout development and adult life. Growing evidences have suggested that deregulation of the Wnt canonical pathway could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The Wnt canonical signaling is a pathway tightly regulated, which activation results in the inhibition of the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK-3β) function and in increased β-catenin activity, that migrates into the nucleus, activating the transcription of the Wnt target genes. Conversely, when the Wnt canonical pathway is turned off, increased levels of GSK-3β promote β-catenin degradation. Hence, GSK-3β could be considered as a key regulator of the Wnt canonical pathway. Of note, GSK-3β has also been involved in the modulation of inflammation and apoptosis, determining the delicate balance between immune tolerance/inflammation and neuronal survival/neurodegeneration. In this review, we have summarized the current acknowledgements about the role of the Wnt canonical pathway in the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with particular regard to the main in vitro and in vivo studies in this field, by reviewing 85 research articles about.

  13. Developing neural stem cell-based treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Byrne, James A

    2014-05-30

    Owing to the aging of the population, our society now faces an impending wave of age-related neurodegenerative pathologies, the most significant of which is Alzheimer's disease. Currently, no effective therapies for Alzheimer's disease have been developed. However, recent advances in the fields of neural stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells now provide us with the first real hope for a cure. The recent discovery by Blurton-Jones and colleagues that neural stem cells can effectively deliver disease-modifying therapeutic proteins throughout the brains of our best rodent models of Alzheimer's disease, combined with recent advances in human nuclear reprogramming, stem cell research, and highly customized genetic engineering, may represent a potentially revolutionary personalized cellular therapeutic approach capable of effectively curing, ameliorating, and/or slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

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    Joyce, Nanette; Annett, Geralyn; Wirthlin, Louisa; Olson, Scott; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells/marrow stromal cells (MSCs) present a promising tool for cell therapy, and are currently being tested in US FDA-approved clinical trials for myocardial infarction, stroke, meniscus injury, limb ischemia, graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune disorders. They have been extensively tested and proven effective in preclinical studies for these and many other disorders. There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of MSCs to treat neurodegenerative diseases, in particular for those that are fatal and difficult to treat, such as Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Proposed regenerative approaches to neurological diseases using MSCs include cell therapies in which cells are delivered via intracerebral or intrathecal injection. Upon transplantation into the brain, MSCs promote endogenous neuronal growth, decrease apoptosis, reduce levels of free radicals, encourage synaptic connection from damaged neurons and regulate inflammation, primarily through paracrine actions. MSCs transplanted into the brain have been demonstrated to promote functional recovery by producing trophic factors that induce survival and regeneration of host neurons. Therapies will capitalize on the innate trophic support from MSCs or on augmented growth factor support, such as delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor or glial-derived neurotrophic factor into the brain to support injured neurons, using genetically engineered MSCs as the delivery vehicles. Clinical trials for MSC injection into the CNS to treat traumatic brain injury and stroke are currently ongoing. The current data in support of applying MSC-based cellular therapies to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  16. Human embryonic stem cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Crook, Jeremy M

    2011-06-01

    There is a renewed enthusiasm for the clinical translation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells. This is abetted by putative clinically-compliant strategies for hES cell maintenance and directed differentiation, greater understanding of and accessibility to cells through formal cell registries and centralized cell banking for distribution, the revised US government policy on funding hES cell research, and paradoxically the discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Additionally, as we consider the constraints (practical and fiscal) of delivering cell therapies for global healthcare, the more efficient and economical application of allogeneic vs autologous treatments will bolster the clinical entry of hES cell derivatives. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease are primary candidates for hES cell therapy, although there are significant hurdles to be overcome. The present review considers key advances and challenges to translating hES cells into novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, with special consideration given to Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Importantly, despite the focus on degenerative brain disorders and hES cells, many of the issues canvassed by this review are relevant to systemic application of hES cells and other pluripotent stem cells such as iPS cells.

  17. Creatine for neuroprotection in neurodegenerative disease: end of story?

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    Bender, Andreas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Creatine (Cr) is a natural compound that plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. In addition, it ameliorates oxidative stress, glutamatergic excitotoxicity, and apoptosis in vitro as well as in vivo. Since these pathomechanisms are implicated to play a role in several neurodegenerative diseases, Cr supplementation as a neuroprotective strategy has received a lot of attention with several positive animal studies in models of Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This has led to a number of randomized clinical trials (RCT) with oral Cr supplementation, with durations up to 5 years. In this paper, we review the evidence and consequences stemming from these trials. In the case of PD, the initial phase II RCT was promising and led to a large and well-designed phase III trial, which, however, turned out to be negative for all outcome measures. None of the RCTs that have examined effects of Cr in ALS patients showed any clinical benefit. In HD, Cr in high doses (up to 30 g/day) was shown to slow down brain atrophy in premanifest Huntingtin mutation carriers. In spite of this, proof is still lacking that Cr can also have beneficial clinical effects in this group of patients, who will go on to develop HD symptoms. Taken together, the use of Cr supplementation has so far proved disappointing in clinical studies with a number of symptomatic neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Resting state brain networks and their implications in neurodegenerative disease

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    Sohn, William S.; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are the basic units of the brain, and form network by connecting via synapses. So far, there have been limited ways to measure the brain networks. Recently, various imaging modalities are widely used for this purpose. In this paper, brain network mapping using resting state fMRI will be introduced with several applications including neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Parkinson's disease. The resting functional connectivity using intrinsic functional connectivity in mouse is useful since we can take advantage of perturbation or stimulation of certain nodes of the network. The study of brain connectivity will open a new era in understanding of brain and diseases thus will be an essential foundation for future research.

  19. MicroRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases and their therapeutic potential.

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    Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M Maral

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are abundant, endogenous, short, noncoding RNAs that act as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by base-pairing with their target mRNA. During the last decade, substantial knowledge has accumulated regarding the biogenesis of miRNAs, their molecular mechanisms and functional roles in a variety of cellular contexts. Altered expression of certain miRNA molecules in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson suggests that miRNAs could have a crucial regulatory role in these disorders. Polymorphisms in miRNA target sites may also constitute an important determinant of disease risk. Additionally, emerging evidence points to specific miRNAs targeting and regulating the expression of particular proteins that are key to disease pathogenesis. Considering that the amount of these proteins in susceptible neuronal populations appears to be critical to neurodegeneration, miRNA-mediated regulation represents a new target of significant therapeutic prospects. In this review, the implications of miRNAs in several neurodegenerative disorders and their potential as therapeutic interventions are discussed.

  20. Neural basis of interpersonal traits in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, Marc; Stanley, Christine M; Wilson, Stephen M; Gyurak, Anett; Beckman, Victoria; Growdon, Matthew; Jang, Jung; Weiner, Michael W; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2009-11-01

    Several functional and structural imaging studies have investigated the neural basis of personality in healthy adults, but human lesions studies are scarce. Personality changes are a common symptom in patients with neurodegenerative diseases like frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and semantic dementia (SD), allowing a unique window into the neural basis of personality. In this study, we used the Interpersonal Adjective Scales to investigate the structural basis of eight interpersonal traits (dominance, arrogance, coldness, introversion, submissiveness, ingenuousness, warmth, and extraversion) in 257 subjects: 214 patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as FTD, SD, progressive nonfluent aphasia, Alzheimer's disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy and 43 healthy elderly people. Measures of interpersonal traits were correlated with regional atrophy pattern using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis of structural MR images. Interpersonal traits mapped onto distinct brain regions depending on the degree to which they involved agency and affiliation. Interpersonal traits high in agency related to left dorsolateral prefrontal and left lateral frontopolar regions, whereas interpersonal traits high in affiliation related to right ventromedial prefrontal and right anteromedial temporal regions. Consistent with the existing literature on neural networks underlying social cognition, these results indicate that brain regions related to externally focused, executive control-related processes underlie agentic interpersonal traits such as dominance, whereas brain regions related to internally focused, emotion- and reward-related processes underlie affiliative interpersonal traits such as warmth. In addition, these findings indicate that interpersonal traits are subserved by complex neural networks rather than discrete anatomic areas.

  1. MicroRNAs: novel therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Reema; Ghosh, Tanay; Scaria, Vinod; Pillai, Beena

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders is rising steadily as human life expectancy increases. However, limited knowledge of the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis is a major hurdle in the identification of drug targets and development of therapeutic strategies for these largely incurable disorders. Recently, differential expression of endogenous regulatory small RNAs, known as 'microRNAs' (miRNAs), in patients of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and models of ataxia suggest that they might have key regulatory roles in neurodegeneration. miRNAs that can target known mediators of neurodegeneration offer potential therapeutic targets. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests novel miRNA-target interactions that could potentially influence neurodegeneration. The recent development of molecules that alter miRNA expression promises valuable tools that will enhance the therapeutic potential of miRNAs.

  2. The role of the mitochondrial dysfunction in two neurodegenerative diseases, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases and is correlated with augmented levels of intracellular oxydant stress. The mitochondrial defects observed in tissues from patients, as well as in animal and cellular models of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases, suggest the implication of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The two projects discussed in this manuscript focus on the role of particular aspects of mitochondrial physiology in ...

  3. Role of the Retromer Complex in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaosi; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    The retromer complex is a protein complex that plays a central role in endosomal trafficking. Retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. The process of intracellular trafficking and recycling is crucial for maintaining normal intracellular homeostasis, which is partly achieved through the activity of the retromer complex. The retromer complex plays a primary role in sorting endosomal cargo back to the cell surface for reuse, to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), or alternatively to specialized endomembrane compartments, in which the cargo is not subjected to lysosomal-mediated degradation. In most cases, the retromer acts as a core that interacts with associated proteins, including sorting nexin family member 27 (SNX27), members of the vacuolar protein sorting 10 (VPS10) receptor family, the major endosomal actin polymerization-promoting complex known as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and scar homolog (WASH), and other proteins. Some of the molecules carried by the retromer complex are risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases. Defects such as haplo-insufficiency or mutations in one or several units of the retromer complex lead to various pathologies. Here, we summarize the molecular architecture of the retromer complex and the roles of this system in intracellular trafficking related the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Autophagy as an essential cellular antioxidant pathway in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress including DNA damage, increased lipid and protein oxidation, are important features of aging and neurodegeneration suggesting that endogenous antioxidant protective pathways are inadequate or overwhelmed. Importantly, oxidative protein damage contributes to age-dependent accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria or protein aggregates. In addition, environmental toxins such as rotenone and paraquat, which are risk factors for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, also promote protein oxidation. The obvious approach of supplementing the primary antioxidant systems designed to suppress the initiation of oxidative stress has been tested in animal models and positive results were obtained. However, these findings have not been effectively translated to treating human patients, and clinical trials for antioxidant therapies using radical scavenging molecules such as α-tocopherol, ascorbate and coenzyme Q have met with limited success, highlighting several limitations to this approach. These could include: (1 radical scavenging antioxidants cannot reverse established damage to proteins and organelles; (2 radical scavenging antioxidants are oxidant specific, and can only be effective if the specific mechanism for neurodegeneration involves the reactive species to which they are targeted and (3 since reactive species play an important role in physiological signaling, suppression of endogenous oxidants maybe deleterious. Therefore, alternative approaches that can circumvent these limitations are needed. While not previously considered an antioxidant system we propose that the autophagy-lysosomal activities, may serve this essential function in neurodegenerative diseases by removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  5. Melatonin in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poeggeler B

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified as common pathophysiological phenomena associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD. As the age-related decline in the production of melatonin may contribute to increased levels of oxidative stress in the elderly, the role of this neuroprotective agent is attracting increasing attention. Melatonin has multiple actions as a regulator of antioxidant and prooxidant enzymes, radical scavenger and antagonist of mitochondrial radical formation. The ability of melatonin and its kynuramine metabolites to interact directly with the electron transport chain by increasing the electron flow and reducing electron leakage are unique features by which melatonin is able to increase the survival of neurons under enhanced oxidative stress. Moreover, antifibrillogenic actions have been demonstrated in vitro, also in the presence of profibrillogenic apoE4 or apoE3, and in vivo, in a transgenic mouse model. Amyloid-β toxicity is antagonized by melatonin and one of its kynuramine metabolites. Cytoskeletal disorganization and protein hyperphosphorylation, as induced in several cell-line models, have been attenuated by melatonin, effects comprising stress kinase downregulation and extending to neurotrophin expression. Various experimental models of AD, PD and HD indicate the usefulness of melatonin in antagonizing disease progression and/or mitigating some of the symptoms. Melatonin secretion has been found to be altered in AD and PD. Attempts to compensate for age- and disease-dependent melatonin deficiency have shown that administration of this compound can improve sleep efficiency in AD and PD and, to some extent, cognitive function in AD patients. Exogenous melatonin has also been reported to alleviate behavioral symptoms such as sundowning. Taken together, these findings suggest that melatonin

  6. REM behaviour disorder detection associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sorensen, Gertrud; Zoetmulder, Marielle;

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal skeleton muscle activity during REM sleep is characterized as REM Behaviour Disorder (RBD), and may be an early marker for different neurodegenerative diseases. Early detection of RBD is therefore highly important, and in this ongoing study a semi-automatic method for RBD detection...... is proposed by analyzing the motor activity during sleep. Method: A total number of twelve patients have been involved in this study, six normal controls and six patients diagnosed with Parkinsons Disease (PD) with RBD. All subjects underwent at least one ambulant polysomnographic (PSG) recording. The sleep...... recordings were scored, according to the new sleep-scoring standard from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, by two independent sleep specialists. A follow-up analysis of the scoring consensus between the two specialists has been conducted. Based on the agreement of the two manual scorings...

  7. Vitagenes, dietary antioxidants and neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Barone, Eugenio; Calafato, Stella; Bates, Timothy; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Kostova, Albena T Dinkova

    2009-01-01

    The ability of a cell to counteract stressful conditions, known as cellular stress response, requires the activation of pro-survival pathways and the production of molecules with anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic or pro-apoptotic activities. Among the cellular pathways conferring protection against oxidative stress, a key role is played by vitagenes, which include heat shock proteins (Hsps) heme oxygenase-1 and Hsp70, as well as the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system. Heat shock response contributes to establish a cytoprotective state in a wide variety of human diseases, including inflammation, cancer, aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. Dietary antioxidants, such as curcumin, L-carnitine/acetyl-L-carnitine and carnosine have recently been demonstrated in vitro to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. In the present review we discuss the importance of vitagenes in the cellular stress response and analyse, from a pharmacological point of view, the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders in humans. PMID:19273073

  8. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26899010

  9. The emerging role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar eAl-Mahdawi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation primarily occurs within human cells as a 5-methylcytosine (5mC modification of the cytosine bases in CpG dinucleotides. 5mC has proven to be an important epigenetic mark that is involved in the control of gene transcription for processes such as development and differentiation. However, recent studies have identified an alternative modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, which is formed by oxidation of 5mC by ten-eleven translocation (TET enzymes. The overall levels of 5hmC in the mammalian genome are approximately 10% of 5mC levels, although higher levels have been detected in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS. The functions of 5hmC are not yet fully known, but evidence suggests that 5hmC may be both an intermediate product during the removal of 5mC by passive or active demethylation processes and also an epigenetic modification in its own right, regulating chromatin or transcriptional factors involved in processes such as neurodevelopment or environmental stress response. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that 5hmC plays in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, Friedreich ataxia (FRDA, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Parkinson’s disease (PD.

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Tan, Lan; Jiang, Teng; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-08-01

    Although most neurodegenerative diseases have been closely related to aberrant accumulation of aggregation-prone proteins in neurons, understanding their pathogenesis remains incomplete, and there is no treatment to delay the onset or slow the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. The availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in recapitulating the phenotypes of several late-onset neurodegenerative diseases marks the new era in in vitro modeling. The iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in these diseases and provides a novel human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics. Modeling human diseases using iPSCs has created novel opportunities for both mechanistic studies as well as for the discovery of new disease therapies. In this review, we introduce iPSC-based disease modeling in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, we discuss the implementation of iPSCs in drug discovery associated with some new techniques.

  11. Overnutrition Determines LPS Regulation of Mycotoxin Induced Neurotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian James Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are now associated with obesity and diabetes and linked to the developing and developed world. Interests in healthy diets have escalated that may prevent neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. The global metabolic syndrome involves lipoprotein abnormalities and insulin resistance and is the major disorder for induction of neurological disease. The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS on dyslipidemia and NAFLD indicate that the clearance and metabolism of fungal mycotoxins are linked to hypercholesterolemia and amyloid beta oligomers. LPS and mycotoxins are associated with membrane lipid disturbances with effects on cholesterol interacting proteins, lipoprotein metabolism, and membrane apo E/amyloid beta interactions relevant to hypercholesterolemia with close connections to neurological diseases. The influence of diet on mycotoxin metabolism has accelerated with the close association between mycotoxin contamination from agricultural products such as apple juice, grains, alcohol, and coffee. Cholesterol efflux in lipoproteins and membrane cholesterol are determined by LPS with involvement of mycotoxin on amyloid beta metabolism. Nutritional interventions such as diets low in fat/carbohydrate/cholesterol have become of interest with relevance to low absorption of lipophilic LPS and mycotoxin into lipoproteins with rapid metabolism of mycotoxin to the liver with the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  12. The involvement of microRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciotta, Simona; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-19

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) originate from a loss of neurons in the central nervous system and are severely debilitating. The incidence of NDDs increases with age, and they are expected to become more common due to extended life expectancy. Because no cure is available, these diseases have become a major challenge in neurobiology. The increasing relevance of microRNAs (miRNAs) in biology has prompted investigation into their possible involvement in neurodegeneration in order to identify new therapeutic targets. The idea of using miRNAs as therapeutic targets is not far from realization, but important issues need to be addressed before moving into the clinics. Here, we review what is known about the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of NDDs. We also report the miRNA expression levels in peripheral tissues of patients affected by NDDs in order to evaluate their application as biomarkers of disease. Finally, discrepancies, innovations, and the effectiveness of collected data will be elucidated and discussed.

  13. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Wang, Wang-Xia; Rajeev, Bernard W

    2008-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are the culmination of many different genetic and environmental influences. Prior studies have shown that RNAs are pathologically altered during the inexorable course of some NDs. Recent evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be a contributing factor in neurodegeneration. miRNAs are brain-enriched, small ( approximately 22 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs that participate in mRNA translational regulation. Although discovered in the framework of worm development, miRNAs are now appreciated to play a dynamic role in many mammalian brain-related biochemical pathways, including neuroplasticity and stress responses. Research about miRNAs in the context of neurodegeneration is accumulating rapidly, and the goal of this review is to provide perspective for these new data that may be helpful to specialists in either field. An overview is provided about the normal functions for miRNAs, including some of the newer concepts related to the human brain. Recently published studies pertaining to the roles of miRNAs in NDs--including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and triplet repeat disorders-are described. Finally, a discussion is included with theoretical syntheses and possible future directions in exploring the nexus between miRNA and ND research.

  14. Cell ageing: a flourishing field for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Brites

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is viewed as an irreversible cell-cycle arrest mechanism involving a complexity of biological progressive processes and the acquisition of diverse cellular phenotypes. Several cell-intrinsic and extrinsic causes (stresses may lead to diverse cellular signaling cascades that include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, excessive accumulation of misfolded proteins, impaired microRNA processing and inflammation. Here we review recent advances in the causes and consequences of brain cell ageing, including the senescence of endothelial cells at the central nervous system barriers, as well as of neurons and glial cells. We address what makes ageing an important risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we highlight the importance of defects in mitochondrial dynamics, in the cathepsin activity imbalance, in cell-cell communication, in the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins and in the microRNA profiling as having potential impact on cellular ageing processes. Another important aspect is that the absence of specific senescence biomarkers has hampered the characterization of senescent cells in ageing and age-associated diseases. In accordance, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP or secretome was shown to vary in distinct cell types and upon different stressors, and SASP heterogeneity is believed to create subsets of senenescent cells. In addition to secreted proteins, we then place extracellular vesicles (exosomes and ectosomes as important mediators of intercellular communication with pathophysiological roles in disease spreading, and as emerging targets for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the application of engineered extracellular vesicles as vehicles for drug delivery. Finally, we summarize current knowledge on methods to rejuvenate senescent cells

  15. The involvement of microRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eMaciotta Rolandin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs originate from loss of neurons in the central nervous system and are severely debilitating. They are worldwide spread and their incidence increases with age so that they are supposed to become more common due to extended life expectancy. Since no cure is available they have become a major challenge to neurobiology. The increasing relevance of microRNAs (miRNAs in biology has prompt the scientific society to investigate on their possible involvement in neurodegeneration with the aim to find new therapeutic targets. Indeed the idea of using miRNAs as therapeutic targets is nowadays not far from realization but important issues need to be addressed before moving towards the clinics. With the present review we aim to resume what have been so far disclose on the involvement of miRNAs in NDDs pathogenesis. Furthermore, their expression levels in peripheral tissues of patients affected by NDDs will be here reported in order to evaluate their application as biomarker of disease. Finally the discrepancy, innovation and effectiveness of data collected will be elucidated and discussed.

  16. Molecular Pathological Classification of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Turning towards Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) are characterized by selective dysfunction and loss of neurons associated with pathologically altered proteins that deposit in the human brain but also in peripheral organs. These proteins and their biochemical modifications can be potentially targeted for therapy or used as biomarkers. Despite a plethora of modifications demonstrated for different neurodegeneration-related proteins, such as amyloid-β, prion protein, tau, α-synuclein, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), or fused in sarcoma protein (FUS), molecular classification of NDDs relies on detailed morphological evaluation of protein deposits, their distribution in the brain, and their correlation to clinical symptoms together with specific genetic alterations. A further facet of the neuropathology-based classification is the fact that many protein deposits show a hierarchical involvement of brain regions. This has been shown for Alzheimer and Parkinson disease and some forms of tauopathies and TDP-43 proteinopathies. The present paper aims to summarize current molecular classification of NDDs, focusing on the most relevant biochemical and morphological aspects. Since the combination of proteinopathies is frequent, definition of novel clusters of patients with NDDs needs to be considered in the era of precision medicine. Optimally, neuropathological categorizing of NDDs should be translated into in vivo detectable biomarkers to support better prediction of prognosis and stratification of patients for therapy trials. PMID:26848654

  17. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2016-01-01

    , frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...... these diseases, but will lead to even more findings in the future as gene and cell culture technology continues to develop....

  18. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND increase with life expectancy. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress (OS in ND and pharmacological attempts to fight against reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms involved in ROS generation in neurodegeneration have been proposed. Recent articles about molecular pathways involved in ROS generation were reviewed. The progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies has been hampered because it is difficult to define targets for treatment and determine what should be considered as neuroprotective. Therefore, the attention was focused on researches about pharmacological targets that could protect neurons against OS. Since it is necessary to look for genes as the ultimate controllers of all biological processes, this paper also tried to identify gerontogenes involved in OS and neurodegeneration. Since neurons depend on glial cells to survive, recent articles about the functioning of these cells in aging and ND were also reviewed. Finally, clinical trials testing potential neuroprotective agents were critically reviewed. Although several potential drugs have been screened in in vitro and in vivo models of ND, these results were not translated in benefit of patients, and disappointing results were obtained in the majority of clinical trials.

  19. Flavonoid-Based Therapies in the Early Management of Neurodegenerative Diseases12

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, Isha; Parihar, Priyanka; Mansuri, Mohammad Lukman; Parihar, Mordhwaj S.

    2015-01-01

    During the past several years, there has been enormous progress in the understanding of the causative factors that initiate neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease. Preventing neuronal damage and neuronal death will have a huge clinical benefit. However, despite major advances in causative factors that trigger these neurodegenerative diseases, to date there ...

  20. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parron, Tesifon [University of Almeria, Department of Neurosciences and Health Sciences, Almeria (Spain); Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Requena, Mar [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Hernandez, Antonio F., E-mail: ajerez@ugr.es [University of Granada School of Medicine, Granada (Spain); Alarcon, Raquel [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative-psychiatric disorders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts in high exposure areas. Black

  1. Residential Distance to High-voltage Power Lines and Risk of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Patrizia; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Mezei, Gabor;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between residential distance to high-voltage power lines and neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease. A Swiss study previously found increased risk of Alzheimer's disease for people living within 50 m of a power...... line. A register-based case-control study including all patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative diseases during the years 1994-2010 was conducted among the entire adult population of Denmark. Using conditional logistic regression models, hazard ratios for ever living close to a power line in the time...... for an association between neurodegenerative disease and living close to power lines....

  2. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kirstie N Anderson1 Andrew J Bradley2,3 1Department of Neurology, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK; 2Eli Lilly and Company Limited, Lilly House, Basingstoke, UK; 3Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Sleep has been described as being of the brain, by the brain, and for the brain. This fundamental neurobiological behavior is controlled by homeostatic and circadian (24-hour processes and is vital for normal brain function. This review will outline the normal sleep–wake cycle, the changes that occur during aging, and the specific patterns of sleep disturbance that occur in association with both mental health disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative problems will also be discussed. Keywords: sleep, mental health, neurodegenerative disorders, cognition

  3. Neurodegenerative diseases : Lessons from genome-wide screens in small model organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Breitling, Rainer; Swertz, Morris A.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Various age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, polyglutamine expansion diseases and Alzheimer's disease, are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins in aggregates in the brain. How and why these proteins form aggregates and cause disease is still poorly

  4. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  5. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Anne H P; Reits, Eric A J; Hol, Elly M

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's,

  6. The role of mitochondria in neurodegenerative diseases: mitochondria as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles responsible for life and death. Extensive evidence from animal and clinical studies suggests that mitochondria play a critical role in aging, cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Several lines of research suggest that mitochondrial oxidative damage is an important cellular change in most late-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Further, emerging evidence suggests that ...

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J. Thomas; Thomas, C. J.; Radcliffe, J.; Itsiopoulos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and ...

  8. Genistein Improves Neuropathology and Corrects Behaviour in a Mouse Model of Neurodegenerative Metabolic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelina Malinowska; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Alex Langford-Smith; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Marie T Vanier; Grzegorz Grynkiewicz; Rob F Wynn; J Ed Wraith; Grzegorz Wegrzyn; Bigger, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease) accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatm...

  9. Causes and Consequences of MicroRNA Dysregulation in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lin; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), originate from a loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and are severely debilitating. The incidence of neurodegenerative diseases increases with age, and they are expected to become more common due to extended life expectancy. Because of no clear mechanisms, these diseases have become a major challenge in neurobiology. It is well recognized that these disorders become the culmination of many different genetic and environmental influences. Prior studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are pathologically altered during the inexorable course of some neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that miRNAs may be the contributing factor in neurodegeneration. Here, we review what is known about the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The biogenesis of miRNAs and various functions of miRNAs that act as the chief regulators will be discussed. We focus in particular on dysregulation of miRNAs which leads to several neurodegenerative diseases from three aspects: miRNA-generating disorders, miRNA-targeting genes and epigenetic alterations. Furthermore, recent evidences have shown that circulating miRNA expression levels are changed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Circulating miRNA expression levels are reported in patients in order to evaluate their application as biomarkers of these diseases. A discussion is included with a potential diagnostic biomarker and the possible future direction in exploring the nexus between miRNAs and various neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Therapeutic approach to pain in neurodegenerative diseases : current evidence and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Tommaso, Marina; Kunz, Miriam; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Neurodegenerative diseases are increasing in parallel to the lengthening of survival. The management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias, Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD-related disorders, and motor neuron diseases (MND), is mainly targeted to motor and cognitive impairment,

  11. The progress of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wei-zhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases include a heterogeneous group of diseases with complicated and overlapped clinical phenotypes. It is difficult to diagnose or identify this kind of disease due to insidious onset and chronic and progressive development. Since processes in the brain can be monitored by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, abundant research efforts focus on the efficacy of biomarkers in CSF to indicate specific neurodegenerative lesions and to assist the diagnosis process, assessing whether one biomarker or several biomarkers together could be the reliable tools for diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative diseases. This article mainly reviews the research status and supplementary value in diagnosis and differentiation of CSF biomarkers in common degenerative diseases [e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS].

  12. The potential of microRNAs as biofluid markers of neurodegenerative diseases--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danborg, Pia B; Simonsen, Anja H; Waldemar, Gunhild; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are biological molecules transcribed from non-protein coding regions of the genome, participating in regulating cellular processes. MiRNAs in biofluids may possess neurodegenerative disease biomarker potential for screening tests, differential diagnosis and disease progression monitoring. This systematic review clarifies biomarker potential of miRNAs detected in biofluids of neurodegenerative disease patients. Thirty-three and ten miRNAs displayed significant expression between patients with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, compared to healthy controls in minimum two studies. Thirty-eight miRNAs showed biomarker potential by distinguishing significantly between minimum two diseases. Summarized data directs future research towards discovering new biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. The potential of microRNAs as biofluid markers of neurodegenerative diseases – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danborg, Pia B; Simonsen, Anja H; Waldemar, Gunhild;

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are biological molecules transcribed from non-protein coding regions of the genome, participating in regulating cellular processes. MiRNAs in biofluids may possess neurodegenerative disease biomarker potential for screening tests, differential diagnosis and disease progression...... monitoring. This systematic review clarifies biomarker potential of miRNAs detected in biofluids of neurodegenerative disease patients. Thirty-three and ten miRNAs displayed significant expression between patients with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, compared to healthy controls...... in minimum two studies. Thirty-eight miRNAs showed biomarker potential by distinguishing significantly between minimum two diseases. Summarized data directs future research towards discovering new biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases....

  14. Ethical Perspectives on Stem Cell-based Cellular Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Mette; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Andersen, Svend;

    2012-01-01

    The effect of stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease are currently being investigated. Here we specify possible therapeutic effects and possible side effects for patients and conclude that cellular therapies may....... Beauchamp and James F. Childress is based on these principles. We show that this theory is useful for analyzing complex ethical cases of biomedicine by using cellular therapy for neurodegenerative diseases as a model system. We go through the three steps in an ethical case analysis using Beauchamp...... and Childress’ principles. We explain that the ethical issues of using stem cells for therapies for neurodegenerative diseases often referred to in the literature are related to the moral status of the blastocyst and the developing embryo. We believe that these are to be seen as potential human life...

  15. Neuroprotection: the emerging concept of restorative neural stem cell biology for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, Barbara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-06-01

    During the past decades Neural Stem Cells have been considered as an alternative source of cells to replace lost neurons and NSC transplantation has been indicated as a promising treatment for neurodegenerative disorders. Nevertheless, the current understanding of NSC biology suggests that, far from being mere spare parts for cell replacement therapies, NSCs could play a key role in the pharmacology of neuroprotection and become protagonists of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review this new emerging concept of NSC biology.

  16. Proline-rich polypeptides in Alzheimer's disease and neurodegenerative disorders - Therapeutic potential or a mirage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladkevich, A.; Bosker, F.; Korf, J.; Yenkoyan, K.; Vahradyan, H.; Aghajanov, M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of effective and safe drugs for a growing Alzheimer disease population is an increasing need at present. Both experimental and clinical evidence support a beneficial effect of proline-rich polypeptides in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. Experiment

  17. New molecular targets for PET and SPECT imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benadiba, Marcel; Luurtsema, Gert; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Buchpigel, Carlos Alberto; Busatto Filho, Geraldo

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases (ND) such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has not yet been completely elucidated. However, in the past few years, there have been great knowledge advances about intra-and extracellular proteins that may display impaired funct

  18. Molecular mechanisms of excitotoxicity and their relevance to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xia DONG; Yan WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2009-01-01

    A pivotal role for excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative diseases is gaining increasingly more acceptance, but the underlying mechanisms through which it participates in neurodegeneration still need further investigation. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors by excitatory amino acids leads to a number of deleterious consequences, including impairment of calcium buffering, generation of free radicals, activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition and secondary excitotoxicity. Recent studies implicate excitotoxicity in a variety of neuropathological conditions, suggesting that neurodegenerative diseases with distinct genetic etiologies may share excitotoxicity as a common pathogenic pathway. Thus, understanding the pathways involved in excitotoxicity is of critical importance for the future clinical treatment of many neurodegenerafive diseases. This review discusses the current understanding of excitotoxic mechanisms and how they are involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Possible protective action of neurotrophic factors and natural compounds against common neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadahiro Numakawa

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that altered levels/function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. BDNF positively contributes to neural survival and synapse maintenance via stimulating its high afifnity receptor TrkB, making upregulation of BDNF and/or activation of BDNF-related intracellular signaling an attractive approach to treating neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, I brielfy introduce small natural compounds such as lfavonoids that successfully increase activation of the BDNF system and discuss their beneifcial effects against neurodegeneration.

  20. Dysregulation of cholesterol balance in the brain: contribution to neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain is increasingly being linked to chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease and Smith-Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLOS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between altered cholesterol metabolism and the neurological deficits are, for the most part, not clear. NPC disease and SLOS are caused by mutations in...

  1. Combination Comprising Parthenolide For Use In The Treatment Of Alzheimer's Disease And Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-06-18

    The present invention generally concerns particular methods and compositions for treatment of a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer\\'s Disease. In particular embodiments, there is a composition comprising Parthenolide and a second agent, including an inhibitor of TLR4/MD-2/CD14, nAChR agonist, Resatorvid, Curcumin, Tilorone or a Tilorone analog, or a combination thereof.

  2. The Role of TNF Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Huang; N.Erdmann; H.Peng; Y.Zhao; Jialin Zheng

    2005-01-01

    A hallmark of all forms of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of neuronal functions, and in many cases neuronal cell death. Although the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases may be distinct, different diseases display a similar pathogenesis, for example abnormal immunity within the central nervous system (CNS), activation of macrophage/microglia and the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies show that neurons in a neurodegenerative state undergo a highly regulated programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF family, has been shown to be involved in apoptosis during many diseases. As one member of a death ligand family, TRAIL was originally thought to target only tumor cells and was not present in CNS. However, recent data showed that TRAIL was unregulated in HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages, a major disease inducing cell during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). TRAIL is also induced on neuron by β-amyloid protein, an important pathogen for Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we summarize the possible common aspects that TRAIL involved those neurodegenerative diseases, TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling in the CNS cells, and specific role of TRAIL in individual diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):113-122.

  3. The Role of TNF Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Huang; N.Erdmann; H.Peng; Y.Zhao

    2005-01-01

    A hallmark of all forms of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of neuronal functions, and in many cases neuronal cell death. Although the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases may be distinct, different diseases display a similar pathogenesis, for example abnormal immunity within the central nervous system (CNS), activation of macrophage/microglia and the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies show that neurons in a neurodegenerative state undergo a highly regulated programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF family, has been shown to be involved in apoptosis during many diseases. As one member of a death ligand family, TRAIL was originally thought to target only tumor cells and was not present in CNS. However, recent data showed that TRAIL was unregulated in HIV-l-infected and immune-activated macrophages, a major disease inducing cell during HIV-l-associated dementia (HAD). TRAIL is also induced on neuron by [$-amyloid protein, an important pathogen for Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we summarize the possible common aspects that TRAIL involved those neurodegenerative diseases, TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling in the CNS cells, and specific role of TRAIL in individual diseases. Cellular & MolecularImmunology. 2005;2(2):113-122.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Quality Control in Neurodegenerative Disease: The Good, the Bad and the Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Scheper; J.J.M. Hoozemans

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are often characterized by the aggregation and accumulation of misfolded proteins (e. g. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Aggregated proteins are very toxic to cells in culture and both in vitro and in vivo there is overwhelming ev

  5. Interferon Gamma: Influence on Neural Stem Cell Function in Neurodegenerative and Neuroinflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Apurva; Ganesan, Priya; O’Donnell, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFNγ), a pleiotropic cytokine, is expressed in diverse neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. Its protective mechanisms are well documented during viral infections in the brain, where IFNγ mediates non-cytolytic viral control in infected neurons. However, IFNγ also plays both protective and pathological roles in other central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Of the many neural cells that respond to IFNγ, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the only pluripotent cells in the developing and adult brain, are often altered during CNS insults. Recent studies highlight the complex effects of IFNγ on NSPC activity in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate these effects, and the eventual outcomes for the host, are still being explored. Here, we review the effects of IFNγ on NSPC activity during different pathological insults. An improved understanding of the role of IFNγ would provide insight into the impact of immune responses on the progression and resolution of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Isoprostanes and Neuroprostanes as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data shows that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative disorders. The literature data indicate that in vivo or postmortem cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue levels of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs especially F4-neuroprotanes (F4-NPs are significantly increased in some neurodegenerative diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Central nervous system is the most metabolically active organ of the body characterized by high requirement for oxygen and relatively low antioxidative activity, what makes neurons and glia highly susceptible to destruction by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and neurodegeneration. The discovery of F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as markers of lipid peroxidation caused by the free radicals has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the relationship between F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as biomarkers of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the knowledge of these novel biomarkers of oxidative stress and the advantages of monitoring their formation to better define the involvement of oxidative stress in neurological diseases.

  7. Lack of miRNA misregulation at early pathological stages in Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita eReinhardt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Late onset neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health concern as the population in many countries ages. Both frequent diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD, 14% incidence for 80-84 year old Europeans or Parkinson disease (PD, 1.4% prevalence for > 55 years old share, with other low-incidence neurodegenerative pathologies such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs, 0.01% prevalence and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, 0.02% prevalence, a lack of efficient treatment in spite of important research efforts. Besides significant progress, studies with animal models have revealed unexpected complexities in the degenerative process, emphasizing a need to better understand the underlying pathological mechanisms. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small regulatory non-coding RNAs, have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. The current data supporting a role of miRNAs in PD, tauopathies, dominant ataxias and FTLD will first be discussed to emphasize the different levels of the pathological processes which may be affected by miRNAs. To investigate a potential involvement of miRNA dysregulation in the early stages of these neurodegenerative diseases we have used Drosophila models for 7 diseases (PD, 3 FTLD, 3 dominant ataxias that recapitulate many features of the human diseases. We performed deep sequencing of head small RNAs after 3 days of pathological protein expression in the fly head neurons. We found no evidence for a statistically significant difference in miRNA expression in this early stage of the pathological process. In addition, we could not identify small non coding CAG repeat RNAs (sCAG in polyQ disease models. Thus our data suggest that transcriptional deregulation of miRNAs or sCAG is unlikely to play a significant role in the initial stages of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. [Progress in induced pluripotent stem cell research for age-related neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Takahashi et al. established a method for reprogramming somatic cells by introducing definite transcription factors, which enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells. In turn, it has become possible to use these iPSCs for producing various tissues needed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, which have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is expected to bring forth rapid progress in the clarification of mechanisms underlying the diseases and discovery of new innovative drugs and lead to rapid progress in regenerative medicine. In recent years, recapitulation and analysis of disease conditions using iPSCs derived from the patients themselves have been reported, and remarkable advances have been made, even for late-onset neurodegenerative disorders. These findings show that the phenotypes of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders can be recapitulated in iPSC-derived neuronal cells, which are reflected the early developmental stages, indicating cellular abnormalities exist from the prenatal period, despite the late onset diseases. In this review, we summarize the state of iPSCs research in the context of neurodegenerative disorders, discuss the possible ways for understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and discovering new drugs, and describe some other aspects of regenerative medicine.

  9. A knowledge based approach to matching human neurodegenerative disease and animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Martone, Maryann E.; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases present a wide and complex range of biological and clinical features. Animal models are key to translational research, yet typically only exhibit a subset of disease features rather than being precise replicas of the disease. Consequently, connecting animal to human conditions using direct data-mining strategies has proven challenging, particularly for diseases of the nervous system, with its complicated anatomy and physiology. To address this challenge we have expl...

  10. Drug discovery of neurodegenerative disease through network pharmacology approach in herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhipeng; Zhang, Xinzhuang; Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Li, Na; Cao, Liang; Wang, Tuanjie; Zhang, Chenfeng; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Xiaojie; Xiao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, referring to as the progressive loss of structure and function of neurons, constitute one of the major challenges of modern medicine. Traditional Chinese herbs have been used as a major preventive and therapeutic strategy against disease for thousands years. The numerous species of medicinal herbs and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) compound formulas in nervous system disease therapy make it a large chemical resource library for drug discovery. In this work, we collected 7362 kinds of herbs and 58,147 Traditional Chinese medicinal compounds (Tcmcs). The predicted active compounds in herbs have good oral bioavailability and central nervous system (CNS) permeability. The molecular docking and network analysis were employed to analyze the effects of herbs on neurodegenerative diseases. In order to evaluate the predicted efficacy of herbs, automated text mining was utilized to exhaustively search in PubMed by some related keywords. After that, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves was used to estimate the accuracy of predictions. Our study suggested that most herbs were distributed in family of Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae and Apocynaceae. The predictive model yielded good sensitivity and specificity with the AUC values above 0.800. At last, 504 kinds of herbs were obtained by using the optimal cutoff values in ROC curves. These 504 herbs would be the most potential herb resources for neurodegenerative diseases treatment. This study would give us an opportunity to use these herbs as a chemical resource library for drug discovery of anti-neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26898452

  11. Protein Modification by Dicarbonyl Molecular Species in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Wesley M.; Aaron Weinberg; Smith, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegeneration results from abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and energy balance within neurons, astrocytes, microglia, or microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. In Alzheimer's disease, -amyloid is considered the primary contributor to neuropathology and neurodegeneration. It now is believed that certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, can contribute to neurodegeneration through the effects of chronic hyperglycemia/insulin resistance resulting in pro...

  12. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Bernhard J SchallerDepartment of Neurosurgery, University of Paris, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But inc...

  13. Non-coding RNA and pseudogenes in neurodegenerative diseases: "The (unUsual Suspects"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio eCosta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders and cancer are severe diseases threatening human health. The glaring differences between neurons and cancer cells mask the processes involved in their pathogenesis. Defects in cell cycle, DNA repair and cell differentiation can determine unlimited proliferation in cancer, or conversely, compromise neuronal plasticity, leading to cell death and neurodegeneration.Alteration in regulatory networks affecting gene expression contribute to human diseases' onset, including neurodegenerative disorders, and deregulation of non-coding RNAs - particularly microRNAs - is supposed to have a significant impact.Recently, competitive endogenous RNAs - acting as sponges - have been identified in cancer, indicating a new and intricate regulatory network. Given that neurodegenerative disorders and cancer share altered genes and pathways, and considering the emerging role of microRNAs in neurogenesis, we hypothesize competitive endogenous RNAs may be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we propose, and computationally predict, such regulatory mechanism may be shared between the diseases. It is predictable that similar regulation occurs in other complex diseases, and further investigation is needed.

  14. Selective neuronal vulnerability in neurodegenerative diseases: from stressor thresholds to degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Smita; Caroni, Pico

    2011-07-14

    Neurodegenerative diseases selectively target subpopulations of neurons, leading to the progressive failure of defined brain systems, but the basis of such selective neuronal vulnerability has remained elusive. Here, we discuss how a stressor-threshold model of how particular neurons and circuits are selectively vulnerable to disease may underly the etiology of familial and sporadic forms of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and ALS. According to this model, the intrinsic vulnerabilities of neuronal subpopulations to stressors and specific disease-related misfolding proteins determine neuronal morbidity. Neurodegenerative diseases then involve specific combinations of genetic predispositions and environmental stressors, triggering increasing age-related stress and proteostasis dysfunction in affected vulnerable neurons. Damage to vasculature, immune system, and local glial cells mediates environmental stress, which could drive disease at all stages.

  15. Content analysis of neurodegenerative and mental diseases social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Bargiela-Flórez, Beatriz; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to characterize the different types of Facebook and Twitter groups for different mental diseases, their purposes, and their functions. We focused the search on depressive disorders, dementia, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and examined the Facebook (www.facebook.com) and Twitter (www.twitter.com) groups. We used four assessment criteria: (1) purpose, (2) type of creator, (3) telehealth content, and (4) free-text responses in surveys and interviews. We observed a total of 357 Parkinson groups, 325 dementia groups, 853 Alzheimer groups, and 1127 depression groups on Facebook and Twitter. Moreover, we analyze the responses provided by different users. The survey and interview responses showed that many people were interested in using social networks to support and help in the fight against these diseases. The results indicate that social networks are acceptable by users in terms of simplicity and utility. People use them for finding support, information, self-help, advocacy and awareness, and for collecting funds.

  16. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population. -- Highlights: ► Environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative–psychiatric disorders. ► Increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts in high exposure areas. ► Males from areas with high pesticide exposure had a higher risk of polyneuropathy.

  17. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhairavi Srinageshwar; Panchanan Maiti; Gary L. Dunbar; Julien Rossignol

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and...

  18. Menkes Kinky Hair Syndrome: A Rare Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozil Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menkes kinky hair disease is a rare X-linked recessive disease nearly exclusively affecting males who present at 2-3 months of age due to abnormal functioning of copper-dependent enzymes due to deficiency of copper. Here, we describe a completely worked-up case of a 4-month-old male infant with very typical history and radiological features confirmed by biochemical and trichoanalysis. The initially seen asymmetric cortical and subcortical T2 hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres converted into symmetrical diffuse cerebral and predominantly cerebellar atrophy with uniform loss of both white and grey matter on follow-up MRI. Also, subdural hemorrhages of various sizes and different stages and tortuosity of larger proximal intracranial vessels with distal narrowing were identified. Ours is a completely worked-up proven case of Menkes kinky hair disease (MKHD with history, electroencephalography, biochemical, trichoanalysis, and MRI findings. This is a good teaching case and shows importance of clinical examination and biochemistry as complimentary to MRI. Tortuous intracranial arteries with blocked major vessels are found only in this disease, thus stressing the value of MR Angiography in these patients.

  19. Caloric restriction and the precision-control of autophagy: A strategy for delaying neurodegenerative disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsapi, C; Loos, B

    2016-10-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend lifespan in most organisms, indicating that nutrient and energy regulatory mechanisms impact aging. The greatest risk factor for neurodegeneration is age; thus, the antiaging effects of CR might attenuate progressive cell death and avert the aggregation of abnormal proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. CR is a potent inducer of autophagy, a tightly regulated intracellular process that facilitates recycling of abnormal protein aggregates and damaged organelles into bioenergetic and biosynthetic materials to maintain homeostasis. Thus, dysregulated autophagy can lead to cellular dysfunction, abnormal protein accumulation, proteotoxicity and subsequently the onset of several neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the targeted and precision-controlled activation of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy. Non-pharmacological therapeutic interventions that delay aging by modulating specific stages of autophagy might be beneficial against premature aging, neurodegeneration and its associated ailments. However, the dynamic and often compensatory cross-talk that exists between the protein degradation pathways makes clinical translational approaches challenging. Here we review the primary autophagy pathways in the context of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on compensatory mechanisms and pathway failure. By critically assessing each underlying molecular machinery, we reveal their impact on aging and unmask the role of caloric restriction in changing cellular fate by delayed aging through stimulation of autophagy. This may point towards novel and better targeted interventions that exploit the autophagic machinery in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27473756

  20. INTERRUPTION OF AMINO ACIDS MOLECULAR ASYMMETRY (D/L- ENANTIOMERS DURING NORMAL AGING AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Chervyakov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some facts about D-amino acids, their diffusion in human’s and animal’s organisms, metabolism, identification methods, involving in ageing and pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases are show in this review. Also there is discussing the role of amino acid molecular asymmetry (D and L enantiomers ratio as a fundamental asymmetry of living matter.

  1. Visual Hallucinations in the Psychosis Spectrum and Comparative Information From Neurodegenerative Disorders and Eye Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, Flavie; Collerton, Daniel; Ffytche, Dominic H.; Jardri, Renaud; Pins, Delphine; Dudley, Robert; Blom, Jan Dirk; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Eperjesi, Frank; Ford, Stephen; Laroi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on visual hallucinations (VHs) has been conducted in the context of eye disease and neurodegenerative conditions, but little is known about these phenomena in psychiatric and nonclinical populations. The purpose of this article is to bring together current knowledge regarding VH

  2. Biosynthesis of endocannabinoids and their modes of action in neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Stelt, M.; Veldink, G.A.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.;

    2003-01-01

    demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system can protect neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity and acute neuronal damage in both in vitro and in vivo models. In this paper we review the data concerning the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in neurodegenerative diseases in which neuronal cell death...

  3. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  4. Molecular Modeling Studies of Piperidine Derivatives as New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors against Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F. F. da Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are related to the progressive loss of structure or function and, eventually, death of neurons. These processes are responsible for diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s, and the main molecular target for the drug design against these illnesses today is the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Following this line, in the present work, we applied docking techniques to study some piperidine derivative inhibitors of AChE and further propose structures of six new AChE inhibitors as potential new drugs against neurodegenerative disorders. The best inhibitor proposed was submitted to additional molecular dynamics simulations steps.

  5. Content analysis of neurodegenerative and mental diseases social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Bargiela-Flórez, Beatriz; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to characterize the different types of Facebook and Twitter groups for different mental diseases, their purposes, and their functions. We focused the search on depressive disorders, dementia, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and examined the Facebook (www.facebook.com) and Twitter (www.twitter.com) groups. We used four assessment criteria: (1) purpose, (2) type of creator, (3) telehealth content, and (4) free-text responses in surveys and interviews. We observed a total of 357 Parkinson groups, 325 dementia groups, 853 Alzheimer groups, and 1127 depression groups on Facebook and Twitter. Moreover, we analyze the responses provided by different users. The survey and interview responses showed that many people were interested in using social networks to support and help in the fight against these diseases. The results indicate that social networks are acceptable by users in terms of simplicity and utility. People use them for finding support, information, self-help, advocacy and awareness, and for collecting funds. PMID:24698768

  6. A Chaperome Subnetwork Safeguards Proteostasis in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Brehme

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chaperones are central to the proteostasis network (PN and safeguard the proteome from misfolding, aggregation, and proteotoxicity. We categorized the human chaperome of 332 genes into network communities using function, localization, interactome, and expression data sets. During human brain aging, expression of 32% of the chaperome, corresponding to ATP-dependent chaperone machines, is repressed, whereas 19.5%, corresponding to ATP-independent chaperones and co-chaperones, are induced. These repression and induction clusters are enhanced in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, or Parkinson’s disease. Functional properties of the chaperome were assessed by perturbation in C. elegans and human cell models expressing Aβ, polyglutamine, and Huntingtin. Of 219 C. elegans orthologs, knockdown of 16 enhanced both Aβ and polyQ-associated toxicity. These correspond to 28 human orthologs, of which 52% and 41% are repressed, respectively, in brain aging and disease and 37.5% affected Huntingtin aggregation in human cells. These results identify a critical chaperome subnetwork that functions in aging and disease.

  7. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material for age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksuphew, Sarawut; Noisa, Parinya

    2015-03-26

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the key event that leads to nervous system dysfunctions and diseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, for instance Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, are associated to aging and suggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neural stem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenous neural stem cells exist throughout life and are found in specific niches of human brain. These neural stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of new neurons to restore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of the brain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated, propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most cell types of the brain. On the other hand, other types of stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can also serve as a source for neural stem cell production, that hold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. The replacement of neural stem cells, either endogenous or stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impaired brain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic mean for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinical features and current routinely treatments of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are documented. Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence of neural stem cells and their derivatives in curing such diseases, together with the remaining challenges to achieve the best outcome for patients.

  8. AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION OF STRUCTURAL MRI FOR DIAGNOSIS OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Tamames Juan Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic approach which classifies structural Magnetic Resonance images into pathological or healthy controls. A classification model was trained to find the boundaries that allow to separate the study groups. The method uses the deformation values from a set of regions, automatically identified as relevant, in a process that selects the statistically significant regions of a t-test under the restriction that this significance must be spatially coherent within a neighborhood of 5 voxels. The proposed method was assessed to distinguish healthy controls from schizophrenia patients. Classification results showed accuracy between 74% and 89%, depending on the stage of the disease and number of training samples.

  9. Imaging in cell-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal cell transplantation for the treatment of Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases has been developed over the past two decades and is now in early clinical testing phase. Direct assessment of the graft's survival, integration into the host brain and impact on neuronal functions requires advanced in vivo neuroimaging techniques. Owing to its high sensitivity, positron emission tomography is today the most widely used tool to evaluate the viability and function of the transplanted tissue in the brain. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are opening new possibilities for imaging neurochemical events in the brain. The ultimate goal will be to use the combination of multiple imaging modalities for complete functional monitoring of the repair processes in the central nervous system. (orig.)

  10. Thymosin β4 as a restorative/regenerative therapy for neurological injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) promotes CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) plasticity and neurovascular remodeling leading to neurological recovery in a range of neurological diseases. Treatment of neural injury and neurodegenerative disease 24 h or more post-injury and disease onset with Tβ4 enhances angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite and axonal outgrowth, and oligodendrogenesis, and thereby, significantly improves functional and behavioral outcomes. We propose that oligodendrogenesis is a common link by which Tβ4 promotes recovery after neural injury and neurodegenerative disease. The ability to target many diverse restorative processes via multiple molecular pathways that drive oligodendrogenesis and neurovascular remodeling may be mediated by the ability of Tβ4 to alter cellular expression of microRNAs (miRNAs). However, further investigations on the essential role of miRNAs in regulating protein expression and the remarkable exosomal intercellular communication network via exosomes will likely provide insight into mechanisms of action and means to amplify the therapeutic effects of Tβ4.

  11. Potential of cystamine and cysteamine in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibrat, C; Cicchetti, F

    2011-03-30

    Neurodegenerative disorders are a subset of disabling pathologies characterized, in part, by a progressive and specific loss of certain brain cell populations. Current therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these disorders are mainly designed towards symptom management and do not manifestly block their typified neuronal loss. However, research conducted over the past decade has reflected the increasing interest and need to find disease-modifying molecules. Among the several neuroprotective agents emerging from experimental animal work, cystamine, as well as its reduced form cysteamine, have been identified as potential candidate drugs. Given the significant benefits observed in a Huntington's disease (HD) model, cysteamine has recently leaped to clinical trial. Here, we review the beneficial properties of these compounds as reported in animal studies, their mechanistic underpinnings, and their potential implications for the future treatment of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, and more specifically for HD and Parkinson's disease (PD). PMID:21111020

  12. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  13. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spack Edward G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s. Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot

  14. The BMP signaling pathway at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction and its links to neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Vafa; Jaiswal, Manish; Bellen, Hugo J

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has recently provided new insights into the roles of various proteins in neurodegenerative diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), and Huntington’s Disease (HD). Several developmental signaling pathways including WNT, MAPK and BMP/TGF-β signaling play important roles in the formation and growth of the Drosophila NMJ. Studies of the fly homolog...

  15. Decrease in Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Jian-Jun; Ning Xin-Bao; Yang Xiao-Dong; Hou Feng-Zhen; Huo Cheng-Yu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the decrease in the Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases was observed by using an improved rescaled range (R/S) analysis method. It indicates that the long-range correlations of gait rhythm from young healthy people are stronger than those from the healthy elderly and the diseased.The result further implies that fractal dynamics in human gait will be altered due to weakening or impairment of neural control on locomotion resulting from aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to analysing short-term data sequences rather than long datasets required by most nonlinear methods, the algorithm has the characteristics of simplicity and sensitivity, most importantly, fast calculation as well as powerful anti-noise capacities. These findings have implications for modelling locomotor control and also for quantifying gait dynamics in varying physiologic and pathologic states.

  16. Decrease in Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Ning, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Huo, Cheng-Yu

    2008-03-01

    In this paper the decrease in the Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases was observed by using an improved rescaled range (R/S) analysis method. It indicates that the long-range correlations of gait rhythm from young healthy people are stronger than those from the healthy elderly and the diseased. The result further implies that fractal dynamics in human gait will be altered due to weakening or impairment of neural control on locomotion resulting from aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to analysing short-term data sequences rather than long datasets required by most nonlinear methods, the algorithm has the characteristics of simplicity and sensitivity, most importantly, fast calculation as well as powerful anti-noise capacities. These findings have implications for modelling locomotor control and also for quantifying gait dynamics in varying physiologic and pathologic states.

  17. Gene-based vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases: Potential utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrna, Jeremy J; Ugen, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent expansion of vaccination and immunotherapeutic strategies from controlling infectious diseases to the targeting of non-infectious conditions including neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to conventional vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities, gene-based methods that express antigens for presentation to the immune system by either live viral vectors or non-viral naked DNA plasmids have been developed and evaluated. This mini-review/commentary summarizes the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the research findings to date, of both of these gene-based vaccination approaches in terms of how they can be targeted against appropriate antigens within the Alzheimer and Parkinson disease pathogenesis processes as well as potentially against targets in other neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, the novel utilization of these viral vector and naked DNA gene-based technologies includes the delivery of immunoglobulin genes from established biologically active monoclonal antibodies. This modified passive immunotherapeutic strategy has recently been applied to deliver passive antibody immunotherapy against the pathologically relevant amyloid β protein in Alzheimer disease. The advantages and disadvantages of this technological application of gene-based immune interventions, as well as research findings to date are also summarized. In sum, it is suggested that further evaluation of gene based vaccines and immunotherapies against neurodegenerative diseases are warranted to determine their potential clinical utility.

  18. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, G.; Pompili, E.; Biagioni, F.; Paparelli, S.; Lenzi, P.; Fornai, F.

    2013-01-01

    Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-tocell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs); mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs). The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step. PMID:23549464

  19. Epidemiology of Major Neurodegenerative Diseases in Women: Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Kassandra L.; Ascherio, Alberto; Grodstein, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to identifying the role of lifestyle, diet, and genetic or biological factors in several neurodegenerative diseases, including cognitive decline, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Methods. We completed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. In primary findings for cognitive function, higher intake of nuts, moderate alcohol consumption, and higher physical activity levels were associated with better cognitive function. Flavonoids, physical activity, and postmenopausal hormone therapy were related to cognitive decline over 2 to 6 years. The NHS also has been integral in establishing Epstein-Barr virus infection, inadequate vitamin D nutrition, cigarette smoking, and obesity as risk factors for multiple sclerosis and inverse associations between cigarette smoking and caffeine and risk of Parkinson’s disease. Increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has been associated with cigarette smoking and decreased risk associated with obesity. Conclusions. The NHS has provided invaluable resources on neurodegenerative diseases and contributed to their etiological understanding. We anticipate that the NHS cohorts will continue to make important contributions to the field of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27459462

  20. microRNAs as neuroregulators, biomarkers and therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Indranil; Patil, Ketan S; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2016-02-01

    The last decade has experienced the emergence of microRNAs as a key molecular tool for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Although the focus has mostly been on cancer, neurodegenerative diseases present an exciting, yet less explored, platform for microRNA research. Several studies have highlighted the significance of microRNAs in neurogenesis and neurodegeneration, and pre-clinical studies have shown the potential of microRNAs as biomarkers. Despite this, no bona fide microRNAs have been identified as true diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for neurodegenerative disease. This is mainly due to the lack of precisely defined patient cohorts and the variability within and between individual cohorts. However, the discovery that microRNAs exist as stable molecules at detectable levels in body fluids has opened up new avenues for microRNAs as potential biomarker candidates. Furthermore, technological developments in microRNA biology have contributed to the possible design of microRNA-mediated disease intervention strategies. The combination of these advancements, with the availability of well-defined longitudinal patient cohort, promises to not only assist in developing invaluable diagnostic tools for clinicians, but also to increase our overall understanding of the underlying heterogeneity of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the existing knowledge of microRNAs in neurodegeneration and provide a perspective of the applicability of microRNAs as a basis for future therapeutic intervention strategies.

  1. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  2. From intrinsic firing properties to selective neuronal vulnerability in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) involve years of gradual preclinical progression. It is widely anticipated that in order to be effective, treatments should target early stages of disease, but we lack conceptual frameworks to identify and treat early manifestations relevant to disease progression. Here we discuss evidence that a focus on physiological features of neuronal subpopulations most vulnerable to NDDs, and how those features are affected in disease, points to signaling pathways controlling excitation in selectively vulnerable neurons, and to mechanisms regulating calcium and energy homeostasis. These hypotheses could be tested in neuronal stress tests involving animal models or patient-derived iPS cells.

  3. Transglutaminase inhibition as a possible therapeutical approach to protect cells from death in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Martina; Serretiello, Enrica; De Vivo, Giulia; Martin, Antonio; Stefanile, Alessandro; Titta, Federica; Gentile, Vittorio

    2013-08-01

    Transglutaminases are ubiquitous enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of glutaminyl residues of a protein/peptide substrate to lysyl residues of a protein/peptide co-substrate. In addition to lysyl residues, other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines (to form mono- or bi-substituted /crosslinked adducts) or -OH groups (to form ester linkages). In absence of co-substrates, the nucleophile may be water, resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue. Recently, "tissue" transglutaminase (transglutaminase 2), a member of the transglutaminase family of enzymes, has been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for some human pathologies, including celiac disease, a very widespread human pathology. Transglutaminase activity has also been hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for other several human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, often associated to celiac disease. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, supranuclear palsy, Huntington's Disease and other polyglutamine diseases, are characterized in part by aberrant cerebral transglutaminase activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains. This review focuses on the possible therapeutic effects of selective transglutaminase inhibitors for patients with diseases characterized by aberrant transglutaminase activity and on the strategies to design such transglutaminase inhibitors. In addition, the review also examines available patents that relates to cysteamine and derivatives. PMID:23688272

  4. Potential role of olive oil phenolic compounds in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Xicota, Laura; Fitó, Montse; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MD) has been associated with a reduced incidence of neurodegenerative diseases and better cognitive performance. Virgin olive oil, the main source of lipids in the MD, is rich in minor phenolic components, particularly hydroxytyrosol (HT). HT potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions have attracted researchers' attention and may contribute to neuroprotective effects credited to MD. In this review HT bioavailability and pharmacokinetics are presented prior to discussing health beneficial effects. In vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects together with its multiple mechanisms of action are reviewed. Other microconstituents of olive oil are also considered due to their potential neuroprotective effects (oleocanthal, triterpenic acids). Finally, we discuss the potential role of HT as a therapeutic tool in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25781069

  5. Potential Role of Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds in the Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rodríguez-Morató

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MD has been associated with a reduced incidence of neurodegenerative diseases and better cognitive performance. Virgin olive oil, the main source of lipids in the MD, is rich in minor phenolic components, particularly hydroxytyrosol (HT. HT potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions have attracted researchers’ attention and may contribute to neuroprotective effects credited to MD. In this review HT bioavailability and pharmacokinetics are presented prior to discussing health beneficial effects. In vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects together with its multiple mechanisms of action are reviewed. Other microconstituents of olive oil are also considered due to their potential neuroprotective effects (oleocanthal, triterpenic acids. Finally, we discuss the potential role of HT as a therapeutic tool in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Physical Exercise-Induced Adult Neurogenesis: A Good Strategy to Prevent Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-yu Yau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative evidence has indicated that there is an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognitive function. With the increasing prevalence of cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative diseases among the ageing population, physical exercise, a potent enhancer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, has emerged as a potential preventative strategy/treatment to reduce cognitive decline. Here we review the functional role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, and how this form of structural plasticity is altered in neurodegenerative diseases known to involve cognitive impairment. We further discuss how physical exercise may contribute to cognitive improvement in the ageing brain by preserving adult neurogenesis, and review the recent approaches for measuring changes in neurogenesis in the live human brain.

  7. Dysregulation of cholesterol balance in the brain: contribution to neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean E. Vance

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain is increasingly being linked to chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease and Smith-Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLOS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between altered cholesterol metabolism and the neurological deficits are, for the most part, not clear. NPC disease and SLOS are caused by mutations in genes involved in the biosynthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol, respectively. However, the types of neurological impairments, and the areas of the brain that are most affected, differ between these diseases. Some, but not all, studies indicate that high levels of plasma cholesterol correlate with increased risk of developing AD. Moreover, inheritance of the E4 isoform of apolipoprotein E (APOE, a cholesterol-carrying protein, markedly increases the risk of developing AD. Whether or not treatment of AD with statins is beneficial remains controversial, and any benefit of statin treatment might be due to anti-inflammatory properties of the drug. Cholesterol balance is also altered in HD and PD, although no causal link between dysregulated cholesterol homeostasis and neurodegeneration has been established. Some important considerations for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases are the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to many therapeutic agents and difficulties in reversing brain damage that has already occurred. This article focuses on how cholesterol balance in the brain is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses some commonalities and differences among the diseases.

  8. Role of the nucleolus in neurodegenerative diseases with particular reference to the retina: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Paul I; Wood, John Pm; Chidlow, Glyn; Sharma, Shiwani; Craig, Jamie; Casson, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    The nucleolus has emerged as a key regulator of cellular growth and the response to stress, in addition to its traditionally understood function in ribosome biogenesis. The association between nucleolar function and neurodegenerative disease is increasingly being explored. There is also recent evidence indicating that the nucleolus may well be crucial in the development of the eye. In this present review, the role of the nucleolus in retinal development as well as in neurodegeneration with an emphasis on the retina is discussed.

  9. The two faces of protein misfolding: gain- and loss-of-function in neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Tatzelt, Jörg; Haass, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases may be diverse; however, a common pathological denominator is the formation of aberrant protein conformers and the occurrence of pathognomonic proteinaceous deposits. Different approaches coming from neuropathology, genetics, animal modeling and biophysics have established a crucial role of protein misfolding in the pathogenic process. However, there is an ongoing debate about the nature of the harmful proteinaceous species and how toxic conformers...

  10. O-GlcNAc cycling shows neuroprotective potential in C. elegans models of neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    John A Hanover; Wang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be an excellent organism in which to model human neurodegenerative disease.1–7 The worm’s simple nervous system, lineage, and neural maps, easily scored movement phenotypes, and robust forward and reverse genetics make it optimal for studying age-dependent processes on a reasonable time scale. A popular approach has been the introduction of transgenes expressing GFP-tagged proteotoxic human proteins into neurons leading to visible aggregation or movement phenotypes.2,...

  11. Automated longitudinal monitoring of in vivo protein aggregation in neurodegenerative disease C. elegans models

    OpenAIRE

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Krishnamani, Gopalan; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Lehnert, Thomas; Auwerx, Johan; Gijs, Martin A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background While many biological studies can be performed on cell-based systems, the investigation of molecular pathways related to complex human dysfunctions – e.g. neurodegenerative diseases – often requires long-term studies in animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans represents one of the best model organisms for many of these tests and, therefore, versatile and automated systems for accurate time-resolved analyses on C. elegans are becoming highly desirable tools in the field. ...

  12. Nano-Drugs Based on Nano Sterically Stabilized Liposomes for the Treatment of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Keren Turjeman; Yaelle Bavli; Pablo Kizelsztein; Yaelle Schilt; Nahum Allon; Tamar Blumenfeld Katzir; Efrat Sasson; Uri Raviv; Haim Ovadia; Yechezkel Barenholz

    2015-01-01

    The present study shows the advantages of liposome-based nano-drugs as a novel strategy of delivering active pharmaceutical ingredients for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that involve neuroinflammation. We used the most common animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS), mice experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The main challenges to overcome are the drugs' unfavorable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, which result in inadequate therapeutic efficacy and in drug toxicity...

  13. Use of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Treat Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Wyse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for treating neurodegenerative disorders has received growing attention recently because these cells are readily available, easily expanded in culture, and when transplanted, survive for relatively long periods of time. Given that such transplants have been shown to be safe in a variety of applications, in addition to recent findings that MSCs have useful immunomodulatory and chemotactic properties, the use of these cells as vehicles for delivering or producing beneficial proteins for therapeutic purposes has been the focus of several labs. In our lab, the use of genetic modified MSCs to release neurotrophic factors for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is of particular interest. Specifically, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF have been recognized as therapeutic trophic factors for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases, respectively. The aim of this literature review is to provide insights into: (1 the inherent properties of MSCs as a platform for neurotrophic factor delivery; (2 the molecular tools available for genetic manipulation of MSCs; (3 the rationale for utilizing various neurotrophic factors for particular neurodegenerative diseases; and (4 the clinical challenges of utilizing genetically modified MSCs.

  14. Use of genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Robert D; Dunbar, Gary L; Rossignol, Julien

    2014-01-23

    The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating neurodegenerative disorders has received growing attention recently because these cells are readily available, easily expanded in culture, and when transplanted, survive for relatively long periods of time. Given that such transplants have been shown to be safe in a variety of applications, in addition to recent findings that MSCs have useful immunomodulatory and chemotactic properties, the use of these cells as vehicles for delivering or producing beneficial proteins for therapeutic purposes has been the focus of several labs. In our lab, the use of genetic modified MSCs to release neurotrophic factors for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is of particular interest. Specifically, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recognized as therapeutic trophic factors for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, respectively. The aim of this literature review is to provide insights into: (1) the inherent properties of MSCs as a platform for neurotrophic factor delivery; (2) the molecular tools available for genetic manipulation of MSCs; (3) the rationale for utilizing various neurotrophic factors for particular neurodegenerative diseases; and (4) the clinical challenges of utilizing genetically modified MSCs.

  15. Natural therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases from a traditional herbal medicine Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiayuan; Jiang, Zhe; Li, Xuezheng; Hou, Yue; Liu, Fen; Li, Ning; Liu, Xia; Yang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are associated with neuroinflammation, manifested by over-production of nitric oxide (NO) by microglial cells. Now there still lack effective treatment and prevention for the neurodegenerative diseases. Concerning neuroinflammation mediated by microglia cell, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre was performed in this study. A new chlorinated flavonoid, 2′,6′-dichlore-3′, 5′-dimethoxy-[2′′,3′′:7,8]-furanoflavone (1) was identified together with 29 known compounds, including flavonoids (compounds 2-17), isoflavonoids (compounds 18-23), chalcones (compounds 24-25), flavonones (compounds 26-27), triterpenes (28-29) and alkaloid (30) from the effective dichloride methane extract of dry stem of P. pinnata (L.) Pierre. Their structures were elucidated by physicochemical and spectral methods. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities were assayed in BV-2 cells by assessing LPS-induced NO production. Then pongaglabol methyl ether (2), lonchocarpin (24) and glabrachromene II (25) were selected as potential therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases because of their significant anti-neuroinflammatory activities. Furthermore, the characteristics of structure type existing in P. pinnata (L.) Pierre and brief SAR were summarized, respectively.

  16. The Emerging Use of In Vivo Optical Imaging in the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen P. Patterson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection and subsequent quantification of photons emitted from living tissues, using highly sensitive charged-couple device (CCD cameras, have enabled investigators to noninvasively examine the intricate dynamics of molecular reactions in wide assortment of experimental animals under basal and pathophysiological conditions. Nevertheless, extrapolation of this in vivo optical imaging technology to the study of the mammalian brain and related neurodegenerative conditions is still in its infancy. In this review, we introduce the reader to the emerging use of in vivo optical imaging in the study of neurodegenerative diseases. We highlight the current instrumentation that is available and reporter molecules (fluorescent and bioluminescent that are commonly used. Moreover, we examine how in vivo optical imaging using transgenic reporter mice has provided new insights into Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Prion disease, and neuronal damage arising from excitotoxicity and inflammation. Furthermore, we also touch upon studies that have utilized these technologies for the development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative conditions that afflict humans.

  17. The emerging use of in vivo optical imaging in the study of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Aileen P; Booth, Stephanie A; Saba, Reuben

    2014-01-01

    The detection and subsequent quantification of photons emitted from living tissues, using highly sensitive charged-couple device (CCD) cameras, have enabled investigators to noninvasively examine the intricate dynamics of molecular reactions in wide assortment of experimental animals under basal and pathophysiological conditions. Nevertheless, extrapolation of this in vivo optical imaging technology to the study of the mammalian brain and related neurodegenerative conditions is still in its infancy. In this review, we introduce the reader to the emerging use of in vivo optical imaging in the study of neurodegenerative diseases. We highlight the current instrumentation that is available and reporter molecules (fluorescent and bioluminescent) that are commonly used. Moreover, we examine how in vivo optical imaging using transgenic reporter mice has provided new insights into Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Prion disease, and neuronal damage arising from excitotoxicity and inflammation. Furthermore, we also touch upon studies that have utilized these technologies for the development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative conditions that afflict humans.

  18. Potentiated Hsp104 variants suppress toxicity of diverse neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E. Jackrel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding is implicated in numerous lethal neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Parkinson disease (PD. There are no therapies that reverse these protein-misfolding events. We aim to apply Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ protein from yeast, to target misfolded conformers for reactivation. Hsp104 solubilizes disordered aggregates and amyloid, but has limited activity against human neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, we have previously engineered potentiated Hsp104 variants that suppress aggregation, proteotoxicity and restore proper protein localization of ALS and PD proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and mitigate neurodegeneration in an animal PD model. Here, we establish that potentiated Hsp104 variants possess broad substrate specificity and, in yeast, suppress toxicity and aggregation induced by wild-type TDP-43, FUS and α-synuclein, as well as missense mutant versions of these proteins that cause neurodegenerative disease. Potentiated Hsp104 variants also rescue toxicity and aggregation of TAF15 but not EWSR1, two RNA-binding proteins with a prion-like domain that are connected with the development of ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Thus, potentiated Hsp104 variants are not entirely non-specific. Indeed, they do not unfold just any natively folded protein. Rather, potentiated Hsp104 variants are finely tuned to unfold proteins bearing short unstructured tracts that are not recognized by wild-type Hsp104. Our studies establish the broad utility of potentiated Hsp104 variants.

  19. Genistein Improves Neuropathology and Corrects Behaviour in a Mouse Model of Neurodegenerative Metabolic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Langford-Smith, Alex; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Vanier, Marie T.; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Wynn, Rob F.; Wraith, J. Ed; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Bigger, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease) accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatments. We recently described significant reductions of accumulated heparan sulphate substrate in liver of a mouse model of MPSIIIB using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here that high doses of genistein aglycone, given continuously over a 9 month period to MPSIIIB mice, significantly reduce lysosomal storage, heparan sulphate substrate and neuroinflammation in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, resulting in correction of the behavioural defects observed. Improvements in synaptic vesicle protein expression and secondary storage in the cerebral cortex were also observed. Conclusions/Significance Genistein may prove useful as a substrate reduction agent to delay clinical onset of MPSIIIB and, due to its multimodal action, may provide a treatment adjunct for several other neurodegenerative metabolic diseases. PMID:21152017

  20. Genistein improves neuropathology and corrects behaviour in a mouse model of neurodegenerative metabolic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Malinowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatments. We recently described significant reductions of accumulated heparan sulphate substrate in liver of a mouse model of MPSIIIB using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here that high doses of genistein aglycone, given continuously over a 9 month period to MPSIIIB mice, significantly reduce lysosomal storage, heparan sulphate substrate and neuroinflammation in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, resulting in correction of the behavioural defects observed. Improvements in synaptic vesicle protein expression and secondary storage in the cerebral cortex were also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genistein may prove useful as a substrate reduction agent to delay clinical onset of MPSIIIB and, due to its multimodal action, may provide a treatment adjunct for several other neurodegenerative metabolic diseases.

  1. Visual hallucinations in the psychosis spectrum and comparative information from neurodegenerative disorders and eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Flavie; Collerton, Daniel; Ffytche, Dominic H; Jardri, Renaud; Pins, Delphine; Dudley, Robert; Blom, Jan Dirk; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Eperjesi, Frank; Ford, Stephen; Larøi, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Much of the research on visual hallucinations (VHs) has been conducted in the context of eye disease and neurodegenerative conditions, but little is known about these phenomena in psychiatric and nonclinical populations. The purpose of this article is to bring together current knowledge regarding VHs in the psychosis phenotype and contrast this data with the literature drawn from neurodegenerative disorders and eye disease. The evidence challenges the traditional views that VHs are atypical or uncommon in psychosis. The weighted mean for VHs is 27% in schizophrenia, 15% in affective psychosis, and 7.3% in the general community. VHs are linked to a more severe psychopathological profile and less favorable outcome in psychosis and neurodegenerative conditions. VHs typically co-occur with auditory hallucinations, suggesting a common etiological cause. VHs in psychosis are also remarkably complex, negative in content, and are interpreted to have personal relevance. The cognitive mechanisms of VHs in psychosis have rarely been investigated, but existing studies point to source-monitoring deficits and distortions in top-down mechanisms, although evidence for visual processing deficits, which feature strongly in the organic literature, is lacking. Brain imaging studies point to the activation of visual cortex during hallucinations on a background of structural and connectivity changes within wider brain networks. The relationship between VHs in psychosis, eye disease, and neurodegeneration remains unclear, although the pattern of similarities and differences described in this review suggests that comparative studies may have potentially important clinical and theoretical implications.

  2. The Enemy Within: Innate Surveillance-mediated Cell Death, the common mechanism of neurodegenerative disease

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    Robert Ian Richards

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases comprise an array of progressive neurological disorders all characterized by the selective death of neurons in the central nervous system. Although rare (familial and common (sporadic forms can occur for the same disease, it is unclear whether this reflects several distinct pathogenic pathways or the convergence of different causes into a common form of nerve cell death. Remarkably, neurodegenerative diseases are increasingly found to be accompanied by activation of the innate immune surveillance system normally associated with pathogen recognition and response. Innate surveillance is the cell’s quality control system for the purpose of detecting such danger signals and responding in an appropriate manner. Innate surveillance is an ‘intelligent system’, in that the manner of response is relevant to the magnitude and duration of the threat. If possible, the threat is dealt with within the cell in which it is detected, by degrading the danger signal(s and restoring homeostasis. If this is not successful then an inflammatory response is instigated that is aimed at restricting the spread of the threat by elevating degradative pathways, sensitizing neighboring cells, and recruiting specialized cell types to the site. If the danger signal persists, then the ultimate response can include not only the programmed cell death of the original cell, but the contents of this dead cell can also bring about the death of adjacent sensitized cells. These responses are clearly aimed at destroying the ability of the detected pathogen to propagate and spread. Innate surveillance comprises intracellular, extracellular, non-cell autonomous and systemic processes. Recent studies have revealed how multiple steps in these processes involve proteins that, through their mutation, have been linked to many familial forms of neurodegenerative disease. This suggests that individuals harboring these mutations may have an amplified response to

  3. Computational Modelling Approaches on Epigenetic Factors in Neurodegenerative and Autoimmune Diseases and Their Mechanistic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroza Khanam Irin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune diseases have unclear aetiologies, but an increasing number of evidences report for a combination of genetic and epigenetic alterations that predispose for the development of disease. This review examines the major milestones in epigenetics research in the context of diseases and various computational approaches developed in the last decades to unravel new epigenetic modifications. However, there are limited studies that systematically link genetic and epigenetic alterations of DNA to the aetiology of diseases. In this work, we demonstrate how disease-related epigenetic knowledge can be systematically captured and integrated with heterogeneous information into a functional context using Biological Expression Language (BEL. This novel methodology, based on BEL, enables us to integrate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation or acetylation of histones into a specific disease network. As an example, we depict the integration of epigenetic and genetic factors in a functional context specific to Parkinson’s disease (PD and Multiple Sclerosis (MS.

  4. Effect of electromagnetic radiations on neurodegenerative diseases- technological revolution as a curse in disguise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Gulam M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Karim, Sajjad; Haque, Absarul; Kamal, Mohammad A; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Azhar, Essam; Mirza, Zeenat

    2014-01-01

    In the present developed world, all of us are flooded with electromagnetic radiations (EMR) emanating from generation and transmission of electricity, domestic appliances and industrial equipments, to telecommunications and broadcasting. We have been exposed to EMR for last many decades; however their recent steady increase from artificial sources has been reported as millions of antennas and satellites irradiate the global population round the clock, year round. Needless to say, these are so integral to modern life that interaction with them on a daily basis is seemingly inevitable; hence, the EMR exposure load has increased to a point where their health effects are becoming a major concern. Delicate and sensitive electrical system of human body is affected by consistent penetration of electromagnetic frequencies causing DNA breakages and chromosomal aberrations. Technological innovations came with Pandora's Box of hazardous consequences including neurodegenerative disorders, hearing disabilities, diabetes, congenital abnormalities, infertility, cardiovascular diseases and cancer to name few, all on a sharp rise. Electromagnetic non-ionizing radiations pose considerable health threat with prolonged exposure. Mobile phones are usually held near to the brain and manifest progressive structural or functional alterations in neurons leading to neurodegenerative diseases and neuronal death. This has provoked awareness among both the general public and scientific community and international bodies acknowledge that further systematic research is needed. The aim of the present review was to have an insight in whether and how cumulative electro-magnetic field exposure is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Analysis of optical neural stimulation effects on neural networks affected by neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The number of people in risk of developing a neurodegenerative disease increases as the life expectancy grows due to medical advances. Multiple techniques have been developed to improve patient's condition, from pharmacological to invasive electrodes approaches, but no definite cure has yet been discovered. In this work Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS) has been studied. ONS stimulates noninvasively the outer regions of the brain, mainly the neocortex. The relationship between the stimulation parameters and the therapeutic response is not totally clear. In order to find optimal ONS parameters to treat a particular neurodegenerative disease, mathematical modeling is necessary. Neural networks models have been employed to study the neural spiking activity change induced by ONS. Healthy and pathological neocortical networks have been considered to study the required stimulation to restore the normal activity. The network consisted of a group of interconnected neurons, which were assigned 2D spatial coordinates. The optical stimulation spatial profile was assumed to be Gaussian. The stimulation effects were modeled as synaptic current increases in the affected neurons, proportional to the stimulation fluence. Pathological networks were defined as the healthy ones with some neurons being inactivated, which presented no synaptic conductance. Neurons' electrical activity was also studied in the frequency domain, focusing specially on the changes of the spectral bands corresponding to brain waves. The complete model could be used to determine the optimal ONS parameters in order to achieve the specific neural spiking patterns or the required local neural activity increase to treat particular neurodegenerative pathologies.

  6. The Role of MAPT in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Genetics, Mechanisms and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Xing, Ang; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a gene responsible for encoding tau protein, which is tightly implicated in keeping the function of microtubules and axonal transport. Hyperphosphorylated tau protein participates in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which characterize many neurodegenerative disorders termed tauopathies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in MAPT associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, it has been presumed that MAPT plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of neurodegeneration via affecting the structure and function of tau. Here, we review the advanced studies to summarize the biochemical properties of MAPT and its encoded protein, as well as the genetics and epigenetics of MAPT in neurodegeneration. Finally, given the potential mechanisms of MAPT to neurodegeneration pathogenesis, targeting MAPT and tau might present significant treatments of MAPT mutation-related neurodegeneration. Affirmatively, the identification of MAPT is extremely beneficial for improving our understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases and developing the mechanism-based therapies. PMID:26363795

  7. Who fans the flames of Alzheimer's disease brains? Misfolded tau on the crossroad of neurodegenerative and inflammatory pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilka Norbert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodegeneration, induced by misfolded tau protein, and neuroinflammation, driven by glial cells, represent the salient features of Alzheimer's disease (AD and related human tauopathies. While tau neurodegeneration significantly correlates with disease progression, brain inflammation seems to be an important factor in regulating the resistance or susceptibility to AD neurodegeneration. Previously, it has been shown that there is a reciprocal relationship between the local inflammatory response and neurofibrillary lesions. Numerous independent studies have reported that inflammatory responses may contribute to the development of tau pathology and thus accelerate the course of disease. It has been shown that various cytokines can significantly affect the functional and structural properties of intracellular tau. Notwithstanding, anti-inflammatory approaches have not unequivocally demonstrated that inhibition of the brain immune response can lead to reduction of neurofibrillary lesions. On the other hand, our recent data show that misfolded tau could represent a trigger for microglial activation, suggesting the dual role of misfolded tau in the Alzheimer's disease inflammatory cascade. On the basis of current knowledge, we can conclude that misfolded tau is located at the crossroad of the neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Thus disease-modified tau represents an important target for potential therapeutic strategies for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Multi-Channel neurodegenerative pattern analysis and its application in Alzheimer's disease characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, David Dagan; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Fulham, Michael J; Eberl, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in non-invasive diagnosis and differentiation of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Various features have been extracted from the neuroimaging data to characterize the disorders, and these features can be roughly divided into global and local features. Recent studies show a tendency of using local features in disease characterization, since they are capable of identifying the subtle disease-specific patterns associated with the effects of the disease on human brain. However, problems arise if the neuroimaging database involved multiple disorders or progressive disorders, as disorders of different types or at different progressive stages might exhibit different degenerative patterns. It is difficult for the researchers to reach consensus on what brain regions could effectively distinguish multiple disorders or multiple progression stages. In this study we proposed a Multi-Channel pattern analysis approach to identify the most discriminative local brain metabolism features for neurodegenerative disorder characterization. We compared our method to global methods and other pattern analysis methods based on clinical expertise or statistics tests. The preliminary results suggested that the proposed Multi-Channel pattern analysis method outperformed other approaches in Alzheimer's disease characterization, and meanwhile provided important insights into the underlying pathology of Alzheimer's disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

  9. Signaling, Polyubiquitination, Trafficking, and Inclusions: Sequestosome 1/p62's Role in Neurodegenerative Disease

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    Marie W. Wooten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregated misfolded proteins are hallmarks of most neurodegenerative diseases. In a chronic disease state, including pathologic situations of oxidative stress, these proteins are sequestered into inclusions. Accumulation of aggregated proteins can be prevented by chaperones, or by targeting their degradation to the UPS. If the accumulation of these proteins exceeds their degradation, they may impair the function of the proteasome. Alternatively, the function of the proteasome may be preserved by directing aggregated proteins to the autophagy-lysosome pathway for degradation. Sequestosome 1/p62 has recently been shown to interact with polyubiquitinated proteins through its UBA domain and may direct proteins to either the UPS or autophagosome. P62 is present in neuronal inclusions of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we review p62's role in signaling, aggregation, and inclusion formation, and specifically as a possible contributor to Alzheimer's disease. The use of p62 as a potential target for the development of therapeutics and as a disease biomarker is also discussed.

  10. [Changes in olfaction during ageing and in certain neurodegenerative diseases: up-to-date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A-J; Guépet-Sordet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is a complex sensory system, and increasing interest is being shown in the link between olfaction and cognition, notably in the elderly. In this literature review, we revisit the specific neurophysiological features of the olfactory system and odorants that lead to a durable olfactory memory and an emotional memory, for which the implicit component produces subconscious olfactory conditioning. Olfaction is known to affect cognitive abilities and mood. We also consider the impairment of olfactory function due to ageing and to neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, through anatomopathological changes in the peripheral and central olfactory structures. The high frequency of these olfactory disorders as well as their early occurrence in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease are in favour of their clinical detection in subjects suffering from these two neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we analyse the impact of olfactory stimulation on cognitive performance and attention. Current observational data from studies in elderly patients with Alzheimer-type dementia are limited to multiple sensory stimulation methods, such as the Snoezelen method, and aromatherapy. These therapies have shown benefits for dementia-related mood and behaviour disorders in the short term, with few side effects. Since olfactory chemosensory stimulation may be beneficial, it may be proposed in patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer-type dementia, as a complementary or even alternative therapy to existing medical strategies. PMID:25304170

  11. Precision Modulation of Neurodegenerative Disease-Related Gene Expression in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heman-Ackah, Sabrina Mahalia; Bassett, Andrew Roger; Wood, Matthew John Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reprogram adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the subsequent development of protocols for their differentiation into disease-relevant cell types have enabled in-depth molecular analyses of multiple disease states as hitherto impossible. Neurons differentiated from patient-specific iPSCs provide a means to recapitulate molecular phenotypes of neurodegenerative diseases in vitro. However, it remains challenging to conduct precise manipulations of gene expression in iPSC-derived neurons towards modeling complex human neurological diseases. The application of CRISPR/Cas9 to mammalian systems is revolutionizing the utilization of genome editing technologies in the study of molecular contributors to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. Here, we demonstrate that CRISPRa and CRISPRi can be used to exert precise modulations of endogenous gene expression in fate-committed iPSC-derived neurons. This highlights CRISPRa/i as a major technical advancement in accessible tools for evaluating the specific contributions of critical neurodegenerative disease-related genes to neuropathogenesis. PMID:27341390

  12. [Changes in olfaction during ageing and in certain neurodegenerative diseases: up-to-date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A-J; Guépet-Sordet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is a complex sensory system, and increasing interest is being shown in the link between olfaction and cognition, notably in the elderly. In this literature review, we revisit the specific neurophysiological features of the olfactory system and odorants that lead to a durable olfactory memory and an emotional memory, for which the implicit component produces subconscious olfactory conditioning. Olfaction is known to affect cognitive abilities and mood. We also consider the impairment of olfactory function due to ageing and to neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, through anatomopathological changes in the peripheral and central olfactory structures. The high frequency of these olfactory disorders as well as their early occurrence in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease are in favour of their clinical detection in subjects suffering from these two neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we analyse the impact of olfactory stimulation on cognitive performance and attention. Current observational data from studies in elderly patients with Alzheimer-type dementia are limited to multiple sensory stimulation methods, such as the Snoezelen method, and aromatherapy. These therapies have shown benefits for dementia-related mood and behaviour disorders in the short term, with few side effects. Since olfactory chemosensory stimulation may be beneficial, it may be proposed in patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer-type dementia, as a complementary or even alternative therapy to existing medical strategies.

  13. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material forage-related neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarawut Suksuphew; Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the keyevent that leads to nervous system dysfunctions anddiseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, forinstance Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, andHuntington's disease, are associated to aging andsuggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neuralstem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenousneural stem cells exist throughout life and are found inspecific niches of human brain. These neural stem cellsare responsible for the regeneration of new neurons torestore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of thebrain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated,propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most celltypes of the brain. On the other hand, other types ofstem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonicstem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can alsoserve as a source for neural stem cell production, thathold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. Thereplacement of neural stem cells, either endogenousor stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impairedbrain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic meanfor neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinicalfeatures and current routinely treatments of agerelatedneurodegenerative diseases are documented.Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence ofneural stem cells and their derivatives in curing suchdiseases, together with the remaining challenges toachieve the best outcome for patients.

  14. Themes From the Special Issue on Neurodegenerative Diseases: What Have We Learned, and Where Can We Go From Here?

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Erin R.

    2014-01-01

    This issue of AJOT adds to the growing and evolving understanding of the effectiveness of occupational therapy—related interventions to meet the needs of people living with neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Mitochondrial ferritin in the regulation of brain iron homeostasis and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen eGao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt is a novel iron-storage protein in mitochondria. Evidences have shown that FtMt is structurally and functionally similar to the cytosolic H-chain ferritin. It protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage presumably through sequestration of potentially harmful excess free iron. It also participates in the regulation of iron distribution between cytosol and mitochondrial contents. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H-ferritin, FtMt is mainly expressed in testis and brain, which suggests its tissue-related roles. FtMt is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, as its increased expression has been observed in Alzheimer’s disease, restless legs syndrome and Friedreich’s ataxia. Studies from our laboratory showed that in Alzheimer’s disease, FtMt overexpression attenuated the β-amyloid induced neurotoxicity, which on the other hand increased significantly when FtMt expression was knocked down. It is also found that, by maintaining mitochondrial iron homeostasis, FtMt could prevent 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic cell damage in Parkinson’s disease. These recent findings on FtMt regarding its functions in regulation of brain iron homeostasis and its protective role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases are summarized and reviewed.

  16. Insight into the Dissociation of Behavior from Histology in Synucleinopathies and in Related Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Kazunari; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Koike, Wakako; Waragai, Masaaki; Takenouchi, Takato; Sugama, Shuei; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2016-03-31

    Recent clinical trials using immunization approaches against Alzheimer's disease (AD) have failed to demonstrate improved cognitive functions in patients, despite potent suppression in the formation of both senile plaques and other amyloid-β deposits in postmortem brains. Similarly, we observed that treatment with ibuprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was effective in improving the histopathology, such as reducing both protein aggregation and glial activation, in the brains of transgenic mice expressing dementia with Lewy bodies-linked P123H β-synuclein. In contrast, only a small improvement in cognitive functions was observed in these mice. Collectively, it is predicted that histology does not correlate with behavior that is resilient and resistant to therapeutic stimuli. Notably, such a 'discrepancy between histology and behavior' is reminiscent of AD-like pathologies and incidental Lewy bodies, which are frequently encountered in postmortem brains of the elderly who had been asymptomatic for memory loss and Parkinsonism during their lives. We suggest that 'the discrepancy between histology and behavior' may be a universal feature that is associated with various aspects of neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, given that the cognitive reserve is specifically observed in human brains, human behavior may be evolutionally distinct from that in other animals, thus, contributing to the differential efficiency of therapy between human and lower animals, an important issue in the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Overall, it is important to better understand 'the discrepancy between histology and behavior' in the mechanism of neurodegeneration for the development of effective therapies against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27031478

  17. Potential therapeutic applications of differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Aijing; Peng, Yuhua; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Difficulties in realizing persistent neurogenesis, inabilities in modeling pathogenesis of most cases, and a shortage of disease material for screening therapeutic agents restrict our progress to overcome challenges presented by neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that reprogramming primary somatic cells of patients into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides a new avenue to overcome these impediments. Their abilities in self-renewal and differentiation into various cell types will enable disease investigation and drug development. In this review, we introduce efficient approaches to generate iPSCs and distinct iPSCs differentiation stages, and critically discuss paradigms of iPSCs technology application to investigate neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Although iPSCs technology is in its infancy and faces many obstacles, it has great potential in helping to identify therapeutic targets for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The Role of Tau in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Potential as a Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Wolfe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal deposition of proteins in and around neurons is a common pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Among these pathological proteins, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intraneuronal filaments in a spectrum of neurological disorders. The discovery that dominant mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau are associated with familial frontotemporal dementia strongly supports abnormal tau protein as directly involved in disease pathogenesis. This and other evidence suggest that tau is a worthwhile target for the prevention or treatment of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. However, it is critical to understand the normal biological roles of tau, the specific molecular events that induce tau to become neurotoxic, the biochemical nature of pathogenic tau, the means by which pathogenic tau exerts neurotoxicity, and how tau pathology propagates. Based on known differences between normal and abnormal tau, a number of approaches have been taken toward the discovery of potential therapeutics. Key questions still remain open, such as the nature of the connection between the amyloid-β protein of Alzheimer’s disease and tau pathology. Answers to these questions should help better understand the nature of tauopathies and may also reveal new therapeutic targets and strategies.

  19. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A M; Kasimov, M R; Zefirov, A L

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body's total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington's, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  20. Infectivity versus Seeding in Neurodegenerative Diseases Sharing a Prion-Like Mechanism

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    Natalia Fernández-Borges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions are considered the best example to prove that the biological information can be transferred protein to protein through a conformational change. The term “prion-like” is used to describe molecular mechanisms that share similarities with the mammalian prion protein self-perpetuating aggregation and spreading characteristics. Since prions are presumably composed only of protein and are infectious, the more similar the mechanisms that occur in the different neurodegenerative diseases, the more these processes will resemble an infection. In vitro and in vivo experiments carried out during the last decade in different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's diseases (PD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS have shown a convergence toward a unique mechanism of misfolded protein propagation. In spite of the term “infection” that could be used to explain the mechanism governing the diversity of the pathological processes, other concepts as “seeding” or “de novo induction” are being used to describe the in vivo propagation and transmissibility of misfolded proteins. The current studies are demanding an extended definition of “disease-causing agents” to include those already accepted as well as other misfolded proteins. In this new scenario, “seeding” would be a type of mechanism by which an infectious agent can be transmitted but should not be used to define a whole “infection” process.

  1. Chronic glutamate toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases-what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eMaher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors. Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Targeting Specific HATs for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment: Translating Basic Biology to Therapeutic Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K. Pirooznia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic epigenetic regulation of neurons is emerging as a fundamental mechanism by which neurons adapt their transcriptional responses to specific developmental and environmental cues. While defects within the neural epigenome have traditionally been studied in the context of early developmental and heritable cognitive disorders, recent studies point to aberrant histone acetylation status as a key mechanism underlying acquired inappropriate alterations of genome structure and function in post-mitotic neurons during the aging process. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the lifetime of neurons through mechanisms related to loss of function of histone acetyltransferase (HATs activity. Several HATs have been shown to participate in vital neuronal functions such as regulation of neuronal plasticity and memory formation. As such, dysregulation of such HATs has been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. In order to counteract the loss of HAT function in neurodegenerative diseases, the current therapeutic strategies involve the use of small molecules called histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that antagonize HDAC activity and thus enhance acetylation levels. Although this strategy has displayed promising therapeutic effects, currently used HDAC inhibitors lack target specificity, raising concerns about their applicability. With rapidly evolving literature on HATs and their respective functions in mediating neuronal survival and higher order brain function such as learning and memory, modulating the function of specific HATs holds new promises as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in research regarding epigenetic histone acetylation mechanisms underlying neuronal activity and cognitive function. We discuss the current understanding of specific HDACs and

  3. Network Analysis of Neurodegenerative Disease Highlights a Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

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    Thanh-Phuong Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in the study of the molecular mechanisms altered in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs, the etiology is still enigmatic and the distinctions between diseases are not always entirely clear. We present an efficient computational method based on protein-protein interaction network (PPI to model the functional network of NDs. The aim of this work is fourfold: (i reconstruction of a PPI network relating to the NDs, (ii construction of an association network between diseases based on proximity in the disease PPI network, (iii quantification of disease associations, and (iv inference of potential molecular mechanism involved in the diseases. The functional links of diseases not only showed overlap with the traditional classification in clinical settings, but also offered new insight into connections between diseases with limited clinical overlap. To gain an expanded view of the molecular mechanisms involved in NDs, both direct and indirect connector proteins were investigated. The method uncovered molecular relationships that are in common apparently distinct diseases and provided important insight into the molecular networks implicated in disease pathogenesis. In particular, the current analysis highlighted the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway as a potential candidate pathway to be targeted by therapy in neurodegeneration.

  4. Therapeutic Approach of Nanotechnology for Oxidative Stress Induced Ocular Neurodegenerative Diseases.

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    Mitra, Rajendra N; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in many different forms of neurodegenerative ocular disease. The imbalance between the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their corresponding neutralization by endogenous antioxidant defense systems leads to cellular oxidative stress, oxidation of different bio-macromolecules, and eventually retinal disease. As a result, the administration of supplemental endogenous antioxidant materials or exogenous ROS scavengers is an interesting therapeutic approach for the treatment of forms of ocular disease associated with oxidative stress. Thus far, different dietary antioxidant supplements have been proven to be clinically reliable and effective, and different antioxidant gene therapy approaches are under investigation. In addition, various metal oxide nanoparticles were shown to be effective in defending against oxidative stress-associated injury. These benefits are due to free radical scavenging properties of the materials arising from non-stoichiometric crystal defects and oxygen deficiencies. Here we discuss the application of this approach to the protection of the retina. PMID:26427447

  5. Implications of prion adaptation and evolution paradigm for human neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, M Enamul; Safar, Jiri G

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that number of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, fronto-temporal dementias, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, propagate in the brain via prion-like intercellular induction of protein misfolding. Prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans, the most prevalent being sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD); they self-replicate and spread by converting the cellular form of prion protein (PrP(C)) to a misfolded pathogenic conformer (PrP(Sc)). The extensive phenotypic heterogeneity of human prion diseases is determined by polymorphisms in the prion protein gene, and by prion strain-specific conformation of PrP(Sc). Remarkably, even though informative nucleic acid is absent, prions may undergo rapid adaptation and evolution in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier. In the course of our investigation of this process, we isolated distinct populations of PrP(Sc) particles that frequently co-exist in sCJD. The human prion particles replicate independently and undergo competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. Exposed to mutant substrate, the winning PrP(Sc) conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to the lowest stability. Thus, the evolution and adaptation of human prions is enabled by a dynamic collection of distinct populations of particles, whose evolution is governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrP(Sc) conformers. This fundamental biological mechanism may explain the drug resistance that some prions gained after exposure to compounds targeting PrP(Sc). Whether the phenotypic heterogeneity of other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding is determined by the spectrum of misfolded conformers (strains) remains to be established. However, the prospect that these conformers may evolve and

  6. The 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in executive function: Implications for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Aznar, Susana; Hervig, Mona El-Sayed

    2016-05-01

    Executive function entails the interplay of a group of cognitive processes enabling the individual to anticipate consequences, attain self-control, and undertake appropriate goal-directed behaviour. Serotonin signalling at serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2AR) has important effects on these behavioural and cognitive pathways, with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as the central actor. Indeed, the 5-HT2ARs are highly expressed in PFC, where they modulate cortical activity and local network oscillations (brain waves). Numerous psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases result in disrupted executive function. Animal and human studies have linked these disorders with alterations in the 5-HT2AR system, making this an important pharmacological target for the treatment of disorders with impaired cognitive function. This review aims to describe the current state of knowledge on the role of 5-HT2AR signalling in components of executive function, and how 5-HT2AR systems may relate to executive dysfunctions occurring in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. We hope thereby to provide insight into how pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT2AR may ameliorate (or exacerbate) aspects of these disorders. PMID:26891819

  7. Grey and White Matter Clinico-Anatomical Correlates of Disinhibition in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Alexander Frizell; Lundblad, Karl; Nilsson, Markus; Landqvist Waldö, Maria; van Westen, Danielle; Lätt, Jimmy; Blennow Nordström, Erik; Vestberg, Susanna; Lindberg, Olof; Nilsson, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition is an important symptom in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the clinico-anatomical underpinnings remain controversial. We explored the anatomical correlates of disinhibition in neurodegenerative disease using the perspective of grey and white matter imaging. Disinhibition was assessed with a neuropsychological test and a caregiver information-based clinical rating scale in 21 patients with prefrontal syndromes due to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 12) or progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 9), and healthy controls (n = 25). Cortical thickness was assessed using the Freesurfer software on 3T MRI data. The integrity of selected white matter tracts was determined by the fractional anisotropy (FA) from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Disinhibition correlated with the cortical thickness of the right parahippocampal gyrus, right orbitofrontal cortex and right insula and the FA of the right uncinate fasciculus and right anterior cingulum. Notably, no relationship was seen with the thickness of ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Our results support an associative model of inhibitory control, distributed in a medial temporal lobe-insular-orbitofrontal network, connected by the intercommunicating white matter tracts. This reconciles some of the divergences among previous studies, but also questions the current conceptualisation of the “prefrontal” syndrome and the central role attributed to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in inhibitory control. PMID:27723823

  8. Effect of meditation on cognitive functions in context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases

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    Rafał eMarciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different meditation practices on various aspects of mental and physical health is receiving growing attention. The present paper reviews evidence about effects of several mediation practices on cognitive functions in the context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. The effect of meditation in this area is still poorly explored. Seven studies were detected through the databases search which explores the effect of meditation on attention, memory, executive functions and other miscellaneous measures of cognition in a sample of older people and people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Overall, reviewed studies suggested a positive effect of meditation techniques, particularly in the area of attention, as well as memory, verbal fluency and cognitive flexibility. These findings are discussed in the context of MRI studies suggesting structural correlates of the effects. Meditation can be a potentially suitable non-pharmacological intervention aimed at the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the conclusions of these studies are limited by their methodological flaws and differences of various types of meditation techniques. Further research in this direction could help to verify the validity of the findings and clarify the problematic aspects.

  9. Effect of meditation on cognitive functions in context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Marciniak, Rafał; Sheardova, Katerina; Cermáková, Pavla; Hudeček, Daniel; Sumec, Rastislav; Hort, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Effect of different meditation practices on various aspects of mental and physical health is receiving growing attention. The present paper reviews evidence on the effects of several mediation practices on cognitive functions in the context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. The effect of meditation in this area is still poorly explored. Seven studies were detected through the databases search, which explores the effect of meditation on attention, memory, executive functions, and other miscellaneous measures of cognition in a sample of older people and people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Overall, reviewed studies suggested a positive effect of meditation techniques, particularly in the area of attention, as well as memory, verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility. These findings are discussed in the context of MRI studies suggesting structural correlates of the effects. Meditation can be a potentially suitable non-pharmacological intervention aimed at the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the conclusions of these studies are limited by their methodological flaws and differences of various types of meditation techniques. Further research in this direction could help to verify the validity of the findings and clarify the problematic aspects.

  10. Brain imaging for oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Okazawa, H; Ikawa, M; Tsujikawa, T; Kiyono, Y; Yoneda, M

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress, one of the most probable molecular mechanisms for neuronal impairment, is reported to occur in the affected brain regions of various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, many studies showed evidence of a link between oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage and neuronal degeneration. Basic in vitro experiments and postmortem studies demonstrated that biomarkers for oxidative damage can be observed in the pathogenic regions of the brain and the affected neurons. Model animal studies also showed oxidative damage associated with neuronal degeneration. The molecular imaging method with positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to delineate oxidatively stressed microenvironments to elucidate pathophysiological changes of the in vivo brain; however, only a few studies have successfully demonstrated enhanced stress in patients. Radioisotope copper labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) may be the most promising candidate for this oxidative stress imaging. The tracer is usually known as a hypoxic tissue imaging PET probe, but the accumulation mechanism is based on the electron rich environment induced by mitochondrial impairment and/or microsomal over-reduction, and thus it is considered to represent the oxidative stress state correlated with the degree of disease severity. In this review, Cu-ATSM PET is introduced in detail from the basics to practical methods in clinical studies, as well as recent clinical studies on cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Several other PET probes are also introduced from the point of view of neuronal oxidative stress imaging. These molecular imaging methods should be promising tools to reveal oxidative injuries in various brain diseases.

  11. Exosomes: vehicles for the transfer of toxic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

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    Shayne Anthony Bellingham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by a number of cell types including neurons and can be isolated from conditioned cell media or bodily fluids such as urine and plasma. Exosome biogenesis involves the inward budding of endosomes to form multivesicular bodies (MVB. When fused with the plasma membrane, the MVB releases the vesicles into the extracellular environment as exosomes. Proposed functions of these vesicles include roles in cell-cell signaling, removal of unwanted proteins, and the transfer of pathogens between cells. One such pathogen which exploits this pathway is the prion, the infectious particle responsible for the transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE of cattle. Similarly, exosomes are also involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Exosomes have been shown to contain full-length APP and several distinct proteolytically cleaved products of APP, including Aβ. In addition, these fragments can be modulated using inhibitors of the proteases involved in APP cleavage. These observations provide further evidence for a novel pathway in which PrP and APP fragments are released from cells. Other proteins such as superoxide dismutase I (SOD-1 and alpha-synuclein (involved in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Parkinson’s disease respectively are also found associated with exosomes. This review will focus on the role of exosomes in neurodegenerative disorders and discuss the potential of these vesicles for the spread of neurotoxicity, therapeutics and diagnostics for these diseases.

  12. The Progress of Mitophagy and Related Pathogenic Mechanisms of the Neurodegenerative Diseases and Tumor

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    Ying Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrion, an organelle with two layers of membrane, is extremely vital to eukaryotic cell. Its major functions are energy center and apoptosis censor inside cell. The intactness of mitochondrial membrane is important to maintain its structure and function. Mitophagy is one kind of autophagy. In recent years, studies of mitochondria have shown that mitophagy is regulated by various factors and is an important regulation mechanism for organisms to maintain their normal state. In addition, abnormal mitophagy is closely related to several neurodegenerative diseases and tumor. However, the related signal pathway and its regulation mechanism still remain unclear. As a result, summarizing the progress of mitophagy and its related pathogenic mechanism not only helps to reveal the complicated molecular mechanism, but also helps to find a new target to treat the related diseases.

  13. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in neural cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Anna M; Sapoń, Karolina; Janas, Teresa; Stowell, Michael H B; Janas, Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    The function of human nervous system is critically dependent on proper interneuronal communication. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles are emerging as a novel form of information exchange within the nervous system. Intraluminal vesicles within multivesicular bodies (MVBs) can be transported in neural cells anterogradely or retrogradely in order to be released into the extracellular space as exosomes. RNA loading into exosomes can be either via an interaction between RNA and the raft-like region of the MVB limiting membrane, or via an interaction between an RNA-binding protein-RNA complex with this raft-like region. Outflow of exosomes from neural cells and inflow of exosomes into neural cells presumably take place on a continuous basis. Exosomes can play both neuro-protective and neuro-toxic roles. In this review, we characterize the role of exosomes and microvesicles in normal nervous system function, and summarize evidence for defective signaling of these vesicles in disease pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Advanced shotgun lipidomics for characterization of altered lipid patterns in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury

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    Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics (MDMS-SL) is a powerful technology platform among current lipidomics practices due to its high efficiency, sensitivity, and reproducibility, as well as its broad coverage. This platform has been broadly used to determine the altered lipid profiles induced by diseases, injury, genetic manipulations, drug treatments, and aging, among others. Herein, we summarized the principles underlying this platform and presented a protocol for analysis of many of the lipid classes and subclasses covered by MDMS-SL directly from lipid extracts of brain samples. We believe that this protocol could aid the researchers in the field to determine the altered lipid patterns in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury. PMID:26235081

  15. Computed tomography of neurodegenerative disease in childhood. Serial CT findings and their diagnostic values

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    Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Hojo, Hiroatsu

    1984-12-01

    Serial computed tomographic scans were performed on seven children with neurodegenerative disorders. In two cases of white-matter diseases (Krabbe's disease and metachromatic leukodystrophy), diffuse, low-density lesions of white matter were visible in the early stage of the diseases. In one case of adrenoleukodystrophy, regional low-density lesions of the white matter around the posterior horns and peculiar high-density strip lesions were visible in the early stage. In two cases of storage-type gray-matter diseases (Tay-Sachs' and infantile Gaucher's disease), there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but diffuse cortical atrophies in the late stage. In one case of Leigh's disease, there were small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and multiple low-density lesions of the gray matter in the early stage. In one case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and diffuse cerebral atrophies in the late stage. Diagnostic values were recognized dominantly in two cases of adrenoleukodystrophy and Leigh's disease. In the other cases, however, serial CT scans were useful in the diagnostic process. (author).

  16. Niemann-Pick C disease gene mutations and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

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    Michael Zech

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a rare autosomal-recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in NPC1 (95% or NPC2. Given the highly variable phenotype, diagnosis is challenging and particularly late-onset forms with predominantly neuropsychiatric presentations are likely underdiagnosed. Pathophysiologically, genetic alterations compromising the endosomal/lysosomal system are linked with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. We sought to examine a possible association of rare sequence variants in NPC1 and NPC2 with Parkinson's disease (PD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, and to genetically determine the proportion of potentially misdiagnosed NPC patients in these neurodegenerative conditions. By means of high-resolution melting, we screened the coding regions of NPC1 and NPC2 for rare genetic variation in a homogenous German sample of patients clinically diagnosed with PD (n = 563, FTLD (n = 133 and PSP (n = 94, and 846 population-based controls. The frequencies of rare sequence variants in NPC1/2 did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Disease-associated NPC1/2 mutations were found in six PD patients (1.1% and seven control subjects (0.8%, but not in FTLD or PSP. All rare variation was detected in the heterozygous state and no compound heterozygotes were observed. Our data do not support the hypothesis that rare NPC1/2 variants confer susceptibility for PD, FTLD, or PSP in the German population. Misdiagnosed NPC patients were not present in our samples. However, further assessment of NPC disease genes in age-related neurodegeneration is warranted.

  17. Knockdown of cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential: implication in neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Uzma Saeed

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction including that caused by oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1, a cytosolic thiol disulfide oxido-reductase, reduces glutathionylated proteins to protein thiols and helps maintain redox status of proteins during oxidative stress. Grx1 downregulation aggravates mitochondrial dysfunction in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and motor neuron disease. We examined the mechanism underlying the regulation of mitochondrial function by Grx1. Downregulation of Grx1 by shRNA results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is prevented by the thiol antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid, or by cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition. The thiol groups of voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC, an outer membrane protein in mitochondria but not adenosine nucleotide translocase (ANT, an inner membrane protein, are oxidized when Grx1 is downregulated. We then examined the effect of beta-N-oxalyl amino-L-alanine (L-BOAA, an excitatory amino acid implicated in neurolathyrism (a type of motor neuron disease, that causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Exposure of cells to L-BOAA resulted in loss of MMP, which was prevented by overexpression of Grx1. Grx1 expression is regulated by estrogen in the CNS and treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with estrogen upregulated Grx1 and protected from L-BOAA mediated MMP loss. Our studies demonstrate that Grx1, a cytosolic oxido-reductase, helps maintain mitochondrial integrity and prevents MMP loss caused by oxidative insult. Further, downregulation of Grx1 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction through oxidative modification of the outer membrane protein, VDAC, providing support for the critical role of Grx1 in maintenance of MMP.

  18. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

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    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27292537

  20. Tool use disorders in neurodegenerative diseases: Roles of semantic memory and technical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Josselin; Lesourd, Mathieu; Jarry, Christophe; Merck, Catherine; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Belliard, Serge; Moreaud, Olivier; Croisile, Bernard; Osiurak, François; Le Gall, Didier

    2016-09-01

    In the field of apraxia, it has been suggested that the ability to use tools and objects in daily life depends not only on semantic knowledge about tool function and context of use but also on technical reasoning about mechanical properties of tools and objects. The aim of the present work was to assess tool use abilities regarding these hypotheses in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and reduced autonomy. Performance of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 31), semantic dementia (SD) (n = 16) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 7) was compared to that of healthy control participants (n = 31) in familiar tool use tasks, functional/contextual associations and mechanical problem solving (MPS). A conversion method was applied to data in order to avoid ceiling effects. Tool use disorders were found in all patient groups but the underlying reasons were different. Patients with SD had difficulties in imagining and selecting familiar tools due to the semantic loss but they performed in normal range in MPS tasks. Interestingly, they performed better with only one tool and its corresponding object, which is interpreted as a partial compensation of semantic loss by spared technical reasoning. Patients with CBS exhibited the reverse pattern, that is, MPS deficits without semantic loss. However, additional qualitative research is needed to disentangle the relative contributions of motor and technical reasoning deficits to this pattern. Both of these profiles were found in patients with AD. For all that, these patients did not commit the same errors as stroke patients with left brain-damage documented in previous works. Several hypotheses are proposed to account for the specificity of tool use disorders in neurodegenerative diseases, and recommendations are provided to caregivers. PMID:27376932

  1. Uncoupling neuronal death and dysfunction in Drosophila models of neurodegenerative disease.

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    Chouhan, Amit K; Guo, Caiwei; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Ye, Hui; Senturk, Mumine; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Li, Yarong; Chatterjee, Shreyasi; Botas, Juan; Jackson, George R; Bellen, Hugo J; Shulman, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Common neurodegenerative proteinopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by the misfolding and aggregation of toxic protein species, including the amyloid beta (Aß) peptide, microtubule-associated protein Tau (Tau), and alpha-synuclein (αSyn) protein. These factors also show toxicity in Drosophila; however, potential limitations of prior studies include poor discrimination between effects on the adult versus developing nervous system and neuronal versus glial cell types. In addition, variable expression paradigms and outcomes hinder systematic comparison of toxicity profiles. Using standardized conditions and medium-throughput assays, we express human Tau, Aß or αSyn selectively in neurons of the adult Drosophila retina and monitor age-dependent changes in both structure and function, based on tissue histology and recordings of the electroretinogram (ERG), respectively. We find that each protein causes a unique profile of neurodegenerative pathology, demonstrating distinct and separable impacts on neuronal death and dysfunction. Strikingly, expression of Tau leads to progressive loss of ERG responses whereas retinal architecture and neuronal numbers are largely preserved. By contrast, Aß induces modest, age-dependent neuronal loss without degrading the retinal ERG. αSyn expression, using a codon-optimized transgene, is characterized by marked retinal vacuolar change, progressive photoreceptor cell death, and delayed-onset but modest ERG changes. Lastly, to address potential mechanisms, we perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal potential degenerative changes at the ultrastructural level. Surprisingly, Tau and αSyn each cause prominent but distinct synaptotoxic profiles, including disorganization or enlargement of photoreceptor terminals, respectively. Our findings highlight variable and dynamic properties of neurodegeneration triggered by these disease-relevant proteins in vivo, and suggest

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia.

  3. The MPTP marmoset model of parkinsonism: a multi-purpose non-human primate model for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; 't Hart, Bert A; Torres, German

    2010-12-01

    Aging societies face an increasing prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders for which no cure exists. The paucity of relevant animal models that faithfully reproduce clinical and pathogenic features of neurodegenerative diseases is a major cause for the lack of effective therapies. Clinically distinct disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, are driven by overlapping pathogenic mechanisms that converge onto vulnerable neurons to ultimately cause abnormal clinical outcomes. These similarities, particularly in the early phases of neurodegeneration, might help identify appropriate animal model systems for studying of cell pathology. While reviewing some of the cellular mechanisms of disease progression, we discuss the MPTP-induced model of Parkinsonism in marmoset monkeys as a model system for construct, face and predictive validity in neurodegenerative studies.

  4. Concise review: toward stem cell-based therapies for retinal neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Natalie D; Martin, Keith R

    2011-08-01

    Loss of sight due to irreversible retinal neurodegeneration imposes a significant disease burden on both patients and society. Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration are the commonest neurodegenerative blinding diseases in the developed world, and both are becoming increasingly prevalent as populations age. Our heavy reliance on our sense of sight means that visual loss often severely restricts day-to-day life, making it difficult to function without additional support. Visual impairment also limits employment possibilities, adding to the economic burden. Current therapies for many degenerative retinopathies are limited in their efficacy, often treating the effects of disease rather than the underlying causes. Consequently, the development of novel adjunctive neuroprotective and neuroregenerative treatments are important goals. Evidence from animal models suggests that stem cells could be useful as part of novel new treatment strategies for eye disease. The accessibility of the eye and extensive repertoire of available surgical techniques may facilitate the translation of stem cell-based therapies, for example, via transplantation, to the retina more rapidly than to other parts of the central nervous system. This concise review will examine how cell therapies are being applied experimentally for neuroregenerative and neuroprotective treatment of currently incurable degenerative retinal diseases. Furthermore, recent progress toward clinical translation of such therapies will be highlighted.

  5. TDP-43 Proteinopathies: A New Player in Neurodegenerative Diseases with Defective Protein Folding

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    Suna Lahut

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The proteome is the sum of all proteins inside a cell, and proteostasis (protein homeostasis is the stable condition of the proteome. Proteostasis is essential for the cellular and organismal health. Stress, aging and the chronic expression of misfolded proteins challenge the proteostasis machinery and the vitality of the cell. There is increasing evidence that the accumulation of damaged proteins not only has direct consequences on the efficiency and fidelity of cellular processes but, when not corrected, that they initiate a cascade of dysfunction, which in humans is associated with a plethora of diseases of protein conformation, referred to as proteinopathies. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, Parkinson’s Disease (PD, Huntington’s Disease (HD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, cancer and diabetes, whose frequencies have drastically increased in countries with aging populations, are all consequences of misfolded proteins. This paper focuses on TDP-43, which excelled as a key protein in neurodegenerative processes because of its association with different diseases, especially with ALS and Frontotemporal Lobar Dementia (FTLD, the two best studied examples of TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  6. Midkine and Pleiotrophin in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Drug Addiction.

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    Alguacil, Luis F; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) and Midkine (MK) are neurotrophines with documented protective actions in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases and beneficial effects on toxicity and addictive behaviours related to drug abuse. Concerning the latter, both PTN and MK prevent the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine on nigrostriatal pathways and endogenous PTN also limits amphetamine reward. Moreover, endogenous PTN overexpression in the prefontral cortex abolishes alcohol- induced conditioned place preference. This review summarizes the existing patents for using PTN and MK in the treatment and diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders with a focus on neurotoxicity, neurodegeneration and substance use disorders. We have also reviewed the mechanism of action of PTN and MK and summarized existing patents on downstream modulators in their signaling pathways for the same indications. PMID:25808239

  7. Fluctuations in protein aggregation: Design of preclinical screening for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, Giulio; Taloni, Alessandro; Buell, Alexander K; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Autocatalytic fibril nucleation has recently been proposed to be a determining factor for the spread of neurodegenerative diseases, but the same process could also be exploited to amplify minute quantities of protein aggregates in a diagnostic context. Recent advances in microfluidic technology allow analysis of protein aggregation in micron-scale samples potentially enabling such diagnostic approaches, but the theoretical foundations for the analysis and interpretation of such data are so far lacking. Here we study computationally the onset of protein aggregation in small volumes and show that the process is ruled by intrinsic fluctuations whose volume dependent distribution we also estimate theoretically. Based on these results, we develop a strategy to quantify in silico the statistical errors associated with the detection of aggregate containing samples. Our work opens a new perspective on the forecasting of protein aggregation in asymptomatic subjects.

  8. Autotransplantation of bone marrow-derived stem cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, I; Melamed, E; Offen, D

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by a progressive degeneration of selective neural populations. This selective hallmark pathology and the lack of effective treatment modalities make these diseases appropriate candidates for cell therapy. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewing precursors that reside in the bone marrow and may further be exploited for autologous transplantation. Autologous transplantation of MSCs entirely circumvents the problem of immune rejection, does not cause the formation of teratomas, and raises very few ethical or political concerns. More than a few studies showed that transplantation of MSCs resulted in clinical improvement. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for the beneficial outcome have yet to be defined. Possible rationalizations include cell replacement, trophic factors delivery, and immunomodulation. Cell replacement theory is based on the idea that replacement of degenerated neural cells with alternative functioning cells induces long-lasting clinical improvement. It is reasoned that the transplanted cells survive, integrate into the endogenous neural network, and lead to functional improvement. Trophic factor delivery presents a more practical short-term approach. According to this approach, MSC effectiveness may be credited to the production of neurotrophic factors that support neuronal cell survival, induce endogenous cell proliferation, and promote nerve fiber regeneration at sites of injury. The third potential mechanism of action is supported by the recent reports claiming that neuroinflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, inhibiting chronic inflammatory stress might explain the beneficial effects induced by MSC transplantation. Here, we assemble evidence that supports each theory and review the latest studies that have placed MSC transplantation into the spotlight of biomedical research.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 and its effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Cristina dos Santos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pre-clinical studies, oxidative stress and its consequences may be the cause or, at least, a contributing factor, to a large number of neurodegenerative diseases. These diseases include common and debilitating disorders, characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of neurons in specific regions of the brain. The most common neurodegenerative diseases are Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 has been extensively studied since its discovery in 1957. It is a component of the electron transportation chain and participates in aerobic cellular respiration, generating energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The property of CoQ10 to act as an antioxidant or a pro-oxidant, suggests that it also plays an important role in the modulation of redox cellular status under physiological and pathological conditions, also performing a role in the ageing process. In several animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, CoQ10 has shown beneficial effects in reducing disease progression. However, further studies are needed to assess the outcome and effectiveness of CoQ10 before exposing patients to unnecessary health risks at significant costs.De acordo com estudos clínicos e pré-clínicos, o estresse oxidativo e suas conseqüências podem ser a causa, ou, no mínimo, o fator que contribui para grande número de doenças degenerativas. Estas doenças incluem problemas comuns e debilitantes, caracterizados por perda progressiva e irreversível de neurônios em regiões específicas do cérebro. As doenças degenerativas mais comuns são doença de Parkinson, de Hutington, de Alzheimer e esclerose amiotrófica lateral. A Coenzima Q10 (CoQ10 tem sido intensamente estudada desde sua descoberta, em 1957. É um componente da cadeia de transporte eletrônico e participa da respiração aeróbica celular, gerando energia na forma de trifosfato de

  10. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinageshwar, Bhairavi; Maiti, Panchanan; Dunbar, Gary L; Rossignol, Julien

    2016-02-02

    The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and how they drive these cells into a mature lineage. Understanding how the stem cells are behaving and giving rise to mature cells can be used to inform researchers on effective ways to design stem cell-based treatments. In this review article, the way in which the basic understanding of how manipulating this process can be utilized to treat certain neurological diseases will be presented. Different genetic factors and their epigenetic changes during reprogramming of stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have significant potential for enhancing the efficacy of cell replacement therapies.

  11. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhairavi Srinageshwar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and how they drive these cells into a mature lineage. Understanding how the stem cells are behaving and giving rise to mature cells can be used to inform researchers on effective ways to design stem cell-based treatments. In this review article, the way in which the basic understanding of how manipulating this process can be utilized to treat certain neurological diseases will be presented. Different genetic factors and their epigenetic changes during reprogramming of stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have significant potential for enhancing the efficacy of cell replacement therapies.

  12. Pharmacological Effects of Active Compounds on Neurodegenerative Disease with Gastrodia and Uncaria Decoction, a Commonly Used Poststroke Decoction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C. C. Chik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases refer to the selective loss of neuronal systems in patients. The diseases cause high morbidity and mortality to approximately 22 million people worldwide and the number is expected to be tripled by 2050. Up to now, there is no effective prevention and treatment for the neurodegenerative diseases. Although some of the clinical therapies target at slowing down the progression of symptoms of the diseases, the general effectiveness of the drugs has been far from satisfactory. Traditional Chinese medicine becomes popular alternative remedies as it has been practiced clinically for more than thousands of years in China. As neurodegenerative diseases are mediated through different pathways, herbal decoction with multiple herbs is used as an effective therapeutic approach to work on multiple targets. Gastrodia and Uncaria Decoction, a popular TCM decoction, has been used to treat stroke in China. The decoction contains compounds including alkaloids, flavonoids, iridoids, carotenoids, and natural phenols, which have been found to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects. In this review, we will summarize the recent publications of the pharmacological effects of these five groups of compounds. Understanding the mechanisms of action of these compounds may provide new treatment opportunities for the patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  14. Redox reactions induced by nitrosative stress mediate protein misfolding and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zezong; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A

    2010-06-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through beta-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  15. Biological metals and metal-targeting compounds in major neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I

    2014-10-01

    Multiple abnormalities occur in the homeostasis of essential endogenous brain biometals in age-related neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As a result, metals both accumulate in microscopic proteinopathies, and can be deficient in cells or cellular compartments. Therefore, bulk measurement of metal content in brain tissue samples reveal only the "tip of the iceberg", with most of the important changes occurring on a microscopic and biochemical level. Each of the major proteins implicated in these disorders interacts with biological transition metals. Tau and the amyloid protein precursor have important roles in normal neuronal iron homeostasis. Changes in metal distribution, cellular deficiencies, or sequestration in proteinopathies all present abnormalities that can be corrected in animal models by small molecules. These biochemical targets are more complex than the simple excess of metals that are targeted by chelators. In this review we illustrate some of the richness in the science that has developed in the study of metals in neurodegeneration, and explore its novel pharmacology.

  16. Estimating frontal and parietal involvement in cognitive estimation: a study of focal neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teagan Ann Bisbing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We often estimate an unknown value based on available relevant information, a process known as cognitive estimation. In this study, we assess the cognitive and neuroanatomic basis for quantitative estimation by examining deficits in patients with focal neurodegenerative disease in frontal and parietal cortex. Executive function and number knowledge are key components in cognitive estimation. Prefrontal cortex has been implicated in multilevel reasoning and planning processes, and parietal cortex has been associated with number knowledge required for such estimations. We administered the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test (BCET to assess cognitive estimation in 22 patients with prefrontal disease due to behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, to 17 patients with parietal disease due to corticobasal syndrome (CBS or posterior cortical atrophy (PCA and 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Both bvFTD and CBS/PCA patients had significantly more difficulty with cognitive estimation than controls. MCI were not impaired on BCET relative to controls. Regression analyses related BCET performance to gray matter atrophy in right lateral prefrontal and orbital frontal cortices in bvFTD, and to atrophy in right inferior parietal cortex, right insula and fusiform cortices in CBS/PCA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a frontal-parietal network plays a crucial role in cognitive estimation.

  17. Dissociation of quantifiers and object nouns in speech in focal neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Sharon; Ternes, Kylie; Bisbing, Teagan; Min, Nam Eun; Moran, Eileen; York, Collin; McMillan, Corey T; Irwin, David J; Grossman, Murray

    2016-08-01

    Quantifiers such as many and some are thought to depend in part on the conceptual representation of number knowledge, while object nouns such as cookie and boy appear to depend in part on visual feature knowledge associated with object concepts. Further, number knowledge is associated with a frontal-parietal network while object knowledge is related in part to anterior and ventral portions of the temporal lobe. We examined the cognitive and anatomic basis for the spontaneous speech production of quantifiers and object nouns in non-aphasic patients with focal neurodegenerative disease associated with corticobasal syndrome (CBS, n=33), behavioral variant frontotemporal degeneration (bvFTD, n=54), and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA, n=19). We recorded a semi-structured speech sample elicited from patients and healthy seniors (n=27) during description of the Cookie Theft scene. We observed a dissociation: CBS and bvFTD were significantly impaired in the production of quantifiers but not object nouns, while svPPA were significantly impaired in the production of object nouns but not quantifiers. MRI analysis revealed that quantifier production deficits in CBS and bvFTD were associated with disease in a frontal-parietal network important for number knowledge, while impaired production of object nouns in all patient groups was related to disease in inferior temporal regions important for representations of visual feature knowledge of objects. These findings imply that partially dissociable representations in semantic memory may underlie different segments of the lexicon. PMID:27301638

  18. Chronic exposure to low benzo[a]pyrene level causes neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongxu; Wu, Meifang; Wang, Chonggang; Wang, Yuanchuan; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2015-10-01

    Previous epidemiological and animal studies report that exposure to environmental pollutant exposure links to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a neurotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been increasingly released into the environment during recent decades. So far, the role of BaP on the development of neurodegenerative diseases remaind unclear. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to low dose BaP would cause neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio). We exposed zebrafish, from early embryogenesis to adults, to environmentally relevant concentrations of BaP for 230 days. Our results indicated that BaP decreased the brain weight to body weight ratio, locomotor activity and cognitive ability; induced the loss of dopaminergic neurons; and resulted in neurodegeneration. In addition, obvious cell apoptosis in the brain was found. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter levels of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, the mRNA levels of the genes encoding dopamine transporter, Parkinson protein 7, phosphatase and tensin-induced putative kinase 1, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine kinase 2, amyloid precursor protein b, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 were significantly down-regulated by BaP exposure. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to low dose BaP could cause the behavioral, neuropathological, neurochemical, and genetic features of neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides clues that BaP may constitute an important environmental risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases in humans. PMID:26349946

  19. Subpicomolar diphenyleneiodonium inhibits microglial NADPH oxidase with high specificity and shows great potential as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qingshan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Jiang, Lulu; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wilson, Belinda; Qian, Li; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2) plays a critical role in mediating neuroinflammation, which is closely linked with the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). The inhibition of NOX2-generated superoxide has become an effective strategy for developing disease-modifying therapies for PD. However, the lack of specific and potent NOX2 inhibitors has hampered the progress of this approach. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) is a widely used...

  20. Neuro degenerative diseases: clinical concerns; Les maladies neuro-degeneratives: problemes cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, V. [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve (HUG), Unite de Neuroimagerie, Dept. de Psychiatrie (Switzerland)

    2005-04-15

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the main neuro-degenerative diseases (NDDs) seen clinically. They share some common clinical symptoms and neuro-pathological findings. The increase of life expectancy in the developed countries will inevitably contribute to enhance the prevalence of these diseases. Behavioral disorders, common in NDDs, will produce major care management challenges. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease corresponds to a histopathological diagnosis, based on the observation of a de-pigmentation and a neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, as well as on the presence of intra-neuronal inclusion bodies. AD is insidious with slowly progressive dementia in which the decline in memory constitutes the main complaint. The diagnosis of definite AD requires the presence of clinical criteria as well as the histopathological confirmation of brain lesions. The two main lesions are the presence of senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Positron emission tomography (PET) explores cerebral metabolism and neurotransmitter kinetics in NDDs using principally [{sup 18}F]-deoxyglucose and [{sup 18}F]-dopa. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic function is altered in PD, as evidenced by the low uptake of [{sup 18}F]-dopa in the posterior putamen as compared to anterior putamen and caudate nucleus. In contrast, [{sup 18}F]-dopa uptake is equally depressed in all striatal structures in progressive supra-nuclear palsy. Regional glucose metabolism at rest is preserved in elderly once cerebral atrophy is taken into account. On the contrary, glucose metabolism is globally reduced in AD, with marked decrease in the parietal and temporal regions. PET has proved to be useful to study in vivo neurochemical processes in patients suffering from NDDs. The potential of this approach is still largely unexploited, and depends on new ligand production to establish early diagnosis and treatment follow-up. (author)

  1. New strategies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease hold considerable promise for future management of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Sunde, Niels Å;

    2001-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are often consideredincurable with no efficient therapies to modifyor halt the progress of disease, and ultimatelylead to reduced quality of life and to death.Our knowledge of the nervous system in healthand disease has, however, increasedconsiderably during the last...... fifty years andtoday, neuroscience reveals promising newstrategies to deal with disorders of thenervous system.Some of these results have been implementedwith success in the treatment of Parkinson'sdisease, a common neurodegenerative illnessaffecting approximately 1% of the populationaged seventy...... or more. Parkinson's disease ischaracterized by a massive loss of dopaminergicneurons in the substantia nigra, leading tosevere functional disturbance of the neuronalcircuitry in the basal ganglia. A thoroughdescription of basal ganglia circuitry inhealth and disease is presented. We describehow...

  2. The armadillo: a model for the neuropathy of leprosy and potentially other neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (also known as Hansen’s disease is an infectious peripheral neurological disorder caused by Mycobacterium leprae that even today leaves millions of individuals worldwide with life-long disabilities. The specific mechanisms by which this bacterium induces nerve injury remain largely unknown, mainly owing to ethical and practical limitations in obtaining affected human nerve samples. In addition to humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus are the only other natural host of M. leprae, and they develop a systemically disseminated disease with extensive neurological involvement. M. leprae is an obligate intracellular parasite that cannot be cultivated in vitro. Because of the heavy burdens of bacilli they harbor, nine-banded armadillos have become the organism of choice for propagating large quantities of M. leprae, and they are now advancing as models of leprosy pathogenesis and nerve damage. Although armadillos are exotic laboratory animals, the recently completed whole genome sequence for this animal is enabling researchers to undertake more sophisticated molecular studies and to develop armadillo-specific reagents. These advances will facilitate the use of armadillos in piloting new therapies and diagnostic regimens, and will provide new insights into the oldest known infectious neurodegenerative disorder.

  3. DIMETER: A Haptic Master Device for Tremor Diagnosis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto González

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a device based on patient motion capture is developed for the reliable and non-invasive diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The primary objective of this study is the classification of differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease (PD and essential tremor (ET. The DIMETER system has been used in the diagnoses of a significant number of patients at two medical centers in Spain. Research studies on classification have primarily focused on the use of well-known and reliable diagnosis criteria developed by qualified personnel. Here, we first present a literature review of the methods used to detect and evaluate tremor; then, we describe the DIMETER device in terms of the software and hardware used and the battery of tests developed to obtain the best diagnoses. All of the tests are classified and described in terms of the characteristics of the data obtained. A list of parameters obtained from the tests is provided, and the results obtained using multilayer perceptron (MLP neural networks are presented and analyzed.

  4. Imaging the Perivascular Space as a Potential Biomarker of Neurovascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joel; Berezuk, Courtney; McNeely, Alicia A; Gao, Fuqiang; McLaurin, JoAnne; Black, Sandra E

    2016-03-01

    Although the brain lacks conventional lymphatic vessels found in peripheral tissue, evidence suggests that the space surrounding the vasculature serves a similar role in the clearance of fluid and metabolic waste from the brain. With aging, neurodegeneration, and cerebrovascular disease, these microscopic perivascular spaces can become enlarged, allowing for visualization and quantification on structural MRI. The purpose of this review is to: (i) describe some of the recent pre-clinical findings from basic science that shed light on the potential neurophysiological mechanisms driving glymphatic and perivascular waste clearance, (ii) review some of the pathobiological etiologies that may lead to MRI-visible enlarged perivascular spaces (ePVS), (iii) describe the possible clinical implications of ePVS, (iv) evaluate existing qualitative and quantitative techniques used for measuring ePVS burden, and (v) propose future avenues of research that may improve our understanding of this potential clinical neuroimaging biomarker for fluid and metabolic waste clearance dysfunction in neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. PMID:26993511

  5. Relevance of the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Curcumin in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Tizabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of curcumin’s potential as a neuroprotectant and an antidepressant. This dual property confers a unique advantage to this herbal medication, believed to be devoid of any major side effects, to combat commonly observed co-morbid conditions of a neurodegenerative and a neuropsychiatric disorder. Moreover, in line with the theme of this series, the role of inflammation and stress in these diseases and possible anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin, as well as its interaction with signal transduction proteins as a common denominator in its varied mechanisms of action, are also discussed. Thus, following a brief introduction of curcumin’s pharmacology, we present research suggesting how its anti-inflammatory properties have therapeutic potential in treating a devastating neurological disorder (Parkinson’s disease = PD and a debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder (major depressive disorder = MDD. It is concluded that curcumin, or better yet, an analog with better and longer bioavailability could be of important therapeutic potential in PD and/or major depression.

  6. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). PMID:27598108

  7. Alteration of brain insulin and leptin signaling promotes energy homeostasis impairment and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taouis Mohammed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS controls vital functions, by efficiently coordinating peripheral and central cascades of signals and networks in a coordinated manner. Historically, the brain was considered to be an insulin-insensitive tissue. But, new findings demonstrating that insulin is present in different regions of themammalian brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. Insulin acts through specific receptors and dialogues with numerous peptides, neurotransmitters and adipokines such as leptin. The cross-talk between leptin and insulin signaling pathways at the hypothalamic level is clearly involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Both hormones are anorexigenic through their action on hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by inducing the expression of anorexigenic neuropetides such as POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor of aMSH and reducing the expression of orexigenic neuropeptide such as NPY (Neuropeptide Y. Central defect of insulin and leptin signaling predispose to obesity (leptin-resistant state and type-2 diabetes (insulin resistant state. Obesity and type-2 diabetes are associated to deep alterations in energy homeostasis control but also to other alterations of CNS functions as the predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by distinct hallmarks within the brain. Postmortem observation of AD brains showed the presence of parenchymal plaques due to the accumulation of the amyloid beta (AB peptide and neurofibrillary tangles. These accumulations result from the hyperphosphorylation of tau (a mictrotubule-interacting protein. Both insulin and leptin have been described to modulate tau phosphorylation and therefore in leptin and insulin resistant states may contribute to AD. The concentrations of leptin and insulin cerebrospinal fluid are decreased type2 diabetes and obese patients. In addition, the concentration of insulin in the

  8. Neurodegenerative diseases in a dish: the promise of iPSC technology in disease modeling and therapeutic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y Z; Zhang, R X

    2015-01-01

    The study of stem-cell biology has been a flourishing research area because of its multi-differentiation potential. The emergence of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) open up the possibility of addressing obstructs, such as the limited cell source, inherent complexity of the human brain, and ethical constrains. Though still at its infancy phase, reprogramming of somatic cells has been demonstrating the ability to enhance in vitro study of neurodegenerative diseases and potential treatment. However, iPSCs would not thoroughly translate to the clinic before limitations are addressed. In this review, by summarizing the recent development of iPSC-based models, we will discuss the feasibility of iPSC technology on relevant diseases depth and illustrate how this new tool applies to drug screening and celluar therapy.

  9. Chaperone mediated autophagy to the rescue: A new-fangled target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xilouri, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2015-05-01

    One of the main pathways of lysosomal proteolysis is chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which represents a selective mechanism for the degradation of specific soluble proteins within lysosomes. Along with the other two lysosomal pathways, macro- and micro-autophagy, CMA contributes to cellular quality control through the removal of damaged or malfunctioning proteins. The two intrinsic characteristics of CMA are the selective targeting and the direct translocation of substrate proteins into the lysosomal lumen, in a fine-tuned manner through the orchestrated action of a chaperone/co-chaperone complex localized both at the cytosol and the lysosomes. Even though CMA was originally identified as a stress-induced pathway, basal CMA activity is detectable in most cell types analyzed so far, including neurons. Additionally, CMA activity declines with age and this may become a major aggravating factor contributing to neurodegeneration. More specifically, it has been suggested that CMA impairment may underlie the accumulation of misfolded/aggregated proteins, such as alpha-synuclein or LRRK2, whose levels or conformations are critical to Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. On the other hand, CMA induction might accelerate clearance of pathogenic proteins and promote cell survival, suggesting that CMA represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of various proteinopathies. In the current review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the role of CMA under physiological and pathological conditions of the nervous system and discuss the implications of these findings for therapeutic interventions for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. This article is part of Special Issue entitled "Neuronal Protein". PMID:25724482

  10. Nano-Drugs Based on Nano Sterically Stabilized Liposomes for the Treatment of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjeman, Keren; Bavli, Yaelle; Kizelsztein, Pablo; Schilt, Yaelle; Allon, Nahum; Katzir, Tamar Blumenfeld; Sasson, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Ovadia, Haim; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2015-01-01

    The present study shows the advantages of liposome-based nano-drugs as a novel strategy of delivering active pharmaceutical ingredients for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that involve neuroinflammation. We used the most common animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS), mice experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The main challenges to overcome are the drugs' unfavorable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, which result in inadequate therapeutic efficacy and in drug toxicity (due to high and repeated dosage). We designed two different liposomal nano-drugs, i.e., nano sterically stabilized liposomes (NSSL), remote loaded with: (a) a "water-soluble" amphipathic weak acid glucocorticosteroid prodrug, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (MPS) or (b) the amphipathic weak base nitroxide, Tempamine (TMN). For the NSSL-MPS we also compared the effect of passive targeting alone and of active targeting based on short peptide fragments of ApoE or of β-amyloid. Our results clearly show that for NSSL-MPS, active targeting is not superior to passive targeting. For the NSSL-MPS and the NSSL-TMN it was demonstrated that these nano-drugs ameliorate the clinical signs and the pathology of EAE. We have further investigated the MPS nano-drug's therapeutic efficacy and its mechanism of action in both the acute and the adoptive transfer EAE models, as well as optimizing the perfomance of the TMN nano-drug. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these two nano-drugs meets the criteria of disease-modifying drugs and supports further development and evaluation of these nano-drugs as potential therapeutic agents for diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:26147975

  11. Cystamine metabolism and brain transport properties: clinical implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Mélanie; Gibrat, Claire; Ouellet, Mélissa; Rouillard, Claude; Calon, Frédéric; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2010-09-01

    Cystamine has shown significant neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Cysteamine, its FDA-approved reduced form, is scheduled to be tested for clinical efficacy in HD patients. Here, we studied the key cystamine metabolites, namely cysteamine, hypotaurine and taurine, as well as cysteine, in order to identify which one is more distinctively responsible for the neuroprotective action of cystamine. After a single administration of cystamine (10, 50 or 200 mg/kg), naïve mice were perfused with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 1, 3, 12, 24 or 48 h post-injection and brain and plasma samples were analyzed by two distinct HPLC methods. Although plasma levels remained under the detection threshold, significant increases in cysteamine brain levels were detected with the 50 and 200 mg/kg doses in mice perfused 1 and 3 h following cystamine injection. To further assess cysteamine as the candidate molecule for pre-clinical and clinical trials in PD, we evaluated its capacity to cross the blood brain barrier. Using an in situ cerebral perfusion technique, we determined that the brain transport coefficient (Clup) of cysteamine (259 μM) was 0.15 ± 0.02 μL/g/s and was increased up to 0.34 ± 0.07 μL/g/s when co-perfused in the presence of cysteine. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that cysteamine is the neuroactive metabolite of cystamine and may further support its therapeutic use in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly in HD and PD. PMID:20569301

  12. Nano-Drugs Based on Nano Sterically Stabilized Liposomes for the Treatment of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Turjeman

    Full Text Available The present study shows the advantages of liposome-based nano-drugs as a novel strategy of delivering active pharmaceutical ingredients for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that involve neuroinflammation. We used the most common animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS, mice experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The main challenges to overcome are the drugs' unfavorable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, which result in inadequate therapeutic efficacy and in drug toxicity (due to high and repeated dosage. We designed two different liposomal nano-drugs, i.e., nano sterically stabilized liposomes (NSSL, remote loaded with: (a a "water-soluble" amphipathic weak acid glucocorticosteroid prodrug, methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (MPS or (b the amphipathic weak base nitroxide, Tempamine (TMN. For the NSSL-MPS we also compared the effect of passive targeting alone and of active targeting based on short peptide fragments of ApoE or of β-amyloid. Our results clearly show that for NSSL-MPS, active targeting is not superior to passive targeting. For the NSSL-MPS and the NSSL-TMN it was demonstrated that these nano-drugs ameliorate the clinical signs and the pathology of EAE. We have further investigated the MPS nano-drug's therapeutic efficacy and its mechanism of action in both the acute and the adoptive transfer EAE models, as well as optimizing the perfomance of the TMN nano-drug. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these two nano-drugs meets the criteria of disease-modifying drugs and supports further development and evaluation of these nano-drugs as potential therapeutic agents for diseases with an inflammatory component.

  13. Induced pluripotency and direct reprogramming: a new window for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Bai, Ye; Liu, Tongtong; Wang, Xiaoqun; Wu, Qian

    2013-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the ability of unlimited self-renewal and can be differentiated into different cell lineages, including neural stem (NS) cells. Diverse regulatory signaling pathways of neural stem cells differentiation have been discovered, and this will be of great benefit to uncover the mechanisms of neuronal differentiation in vivo and in vitro. However, the limitations of hESCs resource along with the religious and ethical concerns impede the progress of ESCs application. Therefore, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via somatic cell reprogramming have opened up another new territory for regenerative medicine. iPSCs now can be derived from a number of lineages of cells, and are able to differentiate into certain cell types, including neurons. Patient-specifi c iPSCs are being used in human neurodegenerative disease modeling and drug screening. Furthermore, with the development of somatic direct reprogramming or lineage reprogramming technique, a more effective approach for regenerative medicine could become a complement for iPSCs.

  14. Plasma-Enabled Carbon Nanostructures for Early Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Pineda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures (CNs are amongst the most promising biorecognition nanomaterials due to their unprecedented optical, electrical and structural properties. As such, CNs may be harnessed to tackle the detrimental public health and socio-economic adversities associated with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. In particular, CNs may be tailored for a specific determination of biomarkers indicative of NDs. However, the realization of such a biosensor represents a significant technological challenge in the uniform fabrication of CNs with outstanding qualities in order to facilitate a highly-sensitive detection of biomarkers suspended in complex biological environments. Notably, the versatility of plasma-based techniques for the synthesis and surface modification of CNs may be embraced to optimize the biorecognition performance and capabilities. This review surveys the recent advances in CN-based biosensors, and highlights the benefits of plasma-processing techniques to enable, enhance, and tailor the performance and optimize the fabrication of CNs, towards the construction of biosensors with unparalleled performance for the early diagnosis of NDs, via a plethora of energy-efficient, environmentally-benign, and inexpensive approaches.

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery: Overcoming blood-brain barrier to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Cláudia; Praça, Catarina; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-08-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital boundary between neural tissue and circulating blood. The BBB's unique and protective features control brain homeostasis as well as ion and molecule movement. Failure in maintaining any of these components results in the breakdown of this specialized multicellular structure and consequently promotes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In several high incidence pathologies such as stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) the BBB is impaired. However, even a damaged and more permeable BBB can pose serious challenges to drug delivery into the brain. The use of nanoparticle (NP) formulations able to encapsulate molecules with therapeutic value, while targeting specific transport processes in the brain vasculature, may enhance drug transport through the BBB in neurodegenerative/ischemic disorders and target relevant regions in the brain for regenerative processes. In this review, we will discuss BBB composition and characteristics and how these features are altered in pathology, namely in stroke, AD and PD. Additionally, factors influencing an efficient intravenous delivery of polymeric and inorganic NPs into the brain as well as NP-related delivery systems with the most promising functional outcomes will also be discussed. PMID:27208862

  16. Specific transfection of inflamed brain by macrophages: a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Haney

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD. This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Erythropoietin as a new therapeutic opportunity in brain inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merelli, A; Czornyj, L; Lazarowski, A

    2015-01-01

    Highly expressed Erythropoietin Receptor (EPO-R) has been detected in several nonhematopoietic hypoxic cells, including cells from different brain areas in response to many different types of cell injury. In brain, hypoxia-ischemia (HI) can induce a wide spectrum of biologic responses, where inflammation and apoptosis are the main protagonists. Inflammation, as a primary brain insult, can induce a chronic hypoxic condition, producing the continuous cycle of inflammation-hypoxia that increases the apoptotic-cell number. It has also been demonstrated that administration of erythropoietin (EPO) prevented the neuronal death induced by HI, as well as the induction of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus in a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease. Anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and/or cell-proliferative effects of EPO, have been observed in all type of cells expressing EPO-R, resulting in a potential tool for neuroprotection, neuroreparation, or neurogenesis of brain damaged areas. The nasal route is an alternative way of drugs administration that has been successfully exploited for bypassing the blood brain barrier, and subsequently delivering EPO and other molecules to central nervous system. Intranasal administration of EPO could be a new therapeutic opportunity in several brain damages that includes hypoxia, inflammation, neurodegenerative process, and apoptosis. PMID:25405533

  18. Technologies enabling autologous neural stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Sasha H.

    The intrinsic abilities of mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) to self-renew, migrate over large distances, and give rise to all primary neural cell types of the brain offer unprecedented opportunity for cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries. This thesis discusses development of technologies in support of autologous NSC-based therapies, encompassing harvest of brain tissue biopsies from living human patients; isolation of NSCs from harvested tissue; efficient culture and expansion of NSCs in 3D polymeric microcapsule culture systems; optimization of microcapsules as carriers for efficient in vivo delivery of NSCs; genetic engineering of NSCs for drug-induced, enzymatic release of transplanted NSCs from microcapsules; genetic engineering for drug-induced differentiation of NSCs into specific therapeutic cell types; and synthesis of chitosan/iron-oxide nanoparticles for labeling of NSCs and in vivo tracking by cellular MRI. Sub-millimeter scale tissue samples were harvested endoscopically from subventricular zone regions of living patient brains, secondary to neurosurgical procedures including endoscopic third ventriculostomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. On average, 12,000 +/- 3,000 NSCs were isolated per mm 3 of subventricular zone tissue, successfully demonstrated in 26 of 28 patients, ranging in age from one month to 68 years. In order to achieve efficient expansion of isolated NSCs to clinically relevant numbers (e.g. hundreds of thousands of cells in Parkinson's disease and tens of millions of cells in multiple sclerosis), an extracellular matrix-inspired, microcapsule-based culture platform was developed. Initial culture experiments with murine NSCs yielded unprecedented expansion folds of 30x in 5 days, from initially minute NSC populations (154 +/- 15 NSCs per 450 mum diameter capsule). Within 7 days, NSCs expanded as almost perfectly homogenous populations, with 94.9% +/- 4.1% of cultured cells staining positive for

  19. The influence of Na+,K+-ATPase on glutamate signaling in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fernanda Kinoshita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Decreased Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA activity causes energy deficiency, which is commonly observed in neurodegenerative diseases. The NKA is constituted of three subunits: α, β and γ, with four distinct isoforms of the catalytic α subunit (α1-4. Genetic mutations in the ATP1A2 gene and ATP1A3 gene, encoding the α2 and α3 subunit isoforms, respectively can cause distinct neurological disorders, concurrent to impaired NKA activity. Within the central nervous system (CNS, the α2 isoform is expressed mostly in glial cells and the α3 isoform is neuron-specific. Mutations in ATP1A2 gene can result in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM2, while mutations in the ATP1A3 gene can cause Rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP and alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC, as well as the cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pescavus, optic atrophy and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS syndrome. Data indicates that the central glutamatergic system is affected by mutations in the α2 isoform, however further investigations are required to establish a connection to mutations in the α3 isoform, especially given the diagnostic confusion and overlap with glutamate transporter disease. The age-related decline in brain α2/3 activity may arise from changes in the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and cGMP‐dependent protein kinase (PKG pathway. Glutamate, through nitric oxide synthase (NOS, cGMP and PKG, stimulates brain α2/3 activity, with the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor cascade able to drive an adaptive, neuroprotective response to inflammatory and challenging stimuli, including amyloid‐β. Here we review the NKA, both as an ion pump as well as a receptor that interacts with NMDA, including the role of NKA subunits mutations. Failure of the NKA-associated adaptive response mechanisms may render neurons more susceptible to degeneration over the course of aging.

  20. Kuru: a half-opened window onto the landscape of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberski, Paweł P; Brown, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Kuru, the first human neurodegenerative disease classified as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), prion disease or, in the past, as a slow unconventional virus disease, was first reported to Western medicine in 1957 by Gajdusek and Zigas. A complete bibliography of kuru through 1975 has been published by Alpers et al. The solution of the kuru riddle opened a novel field of biomedical sciences and initiated more than a quarter of century of research that has already resulted in two Nobel prizes (to D. Carleton Gajdusek in 1976 and to Stanley B. Prusiner in 1997) and was linked to a third (to Kurt Wüthrich who determined the structure of the prion protein). Kuru research has impacted the concepts of nucleation-polymerization "protein cancers", and "conformational disorders". This paper is dedicated to Dr. Carleton Gajdusek on the occasion of his 80th birthday. "Kuru" in the Fore (Fig. 1) language means to shiver from fever or cold. The Fore used the noun of the kuru-verb to describe the always fatal disease which decimated their children and adult women but rarely men. It has been and still is restricted to natives of the Fore linguistic group at Papua New Guinea's Eastern Highlands and those neighboring linguistic groups which exchange women with Fore people (Auiana, Awa, Usurufa, Kanite, Keiagana, late, Kamano, Kimi; Fig. 2). Neighboring groups into which kuru-affected people did not settle through marriage or adoption, such as the Anga (Kukukuku), and remote lagaria, Kamano and Auiana people, were not affected. It seems that Kuru first appeared at or shortly after the turn of XX century in Uwami village of Keiagana people and spread to the Awande in the North Fore where the Uwami had social contacts. Within 20 years it had spread further into the Kasokana (in 1922 according to Lindebaum) and Miarasa villages of North Fore, and a decade later had reached the South Fore at the Wanikanto and Kamira villages. Kuru became endemic in all villages that it

  1. Cell reprogramming and neuronal differentiation applied to neurodegenerative diseases: Focus on Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Shirley D; Casalía, Mariana; Candedo, Verónica Cavaliere; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Pitossi, Fernando J

    2015-11-14

    Adult cells from patients can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) which successively can be used to obtain specific cells such as neurons. This remarkable breakthrough represents a new way of studying diseases and brought new therapeutic perspectives in the field of regenerative medicine. This is particular true in the neurology field, where few techniques are amenable to study the affected tissue of the patient during illness progression, in addition to the lack of neuroprotective therapies for many diseases. In this review we discuss the advantages and unresolved issues of cell reprogramming and neuronal differentiation. We reviewed evidence using iPSCs-derived neurons from neurological patients. Focusing on data obtained from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we show that iPSC-derived neurons possess morphological and functional characteristics of this disease and build a case for the use of this technology to study PD and other neuropathologies while disease is in progress. These data show the enormous impact that this new technology starts to have on different purposes such as the study and design of future therapies of neurological disease, especially PD.

  2. Fractalkine Mediates Communication between Pathogenic Proteins and Microglia: Implications of Anti-Inflammatory Treatments in Different Stages of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Desforges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases has been widely demonstrated. Intraneuronal protein accumulation may regulate microglial activity via the fractalkine (CX3CL1 signaling pathway that provides a mechanism through which neurons communicate with microglia. CX3CL1 levels fluctuate in different stages of neurodegenerative diseases and in various animal models, warranting further investigation of the mechanisms underlying microglial response to pathogenic proteins, including Tau, β-amyloid (Aβ, and α-synuclein. The temporal relationship between microglial activity and localization of pathogenic proteins (intra- versus extracellular likely determines whether neuroinflammation mitigates or exacerbates disease progression. Evidence in transgenic models suggests a beneficial effect of microglial activity on clearance of proteins like Aβ and a detrimental effect on Tau modification, but the role of CX3CL1 signaling in α-synucleinopathies is less clear. Here we review the nature of fractalkine-mediated neuronmicroglia interaction, which has significant implications for the efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatments during different stages of neurodegenerative pathology. Specifically, it is likely that anti-inflammatory treatment in early stages of disease during intraneuronal accumulation of proteins could be beneficial, while anti-inflammatory treatment in later stages when proteins are secreted to the extracellular space could exacerbate disease progression.

  3. A new look at auranofin, dextromethorphan and rosiglitazone for reduction of glia-mediated inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn M Madeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer′s disease are characterized by chronic inflammation in the central nervous system. The two main glial types involved in inflammatory reactions are microglia and astrocytes. While these cells normally protect neurons by providing nutrients and growth factors, disease specific stimuli can induce glial secretion of neurotoxins. It has been hypothesized that reducing glia-mediated inflammation could diminish neuronal loss. This hypothesis is supported by observations that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is linked with lower incidences of neurodegenerative disease. It is possible that the NSAIDs are not potent enough to appreciably reduce chronic neuroinflammation after disease processes are fully established. Gold thiol compounds, including auranofin, comprise another class of medications effective at reducing peripheral inflammation. We have demonstrated that auranofin inhibits human microglia- and astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity. Other drugs which are currently used to treat peripheral inflammatory conditions could be helpful in neurodegenerative disease. Three different classes of anti-inflammatory compounds, which have a potential to inhibit neuroinflammation are highlighted below.

  4. A new look at auranoifn, dextromethorphan and rosiglitazone for reduction of glia-mediated inlfammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jocelyn M. Madeira; Stephanie M. Schindler; Andis Klegeris

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease are characterized by chronic in-lfammation in the central nervous system. The two main glial types involved in inlfammatory reactions are microglia and astrocytes. While these cells normally protect neurons by providing nutrients and growth factors, disease speciifc stimuli can induce glial secretion of neurotoxins. It has been hypothesized that reducing glia-mediated inlfammation could diminish neuronal loss. This hypothesis is supported by observations that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inlfamma-tory drugs (NSAIDs) is linked with lower incidences of neurodegenerative disease. It is possible that the NSAIDs are not potent enough to appreciably reduce chronic neuroinlfammation after disease processes are fully established. Gold thiol compounds, including auranoifn, comprise an-other class of medications effective at reducing peripheral inlfammation. We have demonstrated that auranofin inhibits human microglia- and astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity. Other drugs which are currently used to treat peripheral inlfammatory conditions could be helpful in neu-rodegenerative disease. Three different classes of anti-inlfammatory compounds, which have a potential to inhibit neuroinlfammation are highlighted below.

  5. Current concept in neural regeneration research: NSCs isolation, characterization and transplantation in various neurodegenerative diseases and stroke: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K. Vishwakarma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since last few years, an impressive amount of data has been generated regarding the basic in vitro and in vivo biology of neural stem cells (NSCs and there is much far hope for the success in cell replacement therapies for several human neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The discovery of adult neurogenesis (the endogenous production of new neurons in the mammalian brain more than 40 years ago has resulted in a wealth of knowledge about stem cells biology in neuroscience research. Various studies have done in search of a suitable source for NSCs which could be used in animal models to understand the basic and transplantation biology before treating to human. The difficulties in isolating pure population of NSCs limit the study of neural stem behavior and factors that regulate them. Several studies on human fetal brain and spinal cord derived NSCs in animal models have shown some interesting results for cell replacement therapies in many neurodegenerative diseases and stroke models. Also the methods and conditions used for in vitro culture of these cells provide an important base for their applicability and specificity in a definite target of the disease. Various important developments and modifications have been made in stem cells research which is needed to be more specified and enrolment in clinical studies using advanced approaches. This review explains about the current perspectives and suitable sources for NSCs isolation, characterization, in vitro proliferation and their use in cell replacement therapies for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases and strokes.

  6. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  7. Reaction time impairments in decision-making networks as a diagnostic marker for traumatic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Pedro D; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The presence of diffuse Focal Axonal Swellings (FAS) is a hallmark cellular feature in many neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. Among other things, the FAS have a significant impact on spike-train encodings that propagate through the affected neurons, leading to compromised signal processing on a neuronal network level. This work merges, for the first time, three fields of study: (i) signal processing in excitatory-inhibitory (EI) networks of neurons via population codes, (...

  8. Prominent effects and neural correlates of visual crowding in a neurodegenerative disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Cash, Dave; Henley, Susie M D; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Ridgway, Gerard R; Golden, Hannah L; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Carton, Amelia M; Kaski, Diego; Schott, Jonathan M; Warren, Jason D; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-12-01

    provides a neurodegenerative disease model for exploring the basis of crowding. These data have significant implications for patients with, or who will go on to develop, dementia-related visual impairment, in whom acquired excessive crowding likely contributes to deficits in word, object, face and scene perception.

  9. Resveratrol and its analogs: defense against cancer, coronary disease and neurodegenerative maladies or just a fad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiko, Philipp; Szakmary, Akos; Jaeger, Walter; Szekeres, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene; RV), a dietary constituent found in grapes and wine, exerts a wide variety of pharmacological activities. Because the grape skins are not fermented in the production process of white wines, only red wines contain considerable amounts of this compound. RV is metabolized into sulfated and glucuronidated forms within approximately 15min of entering the bloodstream, and moderate consumption of red wine results in serum levels of RV that barely reach the micromolar concentrations. In contrast, its metabolites, which may be the active principle, circulate in serum for up to 9h. RV has been identified as an effective candidate for cancer chemoprevention due its ability to block each step in the carcinogenesis process by inhibiting several molecular targets such as kinases, cyclooxygenases, ribonucleotide reductase, and DNA polymerases. In addition, RV protects the cardiovascular system by a large number of mechanisms, including defense against ischemic-reperfusion injury, promotion of vasorelaxation, protection and maintenance of intact endothelium, anti-atherosclerotic properties, inhibition of low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and suppression of platelet aggregation, thereby strongly supporting its role in the prevention of coronary disease. Promising data within the use of RV have also been obtained regarding progressive neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases. Because neurotoxicity is often related to mitochondrial dysfunction and may be ameliorated through the inclusion of metabolic modifiers and/or antioxidants, RV may provide an alternative (and early) intervention approach that could prevent further damage. RV induces a multitude of effects that depend on the cell type (e.g., NF-kappaB modulation in cancer cells vs. neural cells), cellular condition (normal, stressed, or malignant), and concentration (proliferative vs. growth arrest), and it can have opposing activities

  10. Why are the neurodegenerative disease-related pathways overrepresented in primary HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a genome-wide perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Li; Conceicao Viviane; Gupta Priyanka; Saksena Nitin K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We demonstrate for the first time that the genome-wide profiling of HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-patients free of neurologic disease show overrepresentation of neurodegenerative pathways (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Huntington’s and Prion Disease, etc.) in genome-wide microarray analysis, which suggests that this genome-wide representation of neurodegenerative diseases-related pathways in PBMCs could possibly be a subcellular manifestation of ne...

  11. Implications of Parkinson's disease pathophysiology for the development of cell replacement strategies and drug discovery in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Funk, Richard H W

    2012-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder traditionally characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) at the midbrain. The potential use of adult or embryonic stem cells, induced pluriputent stem (iPS) cells and endogenous neurogenesis in cell replacement strategies has lead to numerous studies and clinical trials in this direction. It is now possible to differentiate stem cells into dopaminergic neurons in vitro and clinical trials have shown an improvement in PD-related symptoms after intra-striatal embryonic transplants and acceptable cell survival rates on the mid term. However, clinical improvement is transitory and associated with a strong placebo effect. Interestingly, recent pathological studies in PD patients who received embryonic stem cells show that in PD patients, grafted neurons show PD-related pathology. In this manuscript we review the latest findings regarding PD pathophysiology and give an outlook on the implications of these findings in how cell replacement strategies for PD treatment should be tested. These include changes in the type of animal models used, the preparation/conditioning of the cells before intracerebral injection, specially regarding backbone chronic diseases in iPS cells and determining the optimal proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration capacity of the grafted cells.

  12. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  13. The Mircen project, neuro-degenerative disease: mechanisms, therapeutics and imaging research Unit URA Cea Cnrs 2210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the post-genomic era, significant advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of disease have been made. The power of functional and molecular imaging in translating this knowledge into effective therapy is now being more and more recognized. Thus, molecular imaging plays a vital role in the early identification of disease-related molecular markers, in the development of molecular-targeted therapies, and in monitoring phenotypic response to therapy both in experimental animals and in human patients. In this context, MIRCen (acronym for Molecular Imaging Research Center ) provides a comprehensive resource available to empower basic, translational, and clinical research through the application of imaging and drug, cell, and gene based technologies. The MIR center will be dedicated to the development of pre-clinical trials for the treatment of various seriously debilitating diseases such as neuro-degenerative diseases, cardiac and hepatic disorders, and infectious diseases (AIDS). Despite the fact that many of these pathologies are still incurable, recent advances in drug, cell and gene therapy point to the feasibility of new therapeutic approaches. The long term goals of MIRCen are therefore to develop and validate: - pertinent animal models for neuro-degenerative, hepatic, cardiac and infectious diseases in rodents as well as non-human primates, - novel technologies for in vivo sensing and imaging of disease-related molecular events,- drug, gene and cell based palliative and or curative therapeutic strategies aiming at protecting and /or restoring damaged or lost functions. (author)

  14. Assessing the potential clinical utility of transplantations of neural and mesenchymal stem cells for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescaudron, Laurent; Boyer, C; Bonnamain, Virginie; Fink, K D; Lévêque, X; Rossignol, J; Nerrière-Daguin, V; Malouet, A C; Lelan, F; Dey, N D; Michel-Monigadon, D; Lu, M; Neveu, I; von Hörsten, S; Naveilhan, P; Dunbar, G L

    2012-01-01

    Treatments for neurodegenerative diseases have little impact on the long-term patient health. However, cellular transplants of neuroblasts derived from the aborted embryonic brain tissue in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders and in patients have demonstrated survival and functionality in the brain. However, ethical and functional problems due to the use of this fetal tissue stopped most of the clinical trials. Therefore, new cell sources were needed, and scientists focused on neural (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When transplanted in the brain of animals with Parkinson's or Huntington's disease, NSCs and MSCs were able to induce partial functional recovery by promoting neuroprotection and immunomodulation. MSCs are more readily accessible than NSCs due to sources such as the bone marrow. However, MSCs are not capable of differentiating into neurons in vivo where NSCs are. Thus, transplantation of NSCs and MSCs is interesting for brain regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we detail the methods for NSCs and MSCs isolation as well as the transplantation procedures used to treat rodent models of neurodegenerative damage.

  15. Circulating MicroRNA as Potential Source for Neurodegenerative Diseases Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Ying; Yin, Zhongmin; Xiao, Weizhong; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Zhixiang; Jiao, Li; Deng, Lianfu

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of circulating micro-ribonucleic acids (microRNAs, miRNAs) have been discovered its potential as biomarkers to diagnose neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) by many researchers. However, there were obvious inconsistencies among previous studies, and thus we performed this meta-analysis to evaluate whether miRNA is an effective biomarker with high accuracy to diagnose the NDs. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other related databases were used to search eligible articles. The data of sensitivity and specificity were employed to plot the summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curve and calculate the area under the SROC curve (AUC). I (2) test were used to estimate the heterogeneity among different studies. In addition, the possible sources of heterogeneity were further explored by subgroup analyses and meta-regression. All analyses were performed by STATA 12.0 software. In this meta-analysis, eight publications with 459 NDs patients and 340 healthy controls were included to investigate the diagnostic performance of circulating miRNAs for NDs. The overall sensitivity and specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ration (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.88), 0.87 (95% CI 0.83-0.89), 6.2 (95% CI 4.9-7.9), 0.19 (95% CI 0.14-0.27), 33 (95% CI 20-52), and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88-0.93), respectively. The overall SROC curve was plotted with AUC of 0.91 (95% CI 0.88-0.93), which indicated an excellent diagnostic performance of circulating miRNA for NDs. Subgroup analysis based on miRNA profile demonstrated that multiple-miRNA assay had higher diagnostic accuracy for NDs when compared with single-miRNA assay. In conclusion, the circulating miRNAs may be the potential biomarkers in the clinical diagnosis of NDs, and the diagnostic accuracy would be better by using multiple-miRNA assay. However, large-scale studies are still needed to explore the relation between the

  16. Mouse models rarely mimic the transcriptome of human neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic bioinformatics-based critique of preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Terry C; Li, Matthew D; Mehta, Swapnil; Awad, Ahmed J; Morgan, Alexander A

    2015-07-15

    Translational research for neurodegenerative disease depends intimately upon animal models. Unfortunately, promising therapies developed using mouse models mostly fail in clinical trials, highlighting uncertainty about how well mouse models mimic human neurodegenerative disease at the molecular level. We compared the transcriptional signature of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), Parkinson׳s disease (PD), Huntington׳s disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to human disease. In contrast to aging, which demonstrated a conserved transcriptome between humans and mice, only 3 of 19 animal models showed significant enrichment for gene sets comprising the most dysregulated up- and down-regulated human genes. Spearman׳s correlation analysis revealed even healthy human aging to be more closely related to human neurodegeneration than any mouse model of AD, PD, ALS or HD. Remarkably, mouse models frequently upregulated stress response genes that were consistently downregulated in human diseases. Among potential alternate models of neurodegeneration, mouse prion disease outperformed all other disease-specific models. Even among the best available animal models, conserved differences between mouse and human transcriptomes were found across multiple animal model versus human disease comparisons, surprisingly, even including aging. Relative to mouse models, mouse disease signatures demonstrated consistent trends toward preserved mitochondrial function protein catabolism, DNA repair responses, and chromatin maintenance. These findings suggest a more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology in human neurodegeneration than is captured through standard animal models, and suggest that even among conserved physiological processes such as aging, mice are less prone to exhibit neurodegeneration-like changes. This work may help explain the poor track record of mouse-based translational therapies for neurodegeneration and provides a path

  17. 神经退行性疾病的嗅觉障碍%Olfactory dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小燕; 王晓明

    2016-01-01

    嗅觉是人类重要的感觉之一。近年研究发现,嗅觉障碍与神经退行性疾病密切相关,其可能是神经退行性疾病的首发症状,有望成为一项早期诊断及预测病情进展的生物学指标。现就神经退行性疾病与嗅觉障碍的关系及研究进展进行综述。%Olfactory is an important sensation. In recent years, the smell problems are generating considerable interest in the neurological field. Olfactory dysfunction may has potential as a medication-independent biomarker for disease progression and as an early indicator for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. The article summarized the up-to-date knowledge on changes of olfactory system in neurodegenerative disorders and attempted to find the association between olfactory dysfunction and neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Identification of common genetic modifiers of neurodegenerative diseases from an integrative analysis of diverse genetic screens in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An array of experimental models have been developed in the small model organisms C. elegans, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster for the study of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and expanded polyglutamine diseases as exemplified by Huntington's disease (HD and related ataxias. Genetic approaches to determine the nature of regulators of the disease phenotypes have ranged from small scale to essentially whole genome screens. The published data covers distinct models in all three organisms and one important question is the extent to which shared genetic factors can be uncovered that affect several or all disease models. Surprisingly it has appeared that there may be relatively little overlap and that many of the regulators may be organism or disease-specific. There is, however, a need for a fully integrated analysis of the available genetic data based on careful comparison of orthologues across the species to determine the real extent of overlap. Results We carried out an integrated analysis using C. elegans as the baseline model organism since this is the most widely studied in this context. Combination of data from 28 published studies using small to large scale screens in all three small model organisms gave a total of 950 identifications of genetic regulators. Of these 624 were separate genes with orthologues in C. elegans. In addition, 34 of these genes, which all had human orthologues, were found to overlap across studies. Of the common genetic regulators some such as chaperones, ubiquitin-related enzymes (including the E3 ligase CHIP which directly links the two pathways and histone deacetylases were involved in expected pathways whereas others such as the peroxisomal acyl CoA-oxidase suggest novel targets for neurodegenerative disease therapy Conclusions We identified a significant number of overlapping regulators of neurodegenerative disease models. Since the diseases

  19. p75 neurotrophin receptor positive dental pulp stem cells: new hope for patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury%p75 neurotrophin receptor positive dental pulp stem cells:new hope for patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jie-wen; YUAN Hao; SHEN Shun-yao; LU Jing-ting; ZHU Xiao-fang; YANG Tong; ZHANG Jiang-fei

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and neural injury are 2 of the most feared disorders that afflict humankind by leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation.Cell based treatment for these diseases had gained special interest in recent years.Previous studies showed that dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) could differentiate toward functionally active neurons both in vitro and in vivo,and could promote neuranagenesis through both cell-autonomous and paracrine neuroregenerative activities.Some of these neuroregenerative activities were unique to tooth-derived stem cells and superior to bone marrow stromal cells.However,DPSCs used in most of these studies were mixed and unfractionated dental pulp cells that contain several types of cells,and most were fibroblast cells while just contain a small portion of DPSCs.Thus,there might be weaker ability of neuranagenesis and more side effects from the fibroblast cells that cannot differentiate into neural cells.p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) positive DPSCs subpopulation was derived from migrating cranial neural crest cells and had been isolated from DPSCs,which had capacity of differentiation into neurons and repairing neural system.In this article,we hypothesize that p75NTR positive DPSCs simultaneously have greater propensity for neuronal differentiation and fewer side effects from fibroblast,and in vivo transptantation of autologous p75NTR positive DPSCs is a novel method for neuranagenesis.This will bring great hope to patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury.

  20. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  1. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Song Sheng; Zhou Feifan; Chen Wei R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2) low-level laser therapy (LLLT), a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses. Methods To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells...

  2. p75 neurotrophin receptor positive dental pulp stem cells: new hope for patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie-wen; Yuan, Hao; Shen, Shun-yao; Lu, Jing-ting; Zhu, Xiao-fang; Yang, Tong; Zhang, Jiang-fei; Shen, Guo-fang

    2013-08-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and neural injury are 2 of the most feared disorders that afflict humankind by leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation. Cell based treatment for these diseases had gained special interest in recent years. Previous studies showed that dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) could differentiate toward functionally active neurons both in vitro and in vivo, and could promote neuranagenesis through both cell-autonomous and paracrine neuroregenerative activities. Some of these neuroregenerative activities were unique to tooth-derived stem cells and superior to bone marrow stromal cells. However, DPSCs used in most of these studies were mixed and unfractionated dental pulp cells that contain several types of cells, and most were fibroblast cells while just contain a small portion of DPSCs. Thus, there might be weaker ability of neuranagenesis and more side effects from the fibroblast cells that cannot differentiate into neural cells. p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) positive DPSCs subpopulation was derived from migrating cranial neural crest cells and had been isolated from DPSCs, which had capacity of differentiation into neurons and repairing neural system. In this article, we hypothesize that p75NTR positive DPSCs simultaneously have greater propensity for neuronal differentiation and fewer side effects from fibroblast, and in vivo transptantation of autologous p75NTR positive DPSCs is a novel method for neuranagenesis. This will bring great hope to patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury.

  3. Modulation of heat shock transcription factor 1 as a therapeutic target for small molecule intervention in neurodegenerative disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Neef

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington disease are devastating disorders with no therapeutic approaches to ameliorate the underlying protein misfolding defect inherent to poly-glutamine (polyQ proteins. Given the mounting evidence that elevated levels of protein chaperones suppress polyQ protein misfolding, the master regulator of protein chaperone gene transcription, HSF1, is an attractive target for small molecule intervention. We describe a humanized yeast-based high-throughput screen to identify small molecule activators of human HSF1. This screen is insensitive to previously characterized activators of the heat shock response that have undesirable proteotoxic activity or that inhibit Hsp90, the central chaperone for cellular signaling and proliferation. A molecule identified in this screen, HSF1A, is structurally distinct from other characterized small molecule human HSF1 activators, activates HSF1 in mammalian and fly cells, elevates protein chaperone expression, ameliorates protein misfolding and cell death in polyQ-expressing neuronal precursor cells and protects against cytotoxicity in a fly model of polyQ-mediated neurodegeneration. In addition, we show that HSF1A interacts with components of the TRiC/CCT complex, suggesting a potentially novel regulatory role for this complex in modulating HSF1 activity. These studies describe a novel approach for the identification of new classes of pharmacological interventions for protein misfolding that underlies devastating neurodegenerative disease.

  4. More than just two peas in a pod: common amyloidogenic properties of tau and alpha-synuclein in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Virginia M-Y; Giasson, Benoit I; Trojanowski, John Q

    2004-03-01

    Intracytoplasmic filamentous aggregates, such as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease and Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease, are composed of the proteins tau and alpha-synuclein, respectively. These pathological inclusions are linked directly to the etiology and mechanisms of disease in a wide spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders, termed 'tauopathies' and 'synucleinopathies'. Emerging evidence indicates that there is frequent overlap of the pathological and clinical features of patients with tauopathies and synucleinopathies, thereby re-enforcing the notion that these disorders might be linked mechanistically. Indeed, several lines of investigation suggest that tau and alpha-synuclein might constitute a unique class of unstructured proteins that assemble predominantly into homopolymeric (rather than heteropolymeric) fibrils, which deposit mainly in separate amyloid inclusions, but occasionally deposit together. Thus, the ability of tau and alpha-synuclein to affect each other directly or indirectly might contribute to the overlap in the clinical and pathological features of tauopathies and synucleinopathies.

  5. Trafficking and degradation pathways in pathogenic conversion of prions and prion-like proteins in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are caused by the conversion of cellular proteins to a pathogenic conformer. Despite differences in the primary structure and subcellular localization of these proteins, which include the prion protein, α-synuclein and amyloid precursor protein (APP), striking similarity has been observed in their ability to seed and convert naïve protein molecules as well as transfer between cells. This review aims to cover what is known about the intracellular trafficking of these proteins as well as their degradation mechanisms and highlight similarities in their movement through the endocytic pathway that could contribute to the pathogenic conversion and seeding of these proteins which underlies the basis of these diseases.

  6. A missense change in the ATG4D gene links aberrant autophagy to a neurodegenerative vacuolar storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Kyöstilä

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inherited neurodegenerative disorders are debilitating diseases that occur across different species. We have performed clinical, pathological and genetic studies to characterize a novel canine neurodegenerative disease present in the Lagotto Romagnolo dog breed. Affected dogs suffer from progressive cerebellar ataxia, sometimes accompanied by episodic nystagmus and behavioral changes. Histological examination revealed unique pathological changes, including profound neuronal cytoplasmic vacuolization in the nervous system, as well as spheroid formation and cytoplasmic aggregation of vacuoles in secretory epithelial tissues and mesenchymal cells. Genetic analyses uncovered a missense change, c.1288G>A; p.A430T, in the autophagy-related ATG4D gene on canine chromosome 20 with a highly significant disease association (p = 3.8 x 10-136 in a cohort of more than 2300 Lagotto Romagnolo dogs. ATG4D encodes a poorly characterized cysteine protease belonging to the macroautophagy pathway. Accordingly, our histological analyses indicated altered autophagic flux in affected tissues. The knockdown of the zebrafish homologue atg4da resulted in a widespread developmental disturbance and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Our study describes a previously unknown canine neurological disease with particular pathological features and implicates the ATG4D protein as an important autophagy mediator in neuronal homeostasis. The canine phenotype serves as a model to delineate the disease-causing pathological mechanism(s and ATG4D function, and can also be used to explore treatment options. Furthermore, our results reveal a novel candidate gene for human neurodegeneration and enable the development of a genetic test for veterinary diagnostic and breeding purposes.

  7. Bullous pemphigoid and neurodegenerative diseases: a study in a setting of a Central European university dermatology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkiewicz, Paweł; Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika; Bartkiewicz, Paweł; Dmochowski, Marian

    2016-08-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering dermatosis of the elderly mediated by IgG and IgE antibodies to skin hemidesmosomal proteins, BP180 and/or BP230, that occur physiologically also in neuronal tissue. It was reported that BP is associated with neurodegenerative diseases (ND). We performed a retrospective study in a setting of a Central European university dermatology department on prevalence of ND in 94 BP patients. 26 out of 94 BP patients had at least one ND. ND included: Parkinson's disease, dementia, stroke, hear loss, tinnitus, blindness, vertigo, neurosyphilis, systemic sclerosis, and epilepsy. Since population aging is conceivably responsible for the rising number of BP cases as a result of immunosenescence-related phenomena, the plausible BP-specific immunopathogenetic relationship between BP and ND deserves to be further experimentally explored. PMID:26420424

  8. The utility of α-synuclein as biofluid marker in neurodegenerative diseases: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kuiperij, Bea; El-Agnaf, Omar Mukhtar Ali; Engelborghs, Sebastian; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Parnetti, Lucilla; Rektorova, Irena; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Verbeek, Marcel; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of α-synuclein (α-syn) as a major component of Lewy bodies, neuropathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies and of glial inclusions in multiple system atrophy initiated the investigation of α-syn as a biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Due to the involvement of the periphery in PD the quantification of α-syn in peripheral fluids such as serum, plasma and saliva has been investigated as well. We review how the development of multiple assays for the quantification of α-syn has yielded novel insights into the variety of α-syn species present in the different fluids; the optimal preanalytical conditions required for robust quantification and the potential clinical value of α-syn as biomarker. We also suggest future approaches to use of CSF α-syn in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway in patients with adult-onset ataxic neurodegenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Kaeko; Nakayama, Keiko; Yamada, Eiji; Inoue, Yuichi [Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Kosaka, Satoru; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Miki, Takami [Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    We sought to determine whether diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) can detect in vivo axonal damage in the corticopontocerebellar pathway of patients with adult-onset ataxic neurodegenerative disease. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed on 18 patients with adult-onset ataxic neurodegenerative disease and 28 age-matched control subjects. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the mean diffusivity (MD) were measured in the ventral, central, and dorsal pons, middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) and internal capsule to evaluate corticopontocerebellar projection. Changes in FA and MD values were compared between patients and controls. Clinical disability was assessed according to the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). The relationship between DTI measurements and ICARS was studied. Follow-up MRI was performed in five patients approximately 1 year later. FA values were significantly lower in the ventral and central portions of the pons, MCP, and internal capsules than in these areas in control subjects (P < 0.05) with the lower FA values correlating with poorer ICARS (r > -0.57, P < 0.05). MD values were elevated in these areas, but the differences were smaller than for the FA values. No relationship was observed between the MD and ICARS. In the five patients who underwent the follow-up study, there were significant decreases between the initial study and the follow-up DTI study for FA in the MCP and internal capsule (P < 0.05). DTI can demonstrate a degenerated corticopontocerebellar pathway in patients, and FA values can be correlated with ataxia severity. DTI may be a clinically useful tool as a quantitative surrogate marker for monitoring disease progression. (orig.)

  10. Structure of an aprataxin-DNA complex with insights into AOA1 neurodegenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumbale, Percy; Appel, C Denise; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Robertson, Patrick D; Williams, Jessica S; Krahn, Joe; Ahel, Ivan; Williams, R Scott [NIEHS; (Manchester)

    2012-09-17

    DNA ligases finalize DNA replication and repair through DNA nick-sealing reactions that can abort to generate cytotoxic 5'-adenylation DNA damage. Aprataxin (Aptx) catalyzes direct reversal of 5'-adenylate adducts to protect genome integrity. Here the structure of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Aptx-DNA-AMP-Zn2+ complex reveals active site and DNA interaction clefts formed by fusing a histidine triad (HIT) nucleotide hydrolase with a DNA minor groove-binding C2HE zinc finger (Znf). An Aptx helical 'wedge' interrogates the base stack for sensing DNA ends or DNA nicks. The HIT-Znf, the wedge and an '[F/Y]PK' pivot motif cooperate to distort terminal DNA base-pairing and direct 5'-adenylate into the active site pocket. Structural and mutational data support a wedge-pivot-cut HIT-Znf catalytic mechanism for 5'-adenylate adduct recognition and removal and suggest that mutations affecting protein folding, the active site pocket and the pivot motif underlie Aptx dysfunction in the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1).

  11. Common pitfalls of stem cell differentiation: a guide to improving protocols for neurodegenerative disease models and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Martin; Do-Ha, Dzung; Muñoz, Sonia Sanz; Ooi, Lezanne

    2016-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells have revolutionized cellular neuroscience, providing the opportunity to model neurological diseases and test potential therapeutics in a pre-clinical setting. The power of these models has been widely discussed, but the potential pitfalls of stem cell differentiation in this research are less well described. We have analyzed the literature that describes differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into three neural cell types that are commonly used to study diseases, including forebrain cholinergic neurons for Alzheimer's disease, midbrain dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease and cortical astrocytes for neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Published protocols for differentiation vary widely in the reported efficiency of target cell generation. Additionally, characterization of the cells by expression profile and functionality differs between studies and is often insufficient, leading to highly variable protocol outcomes. We have synthesized this information into a simple methodology that can be followed when performing or assessing differentiation techniques. Finally we propose three considerations for future research, including the use of physiological O2 conditions, three-dimensional co-culture systems and microfluidics to control feeding cycles and growth factor gradients. Following these guidelines will help researchers to ensure that robust and meaningful data is generated, enabling the full potential of stem cell differentiation for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:27154043

  12. Is Dysregulation of the HPA-Axis a Core Pathophysiology Mediating Co-Morbid Depression in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Pang, Terence Y

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of prodromal manifestation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These affective symptoms may be observed many years before the core diagnostic symptoms of the neurological condition. It is becoming more apparent that depression is a significant modifying factor of the trajectory of disease progression and even treatment outcomes. It is therefore crucial that we understand the potential pathophysiologies related to the primary condition, which could contribute to the development of depression. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis is a key neuroendocrine signaling system involved in physiological homeostasis and stress response. Disturbances of this system lead to severe hormonal imbalances, and the majority of such patients also present with behavioral deficits and/or mood disorders. Dysregulation of the HPA-axis is also strongly implicated in the pathology of major depressive disorder. Consistent with this, antidepressant drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to alter HPA-axis activity. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding HPA-axis pathology in Alzheimer's, PD and HD, differentiating between prodromal and later stages of disease progression when evidence is available. Both clinical and preclinical evidence will be examined, but we highlight animal model studies as being particularly useful for uncovering novel mechanisms of pathology related to co-morbid mood disorders. Finally, we purpose utilizing the preclinical evidence to better inform prospective, intervention studies.

  13. The possible role of stem cells in acupuncture treatment for neurodegenerative diseases: a literature review of basic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Ho, Li-Ing; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Hsien; Macdonald, Iona; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    This review reports on recent findings concerning the effects of acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) on stem cell mobilization and differentiation, in particular with regard to neurogenesis. Traditional Chinese acupuncture has a history of over 2,500 years and is becoming more popular worldwide. Evidence has demonstrated that acupuncture may be of benefit in stroke rehabilitation, parkinsonism, dementia, and depression. This article reviews recent studies concerning the effects of acupuncture/EA on stem cell mobilization and on progenitor cell proliferation in the CNS. The reviewed evidence indicates that acupuncture/EA has beneficial effects in several neurodegenerative diseases, and it may prove to be a nondrug method for mobilizing stem cells in the CNS.

  14. Autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelia Kesidou; Roza Lagoudaki; Olga Touloumi; Kyriaki-Nefeli Poulatsidou; Constantina Simeonidou

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins and inclusion bodies are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, these aggregates within neurons lead to toxic effects, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Autophagy is a significant intracel ular mechanism that removes damaged organelles and misfolded proteins in order to maintain cel homeostasis. Excessive or insufficient autophagic activity in neurons leads to altered homeostasis and influences their survival rate, causing neurodegeneration. The review article provides an update of the role of autophagic process in representative chronic and acute neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. NeuroDNet - an open source platform for constructing and analyzing neurodegenerative disease networks

    OpenAIRE

    Vasaikar Suhas V; Padhi Aditya K; Jayaram Bhyravabhotla; Gomes James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetic networks control cellular functions. Aberrations in normal cellular function are caused by mutations in genes that disrupt the fine tuning of genetic networks and cause disease or disorder. However, the large number of signalling molecules, genes and proteins that constitute such networks, and the consequent complexity of interactions, has restrained progress in research elucidating disease mechanisms. Hence, carrying out a systematic analysis of how diseases alter...

  16. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  17. [The role of the adaptive stress response in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozpędek, Wioletta; Markiewicz, Łukasz; Diehl, J Alan; Pytel, Dariusz; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2015-12-01

    The ER (Endoplasmatic Reticulum) an intricate intracellular membrane system is responsible for many functions within cells; including folding and post-translational modifications of secretory proteins biosynthesis of ceramides, phospholipids and coordination of cell homeostasis. Perturbation of these ER processes leads to high levels unfolded and misfolded proteins within the lumen of the ER. These disturbances lead to activation of three primary receptors: PERK (Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase), IRE1 (Inositol-Requiring-Enzyme 1) and ATF6 (Activating Transcription Factor 6). These signal transducers are responsible for inducing signalling pathways termed UPR (Unfolded Protein Response) restoring cell homeostasis. In contrast, unresolved ER stress contributes to cell death by apoptosis. Recent research allows for a conclusion that the deregulation of UPR is the main causative factor for functional cell loss and moreover, cell death by apoptosis, which is strictly linked to the pathology of human diseases to include: cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2 and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion diseases.

  18. Dysregulation of the HPA axis as a core pathophysiology mediating co-morbid depression in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eDu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of prodromal manifestation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. These affective symptoms may be observed many years before the core diagnostic symptoms of the neurological condition. It is becoming more apparent that depression is a significant modifying factor of the trajectory of disease progression, and even treatment outcomes. It is therefore crucial that we understand the potential pathophysiologies related to the primary condition, which could contribute to the development of depression. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a key neuroendocrine signaling system involved in physiological homeostasis and stress response. Disturbances of this system lead to severe hormonal imbalances, and the majority of such patients also present with behavioural deficits and/or mood disorders. Dysregulation of the HPA axis is also strongly implicated in the pathology of major depressive disorder. Consistent with this, anti-depressant drugs such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI have been shown to alter HPA axis activity. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding HPA axis pathology in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, differentiating between prodromal and later stages of disease progression where possible. Both clinical and preclinical evidence will be examined, but we highlight animal model studies as being particularly useful for uncovering novel mechanisms of pathology related to co-morbid mood disorders. Finally, we purpose utilizing the pre-clinical evidence to better inform prospective, intervention studies.

  19. Possible pathophysiological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Serretiello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases (TG, E.C. 2.3.2.13 are related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the cross linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate. These enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other post-translational reactions important for cell life. The distribution and the physiological roles of human TGs have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and recently their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified. It has been hypothesized that transglutaminase activity is directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several human diseases. In particular, tissue TG (tTG, TG2, a member of the TG enzyme family, has been recently shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology, Celiac Disease (CD, one of the most common food intolerances described in the western population. The main food agent that provokes the strong and diffuse clinical symptoms has been known for several years to be gliadin, a protein present in a very large number of human foods derived from vegetables. Recently, some biochemical and immunological aspects of this very common disease have been clarified, and “tissue” transglutaminase, a multifunctional and ubiquitous enzyme, has been identified as one of the major factors. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings concerning the relationships between the biochemical properties of the transglutaminase activity and the basic molecular mechanisms responsible for some human diseases, with particular reference to neuropsychiatric disorders. Possible molecular links between CD and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the use of transglutaminase inhibitors are also discussed.

  20. Early-Life Toxic Insults and Onset of Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases-an Overview of Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, Anna Maria; Venerosi, Aldina; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The developmental origin of health and disease hypothesis states that adverse fetal and early childhood exposures can predispose to obesity, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) in adult life. Early exposure to environmental chemicals interferes with developmental programming and induces subclinical alterations that may hesitate in pathophysiology and behavioral deficits at a later life stage. The mechanisms by which perinatal insults lead to altered programming and to disease later in life are still undefined. The long latency between exposure and onset of disease, the difficulty of reconstructing early exposures, and the wealth of factors which the individual is exposed to during the life course make extremely difficult to prove the developmental origin of NDDs in clinical and epidemiological studies. An overview of animal studies assessing the long-term effects of perinatal exposure to different chemicals (heavy metals and pesticides) supports the link between exposure and hallmarks of neurodegeneration at the adult stage. Furthermore, models of maternal immune activation show that brain inflammation in early life may enhance adult vulnerability to environmental toxins, thus supporting the multiple hit hypothesis for NDDs' etiology. The study of prospective animal cohorts may help to unraveling the complex pathophysiology of sporadic NDDs. In vivo models could be a powerful tool to clarify the mechanisms through which different kinds of insults predispose to cell loss in the adult age, to establish a cause-effect relationship between "omic" signatures and disease/dysfunction later in life, and to identify peripheral biomarkers of exposure, effects, and susceptibility, for translation to prospective epidemiological studies. PMID:26695168

  1. Dietary fat and antioxidant vitamin intake in patients of neurodegenerative disease in a rural region of Jalisco, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Meza, Mónica; Gabriel-Ortiz, Genaro; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; López-Espinoza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the intake of lipids and (A, E, and C) vitamins in patients with and without possible neurodegenerative diseases. Methods Twenty adults with possible Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease and 41 control subjects (50–89 years old) from a rural region were studied. Dietary intake was evaluated with the analysis of macronutrients and micronutrients conducted by a food frequency questionnaire and 24 hours dietary record. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and energy intake. Through interrogation and use of medical record form of health secretary we obtained information about the sociodemographic characteristics. Multivariate analysis of variance to allow for covariated adjustment was used. Results Patients had a lower energy intake, vitamin C (P = 0.016), fruits (P < 0.001), vegetables (P = 0.037), and oils and fat (P = 0.002), than the controls. Interestingly, the C vitamin intake in patients was still higher than the recommended. Patients had a higher consumption of cereals (P = 0.017), high-animal fat diet (P = 0.024), and whole milk (P < 0.001); 2.4% of the controls smoke and 5% are alcohol consumers. Eighty-five percent of patients and 78% of the controls do not have physical activity. Family history of subjects in this study indicated chronic diseases. Conclusion The subjects included in this study had a high intake of C vitamin, this is due to the consumption of fruits and vegetables. However, patients with possible Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease had a lower intake of fruits and vegetables, which could be due to type of food to which they have access. PMID:24257159

  2. Effect of Systemic Iron Overload and a Chelation Therapy in a Mouse Model of the Neurodegenerative Disease Hereditary Ferritinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene cause the neurodegenerative disease neuroferritinopathy or hereditary ferritinopathy (HF). HF is characterized by a severe movement disorder and by the presence of nuclear and cytoplasmic iron-containing ferritin inclusion bodies (IBs) in glia and neurons throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and in tissues of multiple organ systems. Herein, using primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts from a mouse model of HF, we show significant intracellular accumulation of ferritin and an increase in susceptibility to oxidative damage when cells are exposed to iron. Treatment of the cells with the iron chelator deferiprone (DFP) led to a significant improvement in cell viability and a decrease in iron content. In vivo, iron overload and DFP treatment of the mouse model had remarkable effects on systemic iron homeostasis and ferritin deposition, without significantly affecting CNS pathology. Our study highlights the role of iron in modulating ferritin aggregation in vivo in the disease HF. It also puts emphasis on the potential usefulness of a therapy based on chelators that can target the CNS to remove and redistribute iron and to resolubilize or prevent ferritin aggregation while maintaining normal systemic iron stores. PMID:27574973

  3. β-amyloidopathy in the Pathogenesis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Correlation with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Victor V; Nesterova, Alla A

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of new biotechnology and genetic engineering methods to the study of the aging organism allowed to select a group of neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) which have a similar mechanism of pathogenesis including pathological processes of protein aggregation and its deposition in the structures of nerve tissue. The development of eye and brain from one embryonic germ layer, community of ethiopathogenetic and morphological manifestations of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), a common pathway of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) are associated with the pathological aggregation of fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) protein and the development of β-amyloidopathy in structural elements of the eye and the brain. The review demonstrates the keynote of AMD and AD pathogenesis is β-amyloidopathy that is a manifestation of proteinopathy leading to cytotoxicity, neurodegeneration and the development of pathological apoptosis activated by the formation of intracellular Aβ. This view on the problem predetermines the development of new strategies for the creating of ophthalmogeriatric and neuroprotective drugs affecting the pathogenesis and including all stages of Aβ formation and pathological aggregation. PMID:26427402

  4. Effect of Systemic Iron Overload and a Chelation Therapy in a Mouse Model of the Neurodegenerative Disease Hereditary Ferritinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garringer, Holly J; Irimia, Jose M; Li, Wei; Goodwin, Charles B; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; Chan, Rebecca J; Peacock, Munro; Muhoberac, Barry B; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene cause the neurodegenerative disease neuroferritinopathy or hereditary ferritinopathy (HF). HF is characterized by a severe movement disorder and by the presence of nuclear and cytoplasmic iron-containing ferritin inclusion bodies (IBs) in glia and neurons throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and in tissues of multiple organ systems. Herein, using primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts from a mouse model of HF, we show significant intracellular accumulation of ferritin and an increase in susceptibility to oxidative damage when cells are exposed to iron. Treatment of the cells with the iron chelator deferiprone (DFP) led to a significant improvement in cell viability and a decrease in iron content. In vivo, iron overload and DFP treatment of the mouse model had remarkable effects on systemic iron homeostasis and ferritin deposition, without significantly affecting CNS pathology. Our study highlights the role of iron in modulating ferritin aggregation in vivo in the disease HF. It also puts emphasis on the potential usefulness of a therapy based on chelators that can target the CNS to remove and redistribute iron and to resolubilize or prevent ferritin aggregation while maintaining normal systemic iron stores. PMID:27574973

  5. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  6. Selective Activation of mTORC1 Signaling Recapitulates Microcephaly, Tuberous Sclerosis, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Kassai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been implicated in human neurological diseases such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, neurodegeneration, and autism. However, little is known about when and how mTOR is involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, due to a lack of animal models that directly increase mTOR activity. Here, we generated transgenic mice expressing a gain-of-function mutant of mTOR in the forebrain in a temporally controlled manner. Selective activation of mTORC1 in embryonic stages induced cortical atrophy caused by prominent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors, associated with upregulation of HIF-1α. In striking contrast, activation of the mTORC1 pathway in adulthood resulted in cortical hypertrophy with fatal epileptic seizures, recapitulating human TSC. Activated mTORC1 in the adult cortex also promoted rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic inclusions and activation of microglial cells, indicative of progressive neurodegeneration. Our findings demonstrate that mTORC1 plays different roles in developmental and adult stages and contributes to human neurological diseases.

  7. Low-level laser therapy regulates microglial function through Src-mediated signaling pathways: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells are an important pathological component in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 64.6 mW/cm2 low-level laser therapy (LLLT, a non-damaging physical therapy, on activated microglia, and the subsequent signaling events of LLLT-induced neuroprotective effects and phagocytic responses. Methods To model microglial activation, we treated the microglial BV2 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. For the LLLT-induced neuroprotective study, neuronal cells with activated microglial cells in a Transwell™ cell-culture system were used. For the phagocytosis study, fluorescence-labeled microspheres were added into the treated microglial cells to confirm the role of LLLT. Results Our results showed that LLLT (20 J/cm2 could attenuate toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated proinflammatory responses in microglia, characterized by down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression and nitric oxide (NO production. LLLT-triggered TLR signaling inhibition was achieved by activating tyrosine kinases Src and Syk, which led to MyD88 tyrosine phosphorylation, thus impairing MyD88-dependent proinflammatory signaling cascade. In addition, we found that Src activation could enhance Rac1 activity and F-actin accumulation that typify microglial phagocytic activity. We also found that Src/PI3K/Akt inhibitors prevented LLLT-stimulated Akt (Ser473 and Thr308 phosphorylation and blocked Rac1 activity and actin-based microglial phagocytosis, indicating the activation of Src/PI3K/Akt/Rac1 signaling pathway. Conclusions The present study underlines the importance of Src in suppressing inflammation and enhancing microglial phagocytic function in activated microglia during LLLT stimulation. We have identified a new and important neuroprotective signaling pathway that consists of regulation of microglial phagocytosis and inflammation under LLLT

  8. CRISPR/Cas9: Implications for Modeling and Therapy of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Weili; Tu, Zhuchi; Sun, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is now used widely to genetically modify the genomes of various species. The ability of CRISPR/Cas9 to delete DNA sequences and correct DNA mutations opens up a new avenue to treat genetic diseases that are caused by DNA mutations. In this review, we describe the advantages of using CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer genomic DNAs in animal embryos, as well as in specific regions or cell types in the brain. We also discuss how to apply CRISPR/Cas9 to establish animal models of neurodegenerati...

  9. Electronic approaches to restitute vision in patients with neurodegenerative diseases of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, K; Zrenner, E

    2013-01-01

    Degenerations of the outer retina are hereditary diseases leading to significant loss of vision. Several concepts of active electrical stimulation of the remaining retinal network resulted in the development of retinal visual implants and prosthetic vision. Subretinal and epiretinal visual implants are currently the leading approaches in restoring functional vision in blind humans with retinitis pigmentosa or other outer retinal degenerations. This review gives a short overview about the principles, advantages, limitations and vision outcome of the up-to-date published artificial vision by electronic visual implants, as well as their known biocompatibility and safety issues.

  10. Non linear approach to study the dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases by Multifractal Detrended Cross-correlation Analysis-A quantitative assessment on gait disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Samanta, Shukla

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the human gait pattern of normal people and patients suffering from Parkinson's disease using the MFDXA (Multifractal Detrended Cross-correlation Analysis) methodology. The auto correlation and cross correlation of the time series of the total force under the left foot and right foot were studied. The study reveals that the degree of multifractality (W) and degree of correlation (γ) are generally more for normal patients than the diseased set. It is also observed that the values of W and γ are nearly same for left foot and right. It is also observed that the study of autocorrelation alone is not sufficient, cross correlations should also be studied to get a better concept of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Role of Abca7 in mouse behaviours relevant to neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Logge

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette transporters of the subfamily A (ABCA are responsible for the translocation of lipids including cholesterol, which is crucial for neurological function. Recent studies suggest that the ABC transporter ABCA7 may play a role in the development of brain disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, Abca7's role in cognition and other behaviours has not been investigated. Therefore, we characterised homozygous Abca7 knockout mice in a battery of tests for baseline behaviours (i.e. physical exam, baseline locomotion and anxiety and behaviours relevant to schizophrenia (i.e. prepulse inhibition and locomotor response to psychotropic drugs and Alzheimer's disease (i.e. cognitive domains. Knockout mice had normal motor functions and sensory abilities and performed the same as wild type-like animals in anxiety tasks. Short-term spatial memory and fear-associated learning was also intact in Abca7 knockout mice. However, male knockout mice exhibited significantly impaired novel object recognition memory. Task acquisition was unaffected in the cheeseboard task. Female mice exhibited impaired spatial reference memory. This phenomenon was more pronounced in female Abca7 null mice. Acoustic startle response, sensorimotor gating and baseline locomotion was unaltered in Abca7 knockout mice. Female knockouts showed a moderately increased motor response to MK-801 than control mice. In conclusion, Abca7 appears to play only a minor role in behavioural domains with a subtle sex-specific impact on particular cognitive domains.

  12. Quantification of muscle activity during sleep for patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Umaer; Trap, Lotte; Jennum, Poul;

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a very strong predictor for later development of Parkinson's disease (PD), and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia (RSWA), resulting in increased muscle activity during REM sleep. Abundant studies have shown the loss of atonia during REM...... sleep, but our aim was to investigate whether iRBD and PD patients have increased muscle activity in both REM and NREM sleep compared to healthy controls. This was achieved by developing a semi-automatic algorithm for quantification of mean muscle activity per second during all sleep stages...... to the different sleep stages and muscle activity beyond the threshold was counted. The results were evaluated statistically using the two-sided Mann-Whitney U-test. The results suggested that iRBD patients also exhibit distinctive muscle activity characteristics in NREM sleep, however not as evident as in REM...

  13. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase as a drug target in cancer, and in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Proud, Christopher G

    2016-03-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) is an unusual protein kinase that regulates the elongation stage of protein synthesis by phosphorylating and inhibiting its only known substrate, eEF2. Elongation is a highly energy-consuming process, and eEF2K activity is tightly regulated by several signaling pathways. Regulating translation elongation can modulate the cellular energy demand and may also control the expression of specific proteins. Growing evidence links eEF2K to a range of human diseases, including cardiovascular conditions (atherosclerosis, via macrophage survival) and pulmonary arterial hypertension, as well as solid tumors, where eEF2K appears to play contrasting roles depending on tumor type and stage. eEF2K is also involved in neurological disorders and may be a valuable target in treating depression and certain neurodegenerative diseases. Because eEF2K is not required for mammalian development or cell viability, inhibiting its function may not elicit serious side effects, while the fact that it is an atypical kinase and quite distinct from the vast majority of other mammalian kinases suggests the possibility to develop it into compounds that inhibit eEF2K without affecting other important protein kinases. Further research is needed to explore these possibilities and there is an urgent need to identify and characterize potent and specific small-molecule inhibitors of eEF2K. In this article we review the recent evidence concerning the role of eEF2K in human diseases as well as the progress in developing small-molecule inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:26806303

  14. The Emerging Role of Guanine Exchange Factors in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian eDroppelmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases participate in a broad range of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and migration. The exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in the activation of these GTPases is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, of which two classes: Dbl-related exchange factors and the more recently described Dock family exchange factors. Increasingly, deregulation of normal GEF activity or function has been associated with a broad range of disease states, including neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we examine this evidence with special emphasis on the novel role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF/p190RhoGEF in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. RGNEF is the first neurodegeneration-linked GEF that regulates not only RhoA GTPase activation but also functions as an RNA binding protein that directly acts with low molecular weight neurofilament (NEFL mRNA 3’UTR to regulate its stability. This dual role for RGNEF, coupled with the increasing understanding of the key role for GEFs in modulating the GTPase function in cell survival suggests a prominent role for GEFs in mediating a critical balance between cytotoxicity and neuroprotection which, when disturbed, contributes to neuronal loss.

  15. Blood-brain barrier proteomics: towards the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Yannis; Gosselet, Fabien; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Cecchelli, Roméo

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the passage of endogenous and exogenous compounds and thus contributes to the brain homeostasis with the help of well-known proteins such as tight junction proteins, plasma membrane transporters and metabolic barrier proteins. In the last decade, proteomics have emerged as supplementary tools for BBB research. The development of proteomic technologies has provided several means to extend knowledge on the BBB and to investigate additional routes for the bypass of this barrier. Proteomics approaches have been used in vivo and also using in vitro BBB models to decipher the physiological characteristics and, under stress conditions, to understand the molecular mechanisms of brain diseases. This work has demonstrated that both quantitative global and targeted proteomics approaches are powerful and provide significant information on the brain microvessel endothelium. However, current knowledge is only partial and it is necessary to increase the studies using proteomics tools that will provide additional information concerning brain pathologies or BBB metabolism. Highly sensitive, accurate and specific protein quantification by quantitative targeted proteomics appears as an essential methodology for human BBB studies. PMID:25446619

  16. A Strategy to Employ Clitoria ternatea as a Prospective Brain Drug Confronting Monoamine Oxidase (MAO) Against Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margret, A Anita; Begum, T Nargis; Parthasarathy, S; Suvaithenamudhan, S

    2015-12-01

    Ayurveda is a renowned traditional medicine practiced in India from ancient times and Clitoria ternatea is one such prospective medicinal herb incorporated as an essential constituent in a brain tonic called as medhya rasayan for treating neurological disorders. This work emphasises the significance of the plant as a brain drug there by upholding Indian medicine. The phytochemicals from the root extract were extricated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay and molecular docking against the protein Monoamine oxidase was performed with four potential compounds along with four reference compounds of the plant. This persuades the prospect of C. ternatea as a remedy for neurodegenerative diseases and depression. The in silico assay enumerates that a major compound (Z)-9,17-octadecadienal obtained from the chromatogram with a elevated retention time of 32.99 furnished a minimum binding affinity energy value of -6.5 kcal/mol against monoamine oxidase (MAO-A). The interactions with the amino acid residues ALA 68, TYR 60 and TYR 69 were analogous to the reference compound kaempferol-3-monoglucoside with a least score of -13.90/-12.95 kcal/mol against the isoforms (MAO) A and B. This study fortifies the phytocompounds of C. ternatea as MAO-inhibitors and to acquire a pharmaceutical approach in rejuvenating Ayurvedic medicine. PMID:26667936

  17. Validation of soluble amyloid-β precursor protein assays as diagnostic CSF biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waalwijk van Doorn, Linda J C; Koel-Simmelink, Marleen J; Haußmann, Ute; Klafki, Hans; Struyfs, Hanne; Linning, Philipp; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Twaalfhoven, Harry; Kuiperij, H Bea; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Scheltens, Philip; Verbeek, Marcel M; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Wiltfang, Jens; Teunissen, Charlotte E

    2016-04-01

    Analytical validation of a biomarker assay is essential before implementation in clinical practice can occur. In this study, we analytically validated the performance of assays detecting soluble amyloid-β precursor protein (sAPP) α and β in CSF in two laboratories according to previously standard operating procedures serving this goal. sAPPα and sAPPβ ELISA assays from two vendors (IBL-international, Meso Scale Diagnostics) were validated. The performance parameters included precision, sensitivity, dilutional linearity, recovery, and parallelism. Inter-laboratory variation, biomarker comparison (sAPPα vs. sAPPβ) and clinical performance was determined in three laboratories using 60 samples of patients with subjective memory complaints, Alzheimer's disease, or frontotemporal dementia. All performance parameters of the assays were similar between labs and within predefined acceptance criteria. The only exceptions were minor out-of-range results for recovery at low concentrations and, despite being within predefined acceptance criteria, non-comparability of the results for evaluation of the dilutional linearity and hook-effect. Based on the inter-laboratory correlation between Lab #1 and Lab #2, the IBL-international assays were more robust (sAPPα: r(2) = 0.92, sAPPβ: r(2) = 0.94) than the Meso Scale Diagnostics (MSD) assay (sAPPα: r(2) = 0.70, sAPPβ: r(2) = 0.80). Specificity of assays was confirmed using assay-specific peptide competitors. Clinical validation showed consistent results across the clinical groups in the different laboratories for all assays. The validated sAPP assays appear to be of sufficient technical quality and perform well. Moreover, the study shows that the newly developed standard operating procedures provide highly useful tools for the validation of new biomarker assays. A recommendation was made for renewed instructions to evaluate the dilutional linearity and hook-effect. We analytically validated the performance of assays

  18. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  19. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr ∼ 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1∼9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI

  20. 谷氨酰胺转氨酶与神经退行性疾病%Transglutaminase and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振; 曾俊晟; 曾胜; 唐北沙; 王俊岭

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) is a kind of calcium-dependent enzymes.The TGase family found in rodents and human contains 9 types,including TG1-7,blood coagulation factor Ⅹ Ⅲ a and erythrocyte membrane protein 4.2,with the former 8 types possessing catalytic activity.TG catalyzes various conversion reactions of glutamine,including transamination,deamination and esterification,and participates in post-transcriptional modification of proteins such as cross-linking peptides glutamine residue and lysylresidue,stabilizing protein structure and catalyzing formation of protein aggregates.TGase has been found to contribute to a variety of important physiological and pathological processes and play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases.Notably,neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease,spinocerebellar ataxia,Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease,have a close connection with TGase's role in the human body.%谷氨酰胺转胺酶(transglutaminase,TGase或TG)是一类Ca2+依赖酶.在啮齿动物和人体内已发现的TGase家族包括TG1~7、血浆凝血因子ⅩⅢa和红细胞膜蛋白4.2等共9种,其中前8种具有催化活性.TG可催化谷氨酰氨基的各种转化反应,包括转酰胺基作用、脱酰胺基作用和酯化作用,并参与蛋白质多肽谷氨酰胺残基和赖氨酰残基之间的交联反应等蛋白转录后修饰,稳定蛋白结构,催化蛋白聚集体的形成.目前已发现TGase参与多种重要的生理病理过程,影响多种疾病的发生和发展,尤其是亨廷顿病、脊髓小脑型共济失调、阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病等神经系统退行性疾病与TGase在人体内的作用密切相关.

  1. Chinese herbal extract dl-3n-butylphthalide A commonly used drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke as a novel therapeutic approach to treat neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfang He; Wensheng Zhou; Zhiping Hu

    2011-01-01

    Dl-3n-butylphthalide is the active component isolated from the seeds of Apium graveolens Linn. A number of pharmacological and clinical studies have proven that dl-3n-butylphthalide is highly po-tent and multi-targeted with low toxicity and has a long time-window for the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying dl-3n-butylphthalide include improving mi-tochondrial function and microcirculation, inhibiting apoptosis and reducing oxidative stress. Fur-thermore, dl-3n-butylphthalide may also be promising for the treatment of neurodegenerative dis-eases, such as Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease.

  2. [NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel A; Izaola, Olatz; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Muñoz-Calero, Paloma; Franco-Lopez, Angeles

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: las enfermedades neurodegenerativas producen alteraciones en el nivel de conciencia o en los mecanismos de la deglución que con frecuencia hacen necesario un soporte nutricional especializado. Objetivo: revisar el riesgo de desnutrición, así como su tratamiento, en pacientes con enfermedad cerebral vascular, enfermedad de Parkinson, demencia y esclerosis lateral amiotrófica. Desarrollo: las enfermedades neurológicas degenerativas son una de las principales indicaciones de soporte nutricional en nuestro país. En los procesos agudos (enfermedad vascular cerebral), el correcto manejo nutricional se relaciona con una mejor evolución y con una disminución de las complicaciones. En los procesos neurodegenerativos crónicos (esclerosis lateral amiatrófica y demencia), la malnutrición es un problema importante que empeora el pronóstico de estos pacientes siendo, necesario un correcto manejo de la disfagia y sus complicaciones, así como la utilización de diferentes etapas de soporte nutricional. Una correcta valoración nutricional de estos pacientes, así como un claro esquema de intervención nutricional, es imprescindible en el seguimiento de su enfermedad. Por último, en la enfermedad de Parkinson avanzada, el soporte nutricional, como en las enfermedades neurodegenerativas anteriores, es de vital importancia, sin olvidarnos de la carga proteica y su distribución en la dieta de estos pacientes. Las sociedades científicas internacionales (American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition ASPEN) recomiendan, con un grado de evidencia B, realizar un cribaje de malnutrición a los pacientes con enfermedades neurológicas. Conclusiones: una correcta valoración nutricional, así como un adecuado soporte nutricional deben formar parte del proceso diagnóstico y terapéutico de estas enfermedades.

  3. Mechanisms of Neuronal Protection against Excitotoxicity, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stroke and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke and neurodegenerative disease, neuronal excitotoxicity, caused by increased extracellular glutamate levels, is known to result in calcium overload and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial deficits may involve a deficiency in energy supply as well as generation of high levels of oxidants which are key contributors to neuronal cell death through necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Excessive glutamate receptor stimulation also results in increased nitric oxide generation which can be detrimental to cells as nitric oxide interacts with superoxide to form the toxic molecule peroxynitrite. High level oxidant production elicits neuronal apoptosis through the actions of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members resulting in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition to apoptotic responses to severe stress, accumulation of misfolded proteins and high levels of oxidants can elicit endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathways which may also contribute to induction of apoptosis. Two categories of therapeutics are discussed that impact major pro-death events that include induction of oxidants, calcium overload, and ER stress. The first category of therapeutic agent includes the amino acid taurine which prevents calcium overload and is also capable of preventing ER stress by inhibiting specific ER stress pathways. The second category involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA receptor partial antagonists illustrated by S-Methyl-N, N-diethyldithiocarbamate sulfoxide (DETC-MeSO, and memantine. DETC-MeSO is protective through preventing excitotoxicity and calcium overload and by blocking specific ER stress pathways. Another NMDA receptor partial antagonist is memantine which prevents excessive glutamate excitation but also remarkably allows maintenance of physiological neurotransmission. Targeting of these major sites of neuronal damage using pharmacological agents is discussed in terms of potential therapeutic approaches for

  4. Context-dependent neural activation: internally and externally guided rhythmic lower limb movement in individuals with and without neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Eve Hackney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients’ quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, tai chi have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control and postural stability in people with PD (Amano, Nocera, Vallabhajosula, Juncos, Gregor, Waddell et al., 2013; Earhart, 2009; M. E. Hackney & Earhart, 2008; Kadivar, Corcos, Foto, & Hondzinski, 2011; Morris, Iansek, & Kirkwood, 2009; Ridgel, Vitek, & Alberts, 2009. However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG and externally guided (EG movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG versus EG designs. Because of the potential task specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural

  5. Context-Dependent Neural Activation: Internally and Externally Guided Rhythmic Lower Limb Movement in Individuals With and Without Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Lee, Ho Lim; Battisto, Jessica; Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients' quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, and Tai Chi) have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control, and postural stability in people with PD (1-6). However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task-specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG) and externally guided (EG) movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG vs. EG designs. Because of the potential task-specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training) and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural activity with respect to PD impairment during rhythmic IG and EG movement will facilitate the development of novel and effective therapeutic approaches to mobility limitations and postural instability. PMID:26696952

  6. Development of the CHARIOT Research Register for the Prevention of Alzheimer's Dementia and Other Late Onset Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Larsen

    socioeconomically disadvantaged practices (r = 0.68, and practices with a higher proportion of White patients (r = 0.82.Response rates are comparable to other registers reported in the literature, and indicate good interest and support for a research register and for participation in research for the prevention of age-related neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. We consider that the simplicity of the approach means that this system is easily scalable and replicable across the UK and internationally.

  7. Genetic dissection of a cell-autonomous neurodegenerative disorder: lessons learned from mouse models of Niemann-Pick disease type C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Lopez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding neurodegenerative disease progression and its treatment requires the systematic characterization and manipulation of relevant cell types and molecular pathways. The neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC is highly amenable to genetic approaches that allow exploration of the disease biology at the organismal, cellular and molecular level. Although NPC is a rare disease, genetic analysis of the associated neuropathology promises to provide insight into the logic of disease neural circuitry, selective neuron vulnerability and neural-glial interactions. The ability to control the disorder cell-autonomously and in naturally occurring spontaneous animal models that recapitulate many aspects of the human disease allows for an unparalleled dissection of the disease neurobiology in vivo. Here, we review progress in mouse-model-based studies of NPC disease, specifically focusing on the subtype that is caused by a deficiency in NPC1, a sterol-binding late endosomal membrane protein involved in lipid trafficking. We also discuss recent findings and future directions in NPC disease research that are pertinent to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in general.

  8. Age, gender, and cancer but not neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases strongly modulate systemic effect of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele on lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Culminskaya, Irina;

    2014-01-01

    cohorts and the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to investigate gender-specific effects of the ApoE4 allele on human survival in a wide range of ages from midlife to extreme old ages, and the sensitivity of these effects to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders (ND.......6 × 10(-6)) in the FHS cohorts. Major human diseases including CVD, ND, and cancer, whose risks can be sensitive to the e4 allele, do not mediate the association of this allele with lifespan in large FHS samples. Non-skin cancer non-additively increases mortality of the FHS women with moderate lifespans...

  9. An integral approach to the etiopathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases (HNDDs and cancer. Possible therapeutic consequences within the frame of the trophic factor withdrawal syndrome (TFWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Meléndez Hevia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvador Harguindey1, Gorka Orive2,6, Ramón Cacabelos3, Enrique Meléndez Hevia4, Ramón Díaz de Otazu5, et al1Institute of Clinical Biology and Metabolism, Vitoria, Spain; 2Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of The Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, EuroEspes Biomedical Research Center, Bergondo, La Coruña, Spain; 4Institute for Cellular Metabolism, Tenerife, Spain; 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Txagorritxu, Vitoria, Spain; 6Biotechnology Institute (BTI, Vitoria, SpainAbstract: A novel and integral approach to the understanding of human neurodegenerative diseases (HNDDs and cancer based upon the disruption of the intracellular dynamics of the hydrogen ion (H+ and its physiopathology, is advanced. From an etiopathological perspective, the activity and/or deficiency of different growth factors (GFs in these pathologies are studied, and their relationships to intracellular acid-base homeostasis reviewed. Growth and trophic factor withdrawal in HNDDs indicate the need to further investigate the potential utilization of certain GFs in the treatment of Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.  Platelet abnormalities and the therapeutic potential of platelet-derived growth factors in these pathologies, either through platelet transfusions or other clinical methods, are considered. Finally, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of apoptosis and antiapoptosis in HNDDs and cancer are viewed as opposite biochemical and biological disorders of cellular acid-base balance and their secondary effects on intracellular signaling pathways and aberrant cell metabolism are considered in the light of the both the seminal and most recent data available. The “trophic factor withdrawal syndrome” is described for the first time in English-speaking medical literature, as well as a Darwinian-like interpretation of cellular behavior related to specific and nonspecific

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT exploration of dopaminergic systems. Diagnosis and surveillance of neuro-degenerative diseases; Les radiopharmaceutiques pour l`exploration des system dopaminergique en TEMP. Interet pour le diagnostic et le suivi des maladies neurodegeneratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouilloteau, D.; Prunier-Levallon, C.; Zimmer, L.; Autret, A.; Besnard, J-Cl.; Baulieu, J-L. [CHU TOURS (France)

    1997-12-31

    New radiopharmaceuticals were developed to explore the pre- or post-synaptic slopes of the dopaminergic terminations. At present, their interest is recognized for the differential diagnosis of the extra-pyramidal syndromes. Other various applications in neurology and psychiatry are in view. On the pre-synaptic slope, implied in the Parkinson`s disease, the dopamine carrier, able to be visualized due to its iodine derivatives of cocaine, is localized. The {beta}CIT, which is presently the best known specificity-free derivative, has actually an equivalent affinity for the dopamine carrier and the serotonin carrier. Besides, its kinetic does not allow its imaging in the day of injection. We have developed and validated another derivative, the PE2I: N-(3-Iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) -2{beta}-carbometoxy -3{beta}-(4`-methyl-phenyl) nortropane which displays the properties required by kinetic and specificity. On the post-synaptic slope the type-D2 dopaminergic receptors were localized, which can be explored by means of (iodolisuride) ergolenes and benzamide derivatives (IBZM). These ligands have not an AMM yet, therefore their utilization may be approached by magistral preparation. The scintigraphy of the D2 receptors and dopamine carrier could be useful for the earlier diagnosis and the therapeutic surveillance of the neuro-degenerative decease. The coupling of the pre- and post-synaptic scintigraphies may be taken into consideration to augment diagnosis potentiality

  11. Cell therapy for neurodegenerative disease and brain injury%神经退行性疾病和脑损伤的细胞疗法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳; 盛卸晃; 宋淑亮; 吉爱国

    2011-01-01

    成熟的神经细胞属于终末分化细胞,具有不可再生性.神经退行性疾病以及其他脑损伤引起的神经元缺失,难以自发修复取代.如何修复大脑中受损的神经细胞、补充神经细胞已成为治疗各类神经系统疾病的关键.本综述将通过干细胞移植和诱导星形胶质细胞去分化两种途径来介绍针对神经退行性疾病和脑损伤的最新疗法.%Since nerve cells are terminal differentiated cells, they have no capacity of regeneration. Therefore, neurodegenerative diseases and other brain injuries may cause permanent loss of neurons without natural replacement. How to repair the damaged nerve cells and supplement them are crucial for the treatment of neurological diseases. In this review, two strategies consist of transplantation of stem cells and dedifferentiation of the astrocytes are discussed for the therapy of neurodegenerative disease and brain injury.

  12. Prions mediated neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W-J; Chen, W-W; Zhang, X

    2015-11-01

    Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that are devoid of nucleic acid and cause a group of rare and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders, affecting approximately 1 person per 1 million inhabitants annually worldwide. These disorders include Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), kuru, fatal insomnia (FI), and variable protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr), all of which involve a conformational change of the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the abnormal scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) through a posttranslational process during which PrPc acquires high β-sheet content. This structural change is accompanied by profound changes in the physicochemical properties of PrPC, rendering the molecule resistant to proteolysis. The conformational change of PrPC can occur due to either spontaneous conversion, dominant mutations in the prion protein (PRNP) gene encoding PrPC, or infection with pathogenic isoform PrPsc from exogenous sources. There is general agreement that PrPC serves as a substrate for conversion to abnormal PrPSc. This latter multiplies exponentially and aggregates in the brain, forming deposits that are associated with the neurodegenerative changes. Although the understanding of the primary causes of prion-induced neurodegeneration is still limited, propagation of PrPSc and neurotoxic signaling seem to interplay in pathogenic process of prions. Here, we review recent findings that have provided fresh insights into this process, and present an overview of incidence, causes and spectrum of related disorders.

  13. Substance P and Antagonists of the Neurokinin-1 Receptor in Neuroinflammation Associated with Infectious and Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alejandra N.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the role that substance P (SP) and its preferred receptor neurokinin-1 (NK1R) play in neuroinflammation associated with select bacterial, viral, parasitic, and neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system. The SP/NK1R complex is a key player in the interaction between the immune and nervous systems. A common effect of this interaction is inflammation. For this reason and because of the predominance in the human brain of the NK1R, its antagonists are attractive potential therapeutic agents. Preventing the deleterious effects of SP through the use of NK1R antagonists has been shown to be a promising therapeutic strategy, as these antagonists are selective, potent, and safe. Here we evaluate their utility in the treatment of different neuroinfectious and neuroinflammatory diseases, as a novel approach to clinical management of CNS inflammation.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases%诱导多能干细胞与神经退行性疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈超; 肖世富

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, are characterized by idiopathic neuron loss in different regions of the central nervous system, which contributes to the relevant dysfunctions in the patients. The application of cell replacement therapy using human embryonic stem (hES) cells, though having attracted much attention, has been hampered by the intrinsic ethical problems. It has been demonstrated that adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the embryonic state, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. It is soon realized that iPS cells may be an alternative source for cell replacement therapy, because it raises no ethical problems and using patient-specific iPS cells for autologous transplantation will not lead to immunological rejection. What's more, certain types of neurons derived from patient-specific iPS cells may display disease-relevant phenotypes. Thus, patient- specific iPS cells can provide a unique opportunity to directly investigate the pathological properties of relevant neural cells in individual patient, and to study the vulnerability of neural cells to pathogenic factors in vitro, which may help reveal the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, the recent development in cellular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using iPS cells was summarized, and the potential value of iPS cells in the modeling of neurodegenerative disease was discussed.%神经退行性疾病,包括帕金森病、阿尔茨海默病和肌萎缩侧索硬化症等的共同特征是在中枢神经系统的不同部位发生特发性神经元丢失.这些神经元的丢失给病人造成了一系列相应的功能障碍.应用人类胚胎干细胞进行细胞替代治疗曾引起人们很大的兴趣,但是一些伦理学问题阻碍了该研究的发展.通过导入特定的转录因子,体细胞能够被诱导为具有胚胎干细胞特性的细胞,即诱导多能

  15. 神经炎症与神经退行性疾病的关系%Relationship Between Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱奥望; 刘展; 郭军; 彰聿平

    2011-01-01

    近十多年来的研究表明,在神经退行性疾病的发生与发展中,脑内始终存在着以胶质细胞激活为主要特征的炎症反应.神经炎症是把双刃剑,一方面,它诱发或加重神经系统的退行性病变;另一方面,它在某些特定情况下有利于神经系统损伤的修复.激活的胶质细胞通过释放致炎细胞因子和活性氧自由基等分子介导神经炎症所致的神经元退行性病变,而由调节性T细胞产生的抗炎细胞因子及由神经元释放的抗炎神经肽能保护神经元抵抗神经炎症,从而减缓或减轻神经退行性疾病的进程.%Over recent decade, studies have shown that inflammatory reaction characterized mainly by the activation of microglia in the brain is implicated in the pathogenesis and processes of neurodegenera tive diseases. Neuroinflammation is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it induces or aggravates the neurodegeneration in the nervous system, and on the other hand, it favors the recovery of the injured neu rons in certain conditions. The activated glial cells release pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, which mediate the neuroinflammation-induced neurodegenerative diseases. The anti-inflammato ry cytokines synthesized by regulatory T cells and neuropeptides secreted by neurons protect the neurons against neuroinflammation, through which neurodegenerative diseases are alleviated.

  16. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aggregation of misfolded proteins in the brain occurs in several neurodegenerative disorders. Aberrant protein aggregation is inducible in rodents and primates by intracerebral inoculation. Possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative diseases has important public health...... excess occurrence of neurodegenerative disease occurred among recipients of blood from a subset of donors was also investigated. As a positive control, transmission of chronic hepatitis before and after implementation of hepatitis C virus screening was assessed. Results: Among included patients, 2.......9% received a transfusion from a donor diagnosed with one of the studied neurodegenerative diseases. No evidence of transmission of any of these diseases was found, regardless of approach. The hazard ratio for dementia in recipients of blood from donors with dementia versus recipients of blood from healthy...

  17. The effect of time-dependent macromolecular crowding on the kinetics of protein aggregation: a simple model for the onset of age-related neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Allen

    2014-08-01

    A linear increase in the concentration of "inert" macromolecules with time is incorporated into simple excluded volume models for protein condensation or fibrillation. Such models predict a long latent period during which no significant amount of protein aggregates, followed by a steep increase in the total amount of aggregate. The elapsed time at which these models predict half-conversion of model protein to aggregate varies by less than a factor of two when the intrinsic rate constant for condensation or fibril growth of the protein is varied over many orders of magnitude. It is suggested that this concept can explain why the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the aggregation of very different proteins and peptides appear at approximately the same advanced age in humans.

  18. Permanent, bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in the rat : A model for chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-related neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, Eszter; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Bari, Ferenc

    2007-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been associated with cognitive decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the pattern of cerebral blood flow in mild cognitive impairment has emerged as a predictive marker for the progression into Alzheimer's disease. The reconstruction of a pathological

  19. Disruption of gut homeostasis by opioids accelerates HIV disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing eMeng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative studies during the past 30 years have established the correlation between opioid abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Further studies also demonstrate that opioid addiction is associated with faster progression to AIDS in patients. Recently, it was revealed that disruption of gut homeostasis and subsequent microbial translocation play important roles in pathological activation of the immune system during HIV infection and contributes to accelerated disease progression. Similarly, opioids have been shown to modulate gut immunity and induce gut bacterial translocation. This review will explore the mechanisms by which opioids accelerate HIV disease progression by disrupting gut homeostasis. Better understanding of these mechanisms will facilitate the search for new therapeutic interventions to treat HIV infection especially in opioid abusing population.

  20. ["SOS SEIN 84" accelerated breast disease management: Patients satisfaction survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Antoine; Dumuids, Magali; Mège, Alice; de Rauglaudre, Gaëtan; Regis Arnaud, Anne; Martin, Nicole; Dupuy Meurat, Françoise; Dolle, Sabine; Gallon, Elise; Serin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In case of a new breast symptom or an abnormal result of breast imaging, some women have a problem finding a quick answer to allay their anxiety. The Institut Sainte-Catherine in Avignon has set up a new form of accelerated disease management through the opening of a new dedicated consultation called SOS SEIN 84. We present the result of a prospective quality study of our first new patients.

  1. Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein is a novel biomarker of neurodegenerative disease in human cerebrospinal fluid and causes neurodegeneration in mouse cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Miyajima

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG is a protein induced by inflammation. It contains a leucine-rich repeat (LRR structure and easily binds with other molecules. However, the function of LRG in the brain during aging and neurodegenerative diseases has not been investigated. Here, we measured human LRG (hLRG concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and observed hLRG expression in post-mortem human cerebral cortex. We then generated transgenic (Tg mice that over-expressed mouse LRG (mLRG in the brain to examine the effects of mLRG accumulation. Finally, we examined protein-protein interactions using a protein microarray method to screen proteins with a high affinity for hLRG. The CSF concentration of hLRG increases with age and is significantly higher in patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP than in healthy elderly people, idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH patients, and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Tg mice exhibited neuronal degeneration and neuronal decline. Accumulation of LRG in the brains of PDD and PSP patients is not a primary etiological factor, but it is thought to be one of the causes of neurodegeneration. It is anticipated that hLRG CSF levels will be a useful biomarker for the early diagnosis of PDD and PSP.

  2. 蛇床子素对神经退行性疾病的作用及机制%Function and Mechanism of Osthole for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路遥; 曾常茜

    2013-01-01

    蛇床子素是最先从伞形科植物中提取分离出的天然香豆素类化合物,具有多种药理学活性。近期研究表明,蛇床子素通过其抗炎、抗氧化、抗凋亡等作用对缺血性脑损伤、实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎、帕金森病、阿尔茨海默病和癫痫等多种神经退行性疾病均具有保护作用。%Osthole is a natural coumarin derivative that was the first isolated from umbelliferae plants . It possesses a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities . Recent research showed that osthole has neuroprotective effects through its antioxidative , antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic actions on various neurodegenerative diseases such as cerebral ischemia , experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis , Parkinson disease , Alzheimer disease , epilepsy and so on .

  3. Immunomodulation and neuroprotection with mesenchymal bone marrow stem cells (MSCs): a proposed treatment for multiple sclerosis and other neuroimmunological/neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Kassis, Ibrahim; Kurkalli, Basan Gowda S; Slavin, Shimon

    2008-02-15

    Bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (non-hematopoietic, stromal cells) can differentiate under certain circumstances into cells from various neuronal and glial type lineages; they also exert immunomodulatory effects. For potential clinical applications, BM-MSCs offer significant practical advantages over other types of stem cells, since they can be obtained from the adult BM (the patient himself being the donor) and can be easily cultured and expanded posing in parallel a very low risk for development of malignancies. We have shown that BM-MSCs cultured with a cocktail of growth factors (containing FGF and BDNF) differentiate into neuronal/glial lineage cells with a predominance of cells expressing astrocytes' markers. BM-MSCs were effective in suppression of chronic EAE in mice and induced neuroprotection, preserving most of the axons in the CNS of successfully-treated animals. Histopathological studies revealed that MSCs could efficiently migrate into the CNS inflamed tissue (both when administered intravenously and intraventricularly) and differentiated into cells expressing neural-glial lineage markers. Our preclinical results indicate that bone marrow can provide a source of stem cells with a potential for migration into inflamed CNS tissue and differentiation into cells expressing neuronal and glial cell markers. Such an approach may provide a feasible and practical way for in situ immunomodulation, neuroprotection and possibly remyelination/regeneration in diseases like multiple sclerosis. We therefore developed a explorative protocol for the evaluation of this therapeutic approach in a small group of patients with MS and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Transgenic Rat Model of Huntington’s Disease: A Histopathological Study and Correlations with Neurodegenerative Process in the Brain of HD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvona Mazurová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rats transgenic for Huntington’s disease (tgHD51 CAG rats, surviving up to two years, represent an animal model of HD similar to the late-onset form of human disease. This enables us to follow histopathological changes in course of neurodegenerative process (NDP within the striatum and compare them with postmortem samples of human HD brains. A basic difference between HD pathology in human and tgHD51 rats is in the rate of NDP progression that originates primarily from slow neuronal degeneration consequently resulting in lesser extent of concomitant reactive gliosis in the brain of tgHD51 rats. Although larger amount of striatal neurons displays only gradual decrease in their size, their number is significantly reduced in the oldest tgHD51 rats. Our quantitative analysis proved that the end of the first year represents the turn in the development of morphological changes related to the progression of NDP in tgHD51 rats. Our data also support the view that all types of CNS glial cells play an important, irreplaceable role in NDP. To the best of our knowledge, our findings are the first to document that tgHD51 CAG rats can be used as a valid animal model for detailed histopathological studies related to HD in human.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of gallocyanine dyes as potential agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpousis, Spyros; Thysiadis, Savvas; Avramidis, Nicolaos; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Efthimiopoulos, Spiros; Sarli, Vasiliki

    2016-01-27

    In search of safe and effective anti-Alzheimer disease agents a series of gallocyanine dyes have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit LRPs/DKK1 interactions. Modulation of the interactions between LRPS and DKK1, regulate Wnt signaling pathway and affect Tau phosphorylation. The current efforts resulted in the identification of potent DKK1 inhibitors which are able to inhibit prostaglandin J2-induced tau phosphorylation at serine 396. PMID:26629858

  6. Human ApoD, an apolipoprotein up-regulated in neurodegenerative diseases, extends lifespan and increases stress resistance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffat, Julien; Walker, David W; Benzer, Seymour

    2008-05-13

    Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) expression increases in several neurological disorders and in spinal cord injury. We provide a report of a physiological role for human ApoD (hApoD): Flies overexpressing hApoD are long-lived and protected against stress conditions associated with aging and neurodegeneration, including hyperoxia, dietary paraquat, and heat stress. We show that the fly ortholog, Glial Lazarillo, is strongly up-regulated in response to these extrinsic stresses and also can protect in vitro-cultured cells in situations modeling Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In adult flies, hApoD overexpression reduces age-associated lipid peroxide accumulation, suggesting a proximal mechanism of action. Similar data obtained in the mouse [Ganfornina, M.D., et al., (2008) Apolipoprotein D is involved in the mechanisms regulating protection from oxidative stress. Aging Cell 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2008.00395.] as well as in plants (Charron et al., personal communication) suggest that ApoD and its orthologs play an evolutionarily conserved role in response to stress, possibly managing or preventing lipid peroxidation.

  7. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  8. Estudo por microscopia eletrônica em doenças neurodegenerativas na infância Electron microscopical study in neurodegenerative diseases in infancy

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    Luiz Fernando Bleggi Torres

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available As doenças neuro degenerativas infantis compõem grupo variado de entidades em que os erros inatos do metabolismo induzem a defeitos enzimáticos intrínsecos às células com eventual acúmulo de material intracelular. A microscopia eletrônica (ME pode auxiliar na caracterização do produto acumulado. Os autores relatam a experiência no diagnóstico das doenças neurodegenerativas na infância através da análise por ME de amostras teciduais provenientes de biópsias, principalmente de pele, conjuntiva e reto e em 2 casos material de necrópsia. As amostras teciduais eram de pacientes com quadro de encefalopatia progressiva a esclarecer. As biópsias de 89 pacientes com quadro de encefalopatia progressiva foram estudadas por microscopia eletrônica. A idade dos pacientes variou de 49 dias a 13 anos, com pico de incidência no primeiro ano de vida (n=28, sendo 50 pacientes do sexo feminino e 39 do masculino. Quanto à origem do material, houve predomínio de pele e conjuntiva. Dos 89 pacientes, 15 tiveram diagnóstico de certeza (16,8% sendo 4 casos de gangliosidose, 3 casos de mucopolissacaridose, 1 caso de doença de Gaucher, 1 caso de doença de Niemann-Pick, 3 casos de lipofuscinose ceróide e 3 casos sugestivos de doença de acúmulo não podendo ser especificadas. Os autores analisaram os aspectos clínicos e os achados ultraestruturais e concluem que a ME é um método complementar valioso no diagnóstico de doença hereditária metabólica de acúmulo, porém de baixa acurácia diagnóstica quando feito como único método de "screening" laboratorial em uma população com encefalopatia progressiva a esclarecer.Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of disorders in which there is storage of abnormal material in cells throughout the body due to an enzyme defect. The authors present the experience in the diagnosis of the neurodegenerative diseases in infancy by electron microscopical study of skin, conjunctival and rectum material of

  9. Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of the Amino Acid Glutamine: Amide-Stacking and Hydrogen Bonding in AN Important Residue in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Dean, Jacob C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease (HD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). An intriguing aspect of the structure of glutamine is its incorporation of an amide group in its side chain, thereby opening up the possibility of forming amide-amide H-bonds between the peptide backbone and side chain. In this study the conformational preferences of two capped gluatamines Z(carboxybenzyl)-Glutamine-X (X=OH, NHMe) are studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase in order to unlock the intrinsic structural motifs that are favored by this flexible sidechain. Conformational assignments are made by comparing the hydride stretch ( 3100-3700 cm-1) and amide I and II ( 1400-1800 cm-1) resonant ion-dip infrared spectra with predictions from harmonic frequency calculations. Assigned structures will be compared to previously published results on both natural and unnatural residues. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison between glutamine and unconstrained γ-peptides due to the similar three-carbon spacing between backbone and side chain in glutamine to the backbone spacing in γ-peptides. The ability of the glutamine side-chain to form amide stacked conformations will be a main focus, along with the prevalence of extended backbone type structures. W. H. James, III, C W. Müller, E. G. Buchanan, M. G. D. Nix, L. Guo, L. Roskop, M. S. Gordon, L. V. Slipchenko, S. H. Gellman, and T. S. Zwier, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131(40), 14243-14245.

  10. Additional Clues for a Protective Role ofVitamin D in Neurodegenerative Diseases: 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Triggers an Anti-Inflammatory Response in BrainPericytes

    OpenAIRE

    Nissou, Marie-France; Guttin, Audrey; Zenga, Cyril; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Wion, Didier

    2014-01-01

    International audience Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) plays a neuroprotectiverole in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Most of the experimental data regarding the genes regulatedby this hormone in brain cells have been obtained with neuron and glial cells. Pericytes play a critical role in brain function thatencompasses their classical function in blood-brain barrier control and maintenance. However, the gene r...

  11. Viral-toxin interactions and Parkinson’s disease: poly(I:C priming enhanced the neurodegenerative effects of paraquat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyn Jessica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson’s disease (PD has been linked with exposure to a variety of environmental and immunological insults (for example, infectious pathogens in which inflammatory and oxidative processes seem to be involved. In particular, epidemiological studies have found that pesticide exposure and infections may be linked with the incidence of PD. The present study sought to determine whether exposure to a viral mimic prior to exposure to pesticides would exacerbate PD-like pathology. Methods Mice received a supra-nigral infusion of 5 μg of the double-stranded RNA viral analog, polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C, followed 2, 7 or 14 days later by administration of the pesticide, paraquat (nine 10 mg/kg injections over three weeks. Results As hypothesized, poly(I:C pre-treatment enhanced dopamine (DA neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta elicited by subsequent paraquat treatment. The augmented neuronal loss was accompanied by robust signs of microglial activation, and by increased expression of the catalytic subunit (gp91 of the NADPH oxidase oxidative stress enzyme. However, the paraquat and poly(I:C treatments did not appreciably affect home-cage activity, striatal DA terminals, or subventricular neurogenesis. Conclusions These findings suggest that viral agents can sensitize microglial-dependent inflammatory responses, thereby rendering nigral DA neurons vulnerable to further environmental toxin exposure.

  12. Accelerated infliximab infusions for inflammatory bowel disease improve effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; McConnell; Simona; Parvulescu-Codrea; Brian; Behm; Beth; Hill; Elizabeth; Dunkle; Karen; Finke; Kathryn; Snyder; Anne; Tuskey; Debbie; Cox; Beth; Woodward

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the safety and effectiveness associated with accelerated infliximab infusion protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).METHODS:Original protocols and infusion rates were developed for the administration of infliximab over 90-min and 60-min.Then the IBD patients on stable maintenance infliximab therapy were offered accelerated infusions.To be eligible for the study,patients needed a minimum of four prior infusions.An initial infusion of 90-min was given to each patient;those tolerating the accelerated infusion were transitioned to a 60-min infusion protocol at their next and all subsequent visits.Any patient having significant infusion reactions would be reverted to the standard 120-min protocol.A change in a patient’s dose mandated a single 120-min infusion before accelerated infusions could be administered again.RESULTS:The University of Virginia Medical Center’s Institutional Review Board approved this study.Fifty IBD patients treated with infliximab 5mg/kg,7.5mg/kg and 10mg/kg were offered accelerated infusions.Forty-six patients consented to participate in the study.Nineteen(41.3%) were female,five(10.9%) were African American and nine(19.6%) had ulcerative colitis.The mean age was 42.6 years old.Patients under age 18 were excluded.Ten patients used immunosuppressive drugs concurrently out of which six were taking azathioprine,three were taking 6-mercaptopurine and one was taking methotrexate.One of the 46 study patients used corticosteroid therapy for his IBD.Seventeen of the patients used prophylactic medications prior to receiving infusions;six patients received corticosteroids as pre-medication.Four patients had a history of distant transfusion reactions to infliximab.These reactions included shortness of breath,chest tightness,flushing,pruritus and urticaria.These patients all took prophylactic medications before receiving infusions.46 patients(27 males and 19 females) received a total of fifty 90-min infusions and ninety

  13. Quantification of total apolipoprotein E and its specific isoforms in cerebrospinal fluid and blood in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Rezeli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A targeted mass spectrometric assay was developed for identification and quantification of apoE isoforms (apoE2, E3 and E4, and it was utilized for screening of samples from AD patients (n = 39 and patients with other neurodegenerative disorders (n = 38. The assay showed good linearity with LOQ corresponds to total apoE concentration of 0.8 and 40 ng/mL in CSF and plasma/serum, respectively. We identified apoE phenotypes with 100% accuracy in clinical samples. We found strong association between genotypes of the individuals and their apoE levels in blood; ϵ4 allele carriers had significantly lower apoE levels in blood than non-carriers.

  14. 线粒体铁蛋白与铁相关的神经退行性疾病%Mitochondria Ferritin and Iron-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亚硕; 石振华; 常彦忠

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalia, mitochondria ferritin (MtFt) was encoded by intronless genes, it has high homology with cytoplasmic of H-ferritin and has ferrousoxidase activity. The MtFt is specifically targeted to mitochondria. Recent studies found that MtFt overexpression had a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-induced damage. This paper mainly introduces the structure and function of MtFt and the defense of MtFt in some of the iron-related neurodegenerative diseases.%在哺乳动物体内,线粒体铁蛋白(mitochondrial ferritin,MtFt)是一个无内含子的基因编码的蛋白,与胞质中的H-ferritin具有较高的同源性,也具有亚铁氧化酶的活性,特异性地在线粒体中表达.近年来的研究发现,过表达MtFt可以使线粒体免受由铁引起的氧化损伤.本文主要介绍MtFt在结构功能上的特点,及其在与铁相关的一些神经退行性疾病中的保护作用.

  15. Exercise is not beneficial and may accelerate symptom onset in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Michelle C; Yuan, Chunyan; Ottenritter, Conwell; Mughal, Mohamed; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Exercise benefits both general health and brain function in rodents and humans. However, it is less clear whether physical activity prevents or ameliorates neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether voluntary wheel running can delay the onset or reduce the severity of Huntington’s disease (HD) in a mouse model. To investigate whether running may delay HD symptoms lifespan, disease onset, locomotor activity, glucose levels, weight, striatal volume, inclusions, cognition and hippocampal neurogenesis were studied in male N171-82Q transgenic HD mice. Running started in pre-symptomatic (44±1 days old) male HD mice, did not improve function and appeared to accelerate disease onset. In particular, HD runners had an earlier onset of disease symptoms (shaking, hunched back and poor grooming), reduced striatal volume and impaired motor behavior, including a shorter latency to fall from the rotarod compared to sedentary controls. Furthermore, weight loss, reduced lifespan, hyperglycemia, Morris water maze learning deficits, diminished hippocampal neurogenesis, deficits in immature neuronal morphology, intranuclear inclusions and decreased dentate gyrus volume were refractory to physical activity. Taken together our research indicates that exercise is not beneficial, and may be detrimental to a vulnerable nervous system. PMID:21152076

  16. Risk-associated coding synonymous SNPs in type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases: genetic silence and the underrated association with splicing regulation and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karambataki, M; Malousi, A; Kouidou, S

    2014-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are tentatively critical with regard to disease predisposition, but coding synonymous SNPs (sSNPs) are generally considered "neutral". Nevertheless, sSNPs in serine/arginine-rich (SR) and splice-site (SS) exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) or in exonic CpG methylation targets, could be decisive for splicing, particularly in aging-related conditions, where mis-splicing is frequently observed. We presently identified 33 genes T2D-related and 28 related to neurodegenerative diseases, by investigating the impact of the corresponding coding sSNPs on splicing and using gene ontology data and computational tools. Potentially critical (prominent) sSNPs comply with the following criteria: changing the splicing potential of prominent SR-ESEs or of significant SS-ESEs by >1.5 units (Δscore), or formation/deletion of ESEs with maximum splicing score. We also noted the formation/disruption of CpGs (tentative methylation sites of epigenetic sSNPs). All disease association studies involving sSNPs are also reported. Only 21/670 coding SNPs, mostly epigenetic, reported in 33 T2D-related genes, were found to be prominent coding synonymous. No prominent sSNPs have been recorded in three key T2D-related genes (GCGR, PPARGC1A, IGF1). Similarly, 20/366 coding synonymous were identified in ND related genes, mostly epigenetic. Meta-analysis showed that 17 of the above prominent sSNPs were previously investigated in association with various pathological conditions. Three out of four sSNPs (all epigenetic) were associated with T2D and one with NDs (branch site sSNP). Five were associated with other or related pathological conditions. None of the four sSNPs introducing new ESEs was found to be disease-associated. sSNPs introducing smaller Δscore changes (<1.5) in key proteins (INSR, IRS1, DISC1) were also correlated to pathological conditions. This data reveals that genetic variation in splicing-regulatory and particularly CpG sites might be related to

  17. Scintigraphic visualization of inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Van Laere, K; Dierckx, RA; Dumont, F; De Deyn, PP; Slegers, G; Korf, J

    2003-01-01

    In the past few decades, our understanding of the central nervous system has evolved from one of an immune-privileged site, to one where inflammation is pathognomonic for some of the most prevalent and tragic neurodegenerative diseases. Current research indicates that diseases as diverse as multiple

  18. Tsallis statistics and neurodegenerative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Aggelos C.; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we perform statistical analysis of time series deriving from four neurodegenerative disorders, namely epilepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD). The time series are concerned with electroencephalograms (EEGs) of healthy and epileptic states, as well as gait dynamics (in particular stride intervals) of the ALS, PD and HDs. We study data concerning one subject for each neurodegenerative disorder and one healthy control. The analysis is based on Tsallis non-extensive statistical mechanics and in particular on the estimation of Tsallis q-triplet, namely {qstat, qsen, qrel}. The deviation of Tsallis q-triplet from unity indicates non-Gaussian statistics and long-range dependencies for all time series considered. In addition, the results reveal the efficiency of Tsallis statistics in capturing differences in brain dynamics between healthy and epileptic states, as well as differences between ALS, PD, HDs from healthy control subjects. The results indicate that estimations of Tsallis q-indices could be used as possible biomarkers, along with others, for improving classification and prediction of epileptic seizures, as well as for studying the gait complex dynamics of various diseases providing new insights into severity, medications and fall risk, improving therapeutic interventions.

  19. Role of metabolism in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Santopaolo, Marianna; Faicchia, Deriggio; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Formisano, Luigi; de Candia, Paola; Galgani, Mario; De Rosa, Veronica; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century, the prevalence of age-related disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases continues to rise. This is the case of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases and Multiple sclerosis, which are chronic disorders characterized by neuronal loss in motor, sensory or cognitive systems. Accumulating evidence has suggested the presence of a strong correlation between metabolic changes and neurodegeneration. Indeed epidemiologic studies have shown strong associations between obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, while animal models have provided insights into the complex relationships between these conditions. In this context, hormones such as leptin, ghrelin, insulin and IGF-1 seem to play a key role in the regulation of neuronal damage, toxic insults and several other neurodegenerative processes. This review aims to presenting the most recent evidence supporting the crosstalk linking energy metabolism and neurodegeneration, and will focus on metabolic manipulation as a possible therapeutic tool in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27506744

  20. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  1. Sound Naming in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Maggie L.; Brambati, Simona M.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L.; Johnson, Julene K.

    2010-01-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two…

  2. Nonlinear multi-photon laser wave-mixing optical detection in microarrays and microchips for ultrasensitive detection and separation of biomarkers for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Manna; Hetu, Marcel; Maxwell, Eric; Pradel, Jean S.; Ramos, Sashary; Tong, William G.

    2015-09-01

    Multi-photon degenerate four-wave mixing is demonstrated as an ultrasensitive absorption-based optical method for detection, separation and identification of biomarker proteins in the development of early diagnostic methods for HIV- 1, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases using compact, portable microarrays and capillary- or microchip-based chemical separation systems that offer high chemical specificity levels. The wave-mixing signal has a quadratic dependence on concentration, and hence, it allows more reliable monitoring of smaller changes in analyte properties. Our wave-mixing detection sensitivity is comparable or better than those of current methods including enzyme-linked immunoassay for clinical diagnostic and screening. Detection sensitivity is excellent since the wave-mixing signal is a coherent laser-like beam that can be collected with virtually 100% collection efficiency with high S/N. Our analysis time is short (1-15 minutes) for molecular weight-based protein separation as compared to that of a conventional separation technique, e.g., sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When ultrasensitive wavemixing detection is paired with high-resolution capillary- or microchip-based separation systems, biomarkers can be separated and identified at the zepto- and yocto-mole levels for a wide range of analytes. Specific analytes can be captured in a microchannel through the use of antibody-antigen interactions that provide better chemical specificity as compared to size-based separation alone. The technique can also be combined with immune-precipitation and a multichannel capillary array for high-throughput analysis of more complex protein samples. Wave mixing allows the use of chromophores and absorption-modifying tags, in addition to conventional fluorophores, for online detection of immunecomplexes related to cancer.

  3. Differential Impairment of Cognitive and Affective Mentalizing Abilities in Neurodegenerative Dementias: Evidence from Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodich, Alessandra; Cerami, Chiara; Crespi, Chiara; Canessa, Nicola; Lettieri, Giada; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Cappa, Stefano F; Cacioppo, John T

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and affective theory of mind (ToM) can be impaired in the course of neurodegenerative dementias. Experimental tests based on different task conditions and/or complexity may fail to capture disease-specific patterns of impairments. In this study, we assessed with a single task both the affective and the cognitive facets of ToM ability in a sample of 47 patients (i.e., 12 AD, 20 bvFTD, and 15 aMCI fulfilling IWG criteria for AD in predementia phase) and 65 healthy controls. Subjects were administered the Story-based Empathy task (SET), a non-verbal task measuring the ability to infer others' intentions (IA) and emotions (EA) compared to a control condition (causal inferences, CI). Global and single sub-condition scores were evaluated with a vectorial method, analyzing the relationship between social abilities and basic cognitive functioning by means of two indices representing the basic ability to perform the task and the balance between basic functions and ToM skills.Dementia (AD and bvFTD) patients showed impaired performances on all SET sub-conditions, whereas aMCI subjects' performance was not different from healthy controls. Vectorial analysis revealed a specific change in the balance between EA and CI conditions only in the bvFTD group, supporting a disproportionate deficit in mental states attribution based on affective cues. The overall deficit in the task in AD appears to be more general and related to the severity of dementia. This latter finding is further supported by the normal performance of the prodromal AD group. PMID:26836153

  4. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  5. Interleukin-18 alters protein expressions of neurodegenerative diseases-linked proteins in human SH-SY5Y neuron-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina M Sutinen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are present in Alzheimer´s disease (AD brains in addition to neuronal loss, Amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau-protein neurofibrillary tangles. Previously we showed that levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-18 (IL-18, are elevated in post-mortem AD brains. IL-18 can modulate the tau kinases, Cdk5 and GSK3β, as well as Aβ-production. IL-18 levels are also increased in AD risk diseases, including type-2 diabetes and obesity. Here, we explored other IL-18 regulated proteins in neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubated with IL-18 for 24, 48 or 72h, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Specific altered protein spots were chosen and identified with mass spectrometry and verified by western immunoblotting. IL-18 had time-dependent effects on the SH-SY5Y proteome, modulating numerous protein levels/modifications. We concentrated on those related to OS (DDAH2, peroxiredoxins 2, 3 and 6, DJ-1, BLVRA, Aβ-degradation (MMP14, TIMP2, Aβ-aggregation (Septin-2 and modifications of axon growth and guidance associated, collapsing response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2. IL-18 significantly increased antioxidative enzymes, indicative of OS, and altered levels of glycolytic α- and γ-enolase and multifunctional 14-3-3γ and -ε, commonly affected in neurodegenerative diseases. MMP14, TIMP2, α-enolase and 14-3-3ε, indirectly involved in Aβ metabolism, as well as Septin-2 showed changes that increase Aβ levels. Increased 14-3-3γ may contribute to GSK3β driven tau hyperphosphorylation and CRMP2 Thr514 and Ser522 phosphorylation with the Thr555-site, a target for Rho kinase, showing time-dependent changes. IL-18 also increased caspase-1 levels and vacuolization of the cells. Although our SH-SY5Y cells were not aged, as neurons in AD, our work suggests that heightened or prolonged IL-18 levels can drive protein changes of known

  6. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases%神经变性疾病相关睡眠障碍的循证治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雪; 李娟; 刘凌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegeuerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment.Methods Search PubMed,MEDLINE,Cochrane Library,Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance","neurodegenerative diseases","Parkinson's disease or PD","Alzheimer's disease or AD","multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words.The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale.Results A total of 35 articles,including 2 systematic reviews,5 randomized controlled trials,13 clinical controlled trials,13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation,13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles.Clinical evidences showed that:1) advice on sleep hygiene,careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD.Bright light therapy (BLT)may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD).However,to date,very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2) treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g.melatonin,acetylcholinesterase inhibitors,antipsychotic drugs,antidepressants)and non-drug therapy (e.g.BLT,behavior therapy),but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3) the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP),and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4) there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.%目的 评价神经变性疾病相

  7. 干细胞治疗神经退行性疾病的前景与问题☆◇%Prospects and problems of stem cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊杰; 宁丽娜; 王再领; 石学敏

    2013-01-01

      背景:虽然各种神经退行性疾病的人群发病率居高不下且有上升趋势,但至今仍无有效治疗方法,因此,寻求有效的治疗神经退行性疾病的途径是科学界面临的挑战。目的:文章分析和综述了对干细胞治疗神经退行性疾病的近年研究进展及热点问题。方法:文章对干细胞移植治疗神经退行性疾病,如阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病、脑卒中、亨廷顿病、视网膜色素变性疾病、肌萎缩性侧索硬化症、癫痫等疾病的基础与临床研究进展进行概述,探讨干细胞治疗神经退行性疾病的可行性、优势及问题。结果与结论:干细胞治疗神经退行性疾病大部分研究还是集中在实验动物模型阶段,还没有支持干细胞临床治疗的有效证据,其安全性和有效性还没有确切临床保证和标准,临床治疗效果及不良反应都有待大宗及长期临床试验研究进一步验证。%BACKGROUND:Although the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases in various populations is high and has an upward trend, so far there is no effective treatment method. So it is a chal enge for scientific community to seek effective treatment method for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. OBJECTIVE:To analyze and review the research progress and hot issues of stem cel s for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS:The basic and clinical researches on stem cel s for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases were overviewed, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, Huntington’s disease, retinitis pigmentosa, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and epilepsy, in order to investigate the feasibility, advantages and problems of stem cel s in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Most of the studies on stem cel s in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases are in the stage of experimental animal models, and there is no valid evidence to

  8. Age, gender, and cancer but not neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases strongly modulate systemic effect of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele on lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Kulminski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enduring interest in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE polymorphism is ensured by its evolutionary-driven uniqueness in humans and its prominent role in geriatrics and gerontology. We use large samples of longitudinally followed populations from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS original and offspring cohorts and the Long Life Family Study (LLFS to investigate gender-specific effects of the ApoE4 allele on human survival in a wide range of ages from midlife to extreme old ages, and the sensitivity of these effects to cardiovascular disease (CVD, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders (ND. The analyses show that women's lifespan is more sensitive to the e4 allele than men's in all these populations. A highly significant adverse effect of the e4 allele is limited to women with moderate lifespan of about 70 to 95 years in two FHS cohorts and the LLFS with relative risk of death RR = 1.48 (p = 3.6 × 10(-6 in the FHS cohorts. Major human diseases including CVD, ND, and cancer, whose risks can be sensitive to the e4 allele, do not mediate the association of this allele with lifespan in large FHS samples. Non-skin cancer non-additively increases mortality of the FHS women with moderate lifespans increasing the risks of death of the e4 carriers with cancer two-fold compared to the non-e4 carriers, i.e., RR = 2.07 (p = 5.0 × 10(-7. The results suggest a pivotal role of non-sex-specific cancer as a nonlinear modulator of survival in this sample that increases the risk of death of the ApoE4 carriers by 150% (p = 5.3 × 10(-8 compared to the non-carriers. This risk explains the 4.2 year shorter life expectancy of the e4 carriers compared to the non-carriers in this sample. The analyses suggest the existence of age- and gender-sensitive systemic mechanisms linking the e4 allele to lifespan which can non-additively interfere with cancer-related mechanisms.

  9. Age, gender, and cancer but not neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases strongly modulate systemic effect of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele on lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Culminskaya, Irina; Arbeeva, Liubov; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Stallard, Eric; Christensen, Kaare; Schupf, Nicole; Province, Michael A; Yashin, Anatoli I

    2014-01-01

    Enduring interest in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphism is ensured by its evolutionary-driven uniqueness in humans and its prominent role in geriatrics and gerontology. We use large samples of longitudinally followed populations from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) original and offspring cohorts and the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to investigate gender-specific effects of the ApoE4 allele on human survival in a wide range of ages from midlife to extreme old ages, and the sensitivity of these effects to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders (ND). The analyses show that women's lifespan is more sensitive to the e4 allele than men's in all these populations. A highly significant adverse effect of the e4 allele is limited to women with moderate lifespan of about 70 to 95 years in two FHS cohorts and the LLFS with relative risk of death RR = 1.48 (p = 3.6 × 10(-6)) in the FHS cohorts. Major human diseases including CVD, ND, and cancer, whose risks can be sensitive to the e4 allele, do not mediate the association of this allele with lifespan in large FHS samples. Non-skin cancer non-additively increases mortality of the FHS women with moderate lifespans increasing the risks of death of the e4 carriers with cancer two-fold compared to the non-e4 carriers, i.e., RR = 2.07 (p = 5.0 × 10(-7)). The results suggest a pivotal role of non-sex-specific cancer as a nonlinear modulator of survival in this sample that increases the risk of death of the ApoE4 carriers by 150% (p = 5.3 × 10(-8)) compared to the non-carriers. This risk explains the 4.2 year shorter life expectancy of the e4 carriers compared to the non-carriers in this sample. The analyses suggest the existence of age- and gender-sensitive systemic mechanisms linking the e4 allele to lifespan which can non-additively interfere with cancer-related mechanisms.

  10. Dysregulated microRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre; de Strooper, Bart

    2010-09-01

    The complexity of the nervous system arises in part, from the large diversity of neural cell types that support the architecture of neuronal circuits. Recent studies have highlighted microRNAs as important players in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and therefore the phenotype of neural cells. A link between microRNAs and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease is becoming increasingly evident. Here, we discuss microRNAs in neurodegeneration, from the fruit fly and mouse utilized as experimental models to dysregulated microRNAs in human neurodegenerative disorders. We propose that studying microRNAs and their mRNA targets in the context of neurodegeneration will significantly contribute to the identification of proteins important for neuronal function and might reveal underlying molecular networks that drive these diseases.

  11. Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  12. Neurodegenerative diseases and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder%神经系统变性疾病与快速眼动期睡眠行为异常

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何荆贵; 张熙

    2011-01-01

    Sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of muscular atonia and prominent motor behavior during rapid eye movement(REM) sleep. RBD can cause sleep disruption and severe injuries for the patient or bed partner. The disorder is strongly associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple-system atrophy(MSA), Parkinson's disease(PD), dementia with Lewy bodies(LBD), and progressive supranuclear palsy(PSP). In many cases, the symptoms of RBD precede other symptoms of these neurodegenerative disorders by several years. RBD might be a stage in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. Longitudinal studies in patients with idiopathic RBD are warranted to characterize the natural history of such patients and will increase awareness of mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.%睡眠行为异常(RBD)的特征是快速眼动(REM)睡眠期骨骼肌弛缓现象消失,并出现突出的运动行为,导致睡眠中断和自身或床伴的伤害.RBD与神经系统变性病有密切关联.RBD的症状常在神经系统变性病的其他症状数年之前出现,被认为可能是神经系统变性病发展过程中的某个阶段.对原发性RBD的纵向研究能充分了解其自然病程,将能增加对神经系统变性病的机制、诊断及治疗的认识.

  13. Stem cell transplantation in the clinical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases%干细胞移植在治疗神经退行性疾病方面的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁星光; 黄玉洁; 伍亚红; 赵青威; 黄明珠; 洪东升

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of neurons contributed to the pathological process of neurodegenerative diseases.Neurodegeneration was the most common cause of dementia in the elderly with a worldwide prevalence estimated to quadruple over the next 50 years, specific treatments that could slow or stop neurodegeneration were not available yet .Regenerative medicine offered new avenues for developing effective therapies for neurodegeneration .Success of cell replacement therapy in this field may largely depend on readily available and unlimited supply of desired functional cell types .Replacement therapy of cell transplantation could treat with drugs alone or in combination with the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases .In this paper , we summarized the research progress of cell transplantation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases , including Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, Huntington′s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis .In order to explore the effectiveness , safety and feasibility of cell transplantation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases , as well as the difficulties and problems were also disscussed .Our work also laid a foundation for the development of neural degenerative diseases during clinical applications .%社会老龄化关联的神经退行性疾病已成为不容忽视的医学和社会问题,药物治疗至今无法达到令人满意的治疗效果。干细胞移植替代疗法可单独或结合药物治疗,为神经退行性疾病的治疗提供了新的途径。本文就目前干细胞移植在神经退行性疾病的治疗中取得的研究进展进行总结,包括阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病、亨廷顿舞蹈病和肌萎缩性侧索硬化症等,探讨干细胞移植在治疗神经退行性疾病方面的有效性、安全性和可行性,以及存在的困难和问题。同时也对干细胞移植治疗神经退行性疾病在未来发展中可能遇到的挑战进行了展望,希望能为其将来在

  14. Gut microbiome in health and disease: Linking the microbiome-gut-brain axis and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaisas, Shivani; Maher, Joshua; Kanthasamy, Anumantha

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiome comprises the collective genome of the trillions of microorganisms residing in our gastrointestinal ecosystem. The interaction between the host and its gut microbiome is a complex relationship whose manipulation could prove critical to preventing or treating not only various gut disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and ulcerative colitis (UC), but also central nervous system (CNS) disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known about the gut microbiome, how it is connected to the development of disease and to identify the bacterial and biochemical targets that should be the focus of future research. Understanding the mechanisms behind the activity and proliferation of the gut microbiome will provide us new insights that may pave the way for novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Why industry propaganda and political interference cannot disguise the inevitable role played by human exposure to aluminium in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eExley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the aluminium age it is clearly unpalatable for aluminium, the globe’s most successful metal, to be implicated in human disease. It is unpalatable because for approximately 100 years humans have reaped the rewards of the most abundant metal of the Earth’s crust without seriously considering the potential consequences for human health. The aluminium industry is a pillar of the developed and developing world and irrespective of the tyranny of human exposure to aluminium it cannot be challenged without significant consequences for businesses, economies and governments. However, no matter how deep the dependency nor unthinkable the withdrawal, science continues to document, if not too slowly, a burgeoning body burden of aluminium in humans. Herein I will make the case that it is inevitable both today and in the future that an individual’s exposure to aluminium is impacting upon their health and is already contributing to, if not causing, chronic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. This is the logical, if uncomfortable, consequence of living in the aluminium age.

  16. Environmental Pollutants as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel eChin-Chan; Juliana eNavarro-Yepes; Betzabet eQuintanilla-Vega

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment, from diet to the new nanomaterials as putative risk factors has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metal...

  17. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid accelerates disease progression in a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping K Yip

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by loss of motor neurons that currently has no cure. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, have many health benefits including neuroprotective and myoprotective potential. We tested the hypothesis that a high level of dietary EPA could exert beneficial effects in ALS. The dietary exposure to EPA (300 mg/kg/day in a well-established mouse model of ALS expressing the G93A superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 mutation was initiated at a pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stage, and the disease progression was monitored until the end stage. Daily dietary EPA exposure initiated at the disease onset did not significantly alter disease presentation and progression. In contrast, EPA treatment initiated at the pre-symptomatic stage induced a significantly shorter lifespan. In a separate group of animals sacrificed before the end stage, the tissue analysis showed that the vacuolisation detected in G93A-SOD1 mice was significantly increased by exposure to EPA. Although EPA did not alter motor neurone loss, EPA reversed the significant increase in activated microglia and the astrocytic activation seen in G93A-SOD1 mice. The microglia in the spinal cord of G93A-SOD1 mice treated with EPA showed a significant increase in 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, a highly toxic aldehydic oxidation product of omega-3 fatty acids. These data show that dietary EPA supplementation in ALS has the potential to worsen the condition and accelerate the disease progression. This suggests that great caution should be exerted when considering dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplements in ALS patients.

  18. Advances in novel anti-neurodegenerative diseases drugs targeting mitochondria%靶向线粒体抗神经退行性疾病新型药物研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙竞; 高静

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria,the major organelle in neurons,which provides energy via oxidative phosphorylation for all kinds of metabolic activities,is involved in many pathophysiological processes,such as calcium homeostasis and apoptosis. Increasing evi⁃dence has indicated that mitochondrial dysfunction displays a significant role in the early stage of neurodegenerative disorders like Par⁃kinson′s disease(PD)and Alzheimer′s disease(AD). Therefore,studies which focus on mitochondrial dysfunction under these patho⁃logical conditions contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorder and discovering new neuroprotective drugs. Actually,various mitochondria-targeting agents have been tried in clinic or under different investigational phases against neuro⁃degenerative disorders. This review discusses the evidence on mitochondrial impairments during neurodegenerative diseases and the advances in mitochondria-targeting agents as a potential alternative drug strategy for effective management of neurodegenerative diseases.%线粒体是广泛存在于神经元细胞中的细胞器,它既能通过氧化磷酸化作用为各种生命活动提供能量,也参与了如钙稳态和细胞凋亡等多种病理生理性活动的调节。大量研究证明线粒体功能障碍在帕金森病、阿尔茨海默病等神经退行性疾病的早期发生过程中发挥重要作用。探索线粒体在该类疾病发生过程中的变化,对认识神经退行性疾病的发病机制,开发新型神经保护药物具有重要意义。事实上,一些线粒体靶向性药物已用于神经退行性疾病的临床治疗或正处于不同研究阶段。本文通过对有关线粒体在神经退行性疾病中相关证据的讨论,综述线粒体靶向性神经保护剂的研究进展,论证其作为神经退行性疾病治疗药物的可行性。

  19. 细胞移植治疗神经变性疾病:是否发生了细胞“转分化”?★%Cell transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases:“Transdifferentiation”appears?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉峰; 张凡喜; 张健民

    2013-01-01

      背景:神经变性疾病为一类缓慢起病、病程呈进行性发展、预后不良的疾病,迄今尚缺乏有效的根治方法。细胞移植为神经变性疾病的治疗提供了一个崭新的思路。  目的:研究细胞移植治疗神经变性疾病的移植细胞、修饰基因及方法,并探讨细胞移植后是否发生“转分化”。  方法:收集细胞移植治疗神经变性疾病的相关文献,分析近年相关研究中细胞移植治疗神经变性疾病的移植细胞、修饰基因,以及细胞移植治疗帕金森病、阿尔茨海默病和肌萎缩侧索硬化的方法。  结果与结论:目前治疗神经变性疾病研究较多的主要为骨髓干细胞、胚胎干细胞、脐血干细胞、神经干细胞、异体细胞等。细胞移植治疗神经变性疾病时的修饰基因主要有酪氨酸羟化酶、孤儿核受体、神经营养因子、Von Hippel-Lindau基因、白细胞介素1及褪黑素等。细胞移植治疗帕金森病多是移植到大鼠纹状体,细胞移植治疗阿尔茨海默病和肌萎缩侧索硬化的移植部位分别多为海马和蛛网膜下腔。细胞移植应用于治疗神经变性疾病正日趋成熟,但移植后是否真的发生了细胞的“转分化”,尚无明确的结论。%BACKGROUND:Neurodegenerative disease is a kind of disease with slow onset, progressive duration and poor prognosis, so far, there is no effective treatment method. Cel transplantation provides a new idea for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. OBJECTIVE:To observe the trasplated cel s, modifiers and methods used in cel transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, and to explore whether“transdifferentiation”appeared after cel transplantation. METHODS:Articles related to cel transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease were col ected, and the transplanted cel s and modifiers used in cel transplantation for the treatment of

  20. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K; Mitchell, Grant W; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A; Croglio, Michael P; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y; Razzo, Beatrice M; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R; Fajgenbaum, David C

    2015-12-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in "omics" technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN's collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care.

  1. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau. PMID:25449570

  2. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau.

  3. Neurodegenerative Shielding by Curcumin and Its Derivatives on Brain Lesions Induced by 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease in Albino Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sunder Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study was undertaken to evaluate the neurodegenerative defending potential of curcumin (CUR, demethoxycurcumin (DMC, and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC on 6-hydroxydopamine-(6-OHDA induced Parkinsonism model in rats. Curcuminoids were administered (60 mg/kg, body weight, per oral for three weeks followed by unilateral injection of 6-OHDA on 22nd day (10 μg/2 μL into the right striatum leading to extensive loss of dopaminergic cells. The behavioral observations, biochemical markers, quantification of dopamine (DA, DOPAC, and HVA followed by dopamine (D2 receptor binding assay and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, using immunohistochemistry were evaluated using HPLC after three weeks of lesion. Pretreated animals showed significant protection against neuronal degeneration compared to lesion animals by normalizing the deranged levels of biomarkers and showed the potency in the order CUR > DMC > BDMC. The same order of effectiveness was observed in D2 receptors binding assay and TH immunohistochemistry study. We conclude that curcuminoids appear to shield progressive neuronal degeneration from increased oxidative attack in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats through its free radical scavenging mechanism, and DA, DOPAC, and HVA enhancing capabilities in the sequence of efficacy CUR > DMC > BDMC. Further, curcuminoids may have potential utility in treatment of many more oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. MicroRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M Maral

    2010-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. During the last decade, considerable advances have been made in our understanding the biogenesis of miRNAs, the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate gene expression and their functional role in various physiological situations. miRNAs are abundant in the brain where they have crucial roles in development and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence from postmortem brain analyses and animal model studies has begun to suggest that miRNA dysfunction contributes to neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we discuss several examples of investigations demonstrating the role of miRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders. As the expression of disease-causing genes is regulated by certain miRNA(s), changes in these miRNAs could lead to the accumulation of disease-causing proteins, and subsequently to neuronal dysfunction and death. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms can provide potential new therapeutic approaches to slow down or halt the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Development of PET tracers for neuro inflammation imaging in neuro degenerative diseases; Developpement de radiotraceurs de la neuroinflammation pour l'imagerie des pathologies neurodegeneratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauveau, F

    2007-10-15

    Inflammatory processes such as micro-glial or endothelial activation are involved in many neuro-degenerative conditions. Neuro-inflammation imaging is considered an attractive tool for fundamental research, diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation in neuro-pathologies. First, an aptamer was selected against a recombinant fragment of the endothelial target VCAM-1, but proved unable to bind the target protein in native conformation, as expressed by a cell line. Second, five radioligands of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), a marker of micro-glial activation, were evaluated in vivo using PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging in a rat model of neuro-inflammation, and were compared to [11C]PK11195. Four radiotracers displayed a better contrast than [11C]PK11195. In a competitive field of research, this work demonstrates the efficiency of in vivo screening of radiotracers for fast selection of clinically relevant molecules. (author)

  6. 微小 RNA 在朊病毒病等神经退行性疾病中的研究进展%Current research progress on microRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases including prion diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏静; 高晨

    2016-01-01

    朊病毒病是一类具有传染性、不可逆且致命的神经退行性疾病,其致病机制为体内正常编码的细胞型朊蛋白(cellular prion protein ,PrPC )构象发生变化,形成了具有感染性的异常痒病型朊病毒(scrapie prion protein ,PrPSc ),但具体机制不清楚,目前为止尚无有效治疗方法。微小 RNA(microRNA ,miRNA)可在转录水平调控细胞蛋白表达,对神经系统发育及功能起重要作用。近年来,对一些特定miRNA在朊病毒病中相应调控机制、自发免疫、炎症信号转导及靶基因预测方面的研究可为治疗朊病毒病提供新的角度。本文就miRNA在朊病毒病发生中的相关研究进展进行综述,并详细探讨其中研究较为深入的miRNA。%Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) ,or prion diseases ,are irreversible and fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the conformational conversion of cellular prion protein (PrPC ) , a normal cellular protein ,into scrapie prion protein (PrPSc ) ,a structural isoform that is infectious and with no effective treatment yet .MicroRNA can regulate cellular protein expression at transcriptional level and may play an critical role in the development process of central nervous system .Recent studies indicate that some specific microRNAs involved in the regulation of innate immune response and inflammation signaling pathways may also be implicated in prion diseases and provide some new insights into the treatment of prion diseases .This review highlights the progress on microRNAs in the occurrence of prion diseases and discusses the leading microRNAs in detail .

  7. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment. PMID:23016644

  8. Accelerating Next Generation Vaccine Development for Global Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Koff, Wayne C.; Dennis R Burton; R.Johnson, Philip; Walker, Bruce D; King, Charles R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Ahmed, Rafi; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are among the greatest successes in the history of public health. However, past strategies for vaccine development are unlikely to succeed in the future against major global diseases such as AIDS, TB, and malaria. For such diseases, the correlates of protection are poorly defined and the pathogens evade immune detection and/or exhibit extensive genetic variability. Recent advances have heralded in a new era of vaccine discovery. However, translation of these advances into vaccines re...

  9. Clinical translation of stem cells in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N

    2012-02-01

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. Apraxias in neurodegenerative dementias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer′s disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating.

  11. 5,6-Dihydrodibenzo[b,f][1,4,5]thiadiazepine derivatives and the use thereof in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Conde, Santiago; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel; González Muñoz, Gema Cristina; Villarroya Sánchez, Mercedes; García López, Manuela; García García, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    [EN] Chemical compounds derived fkom the 5.6-dihydrodibemo[b;B[l,4,5]thiadiazepine heterocyclic system and the use thereof as pharmaceutical compositions for the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system that are caused by a series of processes included in that which is generally known as neurodegeneration, specifically for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or Huntington's disease.

  12. Insights on accelerated skeletal repair in Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Kim

    2015-06-01

    In this patient, spontaneous recovery of trabecular bone architecture was reflected by the early correction in TBS. Subsequent TPTD treatment was associated with marked improvement in BMD, presumably due to enhanced mineralization. Complete skeletal repair was achieved by this two-step mechanism in a very short time following successful surgical treatment for Cushing's disease.

  13. CSF biomarkers in neurodegenerative and vascular dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; Schmitz, Matthias; Ferrer, Isidro; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and prionopathies, together with vascular encephalopathies, are cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Identification of reliable biomarkers in biological fluids, particularly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is of extreme importance in optimizing the precise early clinical diagnosis of distinct entities and predicting the outcome in particular settings. In addition, the study of CSF biomarkers is useful to identify and monitor the underlying pathological processes developing in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Evidence suggests that levels of key CSF molecules correlate, in some circumstances, with prediction, disease progression, and severity of cognitive decline. Correlation of CSF markers and underlying pathological molecular substrates in brain is an exciting field for further study. However, while some dementias such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have accurate CSF biomarkers, other disease types such as dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia lack reliable biomarkers for their specific clinical diagnosis. PMID:27016008

  14. Efficacy of Natural Compounds in Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh Singh

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders represent clusters of serious diseases that results in progressive deterioration of normal structure and physiology of central nervous system. Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or other neurodegenerative disorders involves multifaceted permutation of genetic and environmental factors. Combinations of lifestyle modification linked with environmental factor jointly or alone represent the largest share of cases of these disorders. Etiology of such neuronal degeneration involves manifestation of toxic reaction in the form of functional anomalies leading to dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, activated inflammatory cascade, compromised neuronal survival pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction and finally neuronal apoptosis/necrosis and cell death. Furthermore, evidences from various studies exhibited role of oxidative stress and compromised anti-oxidant defense system as one of the prime factors associated with activation of various signal transduction pathways that would ultimately lead to the formation of amyloid beta or alpha synuclein in the brain. Keeping in view of complex etiology and pathophysiology along with a miniscule of available treatment options associated with these neurodegenerative disorders, the role of natural agents and herbal extracts as therapeutic alternatives alone or in combination with synthetic drugs could not be ruled out. In the same context the present chapter has been aimed to investigate the role of selected natural plants like Withania somnifera, Bacopa monnieri, Curcuma longa, Centella asiatica, Ocimum sanctum, Nardostachys jatamansi and Emblica officinalis in various neurodegenerative disorders and explore their targets to ameliorate neurotoxicity in various experimental models. The rationale for selection of these plants was based on their strong anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant potential and large body of evidence that suggest their efficacy in preclinical as well as in clinical studies

  15. Anti-VEGF antibody treatment accelerates polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shagun; Honer, Michael; Krämer, Stefanie D; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xueqi; Segerer, Stephan; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2011-10-01

    Polycystic kidney growth implies expansion of the vasculature, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent processes play a critical role and that VEGF is a putative therapeutic target. Whether an anti-VEGF antibody improves renal cystic disease has not been determined. We administrated 5 mg/kg B20.4.1, an anti-VEGF-A antibody, or vehicle intraperitoneally twice weekly to 4-wk-old male normal (+/+) and cystic (Cy/+) Han:SPRD rats for 6 wk. Renal function, urinary protein excretion, organ/body weight ratios, cyst volume, tubular epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation, renal VEGF, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and -2α expression, renal histology, and kidney hypoxia visualized by [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography were assessed. The treated compared with untreated +/+ rats had lower TEC proliferation rates, whereas Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 displayed an increased proximal TEC proliferation rate, causing enhanced cyst and kidney growth. The +/+ and Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 had severe renal failure and extensive glomerular damage. Proteinuria, which was highest in anti-VEGF-treated Cy/+ and lowest in untreated normal littermates, was positively correlated with renal HIF-1α and negatively correlated with VEGF expression. The untreated Cy/+ vs. +/+ rats had higher overall [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake. The +/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 vs. untreated had increased [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake, whereas the uptake was unchanged among treated vs. untreated Cy/+ animals. In conclusion, B20.4.1 caused an exaggerated cystic response of the proximal tubules in cystic rats and severe kidney injury that was associated with low renal VEGF and high HIF-1α levels. Anti-VEGF drug therapy may therefore not be a treatment option for polycystic kidney disease. PMID:21677148

  16. 嗅觉障碍与早期神经退行性疾病的研究进展%Advance in Dysosmia and the Early Neurodegenerative Diseases (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石姣姣; 梁珍; 左萍萍

    2014-01-01

    There are a large amount of neural stem cells in the olfactory system which have an active proliferation, ongoing and direc-tional differentiation and migration in order to adapt to the changing environment. The clinical findings showed that the early stages of some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease all presented dysosmia. In recent years, the relationship be-tween air pollution and dysosmia attracts public concerns. This article introduced some research progresses in this field.%嗅觉系统存在着增殖活跃、持续发生并定向分化及迁移的大量神经干细胞,以适应不断变化的周围环境。而临床发现一些神经退行性疾患如阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病的早期均有明显的嗅觉障碍。近年,空气污染与嗅觉障碍的关系备受关注。本文介绍该领域的部分研究进展。

  17. Circulating miRNAs as biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Margherita; Piscopo, Paola; Confaloni, Annamaria; Denti, Michela A

    2014-05-23

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and frontotemporal dementias (FTD), are considered distinct entities, however, there is increasing evidence of an overlap from the clinical, pathological and genetic points of view. All neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neuronal loss and death in specific areas of the brain, for example, hippocampus and cortex for AD, midbrain for PD, frontal and temporal lobes for FTD. Loss of neurons is a relatively late event in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases that is typically preceded by other events such as metabolic changes, synaptic dysfunction and loss, neurite retraction, and the appearance of other abnormalities, such as axonal transport defects. The brain's ability to compensate for these dysfunctions occurs over a long period of time and results in late clinical manifestation of symptoms, when successful pharmacological intervention is no longer feasible. Currently, diagnosis of AD, PD and different forms of dementia is based primarily on analysis of the patient's cognitive function. It is therefore important to find non-invasive diagnostic methods useful to detect neurodegenerative diseases during early, preferably asymptomatic stages, when a pharmacological intervention is still possible. Altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in many disease states, including neurodegeneration, and increasing relevance of miRNAs in biofluids in different pathologies has prompted the study of their possible application as neurodegenerative diseases biomarkers in order to identify new therapeutic targets. Here, we review what is known about the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and the possibilities and challenges of using these small RNA molecules as a signature for neurodegenerative conditions.

  18. Circulating miRNAs as Biomarkers for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Grasso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and frontotemporal dementias (FTD, are considered distinct entities, however, there is increasing evidence of an overlap from the clinical, pathological and genetic points of view. All neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neuronal loss and death in specific areas of the brain, for example, hippocampus and cortex for AD, midbrain for PD, frontal and temporal lobes for FTD. Loss of neurons is a relatively late event in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases that is typically preceded by other events such as metabolic changes, synaptic dysfunction and loss, neurite retraction, and the appearance of other abnormalities, such as axonal transport defects. The brain’s ability to compensate for these dysfunctions occurs over a long period of time and results in late clinical manifestation of symptoms, when successful pharmacological intervention is no longer feasible. Currently, diagnosis of AD, PD and different forms of dementia is based primarily on analysis of the patient’s cognitive function. It is therefore important to find non-invasive diagnostic methods useful to detect neurodegenerative diseases during early, preferably asymptomatic stages, when a pharmacological intervention is still possible. Altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs in many disease states, including neurodegeneration, and increasing relevance of miRNAs in biofluids in different pathologies has prompted the study of their possible application as neurodegenerative diseases biomarkers in order to identify new therapeutic targets. Here, we review what is known about the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and the possibilities and challenges of using these small RNA molecules as a signature for neurodegenerative conditions.

  19. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanova, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics: 1

  20. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  1. Neurotrophic factors and neurodegenerative diseases%神经营养因子与神经元退行性变疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蓉; 李林

    2005-01-01

    神经元退行性变疾病包括多种疾病,如常见的老年性痴呆(alzheimer's disease,AD)和帕金森病(parkinson disease,PD)等.此类疾病的共同特点是进行性的神经元损伤.由于发病机制复杂,并涉及许多至今未知的因素,目前尚无有效的干预措施,故阐明神经元退行性变疾病的发生机制十分重要.神经营养因子(neurotrophic factors, NTFs)是一类调节神经系统发育、成熟和维持神经元功能的天然蛋白质, 在神经系统的发生、发育、营养、存活及损伤后修复中起重要作用,是神经元存活和发挥功能的基础.因此,本文主要讨论NTFs与神经元退行性变疾病特别是AD和PD之间的关系.

  2. Establishment of Radiolabelling Method for the Development of Neurodegenerative Disease Imaging Agent Using 5-HT1A Subtype of Receptor Anatagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 5-HT1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain. And it is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy and diagnosis of diseases. Serotonin is synthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan by sequential hydroxylation and decarboxylation. It is stored in presynaptic vesicles and released from nerve terminals during neuronal firing. One of the best-characterised binding sites for serotonin is the 5-HT1A receptor. This is mainly due to the relatively early discovery of a selective ligand, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) for this subpopulation. Thus, many researchers have tried to develop a radioligand capable of assessing in vivo changes in 5-HT1A receptors in depressed subjects, people with anxiety disorders, patients with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenics. In present study, we studied the radioligands which would play a role in visualization and quantification of this important neuroreceptor for single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

  3. Establishment of Radiolabelling Method for the Development of Neurodegenerative Disease Imaging Agent Using 5-HT{sub 1A} Subtype of Receptor Anatagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Choi, Sang Mu; Kim, On Hee; Hong, Young Don; Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The 5-HT1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain. And it is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy and diagnosis of diseases. Serotonin is synthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan by sequential hydroxylation and decarboxylation. It is stored in presynaptic vesicles and released from nerve terminals during neuronal firing. One of the best-characterised binding sites for serotonin is the 5-HT1A receptor. This is mainly due to the relatively early discovery of a selective ligand, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) for this subpopulation. Thus, many researchers have tried to develop a radioligand capable of assessing in vivo changes in 5-HT1A receptors in depressed subjects, people with anxiety disorders, patients with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenics. In present study, we studied the radioligands which would play a role in visualization and quantification of this important neuroreceptor for single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

  4. The new insight on the regulatory role of the vitamin D3 in metabolic pathways characteristic for cancerogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Adriana Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    Apart from the classical function of regulating intestinal, bone and kidney calcium and phosphorus absorption as well as bone mineralization, there is growing evidence for the neuroprotective function of vitamin D3 through neuronal calcium regulation, the antioxidative pathway, immunomodulation and detoxification. Vitamin D3 and its derivates influence directly or indirectly almost all metabolic processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and mutagenesis. Such multifactorial effects of vitamin D3 can be a profitable source of new therapeutic solutions for two radically divergent diseases, cancer and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, an unusual association seems to exist between the occurrence of these two pathological states, called "inverse comorbidity". Patients with cognitive dysfunctions or dementia have considerably lower risk of cancer, whereas survivors of cancer have lower prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. To our knowledge, there are few publications analyzing the role of vitamin D3 in biological pathways existing in carcinogenic and neuropathological disorders. PMID:26238411

  5. Gene Mutation of Tau Protein and Neurodegenerative Diseases%Tau蛋白基因突变与神经退行性疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建枝

    1999-01-01

    @@ Tau蛋白是神经细胞中含量最高的微管相关蛋白,其正常功能是促进微管蛋白(tubulin)组装成微管(microtubule),并维持已形成微管的稳定性.Tau蛋白的翻译后异常修饰与阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer disease,AD)的神经原纤维退化有关[1].本文综述最近有关Tau蛋白基因突变,Tau mRNA剪接改变导致Tau蛋白组成、结构和功能异常的机制,及其与几种神经退行性疾病的关系的研究.

  6. Engineering superactive granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor transferrin fusion proteins as orally-delivered candidate agents for treating neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelman, Pete; Priebe, Molly C

    2015-01-01

    Intravenously injected granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown efficacy in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) animal studies and is undergoing clinical evaluation. The likely need for dosing of GM-CSF to patients over months or years motivates pursuit of avenues for delivering GM-CSF to circulation via oral administration. Flow cytometric screening of 37 yeast-displayed GM-CSF saturation mutant libraries revealed residues P12, H15, R23, R24, and K72 as key determinants of GM-CSF's CD116 and CD131 GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) subunit binding affinity. Screening combinatorial GM-CSF libraries mutated at positions P12, H15, and R23 yielded variants with increased affinities toward both CD116 and CD131. Genetic fusion of GM-CSF to human transferrin (Trf), a strategy that enables oral delivery of other biopharmaceuticals in animals, yielded bioactive wild type and variant cytokines upon secretion from cultured Human Embryonic Kidney cells. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements showed that all evaluated variants possess decreases in CD116 and CD131 binding KD values of up to 2.5-fold relative to wild type. Improved affinity led to increased in vitro bioactivity; the most bioactive variant, P12D/H15L/R23L, had a leukocyte proliferation assay EC50 value 3.5-fold lower than the wild type GM-CSF/Trf fusion. These outcomes are important first steps toward our goal of developing GM-CSF/Trf fusions as orally available AD and PD therapeutics. PMID:25737095

  7. [18F]desmethoxyfallypride as a novel PET radiotracer for quantitative in vivo dopamine D2/D3 receptor imaging in rat models of neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: [18F]desmethoxyfallypride ([18F]DMFP) is a promising tracer for longitudinal assessment of striatal dopamine D2/D3-receptor (D2R) availability by positron emission tomography (PET) in small animal models. We explored the feasibility of [18F]DMFP-PET to image D2R availability in rat models of Huntington's (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: Animals received either unilateral intrastriatal quinolinic acid lesions or medial forebrain bundle injections of 6-OHDA to produce the loss of striatal projection neurones or deplete the striatal dopamine, corresponding to established animal models for HD and PD, respectively. Three weeks after lesioning, PET scans were acquired on a microPET Focus 120 system following the tail vein injection of [18F]DMFP. Results: [18F]DMFP-PET clearly visualized lesion induced decreases and increases of D2R availability. In vivo estimates of D2R binding and changes thereof gained by pharmacokinetic analyses correlated significantly with D2R density and its change provided by in vitro [3H]raclopride-autoradiography. Conclusions: In conclusion, [18F]DMFP-PET is a suitable method for in vivo D2R-assessment in preclinical research, e.g for monitoring cell-based therapies.

  8. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Phosphodiesterase 1 for the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment Associated with Neurodegenerative and Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Hailin; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Wei; Zhu, Hongwen; Beard, J David; Ida, Koh; Lane, Weston; Snell, Gyorgy; Sogabe, Satoshi; Heyser, Charles J; Snyder, Gretchen L; Hendrick, Joseph P; Vanover, Kimberly E; Davis, Robert E; Wennogle, Lawrence P

    2016-02-11

    A diverse set of 3-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones was designed and synthesized. The structure-activity relationships of these polycyclic compounds as phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) inhibitors were studied along with their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Systematic optimizations of this novel scaffold culminated in the identification of a clinical candidate, (6aR,9aS)-2-(4-(6-fluoropyridin-2-yl)benzyl)-5-methyl-3-(phenylamino)-5,6a,7,8,9,9a-hexahydrocyclopenta[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazolo[4,3-e]pyrimidin-4-(2H)-one phosphate (ITI-214), which exhibited picomolar inhibitory potency for PDE1, demonstrated excellent selectivity against all other PDE families and showed good efficacy in vivo. Currently, this investigational new drug is in Phase I clinical development and being considered for the treatment of several indications including cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders, and other central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS disorders. PMID:26789933

  9. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet repeat sequences d(GGC/GCC)n and d(CAG/CTG)n

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shibasish Chowdhury; Manju Bansal

    2001-12-01

    Model building and molecular mechanics studies have been carried out to examine the potential structures for d(GGC/GCC)5 and d(CAG/CTG)5 that might relate to their biological function and association with triplet repeat expansion diseases. Model building studies suggested that hairpin and quadruplex structures could be formed with these repeat sequences. Molecular mechanics studies have demonstrated that the hairpin and hairpin dimer structures of triplet repeat sequences formed by looping out of the two strands are as favourable as the corresponding B-DNA type hetero duplex structures. Further, at high salt condition, Greek key type quadruplex structures are energetically comparable with hairpin dimer and B-DNA type duplex structures. All tetrads in the quadruplex structures are well stacked and provide favourable stacking energy values. Interestingly, in the energy minimized hairpin dimer and Greek key type quadruplex structures, all the bases even in the non-G tetrads are cyclically hydrogen bonded, even though the A, C and T-tetrads were not hydrogen bonded in the starting structures.

  10. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  11. Huntington's disease accelerates epigenetic aging of human brain and disrupts DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Langfelder, Peter; Kwak, Seung; Aaronson, Jeff; Rosinski, Jim; Vogt, Thomas F; Eszes, Marika; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Choi, Oi-Wa; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Coppola, Giovanni; Yang, X William

    2016-07-01

    Age of Huntington's disease (HD) motoric onset is strongly related to the number of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene, suggesting that biological tissue age plays an important role in disease etiology. Recently, a DNA methylation based biomarker of tissue age has been advanced as an epigenetic aging clock. We sought to inquire if HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age. DNA methylation data was generated for 475 brain samples from various brain regions of 26 HD cases and 39 controls. Overall, brain regions from HD cases exhibit a significant epigenetic age acceleration effect (p=0.0012). A multivariate model analysis suggests that HD status increases biological age by 3.2 years. Accelerated epigenetic age can be observed in specific brain regions (frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and cingulate gyrus). After excluding controls, we observe a negative correlation (r=-0.41, p=5.5×10-8) between HD gene CAG repeat length and the epigenetic age of HD brain samples. Using correlation network analysis, we identify 11 co-methylation modules with a significant association with HD status across 3 broad cortical regions. In conclusion, HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age of specific brain regions and more broadly with substantial changes in brain methylation levels. PMID:27479945

  12. Role of brain glutamic acid metabolism changes in neurodegenerative pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Pavlovna Kanunnikova

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an essential participant of brain metabolism. It is known that the glutamate is a neurotransmitter in a numerous part of the brain synapses and acts through various ionotropic or metabotropic receptors. Multiple alterations of the brain glutamate system are observed in both acute and chronic brain injures. Glutamate metabolism changes take place in many neurodegenerative pathologies, such as brain ischemia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyot...

  13. SÍNDROME DE DISFUNCIÓN COGNITIVA DEL PERRO COMO MODELO DE INVESTIGACIÓN DE LAS ENFERMEDADES NEURODEGENERATIVAS DEL HUMANO Cognitive dysfunction syndrome in dog senior: a suitable model for human neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Y. Gallego1

    2010-01-01

    envejecimiento de los humanos.In humans and canines, the aging process increases the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive dysfunction syndrome in senior dogs. These pathological changes in different brain areas cause dementia syndromes, generating an apparent cognitive deficit characterized by behavioral changes such as alterations in memory and learning processes. The deleterious effects on quality of life in human patient affected by AD, promote the need to find similar pathologies affecting other species, making these, experimental models useful for the investigation of human suffering. Recently it has been suggested a close similarity between several of the clinical, anatomical and physiological characteristic of the Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, which includes the formation and accumulation of amyloid plaques, apoptosis of cholinergic neurons with a consequent reduction of the neurotransmitter acetyl - hill, progressive type cognitive deficits and alterations in the sleep-wake cycle, among others. Thus, progress in understanding the processes involved in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, and recognizing their similarities to those that occurred during the Alzheimer’s disease, has facilitated studies aimed at understanding some aspects that have not been well detailed neurodegenrativas disease in humans. Moreover, considering the high probability of getting the cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, which is identified in several canine populations, allows for the possibility of proposing the dog changes, as an optimal model for research experimentate neurodegenerative processes associated with aging in humans.

  14. Brain protein oxidation in age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with aggregated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D A; Kanski, J

    2001-07-15

    Protein oxidation, one of a number of brain biomarkers of oxidative stress, is increased in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders or animal models thereof, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and alpha-synuclein disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Each of these neurodegenerative disorders is associated with aggregated proteins in brain. However, the relationship among protein oxidation, protein aggregation, and neurodegeneration remain unclear. The current rapid progress in elucidation of mechanisms of protein oxidation in neuronal loss should provide further insight into the importance of free radical oxidative stress in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. 微小 RNA-9在癌症及神经退行性疾病中的研究现状%Research status of microRNA-9 in cancers and neurodegenerative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓琳; 胡雪玲; 孙丽华

    2015-01-01

    微小RNA-9(miR-9)家族是一类非编码小分子单链RNA,能通过参与基因转录后修饰调控基因的表达。近年来,癌症的发病率逐年升高,研究其机制和治疗方法具有十分重要的意义。许多类型的癌症都出现miR-9的表达量异常,提示miR-9可能与肿瘤的形成或发展有关。本文主要讨论miR-9在多种癌症和神经系统相关疾病中的研究现状,重点阐述miR-9在乳腺癌、胃癌、结肠癌、食管癌、人神经母细胞瘤和神经退行性疾病中的作用。%MicroRNA-9( miR-9) family is a kind of non-coding small single-stranded RNA, by participating in the genes of post-translational modifications to regulate gene expression.In recent years, the incidence of cancer rises year by year.To study its mechanism and treatment has great significance.According to recent studies, the quantity of miR-9 expression in many types of cancers is abnormal, suggesting miR-9 may be associated with the formation or development of tumors.This article mainly discuss the research progress of miR-9 in many cancers and nerve system diseases, emphasis on the effect of miR-9 in breast cancer, gastric cancer, colon cancer, esophagus cancer, neuroblastoma and neurodegenerative disease.

  16. Cross-pollination of research findings, although uncommon, may accelerate discovery of human disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Marlena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological leaps in genome sequencing have resulted in a surge in discovery of human disease genes. These discoveries have led to increased clarity on the molecular pathology of disease and have also demonstrated considerable overlap in the genetic roots of human diseases. In light of this large genetic overlap, we tested whether cross-disease research approaches lead to faster, more impactful discoveries. Methods We leveraged several gene-disease association databases to calculate a Mutual Citation Score (MCS for 10,853 pairs of genetically related diseases to measure the frequency of cross-citation between research fields. To assess the importance of cooperative research, we computed an Individual Disease Cooperation Score (ICS and the average publication rate for each disease. Results For all disease pairs with one gene in common, we found that the degree of genetic overlap was a poor predictor of cooperation (r2=0.3198 and that the vast majority of disease pairs (89.56% never cited previous discoveries of the same gene in a different disease, irrespective of the level of genetic similarity between the diseases. A fraction (0.25% of the pairs demonstrated cross-citation in greater than 5% of their published genetic discoveries and 0.037% cross-referenced discoveries more than 10% of the time. We found strong positive correlations between ICS and publication rate (r2=0.7931, and an even stronger correlation between the publication rate and the number of cross-referenced diseases (r2=0.8585. These results suggested that cross-disease research may have the potential to yield novel discoveries at a faster pace than singular disease research. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of cross-disease study is low despite the high level of genetic similarity among many human diseases, and that collaborative methods may accelerate and increase the impact of new genetic discoveries. Until we have a better

  17. Epigenetics and etiology of neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Beata M. Gruber

    2011-01-01

    Determination of specific gene profile expression is essential for morphological and functional differentiation of cells in the human organism. The human genome consists of 25–30 thousands genes but only some of them are expressed in each cell. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modifications or non-coding RNA functions are also responsible for the unique gene expression patterns. It is suggested that transcriptional gene activation is related to hypomethy...

  18. Need to improve clinical trials in rare neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Puopolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare neurodegenerative diseases are fatal and no therapy is available to cure or slow down the progression of disease. We report possibly weaknesses in the management of clinical studies in these diseases, ranging from poor preclinical studies, difficulties in the recruitment of patients, delay in the onset of treatment because of lack in early disease-specific biomarkers, and suboptimal design of Phase II clinical trials. The adoption of innovative statistical approaches in early Phase II trials might improve the screening of drugs in rare neurodegenerative disorders, but this implicates efforts from clinical researchers, statisticians, and regulatory people to the development of new strategies that should maintain rigorous scientific integrity together with a more ethical approach to human experimentations.

  19. MRI of degenerative lumbar spine disease: comparison of non-accelerated and parallel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noelte, Ingo; Gerigk, Lars; Brockmann, Marc A.; Kemmling, Andre; Groden, Christoph [Medical Faculty Mannheim of the University of Heidelberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Parallel imaging techniques such as GRAPPA have been introduced to optimize image quality and acquisition time. For spinal imaging in a clinical setting no data exist on the equivalency of conventional and parallel imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether T1- and T2-weighted GRAPPA sequences are equivalent to conventional sequences for the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease in terms of image quality and artefacts. In patients with clinically suspected degenerative lumbar spine disease two neuroradiologists independently compared sagittal GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (25 patients) and transverse GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (23 lumbar segments in six patients). Comparative analyses included the minimal diameter of the spinal canal, disc abnormalities, foraminal stenosis, facet joint degeneration, lateral recess, nerve root compression and osteochondrotic vertebral and endplate changes. Image inhomogeneity was evaluated by comparing the nonuniformity in the two techniques. Image quality was assessed by grading the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. Motion and aliasing artefacts were classified from grade 1 (severe) to grade 5 (absent). There was no significant difference between GRAPPA and non-accelerated MRI in the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease (P > 0.05), and there was no difference in the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. For inhomogeneity there was a trend in favour of the conventional sequences. No significant artefacts were observed with either technique. The GRAPPA technique can be used effectively to reduce scanning time in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease while preserving image quality. (orig.)

  20. Adaptive Immunity in Neurodegenerative and Neuropsychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, R Lee

    2015-12-01

    Neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders are becoming a greater proportion of the global disease burden; however the pathogenic mechanisms by which these disorders originate and contribute to disease progression are not well-described. Increasing evidence supports neuroinflammation as a common underlying component associated with the neuropathological processes that effect disease progression. This collection of articles explores the role of adaptive immunity in autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, neurotrauma, and psychological disorders. The section emphasizes the interactions of T cells with innate cellular responses within the CNS and the effects on neurological functions. One recurrent theme is that modified and aggregated self-proteins upregulate innate-mediated inflammation and provide a permissive environment for polarization of T cells to proinflammatory effector cells. Moreover, infiltration and reactivation of those T effector cells exacerbate neuroinflammation and oxidative stress to greater neurotoxic levels. Another recurrent theme in these disorders promotes diminished regulatory functions that reduce control over activated T effector cells and microglia, and ultimately augment proinflammatory conditions. Augmentation of regulatory control is discussed as therapeutic strategies to attenuate neuroinflammation, mitigate neurodegeneration or neuronal dysfunction, and lessen disease progression.

  1. 兴奋性氨基酸转运体2在神经退行性变中的作用%Role of EAAT2 in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许保磊; 王蓉

    2012-01-01

    谷氨酸是脑内必需的兴奋性神经递质之一,兴奋性氨基酸转运体(Excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT)2是最主要的谷氨酸转运体,负责脑内90%以上的谷氨酸再摄取,调节突触间隙的谷氨酸浓度.EAAT2功能紊乱导致胞外谷氨酸过量积聚,在多种神经退行性疾病的发病过程中起重要作用,如阿尔茨海默病、亨廷顿舞蹈病、肌萎缩侧索硬化等.对于人EAAT2启动子的研究发现,NF-kB在星形胶质细胞中对EAAT2表达起关键作用.通过筛选1 040种FDA批准的化合物,发现多种β-内酰胺类抗生素如头孢曲松钠等是EAAT2的转录激活剂,可以增加EAAT2的蛋白表达水平,产生神经保护作用.%Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter regulating brain functions. Excitatory amino acid transporter ( EAAT) -2 is one of the major glutamate transporters expressed predominantly in astroglial cells and is responsible for 90% of total glutamate uptake. Glutamate transporters tightly regulate glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft. Dysfunction of EAAT2 and accumulation of excessive extracellular glutamate has been implicated in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer' s disease , Huntington' s disease , and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Analysis of the human EAAT2 promoter showed that NF-kB is an important regulator of EAAT2 expression in astrocytes. Screening of approximately 1 , 040 FDA-approved compounds led to the discovery that many b-lactam antibiotics such as ceftriaxone etc. are transcriptional activators of EAAT2 resulting in increased EAAT2 protein levels and produce neuroprotective effects.

  2. Comparative Incidence of Conformational, Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús de Pedro-Cuesta

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify incidence and survival patterns in conformational neurodegenerative disorders (CNDDs.We identified 2563 reports on the incidence of eight conditions representing sporadic, acquired and genetic, protein-associated, i.e., conformational, NDD groups and age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We selected 245 papers for full-text examination and application of quality criteria. Additionally, data-collection was completed with detailed information from British, Swedish, and Spanish registries on Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD forms, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and sporadic rapidly progressing neurodegenerative dementia (sRPNDd. For each condition, age-specific incidence curves, age-adjusted figures, and reported or calculated median survival were plotted and examined.Based on 51 valid reported and seven new incidence data sets, nine out of eleven conditions shared specific features. Age-adjusted incidence per million person-years increased from ≤1.5 for sRPNDd, different CJD forms and Huntington's disease (HD, to 1589 and 2589 for AMD and Alzheimer's disease (AD respectively. Age-specific profiles varied from (a symmetrical, inverted V-shaped curves for low incidences to (b those increasing with age for late-life sporadic CNDDs and for sRPNDd, with (c a suggested, intermediate, non-symmetrical inverted V-shape for fronto-temporal dementia and Parkinson's disease. Frequently, peak age-specific incidences from 20-24 to ≥90 years increased with age at onset and survival. Distinct patterns were seen: for HD, with a low incidence, levelling off at middle age, and long median survival, 20 years; and for sRPNDd which displayed the lowest incidence, increasing with age, and a short median disease duration.These results call for a unified population view of NDDs, with an age-at-onset-related pattern for acquired and sporadic CNDDs. The pattern linking age at onset to incidence magnitude and survival might

  3. The Applications of the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Studying the Neurodegenerative Diseases%诱导多能干细胞及其在神经退行性疾病研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩发彬

    2012-01-01

    It is the prominent breakthrough in stem cell research to generate the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) through the somatic cell reprogramming of the stem cell transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4. In recent years, continuous progress has been made in the iPS cell research. Since the iPS cells are generated from the somatic fibroblasts or blood cells, they avoid the concerns on the ethics and immune rejections and open the windows for their clinical applications to study the mechanisms, drug screening and self-transplantation therapy of the human diseases. Here we summarized the recent advances in the methods of iPS cells, the mechanisms of reprogramming by transcription factors and the applications of the iPS cells in research on some neurodegenerative diseases and neurodevelopmental diseases. We also discussed the recent advance in using the iPS cells models from patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and spinal muscular atrophy to explore the molecular mechanism of the mutations in the genes for these diseases.%用干细胞转录因子OCT4、SOX2、c-MYC和KLF4进行体细胞重编程产生具有胚胎干细胞特性的诱导多能干细胞(iPS细胞)是干细胞研究领域的突破性进展.近年来,iPS细胞的研究从产生方法、重编程机理及实际应用方面不断取得进展.由于iPS细胞的产生可取自体细胞,因而克服了胚胎干细胞应用的伦理学和免疫排斥等缺陷,为iPS细胞的临床应用开辟了广阔的前景.该文将对iPS细胞的产生方法、重编程机理及其在神经性退行性疾病的研究与应用进行文献综述,反映近几年iPS细胞最新研究成果,并阐述了用病人iPS细胞模型探讨帕金森氏病、老年性痴呆症、脊髓侧索硬化症、脊髓肌肉萎缩症及舞蹈症等5种常见神经性退行性疾病发病机理的研究现状.

  4. Discrimination of EMG and acceleration measurements between patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Saara M; Kankaanpaa, Markku; Tarvainen, Mika P; Meigal, Alexander; Nuutinen, Juho; Jakala, Pekka; Airaksinen, Olavi; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential of electromyographic (EMG) and acceleration measurements in discriminating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) from healthy persons. Two types of muscle contractions are examined: static contractions of biceps brachii muscles and elbow extension movements. Twelve features are extracted from static and ten features from extension measurements. These features describe signal morphology and nonlinear characteristics, power spreading in EMG wavelet scalograms and spectral coherence. Principal component approach is applied separately for static and extension trial to reduce the number of features before discrimination. The discrimination between subjects is done in a two-dimensional space by applying cluster analysis to the best discriminating principal components. The discrimination power of the used method was estimated with EMG and acceleration data measured from 56 patients with PD and 59 healthy controls. In the cluster analysis, three clusters were formed: one cluster with most (85%) of the healthy persons and two clusters with 80% of patients. Patients were divided into two clusters based on their type of motor disability (problems during movement and/or static contraction). Discrimination results show that EMG and acceleration measurements are potential for discriminating patients with PD from healthy persons. Furthermore, they have potential in the objective clinical assessment of PD. PMID:21096652

  5. Inducerede pluripotente stamceller revolutionerer forskningen i neurodegenerative sygdomme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sissel Ida; Knudsen, Matias Jul; Barnkob, Helle Bogetofte;

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's- and Alzheimer's disease has long been hampered by the lack of access to live disease-afflicted neurons for in vitro studies. The introduction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has made such studies possible. iPS cells...... can be reprogrammed from somatic patient-derived cells (e.g. skin cells) and differentiated into any cell type of the body. This allows for the production of neurons, which have the genetic background of the patients and show disease-relevant phenotypes....

  6. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27118295

  7. High fat diet accelerates pathogenesis of murine Crohn's disease-like ileitis independently of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Gruber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity has been associated with a more severe disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and epidemiological data identified dietary fats but not obesity as risk factors for the development of IBD. Crohn's disease is one of the two major IBD phenotypes and mostly affects the terminal ileum. Despite recent observations that high fat diets (HFD impair intestinal barrier functions and drive pathobiont selection relevant for chronic inflammation in the colon, mechanisms of high fat diets in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease are not known. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of HFD on the development of chronic ileal inflammation in a murine model of Crohn's disease-like ileitis. METHODS: TNF(ΔARE/WT mice and wildtype C57BL/6 littermates were fed a HFD compared to control diet for different durations. Intestinal pathology and metabolic parameters (glucose tolerance, mesenteric tissue characteristics were assessed. Intestinal barrier integrity was characterized at different levels including polyethylene glycol (PEG translocation, endotoxin in portal vein plasma and cellular markers of barrier function. Inflammatory activation of epithelial cells as well as immune cell infiltration into ileal tissue were determined and related to luminal factors. RESULTS: HFD aggravated ileal inflammation but did not induce significant overweight or typical metabolic disorders in TNF(ΔARE/WT. Expression of the tight junction protein Occludin was markedly reduced in the ileal epithelium of HFD mice independently of inflammation, and translocation of endotoxin was increased. Epithelial cells showed enhanced expression of inflammation-related activation markers, along with enhanced luminal factors-driven recruitment of dendritic cells and Th17-biased lymphocyte infiltration into the lamina propria. CONCLUSIONS: HFD feeding, independently of obesity, accelerated disease onset of small intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease

  8. Biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders:How good are they?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varun RACHAKONDA; Tian Hong PAN; Wei Dong LE

    2004-01-01

    Biomarkers are very important indicators of normal and abnormal biological processes. Specific changes in pathologies,biochemistries and genetics can give us comprehensive information regarding the nature of any particular disease. A good biomarker should be precise and reliable, distinguishable between normal and interested disease, and differentiable between different diseases. It is believed that biomarkers have great potential in predicting chances for diseases, aiding in early diagnosis, and setting standards for the development of new remedies to treat diseases. New technologies have enabled scientists to identify biomarkers of several different neurodegenerative diseases. The followings, for instance,are only a few of the many new biomarkers that have been recently identified: the phosphorylated tau protein and aggregated β-amyloid peptide for Alzheimer's disease (AD), α-synuclein contained Lewy bodies and altered dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for Parkinson's disease (PD), SOD mutations for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and CAG repeats resulted from Huntington's gene mutations in Huntington's disease (HD). This article will focus on the most-recent findings of biomarkers belonging to the four mentioned neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Actions of neurosteroids in neurons and the treatment of neurodegenerative disease%神经甾体激素对神经元的影响及在神经退行性疾病治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨倩倩; 张鹏; 戴侃纯; 王佳婷; 孙臣友

    2014-01-01

    在中枢神经系统中,神经元和神经胶质细胞能够表达神经甾体激素合成的关键酶。当神经甾体激素产生的浓度足够高时,可行使旁分泌作用。脑内神经甾体激素的合成会随年龄的增长呈现下降的趋势。在应激状态下,神经甾体激素的合成也下降。最近的研究报告显示,脑内神经甾体激素水平的下降与神经元的变性及其功能障碍有关。本文仅就目前研究最多的神经甾体激素(如脱氢表雄酮、孕烯醇酮及其硫酸酯、孕酮和别孕烯醇酮)影响神经元存活,神经突的增长和神经元增生的最新研究成果以及这些神经甾体激素在治疗神经退行性疾病中的潜在性作用进行综述。%Neurons and glia in the central nervous system can express the key enzymes for the synthesis of neurosteroids .Once the concentration of neurosteroids is high enough , they will exert paracrine effects .Synthesis of neurosteroids declines with age in brain .So does it under stressful circumstances .Recent research reports indicate that the decrease of neurosteroids is associated with the neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in the brain .This paper reviews recent research on the most studied neurosteroids ( for example , dehydroepiandrosterone , pregnenolone and their sulphate esters, progesterone and allopregnanolone ) in affecting neuronal survival , neurite outgrowth and neurogenesis , and the potential roles of these neurosteroids in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease as well .

  10. Screening of microRNAs associated with Alzheimer's disease using oxidative stress cell model and different strains of senescence accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Qingfu; Niu, Jingya; Lu, Kang; Xie, Bing; Cui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shunjiang

    2014-03-15

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the molecular mechanisms that control the neuron response to oxidative stress have been extensively studied. However, the effects of oxidative stress on miRNA expression in hippocampal neurons has not been investigated, and little is known about the roles of ROS-modulated miRNAs in cell function as yet. In this study, miRNA microarray technology was used to analyze the expression of miRNAs in the oxidative stressed primary hippocampal neurons, hippocampus of senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and prone 10 (SAMP10). The targets of co-regulated microRNAs were also selected for computational prediction using miRWalk software and functional analysis by the DAVID software. In addition, the changes of co-regulated microRNA expression were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of microarray analysis showed that miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a, miR-296, and miR-130b were all upregulated in H2O2-induced primary hippocampal neurons and different strains of senescence accelerated mice. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that these co-regulated microRNAs may be involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, signal transmission and cancer development. In which, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was one of the most significant pathways to be affected by 83 target genes of miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a miR-296, and miR-130b. The quantitative real-time PCR data confirmed the alterations of the co-upregulated miRNAs. These results suggested that oxidative stress alters the miRNA expression profile of hippocampal neurons, and the deregulated miRNAs might play potential roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study provided a strong basis for the future study aiming at contributions of miRNAs induced by oxidative stress in AD.

  11. The Significance of Small Cerebral Bleeds in Neurodegenerative Dementia Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    De Reuck, Jacques L.

    2012-01-01

    Small cerebral bleeds are frequently observed in brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, they are also observed in patients with other neurodegenerative dementias and in persons without cognitive impairment. The aim of this survey is to compare the bleeding load in brains with different dementia syndromes and in age-matched controls. Hundred sixty-five brains were examined. The prevalence and the severity of the different cerebrovascular ...

  12. The link between type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Liu; Jake Hoekstra; Kangping Xiong; Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Various age-associated diseases are becoming more prominent as a greater percentage of the population reaches old age.Neurodegenerative disorders,e.g.Alzheimer's disease (AD)and Parkinson's disease (PD),and diabetes,in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM),are the diseases that represent a large proportion of diagnoses amongst this group.These dis-eases have long been regarded as separate and each has distinct pathologies,symptoms,and treatments.Recent studies in epide-miology and pathology,however,have shown that T2DM may share a common mechanism of disease with AD and PD, which could allow for a therapeutic intervention capable of managing each disease.This review will discuss evidence implicating connections between these diseases,potential shared mechanisms,and possible treatments.

  13. Recent progress in neurodegenerative disorder research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders,including Alzheimer’s disease(AD) and Parkinson’s disease(PD),are common disorders of the central nervous system among aging populations.In the last 10 years insights concerning the etiology,diagnosis and pathogenesis of these diseases have come from research carried out by Chinese neuroscientists.Their findings include the description of Chinese patients with autosomal recessive early-onset PD,the function of the tau protein,molecular mechanisms underlying protein aggregation,and the identification of biomarkers for AD diagnosis and molecules/compounds with potential neuroprotective activities.

  14. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  15. Biochemical, Biomedical and Metabolic Aspects of Imidazole-Containing Dipeptides with the Inherent Complexity to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Various States of Mental Well-Being: A Challenging Correction and Neurotherapeutic Pharmaceutical Biotechnology for Treating Cognitive Deficits, Depression and Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    , endowed with ferroxidase type activity; possess anti-aging functions, and free-radical scavenging activity, is capable of delaying senescence and extending the life-span of cultured human fibroblasts; is able to kill transformed cells and protect cells against aldehydes and amyloid peptide fragment. Carnosine and carcinine exhibit a well-documented anti-glycating activity against the glycation of proteins, including low-density lipoproteins, glucose degradation products, esterase, histones. A tissue carnosine-degrading enzyme (CN2) colocalized with the activity of histidine decarboxylase to histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) plays a key role in the neuro-transmission and neuroregulation roles of imidazole-containing based dipeptides. Carnosine released from skeletal muscle during exercise may be transported into TMN-histamine neurons and hydrolyzed. Timing of carnosine present in the chicken broth, the specific patented nutraceutical composition (Can-C Plus™), 1% N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops or 1% carcinine lubricant eye drops formulations are important targeting posology vehicles that are involved in many CNS functions through the central brain histamine system including the vision enhancement functions, physiological regulation of cognitive functions, arousal; anxiety; activation of the sympathetic nervous system; the stress-related release of hormones from the pituitary and of central aminergic neurotransmitters; antinociception; water retention and suppression of eating. The roles for the carnosine-stimulated/mediated neuronal histamine system are proposed as a danger and physiological response system active in protection from neurodegenerative diseases and in management of cognitive deficits, depression and intellectual disabilities. PMID:25158972

  16. 疾病特异诱导多能干细胞距离神经退行性疾病的临床治疗还有多远%How long will the disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells be applied in the clinical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗虎; 刘渔凯; 李泽桂

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both the medical treatments and the surgery can only relieve the symptoms but not prevent the progress of neurodegenerative diseases. Cell replacement therapy proceeds fast but its ethical problem and immune rejection also should be in consideration. However, the production of induced pluripotent stem cells provides us a new way to resolve these problems.OBJECTIVE: To review the basic situations and current treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and the possibility of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells be used in regenerative medicine as a new cell resource.METHODS: The PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed) and Wanfang database (http://www.wanfangdata.com.cn) were retrieved for articles published from 1995 to 2010 by computer. The English key words were "induced pluripotent stem cell, PD, ALS, SMA, degenerative disease". The Chinese key words were "stem cells, Parkinson's disease". Totally 374 papers were primarily gotten. Finally, 29 papers were selected according to the inclusion criteria.RERULTS AND CONCLUSION : Patient-specific iPS cells can obtain the same genotype which is beneficial to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of these diseases. These cells also posses the similar multi-directional differentiation ability as embryonic stem cells, which could be induced to dopamine neurons and relieve the clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease in animal model in vitro. The iPS cells have broad prospect in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.%背景:各种神经退行性疾病传统的内外科治疗只能缓解症状而不能阻止疾病的进一步发展,细胞替代治疗近年进展迅速,但是干细胞存在的伦理问题及免疫排斥等问题不容忽视,而诱导多能干细胞的产生为这些问题提供了新的解决途径.目的:综述神经退行性疾病的治疗现状以及诱导多能干细胞作为新的细胞来源治疗神经退行性疾病的可能性.方法:应用计算机检索1995

  17. Disease: H00981 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused...evels of vitamin E. Inherited metabolic disease; Neurodegenerative disease TTPA [HSA:7274] Vitamin E [DR:D02

  18. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn)-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like "prionoids" are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains. PMID:27293325

  19. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disordersVacancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like “prionoids” are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains.

  20. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn)-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like "prionoids" are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains.

  1. MicroRNA in neurodegenerative drug discovery: the way forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristyn; Booth, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases occur when neuronal cells in the brain or spinal cord progressively lose function and eventually die. Pathological analysis of these tissues reveals changes that include the loss of synapses, tangles of misfolded protein and immune cell activation, even during very early stages of disease well before debilitating clinical signs are apparent. This suggests that if neurodegeneration is treated early enough, drugs designed to delay the progress of these diseases by either repairing the early damage and loss of neurons, or protecting neuron functionality from further insult, may be efficacious. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. They are particularly numerous within neurons where many are expressed with high specificity, which suggests that they have important roles in the healthy brain. Indeed, miRNAs are essential for the post-mitotic survival of neurons, implying a crucial role in survival and neuroprotection. This has focused attention on exploring the use of miRNA-based drugs as a means to correct cellular abnormalities and maintain neuronal function in neurodegenerative diseases. These efforts are spurred on by the rapid progress to clinical trials for a number of miRNA-based therapies for other diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, fibrosis and cancer.

  2. Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon Reduces the Passive Targeting of PEGylated Nanoparticles in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyung-Jun; England, Christopher G; Feng, Liangzhu; Graves, Stephen A; Hernandez, Reinier; Nickles, Robert J; Liu, Zhuang; Lee, Dong Soo; Cho, Steve Y; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-20

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading global health concern. Due to limited imaging and therapeutic options, PAD and other ischemia-related diseases may benefit from the use of long circulating nanoparticles as imaging probes and/or drug delivery vehicles. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated nanoparticles have shown shortened circulation half-lives in vivo when injected multiple times into a single subject. This phenomenon has become known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) effect. The phenomenon is of concern for clinical translation of nanomaterials as it limits the passive accumulation of nanoparticles in many diseases, yet it has not been evaluated using inorganic or organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. Herein, we found that the ABC phenomenon was induced by reinjection of PEGylated long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles, which significantly reduced the passive targeting of (64)Cu-labeled PEGylated reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles ((64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG) in a murine model of PAD. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 3, 10, and 17 days postsurgical induction of hindlimb ischemia. At day 3 postsurgery, the nanoparticles displayed a long circulation half-life with enhanced accumulation in the ischemic hindlimb. At days 10 and 17 postsurgery, reinjected mice displayed a short circulation half-life and lower accumulation of the nanoparticles in the ischemic hindlimb, in comparison to the naïve group. Also, reinjected mice showed significantly higher liver uptake than the naïve group, indicating that the nanoparticles experienced higher sequestration by the liver in the reinjected group. Furthermore, photoacoustic (PA) imaging and Prussian blue staining confirmed the enhanced accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver tissue of reinjected mice. These findings validate the ABC phenomenon using long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles upon multiple administrations to the same

  3. Environmental Pollutants as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eChin-Chan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD and Parkinson (PD have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment, from diet to the new nanomaterials as putative risk factors has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metals such as lead, mercury, aluminum, cadmium and arsenic, as well as some pesticides and metal-based nanoparticles have been involved in AD due to their ability to increase beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide and the phosphorylation of Tau protein (P-Tau, causing senile/amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles characteristic of AD. The exposure to lead, manganese, solvents and some pesticides has been related to hallmarks of PD such as mitochondrial dysfunction, alterations in metal homeostasis and aggregation of proteins such as α-synuclein (α-syn, which is a key constituent of Lewy bodies, a crucial factor in PD pathogenesis. Common mechanisms of environmental pollutants to increase Aβ, P-Tau, α-syn and neuronal death have been reported, including the oxidative stress mainly involved in the increase of Aβ and α-syn, and the reduced activity/protein levels of Aβ degrading enzymes such as neprilysin or insulin degrading enzyme. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms by maternal nutrient supplementation and exposure to heavy metals and pesticides have been proposed to lead phenotypic diversity and susceptibility to neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses data from epidemiological and experimental studies about the role of environmental factors in the development of idiopathic AD and PD, and their mechanisms of action.

  4. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 ± 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  5. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  6. Screening and Mechanism Study of Natural Products and Derivatives for Prevention and Cure of Neurodegenerative Diseases by Taking Microglia Activation as the Target%以抑制小胶质细胞活化为靶标的抗神经退行性疾病的天然产物及衍生物的筛选与机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静玉; 陈国良; 吴春福

    2011-01-01

    Microglia activation is associated with the occurrence and progression of neurodegenerative diseases.Thus, inhibition of microglial activation is generally considered a useful strategy for treatment of many neurodegenerative diseases. This paper reviews our research progress in the inhibitory effects of natural products including resveratrol, curcumin, resveratrol derivatives, curcumin derivatives and ginsenosides on microglia activation. This may provide a reference for the further exploration in this field.%脑内小胶质细胞的活化贯穿了神经退行性疾病的发生、发展全过程.抑制小胶质细胞活化已经成为防治此类疾病的重要策略.本文对近年来本课题组在白藜芦醇及其衍生物、姜黄素及其衍生物、人参皂苷等抑制小胶质细胞活化方面的研究进展进行综述,为防治神经退行性疾病药物的深入研究提供参考.

  7. The Role of the Craniocervical Junction in Craniospinal Hydrodynamics and Neurodegenerative Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Flanagan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The craniocervical junction (CCJ is a potential choke point for craniospinal hydrodynamics and may play a causative or contributory role in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, MS, and ALS, as well as many other neurological conditions including hydrocephalus, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, migraines, seizures, silent-strokes, affective disorders, schizophrenia, and psychosis. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the critical role of the CCJ in craniospinal hydrodynamics and to stimulate further research that may lead to new approaches for the prevention and treatment of the above neurodegenerative and neurological conditions.

  8. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with parkinsonism and other neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Progressive neurodegenerative disorders are devastating diseases with often fatal outcomes. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) add to morbidity and increase the risk of becoming dependent on the help of others (e.g., nursing-home referral). In Parkinson's disease (PD), the specific loss...... of incontinence in Alzheimer's disease, but higher cognitive function including attention and self-management may play a role. Incontinence is a major risk factor for loss of independence. The complex pathophysiologic mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders and hence complex symptoms play important roles...

  9. Acceleration training for managing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sechang Oh,1 Takashi Shida,1 Akemi Sawai,1 Tsuyoshi Maruyama,2 Kiyoshi Eguchi,2 Tomonori Isobe,1 Yoshikazu Okamoto,3 Noriko Someya,4 Kiyoji Tanaka,4 Emi Arai,1 Akiko Tozawa,5 Junichi Shoda1 1Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Tsukuba University Hospital, 3Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 4Department of Sports Medicine, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 5Protea Japan Co Ltd, Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan Background: While aerobic training is generally recommended as therapeutic exercise in guidelines, the effectiveness of resistance training has recently been reported in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Acceleration training (AT is a new training method that provides a physical stimulation effect on skeletal muscles by increasing gravitational acceleration with vibration. AT has recently been indicated as a component of medicine. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of AT in the management of NAFLD in obese subjects.Methods: A total of 18 obese patients with NAFLD who had no improvement in liver function test abnormalities and/or steatosis grade after 12 weeks of lifestyle counseling were enrolled in an AT program. These patients attended a 20-minute session of AT twice a week for 12 consecutive weeks.Results: During the AT program, the NAFLD patients showed a modest increase in the strength (+12.6% and cross-sectional area (+3.1% of the quadriceps, coupled with a significant reduction in intramyocellular lipids (−26.4%. Notably, they showed a modest reduction in body weight (−1.9%, abdominal visceral fat area (−3.4%, and hepatic fat content (−8.7%, coupled with a significant reduction in levels of aminotransferase (−15.7%, γ-glutamyltransferase (−14.4%, leptin (−9.7%, interleukin-6 (−26.8%, and tumor necrosis factor-α (−17.9%, and a significant increase of adiponectin (+8.7%. On a health

  10. NIH funding for disease categories related to neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Nation