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  1. Mechanisms of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Reactivation

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    Fengchun Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV consists of latent and lytic replication phases. During latent infection, only a limited number of KSHV genes are expressed. However, this phase of replication is essential for persistent infection, evasion of host immune response, and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. KSHV reactivation from latency produces a wide range of viral products and infectious virions. The resulting de novo infection and viral lytic products modulate diverse cellular pathways and stromal microenvironment, which promote the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. The mechanisms controlling KSHV latency and reactivation are complex, involving both viral and host factors, and are modulated by diverse environmental factors. Here, we review the cellular and molecular basis of KSHV latency and reactivation with a focus on the most recent advancements in the field.

  2. Non-Human Primate Model of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection

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    Heesoon Chang; Wachtman, Lynn M.; Pearson, Christine B.; Jong-Soo Lee; Hye-Ra Lee; Steven H Lee; Jeffrey Vieira; Keith G Mansfield; Jung, Jae U.

    2009-01-01

    Since Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8) was first identified in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions of HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, the basic biological understanding of KSHV has progressed remarkably. However, the absence of a proper animal model for KSHV continues to impede direct in vivo studies of viral replication, persistence, and pathogenesis. In response to this need for an animal model of KSHV infection, we have explored whether common marmosets c...

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in Brazil

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    S. Ramos-da-Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS became a critical health issue with the emergence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in the 1980s. Four clinical-epidemiological forms of KS have been described: classical KS, endemic KS, iatrogenic KS, and AIDS-associated KS. In 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus type 8 was identified by Chang and colleagues, and has been detected worldwide at frequencies ranging from 80 to 100%. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of KSHV infection in KS lesions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Brazil, as well as to review the current knowledge about KS transmission and detection. For these purposes, DNA from 51 cases of KS was assessed by PCR: 20 (39.2% cases of classical KS, 29 (56.9% of AIDS-associated KS and 2 (3.9% of iatrogenic KS. Most patients were males (7.5:1, M/F, and mean age was 47.9 years (SD = ± 18.7 years. As expected, HIV-positive KS patients were younger than patients with classical KS. On the other hand, patients with AIDS-associated KS have early lesions (patch and plaque compared to classical KS patients (predominantly nodular lesions. This is assumed to be the result of the early diagnose of KS in the HIV-positive setting. KSHV infection was detected by PCR in almost all cases (48/51; 94.1%, irrespectively of the clinical-epidemiological form of KS. These results show that KSHV is associated with all forms of KS in Brazilian patients, a fact that supports the role of this virus in KS pathogenesis.

  4. A novel mechanism inducing genome instability in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected cells.

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    Jackson, Brian R.; Marko Noerenberg; Adrian Whitehouse

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and canc...

  5. Cannabinoid modulation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and transformation.

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    Zhang, Xuefeng; Wang, Jian Feng; Kunos, George; Groopman, Jerome E

    2007-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also named human herpesvirus 8) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of Kaposi's sarcoma. A variety of factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma in addition to KSHV. Marijuana is a widely used recreational agent, and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the major active component of marijuana, is prescribed for medicinal use. To evaluate how cannabinoids may affect the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, we studied primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) exposed to KSHV. There was an increased efficiency of KSHV infection in the presence of low doses of Delta(9)-THC. We also found that Delta(9)-THC increased the viral load in KSHV-infected HMVEC through activation of the KSHV lytic switch gene, the open reading frame 50. Furthermore, we observed that Delta(9)-THC stimulated expression of the KSHV-encoded viral G protein-coupled receptor and Kaposi's sarcoma cell proliferation. Our results indicate that Delta(9)-THC can enhance KSHV infection and replication and foster KSHV-mediated endothelial transformation. Thus, use of cannabinoids may place individuals at greater risk for the development and progression of Kaposi's sarcoma. PMID:17671191

  6. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Solid Lymphoma Involving the Heart and Brain

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    Jason R. Andrews

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The disorders most strongly linked to KSHV are multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD, primary effusion lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We report an unusual case of KSHV-associated lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient manifesting with myocardial and central nervous system involvement. We discuss this case in the context of increasing array of KSHV-associated lymphomas. In the HIV-infected patient with a mass lesion, a history of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and prolonged immunosuppression should alert clinicians as to the possibility of KSHV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, in order to establish a timely diagnosis.

  7. The Biology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di QIN; Chun LU

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV),also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8),is discovered in 1994 from Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesion of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)patient.In addition to its association with KS,KSHV has also been implicated as the causative agent of two other AIDS-associated malignancies:primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD).KSHV is a complex DNA virus that not only has the ability to promote cellular growth and survival for tumor development,but also can provoke deregulated angiogenesis,inflammation,and modulate the patient's immune system in favor of tumor growth.As KSHV is a necessary but not sufficient etiological factor for KS,human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a very important cofactor.Here we review the basic information about the biology of KSHV,development of pathogenesis and interaction between KSHV and HIV.

  8. Regional prevalence and transmission route of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus in Zhejiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Hong-zhen; ZHU Biao; WANG Ying-jie; SHENG Zi-ke; SHENG Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Background The infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is most likely the cause of clinical Kaposi's sarcoma,primary effusion lymphoma,and multi-center Castleman's disease.KSHV infection has very limited epidemiological survey data in China,and its definite mode of transmission remains controversial.This study aimed to determine the infection status and the main transmission route of KSHV in Chinese population.Methods An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing KSHV ORF65 recombinant protein was employed to analyze the antibody response to KSHV ORF65 in sera from 122 healthy physical examination people,107intravenous drug users,135 non-intravenous drug users,211 hepatitis B (HBV) patients infected via blood transmission,107 kidney transplant recipients,and 72 female sex workers in Zhejiang Province in Southeast China.Results KSHV infection occurred relatively common (13.1%) in healthy population in Zhejiang,China.Infection rate was 16.7% in female sex workers,but significantly elevated in intravenous drug addicts (58.9%),blood-transmitted HBV patients (28.0%) and kidney transplant patients (41.1%).Conclusion Blood borne transmission of KSHV is probably the main route of infection in Zhejiang Province.

  9. Characterization of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Lymphomas by DNA Microarray Analysis

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    Keiji Ueda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among herpesviruses, γ-herpesviruses are supposed to have typical oncogenic activities. Two human γ-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, are putative etiologic agents for Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and some cases of gastric cancers, and Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL especially in AIDS setting for the latter case, respectively. Since such two viruses mentioned above are highly species specific, it has been quite difficult to prove their oncogenic activities in animal models. Nevertheless, the viral oncogenesis is epidemiologically and/or in vitro experimentally evident. This time, we investigated gene expression profiles of KSHV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, EBV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, and T-cell leukemia cell lines. Both KSHV and EBV cause a B-cell-originated lymphoma, but the gene expression profiles were typically classified. Furthermore, KSHV could govern gene expression profiles, although PELs are usually coinfected with KSHV and EBV.

  10. Non-human primate model of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

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    Heesoon Chang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Since Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8 was first identified in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS lesions of HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, the basic biological understanding of KSHV has progressed remarkably. However, the absence of a proper animal model for KSHV continues to impede direct in vivo studies of viral replication, persistence, and pathogenesis. In response to this need for an animal model of KSHV infection, we have explored whether common marmosets can be experimentally infected with human KSHV. Here, we report the successful zoonotic transmission of KSHV into common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, Cj, a New World primate. Marmosets infected with recombinant KSHV rapidly seroconverted and maintained a vigorous anti-KSHV antibody response. KSHV DNA and latent nuclear antigen (LANA were readily detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and various tissues of infected marmosets. Remarkably, one orally infected marmoset developed a KS-like skin lesion with the characteristic infiltration of leukocytes by spindle cells positive for KSHV DNA and proteins. These results demonstrate that human KSHV infects common marmosets, establishes an efficient persistent infection, and occasionally leads to a KS-like skin lesion. This is the first animal model to significantly elaborate the important aspects of KSHV infection in humans and will aid in the future design of vaccines against KSHV and anti-viral therapies targeting KSHV coinfected tumor cells.

  11. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus OX2 Glycoprotein Activates Myeloid-Lineage Cells To Induce Inflammatory Cytokine Production

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    Chung, Young-Hwa; Means, Robert E.; Choi, Joong-Kook; Lee, Bok-Soo; Jae U. Jung

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is an inflammatory cytokine-mediated angioproliferative disease which is triggered by infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). KSHV contains an open reading frame, K14, that has significant homology with cellular OX2, designated viral OX2 (vOX2). In this report, we demonstrate that vOX2 encodes a glycosylated cell surface protein with an apparent molecular mass of 55 kDa. Purified glycosylated vOX2 protein dramatically stimulated primary monocytes, macroph...

  12. Novel cellular genes essential for transformation of endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

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    Raggo, Camilo; Ruhl, Rebecca; McAllister, Shane; Koon, Henry; Dezube, Bruce J; Früh, Klaus; Moses, Ashlee V

    2005-06-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is involved in the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and Kaposi's sarcoma. The oncogenicity of this virus is reflected in vitro by its ability to transform B cells and endothelial cells. Infection of dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMVEC) transforms the cells from a cobblestone-like monolayer to foci-forming spindle cells. This transformation is accompanied by dramatic changes in the cellular transcriptome. Known oncogenes, such as c-Kit, are among the KSHV-induced host genes. We previously showed that c-Kit is an essential cellular component of the KSHV-mediated transformation of DMVEC. Here, we test the hypothesis that the transformation process can be used to discover novel oncogenes. When expression of a panel of KSHV-induced cellular transcripts was inhibited with antisense oligomers, we observed inhibition of DMVEC proliferation and foci formation using antisense molecules to RDC1 and Neuritin. We further showed that transformation of KSHV-infected DMVEC was inhibited by small interfering RNA directed at RDC1 or Neuritin. Ectopic expression of Neuritin in NIH 3T3 cells resulted in changes in cell morphology and anchorage-independent growth, whereas RDC1 ectopic expression significantly increased cell proliferation. In addition, both RDC1- and Neuritin-expressing cells formed tumors in nude mice. RDC1 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, whereas Neuritin is a growth-promoting protein known to mediate neurite outgrowth. Neither gene has been previously implicated in tumorigenesis. Our data suggest that KSHV-mediated transformation involves exploitation of the hitherto unrealized oncogenic properties of RDC1 and Neuritin. PMID:15958552

  13. Immunogenicity Analysis of Prokaryotic Expression Products of Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus orf65

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-shi FU; Bao-lin LI; Lin-ding WANG

    2008-01-01

    To purify the protein encoding the small capsid protein (SCP) of KSHV and analyze its immunogenicity, the carboxyl terminus of orf65 of Kaposi's sarcoma associated-herpesvirus (KSHV) was expressed in a prokaryotic expression system. The expression of recombinant E. coli containing pQE-80L-orf65 was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and the fusion protein was purified by chromatography. The expressed protein and its purified product were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and showed that 9 kDa was the expected size of the purified orf65 protein. The antiserum was produced in rabbit which was immunized by purified orf65 protein. An ELISA assay was established to analyze the immunogenicity of the purified orf65 protein. The ELISA analysis demonstrated that orf65 protein has strong immune activity, and the immune activity of polyclonal antibody against orf65 was more than 4 fold higher than that in the serum of the non-immunized rabbit. These results demonstrate that purified orf65 protein has very strong immunogenicity and can be used in screening KSHV infection in the general population using ELISA.

  14. Systematic identification of cellular signals reactivating Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma-derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets.

  15. A novel mechanism inducing genome instability in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected cells.

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    Brian R Jackson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and cancer development. Notably, aberrations in the cellular transcription and export complex (hTREX proteins have been identified in high-grade tumours and these defects contribute to genome instability. We have previously shown that the lytically expressed KSHV ORF57 protein interacts with the complete hTREX complex; therefore, we investigated the possible intriguing link between ORF57, hTREX and KSHV-induced genome instability. Herein, we show that lytically active KSHV infected cells induce a DNA damage response and, importantly, we demonstrate directly that this is due to DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, we show that sequestration of the hTREX complex by the KSHV ORF57 protein leads to this double strand break response and significant DNA damage. Moreover, we describe a novel mechanism showing that the genetic instability observed is a consequence of R-loop formation. Importantly, the link between hTREX sequestration and DNA damage may be a common feature in herpesvirus infection, as a similar phenotype was observed with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 ICP27 protein. Our data provide a model of R-loop induced DNA damage in KSHV infected cells and describes a novel system for studying genome instability caused by aberrant hTREX.

  16. Sulfotyrosines of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus G Protein-Coupled Receptor Promote Tumorigenesis through Autocrine Activation▿

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    Feng, Hao; Sun, Zhifeng; Farzan, Michael R.; Feng, Pinghui

    2010-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is a bona fide signaling molecule that is implicated in KSHV-associated malignancies. Whereas vGPCR activates specific cellular signaling pathways in a chemokine-independent fashion, vGPCR binds a broad spectrum of CC and CXC chemokines, and the roles of chemokines in vGPCR tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. We report here that vGPCR is posttranslationally modified by sulfate groups at tyrosine residues...

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus vCyclin open reading frame contains an internal ribosome entry site

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    Bieleski, L; Talbot, Simon

    2001-01-01

    We have previously examined the transcription and splicing of open reading frames (ORFS) 71 (K13), 72, and 73 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the primary effusion lymphoma cell line BCP-1 (latently infected with KSHV) (45). The three genes encoded by these ORFs (for vFLIP, vCyclin, and latency-associated nuclear antigen [LANA]) are transcribed from a common transcription start site in BCP-1 cells during both latency and the lytic cycles. The resulting transcript is splice...

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) vIL-6 Promotes Cell Proliferation and Migration by Upregulating DNMT1 via STAT3 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Wu; Yuqiao Xu; Dongping Mo; Peijun Huang; Ruihong Sun; Lei Huang; Shiyang Pan; Jian Xu

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), the most common AIDS-related malignancy. KSHV vIL-6 promotes KS development, but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we reported that KSHV vIL-6 enhanced the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in endothelial cells,increased the global genomic DNA methylation, and promoted cell proliferation and migration. And this effect could be blocked by the DNA methyltransferase inhibit...

  19. The cyclin encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus stimulates cdk6 to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein and histone H1.

    OpenAIRE

    Godden-Kent, D; Talbot, Simon; Boshoff, C; Chang, Y.; Moore, P.; Weiss, R A; Mittnacht, S

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8) is a novel gammaherpesvirus implicated in the cause of Kaposi's sarcoma and certain malignancies of lymphatic origin. One of the candidate genes possibly involved in promoting tumor development is an open reading frame (ORF) with sequence similarity to human type D cyclin genes. This cyclin-like gene, when expressed in tissue culture cells, promotes phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pro...

  20. CTCF and Rad21 Act as Host Cell Restriction Factors for Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Lytic Replication by Modulating Viral Gene Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Jiang Li; Dinesh Verma; Tim Mosbruger; Sankar Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesv...

  1. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  2. The Crystal Structure of PF-8, the DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit from Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltz, Jennifer L.; Filman, David J.; Ciustea, Mihai; Silverman, Janice Elaine Y.; Lautenschlager, Catherine L.; Coen, Donald M.; Ricciardi, Robert P.; Hogle, James M.; (UPENN)

    2009-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an emerging pathogen whose mechanism of replication is poorly understood. PF-8, the presumed processivity factor of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA polymerase, acts in combination with the catalytic subunit, Pol-8, to synthesize viral DNA. We have solved the crystal structure of residues 1 to 304 of PF-8 at a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. This structure reveals that each monomer of PF-8 shares a fold common to processivity factors. Like human cytomegalovirus UL44, PF-8 forms a head-to-head dimer in the form of a C clamp, with its concave face containing a number of basic residues that are predicted to be important for DNA binding. However, there are several differences with related proteins, especially in loops that extend from each monomer into the center of the C clamp and in the loops that connect the two subdomains of each protein, which may be important for determining PF-8's mode of binding to DNA and to Pol-8. Using the crystal structures of PF-8, the herpes simplex virus catalytic subunit, and RB69 bacteriophage DNA polymerase in complex with DNA and initial experiments testing the effects of inhibition of PF-8-stimulated DNA synthesis by peptides derived from Pol-8, we suggest a model for how PF-8 might form a ternary complex with Pol-8 and DNA. The structure and the model suggest interesting similarities and differences in how PF-8 functions relative to structurally similar proteins.

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Oritani, Kenji [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuda, Tadashi, E-mail: tmatsuda@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR.

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR

  5. Systematic identification of cellular signals reactivating Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuqu Yu; Harada, Josephine N.; Brown, Helen J.; Hongyu Deng; Moon Jung Song; Ting-Ting Wu; Juran Kato-Stankiewicz; Nelson, Christian G; Jeffrey Vieira; Fuyuhiko Tamanoi; Chanda, Sumit K.; Ren Sun

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary e...

  6. Surface Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I, PE-CAM, and ICAM-1 following De Novo Infection of Endothelial Cells with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    OpenAIRE

    Tomescu, Costin; Law, Wai K.; Dean H Kedes

    2003-01-01

    Under selective pressure from host cytotoxic T lymphocytes, many viruses have evolved to downregulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and/or T-cell costimulatory molecules from the surface of infected cells. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes two proteins, MIR-1 and MIR-2, that serve this function during lytic replication. In vivo, however, KSHV exists in a predominantly latent state, with less than 5% of infected cells expressing discernible lytic gene prod...

  7. Expression in a Recombinant Murid Herpesvirus 4 Reveals the In Vivo Transforming Potential of the K1 Open Reading Frame of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

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    Douglas, J; Dutia, B; Rhind, S.; Stewart, James P; Talbot, S J

    2004-01-01

    Murid herpesvirus 4 (commonly called MHV-68) is closely related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and provides an excellent model system for investigating gammaherpesvirus-associated pathogenesis. MHV-76 is a naturally occurring deletion mutant of MHV-68 that lacks 9,538 bp of the left end of the unique portion of the genome encoding nonessential pathogenesis-related genes. The KSHV K1 protein has been shown to transform rodent fibroblasts in vitro and common marmoset T lympho...

  8. KSHV 2.0: A Comprehensive Annotation of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Using Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel Genomic and Functional Features

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    Carolina Arias; Ben Weisburd; Noam Stern-Ginossar; Alexandre Mercier; Alexis S Madrid; Priya Bellare; Meghan Holdorf; Jonathan S Weissman; Don Ganem

    2014-01-01

    Productive herpesvirus infection requires a profound, time-controlled remodeling of the viral transcriptome and proteome. To gain insights into the genomic architecture and gene expression control in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), we performed a systematic genome-wide survey of viral transcriptional and translational activity throughout the lytic cycle. Using mRNA-sequencing and ribosome profiling, we found that transcripts encoding lytic genes are promptly bound by ribosomes...

  9. Exploitation of the complement system by oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus for cell survival and persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Shin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During evolution, herpesviruses have developed numerous, and often very ingenious, strategies to counteract efficient host immunity. Specifically, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV eludes host immunity by undergoing a dormant stage, called latency wherein it expresses a minimal number of viral proteins to evade host immune activation. Here, we show that during latency, KSHV hijacks the complement pathway to promote cell survival. We detected strong deposition of complement membrane attack complex C5b-9 and the complement component C3 activated product C3b on Kaposi's sarcoma spindle tumor cells, and on human endothelial cells latently infected by KSHV, TIME-KSHV and TIVE-LTC, but not on their respective uninfected control cells, TIME and TIVE. We further showed that complement activation in latently KSHV-infected cells was mediated by the alternative complement pathway through down-regulation of cell surface complement regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59. Interestingly, complement activation caused minimal cell death but promoted the survival of latently KSHV-infected cells grown in medium depleted of growth factors. We found that complement activation increased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation (Y705 of KSHV-infected cells, which was required for the enhanced cell survival. Furthermore, overexpression of either CD55 or CD59 in latently KSHV-infected cells was sufficient to inhibit complement activation, prevent STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation and abolish the enhanced survival of cells cultured in growth factor-depleted condition. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus subverts and exploits the host innate immune system to promote viral persistent infection.

  10. Identification and characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 11 promotor activation

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    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Open reading frame 11 (ORF11) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus belongs to a herpesviral homologous protein family shared by some members of the gamma- herpesvirus subfamily. Little is known about this ORF11 homologous protein family. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, ORF11, located adjacent and in the opposite orientation to a well-characterized viral IL-6 gene. Northern blot analysis reveals that ORF11 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle with delayed-early transcription kinetics. We have determined the 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated region of the unspliced ORF11 transcript and identified both the transcription start site and the transcription termination site. Core promoter region, representing ORF11 promoter activity, was mapped to a 159nt fragment 5{prime} most proximal to the transcription start site. A functional TATA box was identified in the core promoter region. Interestingly, we found that ORF11 transcriptional activation is not responsive to Rta, the KSHV lytic switch protein. We also discovered that part of the ORF11 promoter region, the 209nt fragment upstream of the transcription start site, was repressed by phorbol esters. Our data help to understand transcription regulation of ORF11 and to elucidate roles of ORF11 in KSHV pathogenesis and life cycle.

  11. The exonuclease and host shutoff functions of the SOX protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are genetically separable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaunsinger, Britt; Chavez, Leonard; Ganem, Don

    2005-06-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) SOX protein, encoded by ORF37, promotes shutoff of host cell gene expression during lytic viral replication by dramatically impairing mRNA accumulation. SOX is the KSHV homolog of the alkaline exonuclease of other herpesviruses, which has been shown to function as a DNase involved in processing and packaging the viral genome. Although the exonuclease activity of these proteins is widely conserved across all herpesviruses, the host shutoff activity observed for KSHV SOX is not. We show here that SOX expression sharply reduces the half-life of target mRNAs. Extensive mutational analysis reveals that the DNase and host shutoff activities of SOX are genetically separable. Lesions affecting the DNase activity cluster in conserved regions of the protein, but residues critical for mRNA degradation are not conserved across the viral family. Additionally, we present evidence suggesting that the two different functions of SOX occur within distinct cellular compartments-DNase activity in the nucleus and host shutoff activity in the cytoplasm.

  12. Parasite infection is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV in Ugandan women

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    Ndibazza Juliet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune modulation by parasites may influence susceptibility to bacteria and viruses. We examined the association between current parasite infections, HIV and syphilis (measured in blood or stool samples using standard methods and antibodies against Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV, measured by ELISA, in 1915 stored plasma samples from pregnant women in Entebbe, Uganda. Results Seroprevalence of KSHV was higher in women with malaria parasitaemia (73% vs 60% p = 0.01, hookworm (67% vs 56% p = 0.001 and Mansonella perstans (69% vs 59% p = 0.05; seroprevalence increased with increasing intensity of hookworm infection (p Conclusions Specific parasite infections are associated with presence of antibodies against KSHV, perhaps mediated via their effect on immune function.

  13. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

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    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein binds and protects a nuclear noncoding RNA from cellular RNA decay pathways.

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    Brooke B Sahin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The control of RNA stability is a key determinant in cellular gene expression. The stability of any transcript is modulated through the activity of cis- or trans-acting regulatory factors as well as cellular quality control systems that ensure the integrity of a transcript. As a result, invading viral pathogens must be able to subvert cellular RNA decay pathways capable of destroying viral transcripts. Here we report that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV ORF57 protein binds to a unique KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA, called PAN RNA, and protects it from degradation by cellular factors. ORF57 increases PAN RNA levels and its effects are greatest on unstable alleles of PAN RNA. Kinetic analysis of transcription pulse assays shows that ORF57 protects PAN RNA from a rapid cellular RNA decay process, but ORF57 has little effect on transcription or PAN RNA localization based on chromatin immunoprecipitation and in situ hybridization experiments, respectively. Using a UV cross-linking technique, we further demonstrate that ORF57 binds PAN RNA directly in living cells and we show that binding correlates with function. In addition, we define an ORF57-responsive element (ORE that is necessary for ORF57 binding to PAN RNA and sufficient to confer ORF57-response to a heterologous intronless beta-globin mRNA, but not its spliced counterparts. We conclude that ORF57 binds to viral transcripts in the nucleus and protects them from a cellular RNA decay pathway. We propose that KSHV ORF57 protein functions to enhance the nuclear stability of intronless viral transcripts by protecting them from a cellular RNA quality control pathway.

  16. Hsp70 Isoforms Are Essential for the Formation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication and Transcription Compartments.

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    Belinda Baquero-Pérez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with various AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, multiple processes required for KSHV lytic replication, including viral transcription, viral DNA synthesis and capsid assembly occur in virus-induced intranuclear structures, termed replication and transcription compartments (RTCs. Here we utilised a novel methodology, combining subcellular fractionation and quantitative proteomics, to identify cellular proteins which are recruited to KSHV-induced RTCs and thus play a key role in KSHV lytic replication. We show that several isoforms of the HSP70 chaperone family, Hsc70 and iHsp70, are redistributed from the cytoplasm into the nucleus coinciding with the initial formation of KSHV-induced RTCs. We demonstrate that nuclear chaperone foci are dynamic, initially forming adjacent to newly formed KSHV RTCs, however during later time points the chaperones move within KSHV RTCs and completely co-localise with actively replicating viral DNA. The functional significance of Hsp70 isoforms recruitment into KSHV RTCs was also examined using the specific Hsp70 isoform small molecule inhibitor, VER-155008. Intriguingly, results highlight an essential role of Hsp70 isoforms in the KSHV replication cycle independent of protein stability and maturation. Notably, inhibition of Hsp70 isoforms precluded KSHV RTC formation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII relocalisation to the viral genome leading to the abolishment of global KSHV transcription and subsequent viral protein synthesis and DNA replication. These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV lytic replication and highlight the potential of HSP70 inhibitors as novel antiviral agents.

  17. A microRNA encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes B-cell expansion in vivo.

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    Christine Dahlke

    Full Text Available The human gammaherpesvirus Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is strongly linked to neoplasms of endothelial and B-cell origin. The majority of tumor cells in these malignancies are latently infected, and latency genes are consequently thought to play a critical role in virus-induced tumorigenesis. One such factor is kshv-miR-K12-11, a viral microRNA that is constitutively expressed in cell lines derived from KSHV-associated tumors, and that shares perfect homology of its seed sequence with the cellular miR-155. Since miR-155 is overexpressed in a number of human tumors, it is conceivable that mimicry of miR-155 by miR-K12-11 may contribute to cellular transformation in KSHV-associated disease. Here, we have performed a side-by-side study of phenotypic alterations associated with constitutive expression of either human miR-155 or viral miR-K12-11 in bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells. We demonstrate that retroviral-mediated gene transfer and hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation into C57BL/6 mice leads to increased B-cell fractions in lymphoid organs, as well as to enhanced germinal center formation in both microRNA-expressing mouse cohorts. We furthermore identify Jarid2, a component of Polycomb repressive complex 2, as a novel validated target of miR-K12-11, and confirm its downregulation in miR-K12-11 as well as miR-155 expressing bone marrow cells. Our findings confirm and extend previous observations made in other mouse models, and underscore the notion that miR-K12-11 may have arisen to mimic miR-155 functions in KSHV-infected B-cells. The expression of miR-K12-11 may represent one mechanism by which KSHV presumably aims to reprogram naïve B-cells towards supporting long-term latency, which at the same time is likely to pre-dispose infected lymphocytes to malignant transformation.

  18. What Is Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a certain virus (the Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus or KSHV ) are more likely to develop KS. ... who already have a KSHV (Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus) infection are more likely to develop KS. Endemic ( ...

  19. Kaposi sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV, a weakened immune system, and the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8). Kaposi sarcoma has been linked ... on foot References Kaye KM. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus type 8). In: Mandell GL, Bennett ...

  20. The size and conformation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) DNA in infected cells and virions.

    OpenAIRE

    Renne, R; Lagunoff, M; Zhong, W.; Ganem, D

    1996-01-01

    The genome of a novel human herpesvirus has been detected in specimens of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and in several AIDS-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Here we examine the size and genomic conformation of the DNA of this virus (known as KS-associated herpesvirus or human herpesvirus 8) in latently and lytically infected cells and in virions. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of viral DNA shows that the viral genome is similar in size to those of other gammaherpesviruses (160 to 170 kb). As ...

  1. Human herpesvirus-8/Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is a new transmissible virus that infects B cells

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Herpesviral DNA fragments isolated from AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) tissue (KSHV-DNA) share homology with two lymphotropic oncogenic gamma-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and Herpesvirus saimiri, and are present in the lesions of more than 95% of HIV and non- HIV-associated forms of KS, AIDS-related body cavity-based lymphomas, and AIDS-related multicentric Castleman's disease. Here we show that BC- 1, a KSHV-DNA-positive, body cavity-based lymphoma cell line, produces infective h...

  2. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

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    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lan, Ke [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jian-Hua, E-mail: Jh_wang@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  3. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  4. Binding of cellular export factor REF/Aly by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is not required for efficient KSHV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is expressed early during lytic KSHV replication, enhances expression of many KSHV genes, and is essential for virus production. ORF57 is a member of a family of proteins conserved among all human and many animal herpesviruses that are multifunctional regulators of gene expression and act posttranscriptionally to increase accumulation of their target mRNAs. The mechanism of ORF57 action is complex and may involve effects on mRNA transcription, stability, and export. ORF57 directly binds to REF/Aly, a cellular RNA-binding protein component of the TREX complex that mediates RNA transcription and export. We analyzed the effects of an ORF57 mutation known to abrogate REF/Aly binding and demonstrate that the REF-binding mutant is impaired in activation of viral mRNAs and noncoding RNAs confined to the nucleus. Although the inability to bind REF leads to decreased ORF57 activity in enhancing gene expression, there is no demonstrable effect on nuclear export of viral mRNA or the ability of ORF57 to support KSHV replication and virus production. These data indicate that REF/Aly-ORF57 interaction is not essential for KSHV lytic replication but may contribute to target RNA stability independent of effects on RNA export, suggesting a novel role for REF/Aly in viral RNA metabolism.

  5. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4+ T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4+ T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4+ T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells

  6. Distinct profiles of antibodies to Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus antigens in patients with Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman’s disease, and primary effusion lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs Joseph A; Iadarola Michael J; Little Richard F; Wyvill Kathleen M; Ching Kathryn H; Issa Alexandra T; Burbelo Peter D; Yarchoan Robert

    2010-01-01

    Antibody responses against lytic and latent KSHV antigens were investigated in patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma. Antibodies against the lytic antigen K8.1 were 5-fold higher in MCD than KS patients, while antibodies to the sum of latent antigens v-cyclin and LANA were 27-fold higher in KS compared to MCD patients (P< 0.0001). The sum of anti-v-cyclin and anti-LANA antibody titers discriminated patients with KS from those ...

  7. HITS-CLIP analysis uncovers a link between the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein and host pre-mRNA metabolism.

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    Emi Sei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. The KSHV ORF57 protein is a conserved posttranscriptional regulator of gene expression that is essential for virus replication. ORF57 is multifunctional, but most of its activities are directly linked to its ability to bind RNA. We globally identified virus and host RNAs bound by ORF57 during lytic reactivation in PEL cells using high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP. As expected, ORF57-bound RNA fragments mapped throughout the KSHV genome, including the known ORF57 ligand PAN RNA. In agreement with previously published ChIP results, we observed that ORF57 bound RNAs near the oriLyt regions of the genome. Examination of the host RNA fragments revealed that a subset of the ORF57-bound RNAs was derived from transcript 5' ends. The position of these 5'-bound fragments correlated closely with the 5'-most exon-intron junction of the pre-mRNA. We selected four candidates (BTG1, EGR1, ZFP36, and TNFSF9 and analyzed their pre-mRNA and mRNA levels during lytic phase. Analysis of both steady-state and newly made RNAs revealed that these candidate ORF57-bound pre-mRNAs persisted for longer periods of time throughout infection than control RNAs, consistent with a role for ORF57 in pre-mRNA metabolism. In addition, exogenous expression of ORF57 was sufficient to increase the pre-mRNA levels and, in one case, the mRNA levels of the putative ORF57 targets. These results demonstrate that ORF57 interacts with specific host pre-mRNAs during lytic reactivation and alters their processing, likely by stabilizing pre-mRNAs. These data suggest that ORF57 is involved in modulating host gene expression in addition to KSHV gene expression during lytic reactivation.

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-positive primary effusion lymphoma tumor formation in NOD/SCID mice is inhibited by neomycin and neamine blocking angiogenin's nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Virginie; Sadagopan, Sathish; Johnson, Karen E; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2013-11-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) is a 14-kDa multifunctional proangiogenic secreted protein whose expression level correlates with the aggressiveness of several tumors. We observed increased ANG expression and secretion in endothelial cells during de novo infection with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), in cells expressing only latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) protein, and in KSHV latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) BCBL-1 and BC-3 cells. Inhibition of phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) mediated ANG's nuclear translocation by neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic (not G418-neomicin), resulted in reduced KSHV latent gene expression, increased lytic gene expression, and increased cell death of KSHV(+) PEL and endothelial cells. ANG detection in significant levels in KS and PEL lesions highlights its importance in KSHV pathogenesis. To assess the in vivo antitumor activity of neomycin and neamine (a nontoxic derivative of neomycin), BCBL-1 cells were injected intraperitoneally into NOD/SCID mice. We observed significant extended survival of mice treated with neomycin or neamine. Markers of lymphoma establishment, such as increases in animal body weight, spleen size, tumor cell spleen infiltration, and ascites volume, were observed in nontreated animals and were significantly diminished by neomycin or neamine treatments. A significant decrease in LANA-1 expression, an increase in lytic gene expression, and an increase in cleaved caspase-3 were also observed in neomycin- or neamine-treated animal ascitic cells. These studies demonstrated that ANG played an essential role in KSHV latency maintenance and BCBL-1 cell survival in vivo, and targeting ANG function by neomycin/neamine to induce the apoptosis of cells latently infected with KSHV is an attractive therapeutic strategy against KSHV-associated malignancies.

  9. miR-K12-7-5p encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus stabilizes the latent state by targeting viral ORF50/RTA.

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    Xianzhi Lin

    Full Text Available Seventeen miRNAs encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV have been identified and their functions have begun to be characterized. Among these miRNAs, we report here that miR-K12-7 directly targets the replication and transcription activator (RTA encoded by open reading frame 50. We found that miR-K12-7 targeted the RTA 3' untranslated region (RTA3'UTR in a seed sequence-dependent manner. miR-K12-7-5p derived from miR-K12-7 mediates the inhibition of RTA expression, and the mutation of the seed match site totally abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-K12-7 on RTA3'UTR. The inhibition of RTA expression by miR-K12-7 was further confirmed in the latently KSHV-infected 293/Bac36 cell line through transient transfection of miR-K12-7 expression plasmid or specific inhibitor of miR-K12-7-5p, respectively. The transient transfection of miR-K12-7 into 293/Bac36 cells reduced RTA expression and the expression of the downstream early genes regulated by RTA, and also the production of progeny virus was significantly reduced after treatment with chemical inducers. Our study revealed that another miRNA, miR-K12-7-5p, targets the viral immediate early gene RTA and that this miRNA contributes to the maintenance of viral latency.

  10. Differences in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-specific and herpesvirus-non-specific immune responses in classic Kaposi sarcoma cases and matched controls in Sicily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Emanuele; Goedert, James J; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Firenze, Alberto; Bonura, Filippa; Viviano, Enza; Romano, Nino; Luppi, Mario

    2011-10-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) might develop because of incompetent immune responses, both non-specifically and specifically against the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 15 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 13 KSHV seropositives (without KS) and 15 KSHV-seronegative controls were tested for interferon-γ T-cell (enzyme-linked immunospot [Elispot]) responses to KSHV-latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), KSHV-K8.1 and CMV/Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) peptide pools. The forearm and thigh of each participant was also tested for delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) against common recall antigens. Groups were compared with Fisher exact test and multinomial logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A KSHV Elispot response was detected in 10 (67%) classic KS cases, 11 (85%) KSHV seropositives (without KS) and two (13%) seronegative controls. All four cases with KSHV-LANA responses had current KS lesions, whereas five of six cases with KSHV-K8.1 responses had no lesions (P = 0.048). No case responded to both LANA and K8.1. Compared with the seronegative controls, the risk for classic KS was inversely related to DTH in the thigh (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.94, P = 0.01), directly associated with DTH in the forearm (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02-1.80, P = 0.04) and tended to be increased fivefold per KSHV Elispot response (OR 5.13, 95% CI 0.86-30.77, P = 0.07). Compared with KSHV seropositives (without KS), the risk for classic KS was reduced fivefold (OR 0.20, CI 0.03-0.77, P = 0.04) per KSHV response. The CMV/EBV Elispot responses were irrelevant. Deficiency of both KSHV-specific and KSHV-non-specific immunity is associated with classic KS. This might clarify why Kaposi sarcoma responds to immune reconstitution.

  11. Interaction of c-Cbl with myosin IIA regulates Bleb associated macropinocytosis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    Full Text Available KSHV is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, an angioproliferative endothelial cell malignancy. Macropinocytosis is the predominant mode of in vitro entry of KSHV into its natural target cells, human dermal microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. Although macropinocytosis is known to be a major route of entry for many viruses, the molecule(s involved in the recruitment and integration of signaling early during macropinosome formation is less well studied. Here we demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein c-Cbl is required for KSHV induced membrane blebbing and macropinocytosis. KSHV induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl as early as 1 min post-infection and was recruited to the sites of bleb formation. Infection also led to an increase in the interaction of c-Cbl with PI3-K p85 in a time dependent manner. c-Cbl shRNA decreased the formation of KSHV induced membrane blebs and macropinocytosis as well as virus entry. Immunoprecipitation of c-Cbl followed by mass spectrometry identified the interaction of c-Cbl with a novel molecular partner, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (myosin IIA, in bleb associated macropinocytosis. Phosphorylated c-Cbl colocalized with phospho-myosin light chain II in the interior of blebs of infected cells and this interaction was abolished by c-Cbl shRNA. Studies with the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin demonstrated that myosin IIA is a biologically significant component of the c-Cbl signaling pathway and c-Cbl plays a new role in the recruitment of myosin IIA to the blebs during KSHV infection. Myosin II associates with actin in KSHV induced blebs and the absence of actin and myosin ubiquitination in c-Cbl ShRNA cells suggested that c-Cbl is also responsible for the ubiquitination of these proteins in the infected cells. This is the first study demonstrating the role of c-Cbl in viral entry as well as macropinocytosis, and provides the evidence that a signaling complex

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K-Rta exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL like activity and is essential for viral reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Izumiya

    Full Text Available The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO is a protein that regulates a wide variety of cellular processes by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to a diverse array of target proteins. Sumoylation also plays an important role in the replication of many viruses. Previously, we showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV encodes a SUMO-ligase, K-bZIP, which catalyzes sumoylation of host and viral proteins. We report here that this virus also encodes a gene that functions as a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin-ligase (STUbL which preferentially targets sumoylated proteins for degradation. K-Rta, the major transcriptional factor which turns on the entire lytic cycle, was recently found to have ubiquitin ligase activity toward a selected set of substrates. We show in this study that K-Rta contains multiple SIMs (SUMO interacting motif and binds SUMOs with higher affinity toward SUMO-multimers. Like RNF4, the prototypic cellular STUbL, K-Rta degrades SUMO-2/3 and SUMO-2/3 modified proteins, including promyelocytic leukemia (PML and K-bZIP. PML-NBs (nuclear bodies or ND-10 are storage warehouses for sumoylated proteins, which negatively regulate herpesvirus infection, as part of the intrinsic immune response. Herpesviruses have evolved different ways to degrade or disperse PML bodies, and KSHV utilizes K-Rta to inhibit PML-NBs formation. This process depends on K-Rta's ability to bind SUMO, as a K-Rta SIM mutant does not effectively degrade PML. Mutations in the K-Rta Ring finger-like domain or SIM significantly inhibited K-Rta transactivation activity in reporter assays and in the course of viral reactivation. Finally, KSHV with a mutation in the Ring finger-like domain or SIM of K-Rta replicates poorly in culture, indicating that reducing SUMO-conjugates in host cells is important for viral replication. To our knowledge, this is the first virus which encodes both a SUMO ligase and a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase that together may generate

  13. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF75 is essential for viral lytic replication and plays a critical role in the antagonization of ND10-instituted intrinsic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Full

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components are restriction factors that inhibit herpesviral replication. Effector proteins of different herpesviruses can antagonize this restriction by a variety of strategies, including degradation or relocalization of ND10 proteins. We investigated the interplay of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV infection and cellular defense by nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components. Knock-down experiments in primary human cells show that KSHV-infection is restricted by the ND10 components PML and Sp100, but not by ATRX. After KSHV infection, ATRX is efficiently depleted and Daxx is dispersed from ND10, indicating that these two ND10 components can be antagonized by KSHV. We then identified the ORF75 tegument protein of KSHV as the viral factor that induces the disappearance of ATRX and relocalization of Daxx. ORF75 belongs to a viral protein family (viral FGARATs that has homologous proteins in all gamma-herpesviruses. Isolated expression of ORF75 in primary cells induces a relocalization of PML and dispersal of Sp100, indicating that this viral effector protein is able to influence multiple ND10 components. Moreover, by constructing a KSHV mutant harboring a stop codon at the beginning of ORF75, we could demonstrate that ORF75 is absolutely essential for viral replication and the initiation of viral immediate-early gene expression. Using recombinant viruses either carrying Flag- or YFP-tagged variants of ORF75, we could further corroborate the role of ORF75 in the antagonization of ND10-mediated intrinsic immunity, and show that it is independent of the PML antagonist vIRF3. Members of the viral FGARAT family target different ND10 components, suggesting that the ND10 targets of viral FGARAT proteins have diversified during evolution. We assume that overcoming ND10 intrinsic defense constitutes a critical event in the replication of all herpesviruses; on the other hand, restriction of herpesviral replication by ND10

  14. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 functions as a viral splicing factor and promotes expression of intron-containing viral lytic genes in spliceosome-mediated RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Yamanegi, Koji; Allemand, Eric; Kruhlak, Michael; Krainer, Adrian R; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2008-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 facilitates the expression of both intronless viral ORF59 genes and intron-containing viral K8 and K8.1 genes (V. Majerciak, N. Pripuzova, J. P. McCoy, S. J. Gao, and Z. M. Zheng, J. Virol. 81:1062-1071, 2007). In this study, we showed that disruption of ORF57 in a KSHV genome led to increased accumulation of ORF50 and K8 pre-mRNAs and reduced expression of ORF50 and K-bZIP proteins but had no effect on latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). Cotransfection of ORF57 and K8beta cDNA, which retains a suboptimal intron of K8 pre-mRNA due to alternative splicing, promoted RNA splicing of K8beta and production of K8alpha (K-bZIP). Although Epstein-Barr virus EB2, a closely related homolog of ORF57, had a similar activity in the cotransfection assays, herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 was inactive. This enhancement of RNA splicing by ORF57 correlates with the intact N-terminal nuclear localization signal motifs of ORF57 and takes place in the absence of other viral proteins. In activated KSHV-infected B cells, KSHV ORF57 partially colocalizes with splicing factors in nuclear speckles and assembles into spliceosomal complexes in association with low-abundance viral ORF50 and K8 pre-mRNAs and essential splicing components. The association of ORF57 with snRNAs occurs by ORF57-Sm protein interaction. We also found that ORF57 binds K8beta pre-mRNAs in vitro in the presence of nuclear extracts. Collectively our data indicate that KSHV ORF57 functions as a novel splicing factor in the spliceosome-mediated splicing of viral RNA transcripts.

  16. Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KS) is caused by the Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV). There are no vaccines at this time ... HIV-infected people who take drugs to treat herpesvirus infections (such as ganciclovir or foscarnet) are less ...

  17. HIV-1 Tat promotes Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis by regulating PI3K/PTEN/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhou

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is etiologically associated with KS, the most common AIDS-related malignancy. KS is characterized by vast angiogenesis and hyperproliferative spindle cells. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can trigger KSHV reactivation and accelerate Kaposin A-induced tumorigenesis. Here, we explored Tat promotion of KSHV vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Tat promotes vIL-6-induced cell proliferation, cellular transformation, vascular tube formation and VEGF production in culture. Tat enhances vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis of fibroblasts and human endothelial cells in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model. In an allograft model, Tat promotes vIL-6-induced tumorigenesis and expression of CD31, CD34, SMA, VEGF, b-FGF, and cyclin D1. Mechanistic studies indicated Tat activates PI3K and AKT, and inactivates PTEN and GSK-3β in vIL-6 expressing cells. LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, effectively impaired Tat's promotion of vIL-6-induced tumorigenesis. Together, these results provide the first evidence that Tat might contribute to KS pathogenesis by synergizing with vIL-6, and identify PI3K/AKT pathway as a potential therapeutic target in AIDS-related KS patients.

  18. NEDDylation Is Essential for Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Lytic Reactivation and Represents a Novel Anti-KSHV Target

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, David J.; Wood, Jennifer J; Jackson, Brian R.; Belinda Baquero-Pérez; Adrian Whitehouse

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which are aggressive malignancies associated with immunocompromised patients. For many non-viral malignancies, therapeutically targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been successful. Likewise, laboratory studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the UPS might provide a promising avenue for the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. The largest cla...

  19. Epidemiology and Transmission of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenu Minhas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV epidemiology and transmission. Since the identification of KSHV twenty years ago, it is now known to be associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Many studies have been conducted to understand its epidemiology and pathogenesis and their results clearly show that the worldwide distribution of KSHV is uneven. Some geographical areas, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Mediterranean region and the Xinjiang region of China, are endemic areas, but Western Europe and United States have a low prevalence in the general population. This makes it imperative to understand the risk factors associated with acquisition of infection. KSHV can be transmitted via sexual contact and non-sexual routes, such as transfusion of contaminated blood and tissues transplants, or via saliva contact. There is now a general consensus that salivary transmission is the main route of transmission, especially in children residing in endemic areas. Therefore, there is a need to better understand the sources of transmission to young children. Additionally, lack of animal models to study transmission, gold standard serological assay and the lack of emphasis on endemic KS research has hampered the efforts to further delineate KSHV transmission in order to design effective prevention strategies.

  20. Molecularly targeted therapy for Kaposi's sarcoma in a kidney transplant patient: case report, "what worked and what did not"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Rotter Ricardo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imatinib is a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor; for which there is limited information regarding its effects on AIDS Kaposi's sarcoma and none in patients with transplant-associated Kaposi's sarcoma. Sirolimus, an immunosuppressive drug used for kidney transplant, exhibits antiangiogenic activity related to impaired production of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor, clinical benefit has been reported in Kaposi's sarcoma associated with renal graft. Case Presentation Here we report a case of an 80 year old male, who developed Kaposi's Sarcoma nine months after receiving a living non-related donor kidney transplant at age 74. Three years after treatment with different chemotherapeutic agents for progressive cutaneous Kaposi's Sarcoma with no visceral involvement, he was prescribed Imatinib (200 mg/day for two weeks followed by 400 mg/day after four weeks of treatment he developed anasarca, further progression of KS and agranulocytosis. Imatinib was discontinued and there was significant clinical recovery. One year later his immunosuppressive therapy was changed to Sirolimus and regression of the Kaposi's sarcoma occurred. Conclusion The lack of benefit and severe toxicity associated with the use of Imatinib in this patient should alert clinicians of potentially adverse consequence of its use in patients with transplant associated Kaposi's sarcoma. On the other hand the positive response seen in this patient to Sirolimus even after a long evolution of Kaposi's sarcoma, multiple chemotherapy regimens and extensive cutaneous disease further suggest it therapeutical utility for transplant associated Kaposi's sarcoma.

  1. [Moritz Kaposi: further currency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, I

    1987-03-01

    In connection with the frequent appearance of Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS, the biography of Moritz Kohn/Kaposi, a dermatologist of Hungarian origin in Vienna, is presented. The merits and failures of his morphologically oriented concept are discussed. Today his activity is high estimed by dermatologists all over the world.

  2. Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  3. Epidemic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  4. Pre-micro RNA signatures delineate stages of endothelial cell transformation in Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J O'Hara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA have emerged as key regulators of cell lineage differentiation and cancer. We used precursor miRNA profiling by a novel real-time QPCR method (i to define progressive stages of endothelial cell transformation cumulating in Kaposi sarcoma (KS and (ii to identify specific miRNAs that serve as biomarkers for tumor progression. We were able to compare primary patient biopsies to well-established culture and mouse tumor models. Loss of mir-221 and gain of mir-15 expression demarked the transition from merely immortalized to fully tumorigenic endothelial cells. Mir-140 and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral miRNAs increased linearly with the degree of transformation. Mir-24 emerged as a biomarker specific for KS.

  5. Kaposis sarkom tolket som haematom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Jesper R; Hasselager, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a frequent skin cancer in HIV-positive patients, but is relatively uncommon in HIV-negative and non-immune compromised patients. We present a case of Kaposi's sarcoma of the face and scalp in a HIV-negative male with previous facial basal cell carcinoma....

  6. Human herpesvirus-8: beyond Kaposi's .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimar, Doron; Rimar, Yossi; Keynan, Yoav

    2006-07-01

    Today, more than 10 years and 2000 articles since human herpesvirus 8 was first described by Chang et al., novel insights into the transmission and molecular biology of HHV-8 have unveiled a new spectrum of diseases attributed to the virus. The association of HHV-8 with proliferative disorders--including Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease and primary effusion lymphoma--is well established. Other aspects of HHV-8 infection are currently the subject of accelerated research. Primary HHV-8 infection may manifest as a mononucleosis-like syndrome in the immunocompetent host, or in various forms in the immunocompromised host. The association of HHV-8 with primary pulmonary hypertension was observed by Cool et al. in 2003, but six clinical trials evaluating the role of HHV-8 in pulmonary hypertension have not been able to replicate this intriguing observation. It has been speculated that HHV-8 may secondarily infect proliferating endothelium in patients with pulmonary hypertension. HHV-8 epidemiology, modes of transmission, new spectrum of disease and treatment are presented and discussed. PMID:16889165

  7. Treatment Options for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  8. General Information about Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in skin lesions of classic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouni, Mirna; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), which allows them to provide anti-viral resistance and to link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. pDCs are involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious [especially viral, such as Molluscum contagiosum (MC)], inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, systemic lympho-angioproliferative tumor associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Microscopy typically exhibits a chronic inflammatory lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in addition to the vascular changes and spindle cell proliferation. Despite the extensive research done on the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV, pDCs role in relation to KS has only rarely been investigated. Given this, we intend to investigate pDC occurrence and activity in the skin lesions of KS. Immunohistochemical staining for BDCA-2 (specific pDC marker) and MxA (surrogate marker for local type I IFN production) was performed on classic KS (n = 20) with the control group comprising inflamed MC (n = 20). As expected, BDCA-2+ pDCs were present in abundance with diffuse and intense MxA expression (indicative of local type I IFN production) in all inflamed MC cases (20 of 20, 100 %). Though present in all the KS cases, pDCs were significantly less abundant in KS than in inflamed MC cases, and MxA expression was patchy/weak in most KS cases. In summary, pDCs are part of the inflammatory host response in KS; however, they were generally low in number with decreased type I IFN production which is probably related to KSHV's ability to evade the immune system through the production of different viral proteins capable of suppressing IFN production as well as pDC function.

  12. Management of pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma: new perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article focuses on the current approach to diagnosis and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma involving the respiratory system. (author). 27 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Recent advances in the study of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis; Avey; Brittany; Brewers; Fanxiu; Zhu

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over twenty years since a novel herpesviral genome was identified in Kaposi’s sarcoma biopsies. Since then, the cumulative research effort by molecular biologists, virologists, clinicians, and epidemiologists alike has led to the extensive characterization of this tumor virus, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)), and its associated diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of KSHV biology and pathogenesis, with a particular emphasis on new and exciting advances in the field of epigenetics. We also discuss the development and practicality of various cell culture and animal model systems to study KSHV replication and pathogenesis.

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ORF60, the small subunit (R2) of ribonucleotide reductase from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)

    OpenAIRE

    Gurmu, Daniel; Dahlroth, Sue-Li; Haas, Juergen; Nordlund, Par; Erlandsen, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is responsible for converting ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA. The enzyme is present in all life forms as well as in some large DNA viruses such as herpesviruses. The alpha-herpesviruses and gamma-herpesviruses encode two class Ia RNR subunits, R1 and R2, while the beta-herpesvirus subfamily only encode an inactive R1 subunit. Here, the crystallization of the R2 subunit of RNR encoded by the ORF60 gene from the oncov...

  15. Immunosuppressive Therapy-Related Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States have been diagnosed in homosexual or bisexual men infected with HIV. Signs of ... type of nonepidemic Kaposi sarcoma that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  16. Bronchopulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with AIDS.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, D. M.; McCarty, M.; Fleming, J.; Moss, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common secondary neoplasm to complicate HIV infection and may cause pulmonary disease. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out in 140 consecutive patients who were HIV seropositive and required bronchoscopy for new respiratory symptoms of at least two weeks' duration, with either a chest radiographic abnormality or abnormality of pulmonary function. The patients were classified into those with single local endobronchial lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma...

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus microRNAs induce metabolic transformation of infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Yogev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered cell metabolism is inherently connected with pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. KS tumour cells display features of lymphatic endothelial differentiation and in their vast majority are latently infected with KSHV, while a small number are lytically infected, producing virions. Latently infected cells express only a subset of viral genes, mainly located within the latency-associated region, among them 12 microRNAs. Notably, the metabolic properties of KSHV-infected cells closely resemble the metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells. However, how and why KSHV alters host cell metabolism remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of KSHV infection on the metabolic profile of primary dermal microvascular lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC and the functional relevance of this effect. We found that the KSHV microRNAs within the oncogenic cluster collaborate to decrease mitochondria biogenesis and to induce aerobic glycolysis in infected cells. KSHV microRNAs expression decreases oxygen consumption, increase lactate secretion and glucose uptake, stabilize HIF1α and decreases mitochondria copy number. Importantly this metabolic shift is important for latency maintenance and provides a growth advantage. Mechanistically we show that KSHV alters host cell energy metabolism through microRNA-mediated down regulation of EGLN2 and HSPA9. Our data suggest that the KSHV microRNAs induce a metabolic transformation by concurrent regulation of two independent pathways; transcriptional reprograming via HIF1 activation and reduction of mitochondria biogenesis through down regulation of the mitochondrial import machinery. These findings implicate viral microRNAs in the regulation of the cellular metabolism and highlight new potential avenues to inhibit viral latency.

  18. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mônica; Vilasboas, Virginia; Mendes, Luciana; Talhari, Carolina; Talhari, Sinésio

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few indolent lesions to an aggressive diffuse disease. Advanced Kaposi's sarcoma lesions, typically those on the lower extremities, are often associated with lymphedema. In this paper, we report a case of a patient with a rare form of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma called lymphangiectatic Kaposis's sarcoma. PMID:23739700

  19. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS *

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Mônica; Vilasboas, Virginia; Mendes, Luciana; Talhari, Carolina; Talhari, Sinésio

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few in...

  20. Primary Kaposi Sarcoma of Penis in HIV Negative Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Karami, Hossein; Bagher-Tabrizi, Alireza; Yaghoobi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Primary Kaposi sarcoma of penis is very rare. We will introduce a 47 years old male patient referred to our clinic from dermatology service, in this report. The patient suffered from itchy penile papules around coronal region. The lab tests had revealed a negative serology of HIV but tissue PCR was positive for Human Herpesvirus-8 (HHV8). Histological findings were compatible with Kaposi sarcoma. Primary Kaposi sarcoma of penis is rare but could occur in HIV negative patients.

  1. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS Sarcoma de Kaposi linfangiectásico em paciente com Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Mônica Santos; Virginia Vilasboas; Luciana Mendes; Carolina Talhari; Sinésio Talhari

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few in...

  2. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS Sarcoma de Kaposi linfangiectásico em paciente com Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few indolent lesions to an aggressive diffuse disease. Advanced Kaposi's sarcoma lesions, typically those on the lower extremities, are often associated with lymphedema. In this paper, we report a case of a patient with a rare form of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma called lymphangiectatic Kaposis's sarcoma.O sarcoma de Kaposi é uma neoplasia originária do endotélio linfatico, que apresenta um amplo espectro de manifestações, com quatro formas clínicas: sarcoma de Kaposi clássico, endêmico, iatrogêncio e epidêmico ou associado ao HIV. Em pacientes imunocompetentes, a doença é tipicamente limitada às extremidades. Porém em pacientes imunideprimidos, o sarcoma de Kaposi é uma doença sistêmica multifocal. Apresenta cursos clínicos diferentes, desde simples lesões cutâneas isoladas até lesões agressivas e difusas, com ou sem envolvimento sistêmico. Lesões avançadas de sarcoma de Kaposi, principalmente as localizadas nas extremidades, podem apresentar linfedema. Neste trabalho, reportamos caso de paciente com forma rara de Sarcoma de Kaposi associado a Aids, chamada de sarcoma de Kaposi linfangiectásico.

  3. Pulmonary capillary blood volume in patients with probable pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Camus, F.; de Picciotto, C.; Gerbe, J; S Roy; Bouchaud, O.; E. Casalino; Perronne, C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increase in pulmonary capillary blood volume secondary to angiogenesis has been described in Kaposi's sarcoma. The value of the pulmonary capillary blood volume as an early marker of pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma was evaluated. METHODS: In a prospective study 45 HIV positive patients (nine asymptomatic for Kaposi's sarcoma, 29 with cutaneous or mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma, and seven with pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma), underwent pulmonary function tests and determination of transf...

  4. Kaposi sarcoma incidence in Mozambique: national and regional estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Paula; Albuquerque, Gabriela; Vieira, Mariana; Foia, Severiano; Ferro, Josefo; Carrilho, Carla; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is expressed in four clinical variants, all associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection, namely, classic, endemic, immunosuppression-related and AIDS-related. The latter currently accounts for most of the burden of Kaposi sarcoma in sub-Saharan Africa, reflecting the frequency of HIV infection and its management. We aimed to estimate the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique and in its provinces. We estimated the number of incident cases of Kaposi sarcoma by adding up the expected number of endemic and AIDS-related cases. The former were estimated from the rates observed in Kyandondo, Uganda (1960-1971). The latter were computed from the number of AIDS-related deaths in each region, assuming that the ratio between the AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma incident cases and the number of AIDS-related deaths observed in the city of Beira applies to all regions. A total of 3862 Kaposi sarcoma cases were estimated to have occurred in Mozambique in 2007, mostly AIDS-related, in the age group 25-49 years, and in provinces from South/Centre. The age-standardized incidence rates were 36.1/100 000 in men and 11.5/100 000 in women, with a more than three-fold variation across provinces. We estimated a high incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique, along with large regional differences. These results can be used to improve disease management and to sustain political decisions on health policies.

  5. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma after heart transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Glen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Kaposi's sarcomas have been associated with different conditions of immunosuppression and are also known to be a typical complication of solid organ transplantations. Case presentation We report the case of a 65-year-old Turkish man with a history of heart transplantation 10 months ago who presented for clarification of his dyspnea. The patient had a known history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a smoking history of 40 pack years. Radiologically, three progressively growing intra-pulmonary nodules were detected. The histology was diagnostic for a Kaposi's sarcoma. Visceral and especially primary intra-pulmonary Kaposi's sarcomas are very rare and have been described to have a rather unfavorable prognosis. Conclusions Even with a history suggestive for conventional lung cancer, Kaposi's sarcomas should be considered in patients after transplantation of solid organs. It should be noted that in a minority of cases this tumor exists in the absence of the typical cutaneous lesions.

  6. Selective peptide inhibitors of antiapoptotic cellular and viral Bcl-2 proteins lead to cytochrome c release during latent Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Burrer, Christine M.; Foight, Glenna W.; Keating, Amy E.; Chan, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas including primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. KSHV establishes latency within B cells by modulating or mimicking the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins to promote cell survival. Our previous BH3 profiling analysis, a functional assay that assesses the contribution of Bcl-2 proteins towards cellular survival, identified two Bcl-2 proteins, cellular Mcl-1 and viral KsBcl-2, as pote...

  7. Inhibition of Replication and Transcription Activator and Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus by Morpholino Oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan-Jin; Wang, Kai-Yu; Stein, David A.; Patel, Deendayal; Watkins, Rheba; Moulton, Hong M.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Matson, David O.

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The KSHV replication and transcription activator (RTA) and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) play key roles in activating KSHV lytic replication and maintaining KSHV latency, respectively. Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) are similar to short single-stranded DNA oligomers, but possess a modified backbone that confers highly specific binding and resistanc...

  8. Neoplasms HIV associated Kaposi sarcoma not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract - The incidence of malignancies in virus carriers acquired immunodeficiency (HIV) has increased in conjunction with the disease during the past decade. 40% of all AIDS patients develop cancer during the course of HIV infection. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and cervical cancer have an impact extremely high in HIV infected patients, and they are considered as disease AIDS-defining stage. Many reports suggest that other neoplasms they can have a high impact on the population of HIV carrier, including head and neck carcinoma, rectal cancer - anal, plasma cytomas, and melanoma lung cancer. Methods - We examined the spectrum of cancer in HIV-infected patients, specifically neoplasms except Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed between 1/1998 - 6/2004. Information on age, sex, factors was gathered risk for AIDS, neoplasms and mortality rate. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 21 patients, what 15 were male (71%) and 6 females (29%); the median age was 36 (29-70). Tumors were reported: 11 Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (52%), 2 Hodgkin's lymphoma (6.6%), 1 medullary thyroid cancer (6.6%), 1 melanoma (6.6%), 1 rectal cancer (5%) and three head and neck cancers (14%), 1 cancer 1 lung and breast cancer. Five of the patients were intravenous drug abusers (24%); 4 patients were homosexual, bisexual March 8 straight, on 6 patients know the data. Conclusions - The spectrum of malignancies associated with infection HIV in our study was similar to that described in other populations. ratio between the immune system and the epidemiology of the virus-induced tumors is to importance to identify new therapeutic approaches in the treatment and / or prevention of these neoplasms

  9. Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma in an HIV-positive person successfully treated with paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Dongre, Atul; Montaldo, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    Epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma is one of the malignant neoplasms, which can develop in HIV-infected patients. Although the prevalence of HIV infection is reported to be high in Asian countries, Kaposi's sarcoma is rarely reported. We report a case of Kaposi's sarcoma involving the skin and oral mucosa along with extensive bilateral lymphedema of lower extremities, treated successfully with paclitaxel and antiretrovirals.

  11. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus latency associated nuclear antigen protein release the G2/M cell cycle blocks by modulating ATM/ATR mediated checkpoint pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects the human population and maintains latency stage of viral life cycle in a variety of cell types including cells of epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial origin. The establishment of latent infection by KSHV requires the expression of an unique repertoire of genes among which latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome. LANA regulates the transcription of a number of viral and cellular genes essential for the survival of the virus in the host cell. The present study demonstrates the disruption of the host G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation as an associated function of LANA. DNA profile of LANA expressing human B-cells demonstrated the ability of this nuclear antigen in relieving the drug (Nocodazole induced G2/M checkpoint arrest. Caffeine suppressed nocodazole induced G2/M arrest indicating involvement of the ATM/ATR. Notably, we have also shown the direct interaction of LANA with Chk2, the ATM/ATR signalling effector and is responsible for the release of the G2/M cell cycle block.

  12. Sarcoma de Kaposi en paciente con SIDA

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    Jesús Ramón León Polanco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino de 33 años de edad, con antecedentes de VIH-SIDA desde hace 10 años, que se mantiene en tratamiento con antirretrovirales. Durante todo este tiempo ha presentado varios episodios de infecciones respiratorias, incluyendo tuberculosis pulmonar 5 años atrás. Acude a consulta refiriendo edemas en miembros inferiores acompañado de lesiones en piel de color violáceo de un año de evolución, previamente interpretado como linfangitis rebelde al tratamiento y que se extendió a la cara interna de los muslos y a los miembros inferiores. Con pérdida de peso, no prurito en las lesiones, fiebre, lesiones en la mucosa oral. Se determinó hemoglobina 89 g/L, leucocitos 4,5 x 109 /L, se estudiaron las funciones hepática y renales resultando normales. Radiografías de tórax y ultrasonido abdominal normales. Se realizó estudio anatomopatológico de piel que informó Sarcoma de Kaposi. Se impuso tratamiento con quimioterapia

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication in a Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Line Stimulates Lytic-Phase Replication of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    OpenAIRE

    Varthakavi, Vasundhara; Browning, Philip J.; Spearman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) coinfect many individuals in North America and in parts of Africa. Infection with HIV is a leading risk factor for the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that HIV infection of common or adjacent cells would stimulate replication and spread of KSHV. Infection of a primary effusion lymphoma cell line by vesicular stomatitis virus type G-pseudotyped HIV type 1 led to a...

  14. Fine needle cytology of Kaposi's sarcoma in heterosexual male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali R. Dhote

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcomas the most common malignancy associated with Human Herpesvirus-8 (HHV8 infection. Though name is sarcoma but it is low grade vascular neoplasm. It is the tumour which arises from endothelial lining of vessels as well as lymphatic channels. So it involved all sites such as skin, Gastro intestine, lungs along with lymph nodes. We are presenting one such case of 65 year immunocompromised Indian male presented with multiple non blanching reddish bluish nodules on all extremities, chest, back with submandibular and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was performed and diagnosis was given low grade spindle cell neoplasm consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma which was confirmed on histopathology as Kaposi's sarcoma. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 789-791

  15. Pleuropulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma in the Setting of Immune Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Karthik; Semaan, Roy; Arias, Sixto; Karakousis, Petros; Lee, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 26 year with history of HIV/AIDS who presented with a pleural effusion. Serial radiography, pleural fluid analysis as well as clinical symptoms revealed development of Kaposi Sarcoma related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (KS-IRIS) in the setting of initiation of effective anti- retroviral therapy.

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma in an HIV-positive person successfully treated with paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongre, Atul; Montaldo, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    Epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma is one of the malignant neoplasms, which can develop in HIV-infected patients. Although the prevalence of HIV infection is reported to be high in Asian countries, Kaposi's sarcoma is rarely reported. We report a case of Kaposi's sarcoma involving the skin and oral mucosa along with extensive bilateral lymphedema of lower extremities, treated successfully with paclitaxel and antiretrovirals. PMID:19439884

  17. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma as the initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tasnim F. Imran; Ziyaad Al-Khateeb; Jin Jung; Stephen Peters; Lisa L. Dever

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually presents in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions that may advance to extensive visceral disease. There have been only a few documented cases in which the initial presentation of Kaposi's sarcoma involved the bronchopulmonary system. We describe a newly diagnosed patient who presented with pulmonary KS as his initial presentation of the disease. Our report is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness that pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma should be considered in...

  18. Imaging of Kaposi sarcoma in a transplanted liver: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In post-transplant patients, de novo malignancies such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD, lung carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, cutaneous malignancies, and Kaposi sarcoma are now seen. The immunotherapy used to prevent graft failure indirectly increases their risk. We present a rare case of visceral Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with orthotopic liver transplant.

  19. Kaposi´s sarcoma, epidemic type. Case presentation Sarcoma de Kaposi, variedad epidémica. Presentación de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    Ilen Ochoa Tamayo; Gilberto Serrano Ocaña; Juan Carlos Ortiz Sablon

    2009-01-01

    Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi's sarcoma was found mainly in elderly men of Mediterranean coast, eastern European background and Jewish ancestry (rarely in older women) and is a slow growing skin tumor. In AIDS patients, the KS tends to develop more rapidly compromising the skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and other organs. In people with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma is caused by an interaction between HIV, a weakened immune system and human herpes virus 8. It affects approximately 20% of peop...

  20. Disseminated Kaposi sarcoma with osseous metastases in an HIV-positive patient

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Bruce M.; Syed, Almas; Carmack, Susanne W.; Thomas, Cody A.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a neoplasm commonly associated with human herpesvirus 8 and HIV/AIDS. We present a 44-year-old African immigrant woman who presented to the emergency department after several months of abdominal pain. She was found to be HIV positive, and computed tomography demonstrated numerous lesions of the lungs, liver, and spleen, gastric wall thickening, and several lytic lesions of the spine. Fluoroscopy-guided biopsy of a lytic lesion of the spine yielded the diagnosis of Kaposi sar...

  1. Multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in a cyclosporin treated, HIV-1 negative patient: case report

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    van Oers MHJ

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD is a rare disease, but is more frequent in AIDS patients. MCD has only been reported twice before in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy after renal transplantation, and never in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy without transplantation. About half of the cases of MCD are human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 – related, in contrast to Kaposi's sarcoma, a more common complication arising after immunosuppression, where the virus is found in virtually all cases. Case presentation We report a HIV-1 negative, non-transplant patient who developed HHV8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma after 17 years of immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporin A for a minimal change nephropathy. Chemotherapy with liposomal doxorubicin resolved both symptoms of multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in this patient. A concomitant decline in the HHV8 viral load in serum/plasma, as determined by a quantitative real-time PCR assay, was observed. Conclusions Multicentric Castleman's disease can be a complication of cyclosporin A treatment. Both multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in this patient were responsive to liposomal doxorubicin, the treatment of choice for Kaposi's sarcoma at the moment, again suggesting a common mechanism linking both disorders, at least for HHV8-positive multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma. HHV8 viral load measurements can be used to monitor effectiveness of therapy.

  2. Morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of in-situ Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantanowitz Liron

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spectrum of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has been expanded to include pre-KS lesions. Case Presentation We report, for the first time, a case providing direct histological evidence of the development of early (in-situ KS from mediastinal lymphatic vessels in the setting of chronic lymphedema in an HIV-positive patient. Spindle-shaped and endothelial cells in these early KS-appearing lesions were immunoreactive for HHV8, D2-40 and CD34. Conclusion Our findings suggest that HHV8-infected spindle-shaped cells associated with lymphangiogenesis that evolve into KS lesions, acquire from the outset an aberrant mixed vascular and lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype.

  3. Psychosocial considerations in the therapy of epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J C; Tross, S

    1987-06-01

    Since the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) burst into prominence in 1981, it has claimed victims at an exponential rate and taxed the resources of physicians, health workers, and social support agencies. A sizeable minority of AIDS patients, mainly male homosexuals, have been presented with epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma (EKS). Although life expectancy with this presentation may be greater than with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or other opportunistic infection, the underlying immunodeficiency still foreshadows an untimely death, usually from infection. Those remaining months or years are frequently marked by a poor quality of life attended by pain, functional impairment, cosmetic stigmata, central nervous system (CNS) complications, loss of employment, poverty, ostracism, guilt, and anger. Psychologic burdens may disrupt the patient's efforts to deal with the disease. Health care workers must often overcome their own prejudices and fears about AIDS to provide effective management. PMID:3603057

  4. Sarcoma de Kaposi primário do pênis Primary Kaposi's sarcoma of the penis

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Mitsue Mukai; Talitha Chaves; Lucio Caldas; José Fillus Neto; Jesus Rodriguez Santamaría

    2009-01-01

    Sarcoma de Kaposi é um tumor vascular que afeta a parede dos vasos linfáticos. Possui quatro formas: clássica, endêmica, iatrogênica e associada ao HIV. É uma doença sistêmica, maligna, multifatorial e de curso variável. A apresentação inicial no pênis é rara, e mais observada em pacientes HIV positivos. Em pacientes HIV negativos, os casos que ocorrem nesta região, apresentam-se com pápulas, nódulos, placas e lesões verruciformes, assintomáticas. Para o tratamento da forma clássica, dispõem-...

  5. Sarcoma de Kaposi primário do pênis Primary Kaposi's sarcoma of the penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Mitsue Mukai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma de Kaposi é um tumor vascular que afeta a parede dos vasos linfáticos. Possui quatro formas: clássica, endêmica, iatrogênica e associada ao HIV. É uma doença sistêmica, maligna, multifatorial e de curso variável. A apresentação inicial no pênis é rara, e mais observada em pacientes HIV positivos. Em pacientes HIV negativos, os casos que ocorrem nesta região, apresentam-se com pápulas, nódulos, placas e lesões verruciformes, assintomáticas. Para o tratamento da forma clássica, dispõem-se de excisão cirúrgica, crioterapia, eletrocirurgia, laser e radioterapia. Neste trabalho, é relatado um caso raro de um paciente com a forma clássica, em região peniana tratado com sucesso com radioterapia.Kaposi's sarcoma is a vascular tumor involving the wall of lymphatic vessels. There are four types: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. It is a systemic, malignant and multifactorial disease and has a variable course. The primary presentation on the penis is uncommon and is mainly observed in HIV-positive patients. In HIV-negative individuals, asymptomatic papules, nodules, plaques and verrucous lesions are found. The treatment for the classic form involves surgery, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, laser and radiation therapy. The authors present a rare case of a patient with the classic form on the penis, who was successfully treated by radiation therapy.

  6. Late post transplant HIV infection with BK viremia and allograft tuberculosis in a renal transplant recipient with Kaposi sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, V.; Kandasamy, V.; Reddy, Y. N.; Kurien, A.; Mathew, M.; Abraham, G

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we discuss a case of a 51-year-old African renal transplant who presented with metastatic Kaposi sarcoma 1 year after transplant. The Kaposi sarcoma was treated with a switch of immunosuppressants and chemotherapy. Six years after transplant, he presented with chronic allograft nephropathy, allograft tuberculosis, BK viremia, and was diagnosed to have contracted HIV infection.

  7. Intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma may mimic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in HIV infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Zoufaly; S Schmiedel; AW Lohse; J van Lunzen

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma shares macroscopic and histopathologic features with gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Correct diagnosis may pose a clinical challenge.We describe the case of a young HIV-1-infected African lady without advanced immunodeficiency, who presented with a diffuse spindle cell tumor of the gut. Initial diagnosis was of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, based on endoscopy and histopathology. Further evaluation revealed evidence for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and the diagnosis had to be changed to diffuse intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma. Antiretroviral triple therapy together with chemotherapy was commenced, and has led to the rapid remission of intestinal lesions. With a background of HIV infection, the presence of HHV8 as the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma should be determined, as distinct treatment is indicated.

  8. Viral oncogene-induced DNA damage response is activated in Kaposi sarcoma tumorigenesis.

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    Sonja Koopal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma is a tumor consisting of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV-infected tumor cells that express endothelial cell (EC markers and viral genes like v-cyclin, vFLIP, and LANA. Despite a strong link between KSHV infection and certain neoplasms, de novo virus infection of human primary cells does not readily lead to cellular transformation. We have studied the consequences of expression of v-cyclin in primary and immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs. We show that v-cyclin, which is a homolog of cellular D-type cyclins, induces replicative stress in ECs, which leads to senescence and activation of the DNA damage response. We find that antiproliferative checkpoints are activated upon KSHV infection of ECs, and in early-stage but not late-stage lesions of clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens. These are some of the first results suggesting that DNA damage checkpoint response also functions as an anticancer barrier in virally induced cancers.

  9. MAPPING OF NATURAL KAPOSI SARCOMA INHIBITOR USING NETWORK BIOLOGY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadeepa R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of protein-ligand interaction networks on a proteome scale is crucial to address a wide range of biological problems such as correlating molecular functions to physiological processes and designing safe and efficient therapeutics. In this study we have developed a novel computational strategy to identify ligand binding profiles of proteins across gene families and applied it to predicting protein functions, elucidating molecular mechanisms of drug adverse effects, and repositioning safe pharmaceuticals to treat different diseases The resultant network is then extrapolated to proteomics level to sort out the genes only expressed in the specific cancer types. The network is statistically analyzed and represented by the graphical interpretation to encounter the hub nodes. The objective of developing a biological networking is for the evaluation and validation of cancer drugs and their targets. In the field of cancer biology, the drug and their targets holds a role of paramount importance. With the work conducted here it shows the study of relation between drug target networks. Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a systemic disease which can present with cutaneous lesions with or without internal involvement. Genes belonging to the group of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors are best targeted for cancer studies. Biological networks like gene regulatory networks, protein interaction network is usually created to simplify the studies. In the present study, 26 proteins as receptor were selected for the study; all the receptors were responsible for the cause of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Also, 121 natural anti-Kaposi Sarcoma compounds were selected from different sources the natural components were the best component for blocking of abnormal activity.

  10. L'atteinte osseuse dans le sarcome de Kaposi classique et agressif: à propos d'un cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; El Alaoui, Adil; El Bardai, Mohammed; Mezzani, Amine; Lahrach, Kamal; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Le sarcome de Kaposi classique est une tumeur rare multifocale d'origine des cellules endothéliales vasculaires à caractère évolutif progressif et peu maligne. L'atteinte viscérale dans le sarcome de kaposi est parfois observée chez les patients VIH positif par contre la dissémination tumorale dans les ganglions lymphatiques viscérales dans le SK classique reste très rare. On rapporte un cas rare de sarcome de kaposi classique agressif de la main avec une évolution rapide et destructive. PMID:27347285

  11. Targeting mTOR in HIV-Negative Classic Kaposi's Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Merimsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year old female with HIV-negative classic Kaposi's sarcoma responded to mTOR targeting by rapamycin. The response was well documented by PET-CT. This case provides supporting evidence that the mTOR pathway may be important in the tumorigenesis of KS and that rapamycin may have activity in this disease.

  12. Human herpesvirus 8 genotype E in patients with Kaposi sarcoma, Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Cassar, Olivier; Blondot, Marie Lise; Mohanna, Salim; Jouvion, Gregory; Bravo, Francisco; Maco, Vicente; Duprez, Renan; Huerre, Michel; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gessain, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    International audience To determine human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) K1 genotypes in patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) from Peru, we characterized HHV-8 in 25 KS biopsy samples. Our findings of 8 A, 1 B, 14 C, and 2 E subtypes showed high HHV-8 diversity in these patients and association between E genotype and KS development.

  13. Kaposi´s sarcoma, epidemic type. Case presentation Sarcoma de Kaposi, variedad epidémica. Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilen Ochoa Tamayo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi's sarcoma was found mainly in elderly men of Mediterranean coast, eastern European background and Jewish ancestry (rarely in older women and is a slow growing skin tumor. In AIDS patients, the KS tends to develop more rapidly compromising the skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and other organs. In people with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma is caused by an interaction between HIV, a weakened immune system and human herpes virus 8. It affects approximately 20% of people with HIV that don’t take antiretroviral drugs. It is more common in homosexual’s patients, but may appear in any HIV positive individual, in Africa where heterosexual HIV transmission route is the most important can also be found in children and women. We are presenting a case of Kaposi sarcoma in a young female admitted at the Internal Medicine Department of Dora Nginza Hospital.Antes de la epidemia del SIDA, el sarcoma de Kaposi se presentaba principalmente en hombres ancianos en la costa mediterránea, Europa del este y judíos (rara vez en mujeres de edad avanzada en quienes se desarrollaba lentamente. En los pacientes con SIDA, el cáncer tiende desarrollarse mas rápidamente comprometiendo la piel, los pulmones, el tracto gastrointestinal y otros órganos. En personas con SIDA, el sarcoma de Kaposi es causado por una interacción entre el VIH , un sistema inmunitario debilitado y el herpes virus humano 8. Afecta aproximadamente al 20% de las personas con VIH que no toman medicamentos antirretrovirales. Predomina en los pacientes homosexuales, pero puede aparecer en cualquier individuo VIH positivo, en África donde la vía de transmisión heterosexual es la más importante puede ser encontrado también en niños y mujeres. A continuación presentaremos un caso en una paciente femenina joven atendida en el servicio de medicina Interna del Hospital Dora Nginza.

  14. Effective palliative treatment of epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: Limited information is available in the medical literature on Epidemic Kaposi's Sarcoma (EKS) of the foot. A considerable amount of distress is experienced from EKS of the foot because minimal disease can cause severe discomfort, making it difficult to ambulate and even wear shoes. Various fractionation schemes and doses have been proposed to palliate these patients. The limiting factor for higher dose regimens appears to be the acute toxicity of foot discomfort which is experienced towards the end of treatment. Even doses as low as 20.0 Gy at 2.0 Gy/fx have been associated with transient episodes of generalized foot pain followed by desquamation of the skin of the sole in (5(7)) patients treated to the foot at Los Angeles County Hospital (JCO 6:863-867, 1988). In fact, Piedbois et al. (IJROBP 30:1207-1211, 1994) discontinued treatment to the foot if a partial remission was appreciated with split course radiation therapy to 20.0 Gy to lessen the risk of morbidity. These observations prompted us to review the treatment results of radiation therapy for EKS of the foot at our institutions. METHODS: Between 1985 and 1996, 36 patients with EKS of the foot were treated with palliative intent. All of the patients were homosexual or bisexual males with a median age of 35 years (range 24 - 68 years). Most patients were referred for radiation therapy due to foot discomfort and difficulty with ambulation. The majority of patients had prior or concurrent treatment with chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Opportunistic infections were noted in 43% of patients at the time of treatment. From the pool of 36 patients, 40 sites were evaluable at least one month after completion of radiation therapy with a median follow-up time of 7 months. These sites were treated with either electrons (n = 10), orthovoltage photons (n = 3), or megavoltage photons (n 27). The most common regimen entailed a novel fractionation schedule of 3 fractions a week at 3.5 Gy/fx to a total dose of 21.0 Gy

  15. Disseminated cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma in a patient receiving triptolide/tripdiolide for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E.; Frankiewicz, Dorota; Bręborowicz, Danuta; Matławska, Irena; Bylka, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To date, Kaposi sarcoma has not been mentioned among the adverse effects of triptolide/tripdiolide, ethyl acetate extracts or polyglycosides of the Chinese herbal remedy Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. Case Report A patient was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 29 years. She underwent treatment with corticosteroids, methotrexate and gold sodium thiosulfate, and was chronically taking ketoprofen. At the age of 59 years she started to take a powder (≈2 g/day) f...

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates angiogenesis and vascular permeability in Kaposi's sarcoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Cornali, E.; Zietz, C; Benelli, R; Weninger, W.; Masiello, L.; Breier, G; Tschachler, E; Albini, A; Stürzl, M

    1996-01-01

    Abundant vasculature with increased permeability is a prominent histological feature of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a multifocal, cytokine-regulated tumor. Here we report on the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in AIDS-KS angiogenesis and vascular permeability. We demonstrate that different cytokines, which were previously shown to be active in KS development, modulate VEGF expression in KS spindle cells and cooperate with VEGF on the functional level. Northern blot analysis as we...

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus microRNAs Target Caspase 3 and Regulate Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Suffert; Georg Malterer; Jean Hausser; Johanna Viiliäinen; Aurélie Fender; Maud Contrant; Tomi Ivacevic; Vladimir Benes; Frédéric Gros; Olivier Voinnet; Mihaela Zavolan; Ojala, Päivi M.; Haas, Juergen G.; Sébastien Pfeffer

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a cluster of twelve micro (mi)RNAs, which are abundantly expressed during both latent and lytic infection. Previous studies reported that KSHV is able to inhibit apoptosis during latent infection; we thus tested the involvement of viral miRNAs in this process. We found that both HEK293 epithelial cells and DG75 cells stably expressing KSHV miRNAs were protected from apoptosis. Potential cellular targets that were significantly down-regulated upon KS...

  18. Classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma and human herpesvirus 8 infection in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnur, P; Katano, H; Wang, Z H; Osakabe, Y; Kudo, M; Sata, T; Ebihara, Y

    2001-11-01

    We report 17 cases of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, which is located in the north-western area of China surrounded by Mongolia in the east, Russia in the north and Kazakhstan in the west. Fifteen of the patients were of the Uygur people. All patients were male and did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Most of the lesions were found in the lower and/or upper extremities, with 16 patients showing multiple lesions. Immunohistochemical examination of the lesions revealed that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen was expressed in the nuclei of spindle-shaped tumor cells. HHV-8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all seven cases examined. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DNA sequences of the HHV-8-encoded K1 gene in the seven Kaposi's sarcoma cases were classified as subtype C that was common in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and East Asian countries. In addition, using immunofluorescence we investigated the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in 73 Uygur patients with diseases other than Kaposi's sarcoma. Surprisingly, the serological study revealed that 34 of the patients (46.6%) were positive for antibodies against HHV-8, suggesting that HHV-8 infection is widespread in Xinjiang area. The occurrence of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma with a high seropositivity rate implies that Xinjiang is the most endemic area for HHV-8 infection in the world known to date. Considering that Xinjiang is located at the middle point of the Silk Road that used to extend from Rome to China, these data imply that the virus may have been in circulation in this area due to the migration of the people via the Silk Road.

  19. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  20. OX40 and 4-1BB downregulate Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in lymphatic endothelial cells, but 4-1BB and not OX40 inhibits viral replication in B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min; Myoung, Jinjong

    2015-12-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the human gammaherpesvirus subfamily and is associated with malignancies of endothelial origin (Kaposi’s sarcoma, KS) and B-cell origin [primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD)]. Viral lytic replication is known to be required for KS and MCD. As KSHV-related tumours mostly develop in human subjects when the immune system is compromised by immunosuppressive regimen, human immunodeficiency virus infection or some genetic deficiencies, KSHV-specific immune responses are believed to be important in the control of KSHV replication. However, analysis of the roles of immune cells in viral pathogenesis has been difficult due to the lack of an adequate animal model. Recently, congenital OX40 deficiency, as determined by genome-wide exome sequencing, was shown to be associated with aggressive childhood KS in a patient, suggesting that disrupted OX40–OX40L interactions might be implicated in disease development. Here, we report that interaction of recombinant OX40 protein with OX40L expressed on endothelial cells severely impaired KSHV lytic replication. Furthermore, 4-1BB–4-1BBL interactions were also capable of efficiently inhibiting viral replication in B-cells and endothelial cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence that ligation of tumour necrosis factor superfamily members and their cognate receptors is important for the control of viral lytic replication. These data are likely to pave the way for the development of KSHV-specific therapies for KS and MCD, in which viral lytic replication is a disease-determining factor. PMID:26467721

  1. Platelet activating factor produced in vitro by Kaposi's sarcoma cells induces and sustains in vivo angiogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bussolino, F.; Arese, M; Montrucchio, G; Barra, L; Primo, L; Benelli, R; Sanavio, F; M. Aglietta; Ghigo, D; Rola-Pleszczynski, M R

    1995-01-01

    Imbalance in the network of soluble mediators may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In this study, we demonstrated that KS cells grown in vitro produced and in part released platelet activating factor (PAF), a powerful lipid mediator of inflammation and cell-to-cell communication. IL-1, TNF, and thrombin enhanced the synthesis of PAF. PAF receptor mRNA and specific, high affinity binding site for PAF were present in KS cells. Nanomolar concentration of PAF stim...

  2. Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology on the management and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Arruda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal vascular lesion of low-grade potential that is most often present in mucocutaneous sites and usually also affects lymph nodes and visceral organs. The condition may manifest through purplish lesions, flat or raised with an irregular shape, gastrointestinal bleeding due to lesions located in the digestive system, and dyspnea and hemoptysis associated with pulmonary lesions. In the early 1980s, the appearance of several cases of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men was the first alarm about a newly identified epidemic, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In 1994, it was finally demonstrated that the presence of a herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma called HHV-8 or Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus and its genetic sequence was rapidly deciphered. The prevalence of this virus is very high (about 50% in some African populations, but stands between 2% and 8% for the entire world population. Kaposi's sarcoma only develops when the immune system is depressed, as in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which appears to be associated with a specific variant of the Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus. There are no treatment guidelines for Kaposi's sarcoma established in Brazil, and thus the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology and the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases developed the treatment consensus presented here.

  3. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling. PMID:26929373

  4. AIDS Kaposi sarcoma-derived cells produce and respond to interleukin 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell lines derived from Kaposi sarcoma lesions of patients with AIDS (AIDS-KS cells) produce several cytokines, including an endothelial cell growth factor, interleukin 1β, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Since exposure to human immunodeficiency virus increases interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in monocytes and endothelial cells produce IL-6, the authors examined IL-6 expression and response in AIDS-KS cell lines and IL-6 expression in AIDS Kaposi sarcoma tissue. The AIDS-KS cell lines (N521J and EKS3) secreted large amounts of immunoreactive and biologically active IL-6. The authors found both IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6-R) RNA by slot blot hybridization analysis of AIDS-KS cells. The IL-6-R was functional, as [3H]thymidine incorporation by AIDS-KS cells increased significantly after exposure to human recombinant IL-6 (hrIL-6) at >10 units/ml. When AIDS-KS cells (EKS3) were exposed to IL-6 antisense oligonucleotide, cellular proliferation decreased by nearly two-thirds, with a corresponding decrease in the production of IL-6. These results show that both IL-6 and IL-6-R are produced by AIDS-KS cells and that IL-6 is required for optimal AIDS-KS cell proliferation, and they suggest that IL-6 is an autocrine growth factor for AIDS-KS cells

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus and HIV-1 seroprevalences in prostitutes in Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Grandadam, Marc; Flandre, Philippe; Nicand, Elisabeth; Milliancourt, Catherine; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Philippon, Michel; Teyssou, Remy; Agut, Henri; Dupin, Nicolas; Calvez, Vincent

    2002-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked causally to Kaposi's sarcoma. Epidemiological studies have shown that KSHV transmission can occur during sex among homosexual men, but heterosexual transmission seems to be very rare in KSHV low prevalence countries. A seroepidemiological study was conducted to determine whether KSHV is transmitted sexually between heterosexuals in an endemic country. Sera from 282 subjects of African origin living in Djibouti were tested for antibodies to KSHV and HIV-1. Among the 282 individuals, 43 were female prostitutes working in the streets (group 1), 123 were female prostitutes working in luxury bars (group 2), 41 were non-prostitute females (group 3), and 75 were non-prostitute males (group 4). KSHV seroprevalence was 26, 20, 17, and 36% in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The seroprevalence of KSHV is not different between street or bar prostitutes and non-prostitute females (OR = 1.67; P = 0.34 and OR = 1.18; P = 0.73). These results suggest that in this endemic country commercial sex work does not seem to be a risk factor for KSHV infection and provides evidence against heterosexual transmission of KSHV in the female population studied.

  6. Supraglottic Kaposi's Sarcoma in HIV-Negative Patients: Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Server, Ela A.; Durna, Yusuf M.; Yigit, Ozgur; Bozkurt, Erol R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of an HIV-negative, supraglottic Kaposi's sarcoma patient. The 80-year-old male patient was admitted with complaints of hoarseness, difficulty in swallowing, and a stinging sensation in his throat for approximately six months. The endoscopic larynx examination revealed a lesion which had completely infiltrated the epiglottis, reached right aryepiglottic fold, was vegetating, pink and purple in color, multilobular, fragile, and shaped like a bunch of grapes, and partially blocked the bleeding airway passage. The case was discussed by the hospital's head-neck cancer committee and a surgery decision was made. A tracheotomy was performed under local anesthesia before the operation due to respiratory distress and endotracheal intubation difficulty. Direct laryngoscopy showed that the mass was limited in the supraglottic area, had invaded the entire left aryepiglottic fold and one-third of the front right aryepiglottic fold, and completely covered epiglottis. It should be remembered that although rare, Kaposi's sarcoma may be encountered in larynx malignancy cases. Disease-free survival may be achieved through local excision and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:27375914

  7. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma Herpesvírus humano tipo 8 (HHV-8 e a etiopatogênese do sarcoma de Kaposi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Carneiro Leão

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on human herpesvirus 8 with particular attention to the aspects related to the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors searched original research and review articles on specific aspects of human herpesvirus 8 infection, including virology, epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis, natural history, therapy, and Kaposi's sarcoma etiopathogenesis. The relevant material was evaluated and reviewed. RESULTS: Human herpesvirus 8 is a recently discovered DNA virus that is present throughout the world but with major geographic variation. In the Western world, the virus, transmitted mainly by means of sexual contact, is strongly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma and more controversially with multiple myeloma and other non-proliferative disorders. There is no specific effective treatment, but HIV protease inhibitors may play an indirect role in the clearance of human herpesvirus 8 DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA is present in saliva, but there are as yet no documented cases of nosocomial transmission to health care workers. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 among health care workers is probably similar to that in the general population. CONCLUSION: Human herpesvirus 8 appears to be, at least in Western Europe and United States, restricted to a population at risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8 certainly has the means to overcome cellular control and immune responses and thus predispose carriers to malignancy, particularly Kaposi's sarcoma. The wide diffusion of Human herpesvirus 8 in classic Kaposi's sarcoma areas appears to represent an important factor in the high incidence of the disease. However, additional co-factors are likely to play a role in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente artigo foi revisar a literatura recente em rela

  8. The Inflammatory Kinase MAP4K4 Promotes Reactivation of Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus and Enhances the Invasiveness of Infected Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Darya A.; Kiran Bala; Guntram Büsche; Magdalena Weidner-Glunde; Susann Santag; Semra Kati; Silvia Gramolelli; Modester Damas; Oliver Dittrich-Breiholz; Michael Kracht; Jessica Rückert; Zoltan Varga; György Keri; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a mesenchymal tumour, which is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) and develops under inflammatory conditions. KSHV-infected endothelial spindle cells, the neoplastic cells in KS, show increased invasiveness, attributed to the elevated expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The majority of these spindle cells harbour latent KSHV genomes, while a minority undergoes lytic reactivation with subsequent production of new virions and...

  9. Relationship between oral Kaposi 's sarcoma and HAART: contribution of two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Trapero, Julián; Del Romero-Guerrero, Jorge; Cano-Sánchez, Jorge; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmen; Martínez-González, José Ma; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Two HIV infected patients not receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) presented with epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity. One patient initially refused HAART, but when the lesion became large enough to be noticeable he agreed to HAART associated with excision of the intraoral lesion by CO2 laser. The other patient developed KS and progressed to AIDS at two years after ceasing HAART due to adverse effects; he was referred to hospital for renewed administration of HAART. In both cases, the lesions observed in the oral cavity were the first clinical manifestation of AIDS. These reports underline the close relationship between the use of HAART and the control of KS lesions, highlighting the important role of the dentist in the identification and early diagnosis of these oral lesions.

  10. Incidentally Detected Kaposi Sarcoma of Adrenal Gland with Anaplastic Features in an HIV Negative Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Murat; Sen, Erdem; Cebeci, Hakan; Ata, Ozlem; Yavas, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a vascular tumor caused by infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), is a systemic disease that can present with cutaneous lesions with or without visceral involvement. Very few cases of KS, most of which were associated with AIDS, have been reported in the adrenal gland. Anaplastic transformation of KS is a rare clinical presentation known as an aggressive disease with local recurrence and metastatic potential. We report here a 47-year-old HIV negative male presented with extra-adrenal symptoms and had an incidentally detected anaplastic adrenal KS exhibited aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of anaplastic primary adrenal KS without mucocutaneous involvement but subsequently developed other side adrenal metastases in an HIV negative patient.

  11. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  12. Absolute dose measurement Gafchromic R EBT2 movies. Case Study of Kaposis sarcoma; Medida de dosis absoluta con peliculas Gafchromic EBT2. Caso practico de un sarcoma de Kaposi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.; Moral, F. del; Meilan, E.; Azevedo Gomes, J. C. de; Tejeiro Garcia, A. G.; Andrade Alvarez, B.; Vazquez, J.; Nieto, I.; Medal, D.; Lopez Medina, A.; Francisco, S.; Salgado, M.; Munoz, V.

    2011-07-01

    Because of its high spatial resolution, low energy dependence and good response over a wide energy range, EBT2 Gafchromic films are widely used in many applications in radiotherapy for measuring relative dose. Despite being the most common use can be used to measure absolute dose. This text is an example of using films as EBT2 for in vivo absolute dose in a Kaposis sarcoma.

  13. Kaposi's Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its prevalence. It is almost exclusively seen in homosexual or bisexual men. Nonepidemic Gay related KS - There is a type of KS that develops in homosexual men who have no signs or symptoms of ...

  14. Visceral Kaposi's Sarcoma Related to Human Herpesvirus-8 in Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhammane, H; Mentha, G; Tschanz, E; El Mesbahi, O; Dietrich, P Y

    2012-01-01

    Background. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in transplant recipients is about 400 to 500 times rate in the general population. It is strongly associated to Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) infection which has been found in 95% of KS lesions. The optimal approach to managing posttransplantation KS is to reduce or discontinue immunosuppressive therapy but this strategy carries a risk of the acute rejection of the graft. Recently, the use of an mTOR inhibitor has added new opportunities for KS treatment and prevention. Case Report. We report a case of 24 years-old Turkish woman with visceral HHV-8-associated Kaposi's sarcoma after orthotopic liver transplantation. Conclusion. Posttransplantation KS is considered an experimental model of virus induced tumor suggesting the usefulness of HHV-8 screening in transplant recipient and donor. Therapeutic approaches are complex and require a multidisciplinary team. PMID:23320218

  15. Extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes in Kaposi's sarcoma-like dermal lesions of transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, S K; F. J. Martin; Jay, G; Vogel, J.; Papahadjopoulos, D; Friend, D S

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene develop dermal lesions resembling a common malignant tumor in AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). To evaluate the permeability characteristics of these lesions and the therapeutic potential of drug-carrying liposomes, we have studied the localization of sterically stabilized liposomes, which show long circulation time in blood and increased accumulation in tumors. Liposomes encapsulating colloidal gold were injected intravenously into transgenic mice bearing ...

  16. Use of X-Chromosome Inactivation Pattern to Analyze the Clonality of 14 Female Cases of Kaposi Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Ding; XiuJuan, Wu; Yan, Zhang; JunQin, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Shirong, Yu; Xiaojing, Kang; Yanyan, Feng; Weidong, Wu; Dong, Luo; Qingli, Lu; DeZhi, Zhang; XiongMing, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) has features of both neoplastic growth and hyperplastic proliferation. It is the most common tumor seen in patients with HIV infection. Whether KS is a real tumor or a benign hyperplastic disease is not known. Material/Methods Tissues from KS and cutaneous hemangioma lesion DNA were extracted, and then digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII. Human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) was amplified with PCR method and the product was separa...

  17. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuria Ablanedo-Terrazas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject.

  18. Linear Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics.

  19. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma in morocco: clinico -epidemiological study at the national institute of oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errihani Hassan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classic Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS is a rare disease likely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8 infection, and occurs predominantly in Jewish, Mediterranean and middle eastern men .There is a dearth of data in Moroccan patients with CKS regarding epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes. This report examines a cohort of patients with CKS evaluated at the national institute of oncology over 11-year period. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients referred to the national institute of oncology with classical Kaposi sarcoma, between January 1998 and February 2008, was performed. Reviewed information included demographics, clinical and pathological staging, death or last follow-up. Results During the study period, 56 patients with a diagnosis of CKS have been referred to our hospital. There were 11(19,7% females and 45 (80,3% males (male-to-female ratio: 4:1. Mean age at diagnosis was 61,7 ± 15 (range: 15- 86 years. Nodules and/or plaques were the most frequent type of lesion. The most common location was the lower limbs, particularly the distal lower extremity (90%. In addition to skin involvement, visceral spread was evident in 9 cases. The most common visceral involvement sites were lymph nodes (44%, lung (22%, and gastrointestinal tract (22%. Associated lymphoedema was seen in 24 (42% of the patients. There were 18 stage I patients (32,14%, 8: stage II (14,28%, 21 stage III(37,5% and 9 stage IV (16,07%. A second primary malignancy was diagnosed in 6 cases (10,7%, none of the reticuloendothelial system. With a median follow-up of 45 months, 38 (67,8 patients are alive, of whom 25 (65,78% patients with stable disease, five with progressive disease currently under systemic chemotherapy and 8(21,05% are alive and free of disease, over a mean interval of 5 years. Conclusion This is the largest reported series in our context. In Morocco, CKS exhibits some special characteristics including a disseminated skin

  20. An immunohistochemical study of p53 protein expression in classical Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R; Ramon, M; Kilim, S; Lichtig, C; Friedman-Birnbaum, R

    1996-08-01

    The present study was performed to determine the frequency of p53 protein immunoreactivity in classical Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) as a whole and in relation to the histological subtypes which are considered to correspond to the developmental stages of the tumor. The accumulation of p53 protein was studied immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibody BP53-12 on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of 36 KS lesions, of which 14 were classified histologically as early type and 22 as spindle-cell or mixed type. No positive immunoreactivity was detected in any of the 14 early-type lesions. Among the 22 spindle-cell and mixed variants, positive staining was detected in 5-10% of the tumor cells in one lesion, 1-5% of the cells in six lesions, and in < 1% of the cells in two lesions. These very small percentages of positively stained cells in less than half of the cases of the spindle-cell and mixed variants do not support a significant role for p53 in tumor progression and evolution in KS. PMID:8879300

  1. Renal transplantation exposes patients with previous Kaposi's sarcoma to a high risk of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutrelepont, J M; De Pauw, L; Gruber, S A; Dunn, D L; Qunibi, W; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Penn, I; Abramowicz, D

    1996-08-27

    It is currently estimated that about 0.5% of patients will develop Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) after kidney transplantation. Tapering of immunosuppression often leads to KS remission, but also results in graft loss in more than 50% of cases. Whether retransplantation is safe in these patients is unknown. We here report on eight patients who developed KS recurrence after kidney transplantation-(A) Patients with previously treated KS: There were 4 patients who had clinical remission of KS (including three posttransplantation) for periods ranging from 5 months up to 19 years before transplantation. All 4 developed KS recurrence within months after transplantation. In 3 patients, KS regressed only when all immunosuppression was discontinued, at the price of allograft removal. Partial remission occurred in the fourth patient following reduction of immunosuppression and gancyclovir administration; (B) Patients with recurrent KS during a single transplant: 4 patients developed KS after transplantation that regressed following reduction of immunosuppressive therapy. Increased immunosuppression, in the form of steroid pulses in 3 patients was associated with recurrence of KS. Subsequent reduction of immunosuppression caused regression of KS in all 4 patients, but 2 recipients lost their allografts. These data emphasize the high risk of recurrence of KS after renal transplantation. If physicians decide to transplant patients with a history of KS, they should inform the future recipient of the possibility of KS recurrence. PMID:8781611

  2. Treatment of cutaneous Kaposi's Sarcoma with tin ethyl etiopurpurin (SnET2) photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) lesions in immunocompromised individuals are often physiologically and psychologically distressing. The multifocal nature of these lesions makes local treatments (i.e., surgery, radiation) difficult and time consuming. Further, cosmetic outcomes are generally poor. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can overcome some of these negative outcomes in a single treatment session and as such may be of benefit to these patients. Methods: SnET2 PDT was performed on 9 pts. with known KS lesions. The total number of lesions treated was 121. All patients were HIV positive. The drug SnET2 was intravenously injected and subsequently activated, 24 hours post-injection, by 665 nm light delivered via fiberoptic from a diode laser light source. The total light dose delivered was 300J/sq. cm at a power density of 50-150mW/sq.cm. Response rates were assessed by serial follow-up and patient subjective satisfaction rates were recorded. Results: Subjectively each patient was satisfied with the cosmetic outcome of treatment. Of 8 evaluable patients with 116 lesions response rates were: (CR 75%; PR 19%; NR 0%; 6% of lesions were of Indeterminate status at follow-up). Follow-up ranged from 1-9 months. Adverse experiences were mild to moderate of which 100% were due to sun exposure and did not require treatment. Conclusions: PDT is a well tolerated procedure that produces excellent subjective and objective responses. The patient is treated in a single session on an outpatient basis

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient. PMID:24231484

  4. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...... active G protein-coupled receptor known as vGPCR that binds CXC chemokines with high affinity. In this study, we show that conditional transgenic expression of vGPCR by cells of endothelial origin triggers an angiogenic program in vivo, leading to development of an angioproliferative disease...

  5. Factores de progresión tumoral en el sarcoma de Kaposi: estudio inmunohistoquímico

    OpenAIRE

    Penín Mosquera, Rosa Maria

    2003-01-01

    El sarcoma de Kaposi (SK) es una enfermedad angioproliferativa con cuatro formas clínico-epidemiológicas: clásica (SK-C), africana endémica, relacionada con fármacos inmunosupresores y relacionada con el síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SK-SIDA). La afectación del SK es generalmente cutánea, pero en los casos agresivos puede diseminarse a localizaciones extracutáneas. En la piel, las lesiones se clasifican clínicopatológicamente en máculas, placas y tumores de acuerdo con su progresió...

  6. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  7. Seroprevalence of Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nategh Rakhshandeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seroepidemiological surveys show that the prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 infection mostly varies in various geographical areas and reflects the local incidence of classic and endemic KS, being widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean countries and uncommon in the USA and Northern Europe. In the Middle East only few populations, such as Ashkenazi and Sephardic groups in Israel, have been adequately evaluated for HHV-8 seroprevalence. Among Iranian population a striking higher seroprevalence of HHV8 has been reported among haemodialysis (16.9%, renal transplant recipients (25% and HIV (45.7% patients compared to blood donors (2%. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is the rarest cancer in Iran, with an annual age-standardized incidence varying from 0.10 to 0.17 per 100,000 in males and from 0.06 to 0.08 per 100,000 in females. KS, however, is one of the most important malignancies in Iranian renal transplanted patients affecting up to 2.4% of organ recipients. The epidemiology of HHV8 and KS in Iran needs further evaluation. While the high prevalence of HHV-8 antibodies in HIV positive and haemodialysis individuals may be attributed to high-risk sexual behavior and polytransfusions, respectively, unknown determinants may be responsible for high seroprevalence of HHV8 and high incidence of KS in solid organ recipients. A global survey on HHV8 seroprevalence in Iran is mandatory to define co-factors associated with HHV8 infection and KS risk in the general Iranian population and in specific patient groups.

  8. HHV-8 infection in patients with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8 in HIV-positive Brazilian patients with (HIV+/KS+ and without Kaposi's sarcoma (HIV+/KS- using PCR and immunofluorescence assays, to assess its association with KS disease, to evaluate the performance of these tests in detecting HHV-8 infection, and to investigate the association between anti-HHV-8 antibody titers, CD4 counts and staging of KS disease. Blood samples from 66 patients, 39 HIV+/KS+ and 27 HIV+/KS-, were analyzed for HHV-8 viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by PCR and HHV-8 antigenemia for latent and lytic infection by immunofluorescence assay. Positive samples for latent nuclear HHV-8 antigen (LNA antibodies were titrated out from 1/100 to 1/409,600 dilution. Clinical information was collected from medical records and risk behavior was assessed through an interview. HHV-8 DNA sequences were detected by PCR in 74.3% of KS+ patients and in 3.7% of KS- patients. Serological assays were similar in detecting anti-LNA antibodies and anti-lytic antigens in sera from KS+ patients (79.5% and KS- patients (18.5%. HHV-8 was associated with KS whatever the method used, i.e., PCR (odds ratio (OR = 7.4, 95% confidence interval (CI = 2.16-25.61 or anti-LNA and anti-lytic antibodies (OR = 17.0, 95%CI = 4.91-59.14. Among KS+ patients, HHV-8 titration levels correlated positively with CD4 counts (rho 0.48, P = 0.02, but not with KS staging. HHV-8 is involved in the development of KS in different geographic areas worldwide, as it is in Brazil, where HHV-8 is more frequent among HIV+ patients. KS severity was associated with immunodeficiency, but no correlation was found between HHV-8 antibody titers and KS staging.

  9. Induction of interleukin-6 and oncostatin M by radiation in Kaposi's sarcoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define the in vitro radiosensitivity of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and to explore the mechanism of its extreme clinical radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: The radiation survivals of the three KS cell cultures (KSY-1, KS-JD, KS6-3E) were determined by clonogenic assay and MTT assay. Supernatants from irradiated cells were collected at different time points for measurement of the interleukin 6 (IL-6), oncostatin M (OSM), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by ELISA. Changes in the mRNA expression of these cytokines were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot hybridization. Fresh KS cells were preincubated with the irradiated supernatant before irradiation, and the change in survivals were assessed. Results: The mean SF-2 (survival fraction after 2 Gy) for KS was 0.43. Preincubation with the irradiated supernatant reduced the SF-2 significantly from 0.43 to 0.33 (p<0.05). Treatment with irradiated supernatant alone was not cytotoxic to the cells. Radiation induced IL-6 and OSM production by KS cells at the transcription level. A single dose of 2 Gy increased IL-6 and OSM mRNA expression of the KS Y-1 cells. This corresponded to an increase in the IL-6 and OSM levels in the culture medium. There was no significant change in the level of bFGF. Preincubation with recombinant human IL-6 or OSM sensitized KS in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The low SF-2 value for these KS cell lines correlates with the clinical radiosensitivity of KS. The high radiosensitivity may be due to radiation induction of cytokines such as IL-6 and OSM, which are radiosensitizers for KS cells

  10. A rare complication of follicular hair unit extraction: Kaposi's varicelliform eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, A Tulin; Demirci, Gulsen T; Uzunismail, M Adnan; Yildiz, Semsi

    2016-01-01

    Follicular hair unit extraction (FUE) is becoming a popular type of hair transplantation recently. Kaposi's varicelliform eruption (KVE) is an uncommon skin emergency due to cutaneous dissemination of several types of viruses, most notably herpes virus, over the lesions of preexisting skin disorders. A 34-year-old man visited our dermatology outpatient clinic with a blistering, itchy and tender eruption on his head and body. He had undergone follicular FUE for androgenic alopecia 12 days previously, and 5 days after the procedure, umbilicated and/or hemorrhagic vesiculopustules appeared firstly on the occipital scalp skin where the hair units were taken. The lesions had rapidly spread over the upper chest and back. After the operation, he had taken oral methylprednisolone, amoxicillin clavulanate and had used fusidic acid ointment without any benefit. Bacterial culture of the pustules yielded no microorganism, while Tzanck smear from the vesicles revealed multinuclear giant cell groups. Based on a diagnosis of KVE, we treated the patient with oral valacyclovir hydrochloride 1000 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. Symptoms cleared rapidly, pustules and vesicles dried in a few days, and re-epithelialization of the eroded areas started at the end of the first week. The reported complications of FUE include necrosis of the donor site, postoperative hyperesthesia, recipient area folliculitis, keloids, bleeding, infection and pyogenic granuloma. Up to this date there are only three reports of KVE developing just after dermatological surgery, including dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, and skin grafting. According to our knowledge, this is the first case of KVE occurring after the FUE procedure. We think that the traumatic effects and skin barrier disruption due to operation and immune alteration due to postsurgical steroid treatment might have precipitated the activation and dissemination of latent herpesvirus infection. PMID:26937302

  11. Changing patterns of Kaposi's sarcoma in Danish acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with complete follow-up. The Danish Study Group for HIV Infection (DASHI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Melbye, M; Pedersen, C;

    1995-01-01

    clinically and with consecutive CD4 cell count measurement from time of AIDS-defining illness to date of death or censoring date, whichever came first. The proportion of homo-/bisexual men (n = 520) with Kaposi's sarcoma (n = 100) at AIDS diagnosis declined from 31% before 1985 to 13% in 1990, whereas...

  12. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... with the traditional audit and legal universes and industries are examples of emerging potentials both from a research and business point of view to exploit and explore further. The accelerator approach may therefore be an Idea Watch to consider, no matter which industry you are in, because in essence accelerators...

  13. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  14. Gene expression profile of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) is a proliferation of aberrant vascular structures lined by spindle cells, and is caused by a gammaherpes virus (HHV8/KSHV). Its course is aggravated by co-infection with HIV-1, where the timing of infection with HIV-1 and HHV8 is important for the clinical outcome. In order to better understand the pathogenesis of KS, we have analysed tissue from two AIDS-KS lesions, and from normal skin by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was then used to validate the results. The expression profile of AIDS-related KS (AIDS-KS) reflects an active process in the skin. Transcripts of HHV8 were found to be very low, and HIV-1 mRNA was not detected by SAGE, although it could be found using RT-PCR. Comparing the expression profile of AIDS-KS tissue with publicly available SAGE libraries suggested that AIDS-KS mRNA levels are most similar to those in an artificially mixed library of endothelial cells and leukocytes, in line with the description of KS lesions as containing spindle cells with endothelial characteristics, and an inflammatory infiltrate. At least 64 transcripts were found to be significantly elevated, and 28 were statistically downregulated in AIDS-KS compared to normal skin. Five of the upregulated mRNAs, including Tie 1 and sialoadhesin/CD169, were confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR to be elevated in additional AIDS-KS biopsies. Antibodies to sialoadhesin/CD169, a known marker of activated macrophages, were shown to specifically label tumour macrophages. The expression profile of AIDS-KS showed 64 genes to be significantly upregulated, and 28 genes downregulated, compared with normal skin. One of the genes with increased expression was sialoadhesin (CD169). Antibodies to sialoadhesin/CD169 specifically labelled tumour-associated macrophages, suggesting that macrophages present in AIDS-KS lesions belong to a subset of human CD169+ macrophages

  15. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  16. Mapping the Epidemiology of Kaposi Sarcoma and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Among Children in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Chris A; Keating, Elizabeth M; Lukolyo, Heather; Danysh, Heather E; Scheurer, Michael E; Mehta, Parth S; Lubega, Joseph; Slone, Jeremy S

    2016-08-01

    Children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased risk of developing Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) compared to HIV-negative children. We compiled currently published epidemiologic data on KS and NHL among children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Among countries with available data, the median incidence of KS was 2.05/100,000 in the general pediatric population and 67.35/100,000 among HIV-infected children. The median incidence of NHL was 1.98/100,000 among the general pediatric population, while data on NHL incidence among HIV-infected children were lacking. Larger regional studies are needed to better address the dearth of epidemiologic information on pediatric KS and NHL in SSA. PMID:27082516

  17. Angiomatous reaction Kaposi-sarcoma-like as a side effect of topical corticosteroid therapy in lichen sclerosus of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catricalà, Caterina; Marenda, Samantha; Muscardin, Luca Maria; Donati, Pietro; Lepri, Andrea; Eibenschutz, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition usually located in the anogenital area. Topical corticosteroid therapy is the first choice treatment which may arrest or delay the progression of the disorder. We report the case of a 74-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of nodular lesions localized on penis. The man had a previous history of genital lesions that had been diagnosed as LS and treated with long-term topical corticosteroid therapy. After 3 months of corticosteroid therapy, the patient observed the appearance of several nodular erythematous lesions on the penis with progressive disappearance of the clinical symptoms of LS. These purple to red asymptomatic angiomatoid nodules resembled the clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma. PMID:19580581

  18. Treatment Outcomes of AIDS-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma under a Routine Antiretroviral Therapy Program in Lilongwe, Malawi: Bleomycin/Vincristine Compared to Vincristine Monotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mwafongo, Albert A.; ROSENBERG, Nora E.; Wingston Ng'ambi; Werner, Alexandra B.; Garneau, William M.; Joe Gumulira; Sam Phiri; Mina C Hosseinipour

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) being the most prevalent AIDS-associated cancer in resource limited settings, optimal treatment options remain unknown. We assessed whether bleomycin/vincristine compared to vincristine monotherapy was associated with improved treatment outcomes for AIDS-associated KS among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Malawi. Methods All patients initiating cART and chemotherapy for AIDS-related KS were identified from an electronic da...

  19. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  20. Advanced accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the suitability of four novel particle acceleration technologies for multi-TeV particle physics machines: laser driven linear accelerators (linac), plasma beat-wave devices, plasma wakefield devices, and switched power and cavity wakefield linacs. The report begins with the derivation of beam parameters practical for multi-TeV devices. Electromagnetic field breakdown of materials is reviewed. The two-beam accelerator scheme for using a free electron laser as the driver is discussed. The options recommended and the conclusions reached reflect the importance of cost. We recommend that more effort be invested in achieving a self-consistent range of TeV accelerator design parameters. Beat-wave devices have promise for 1-100 GeV applications and, while not directly scalable to TeV designs, the current generation of ideas are encouraging for the TeV regime. In particular, surfatrons, finite-angle optical mixing devices, plasma grating accelerator, and the Raman forward cascade schemes all deserve more complete analysis. The exploitation of standard linac geometry operated in an unconventional mode is in a phase of rapid evolution. While conceptual projects abound, there are no complete designs. We recommend that a fraction of sponsored research be devoted to this approach. Wakefield devices offer a great deal of potential; trades among their benefits and constraints are derived and discussed herein. The study of field limitation processes has received inadequate attention; this limits experiment designers. The costs of future experiments are such that investment in understanding these processes is prudent. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of the latent nuclear antigen-1 of the human herpesvirus type 8 to differentiate cutaneous epidemic Kaposi sarcoma and its histological simulators Detecção imuno-histoquímica do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvirus tipo 8 para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi epidêmico cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fonseca Pereira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common neoplasia diagnosed in AIDS patients and the expression of the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen-1 has been useful for its histological diagnosis. The aim of this study is to confirm that immunohistochemistry is a valuable tool for differentiating KS from its simulators in skin biopsies of HIV patients. Immunohistochemical and histological analyses were performed in 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and 60 of its histological simulators. Positivity was present in the 49 Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies and no staining was observed in the 60 simulators analyzed, resulting in sensibility and specificity of 100%. HHV-8 immunohistochemical detection is an effective tool for diagnosing Kaposi's sarcoma, especially in early lesions in which neoplastic features are not evident. It also contributes to its histological differential diagnosis.O sarcoma de Kaposi é a neoplasia mais diagnosticada em pacientes com SIDA e a expressão do antígeno nuclear latente-1 do herpesvírus humano tipo-8 (HHV-8 tem se mostrado útil no seu diagnóstico histológico. O objetivo deste estudo é confirmar que o método imuno-histoquímico é uma ferramenta útil para diferenciar o sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo de seus simuladores histológicos em pacientes HIV positivos. Análise histológica e imuno-histoquímica foram realizadas em 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi cutâneo e 60 casos de seus simuladores histológicos. Positividade à imuno-histoquímica para o antígeno nuclear latente 1 do HHV-8 foi observada nos 49 casos de sarcoma de Kaposi e nenhuma reação foi detectada nos 60 simuladores analisados, resultando em 100% de sensibilidade e especificidade. A detecção do HHV-8 por imuno-histoquímica é uma ferramenta útil para o diagnóstico de sarcoma de Kaposi, especialmente na lesão inicial cujo caráter neoplásico não é evidente, e contribui para seu diagnóstico diferencial histológico.

  2. KEKB accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEKB, the B-Factory at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) recently achieved the luminosity of 1 x 1034 cm-2s-1. This luminosity is two orders higher than the world's level at 1990 when the design of KEKB started. This unprecedented result was made possible by KEKB's innovative design and technology in three aspects - beam focusing optics, high current storage, and beam - beam interaction. Now KEKB is leading the luminosity frontier of the colliders in the world. (author)

  3. Accelerating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  4. KS-Detect - Validation of Solar Thermal PCR for the Diagnosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma Using Pseudo-Biopsy Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Jiang, Li; Fu, Cheng; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    Resource-limited settings present unique engineering challenges for medical diagnostics. Diagnosis is often needed for those unable to reach central healthcare systems, making portability and independence from traditional energy infrastructure essential device parameters. In 2014, our group presented a microfluidic device that performed a solar-powered variant of the polymerase chain reaction, which we called solar thermal PCR. In this work, we expand on our previous effort by presenting an integrated, portable, solar thermal PCR system targeted towards the diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma. We call this system KS-Detect, and we now report the system's performance as a diagnostic tool using pseudo-biopsy samples made from varying concentrations of human lymphoma cell lines positive for the KS herpesvirus (KSHV). KS-Detect achieved 83% sensitivity and 70% specificity at high (≥ 10%) KSHV+ cell concentrations when diagnosing pseudo-biopsy samples by smartphone image. Using histology, we confirm that our prepared pseudo-biopsies contain similar KSHV+ cell concentrations as human biopsies positive for KS. Through our testing of samples derived from human cell lines, we validate KS-Detect as a viable, portable KS diagnostic tool, and we identify critical engineering considerations for future solar-thermal PCR devices. PMID:26799834

  5. Kaposi Sarcoma among HIV Infected Patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: A 14-Year Retrospective Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakanmi Akinde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the increased incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS resulting from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS pandemic, there is still significant underreporting of KS in this environment. Objectives. This study was aimed at determining the incidence and clinicopathologic patterns of KS among HIV infected patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Nigeria, over a 14-year period: January 2000 to December 2013. Methodology. The materials for this study included patients’ hospital clinical files, duplicate copies of histopathologic reports, and tissue blocks and corresponding archival slides in the Anatomic and Molecular Pathology Department and the HIV/AIDS unit of the Department of Haematology. Results. Within the study period, 182 cases of KS were diagnosed, accounting for 1.2% of all patients managed for HIV/AIDS and 2.99% of solid malignant tumours. The male-to-female ratio and modal age group were 1 : 1.3 and 5th decade, respectively. Most cases (90% had purely mucocutaneous involvement with the lower limb being the commonest site (65.8%. The majority of lesions were plaques (65.8%. Vascular formation was the predominant histologic type seen (43.5%. Conclusion. KS in Lagos followed the same epidemiologic trend as other centers in Nigeria, with an increasing incidence in this era of HIV/AIDS.

  6. Kaposi Sarcoma among HIV Infected Patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: A 14-Year Retrospective Clinicopathological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinde, Olakanmi; Adeyemo, Titilope; Omoseebi, Oladipo; Ikeri, Nzechukwu; Okonkwo, Ikechukwu; Afolayan, Olatunji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the increased incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) resulting from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic, there is still significant underreporting of KS in this environment. Objectives. This study was aimed at determining the incidence and clinicopathologic patterns of KS among HIV infected patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Nigeria, over a 14-year period: January 2000 to December 2013. Methodology. The materials for this study included patients' hospital clinical files, duplicate copies of histopathologic reports, and tissue blocks and corresponding archival slides in the Anatomic and Molecular Pathology Department and the HIV/AIDS unit of the Department of Haematology. Results. Within the study period, 182 cases of KS were diagnosed, accounting for 1.2% of all patients managed for HIV/AIDS and 2.99% of solid malignant tumours. The male-to-female ratio and modal age group were 1 : 1.3 and 5th decade, respectively. Most cases (90%) had purely mucocutaneous involvement with the lower limb being the commonest site (65.8%). The majority of lesions were plaques (65.8%). Vascular formation was the predominant histologic type seen (43.5%). Conclusion. KS in Lagos followed the same epidemiologic trend as other centers in Nigeria, with an increasing incidence in this era of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27034839

  7. Extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes in Kaposi's sarcoma-like dermal lesions of transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S K; Martin, F J; Jay, G; Vogel, J; Papahadjopoulos, D; Friend, D S

    1993-07-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene develop dermal lesions resembling a common malignant tumor in AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). To evaluate the permeability characteristics of these lesions and the therapeutic potential of drug-carrying liposomes, we have studied the localization of sterically stabilized liposomes, which show long circulation time in blood and increased accumulation in tumors. Liposomes encapsulating colloidal gold were injected intravenously into transgenic mice bearing KS lesions, and tissues were processed 24 hours later for both electron microscopy and for light microscopy with silver enhancement. Liposomes and silver marker were detected predominantly in the dermis surrounding the early and mature KS lesions, which were characterized by a proliferation of fibroblast-like spindle cells and abnormal blood vessels close to the epidermis. The silver-enhanced gold marker often surrounded vascular channels and scattered erythrocytes. As determined by electron microscopy, some spindle cells and macrophages had ingested intact liposomes. Transendothelial transport of liposomes was observed both through open channels between endothelial cells and also through endothelial cells lining intact vessels. Both extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes through irregular endothelium were much higher in KS lesions than in the adjacent normal skin. The high accumulation of sterically stabilized liposomes in KS lesions and their intracellular uptake by some spindle cells enhances their potential as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents against this neoplasm. PMID:8317543

  8. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  9. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  10. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E.; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involv...

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between c-Kit expression and mean platelet volume in classic Kaposi's sarcoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Bedir, Recep; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Yuce, Suleyman; Dilek, Nursel

    2016-01-01

    Background c-Kit is a proto-oncogene that encodes tyrosine kinase receptor (CD117). Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a useful marker, providing information on platelet function and diameter. Objective To investigate c-Kit expression and intensity in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and to investigate the relation between Ki-67 proliferation and MPV. Methods A total of 32 patients, diagnosed with classic cutaneous KS, were included in this study. We reevaluated the histopathological reports with the preparations, confirmed the diagnosis and then determined the patients' histopathological stages. c-Kit expression and Ki-67 proliferation were investigated immunohistochemically in KS cases, while MPV in all cases was checked. Results Although c-Kit expression was detected in 22 cases (68.8%), it was not expressed in 10 cases (31.2%). We detected 8 cases with + (25%), 6 with ++ (18.8%) and 8 with +++ (25%). Ki-67 expression was 5.0% (min-max 1.0-20.0). Relapse was observed in 5 cases (15.6%) out of 32. There was positive correlation between c-Kit expression and MPV (rs=0.598, p<0.001), and between c-Kit intensity and MPV (rs=0.588, p<0.001). Conclusion c-Kit is highly positive in KS. c-Kit positivity indicates a high risk of tumor growth, invasion and relapse. Furthermore, c-Kit expression stimulates megakaryocytes to release young and large thrombocytes into the periphery. Thus, high MPV, c-Kit expression and immunostaining intensity indicate high invasion and relapse in KS subjects. PMID:27579736

  12. Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 sequentially shapes the NK cell repertoire during the course of asymptomatic infection and Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dupuy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of innate immunity to immunosurveillance of the oncogenic Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV8 has not been studied in depth. We investigated NK cell phenotype and function in 70 HHV8-infected subjects, either asymptomatic carriers or having developed Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Our results revealed substantial alterations of the NK cell receptor repertoire in healthy HHV8 carriers, with reduced expression of NKp30, NKp46 and CD161 receptors. In addition, down-modulation of the activating NKG2D receptor, associated with impaired NK-cell lytic capacity, was observed in patients with active KS. Resolution of KS after treatment was accompanied with restoration of NKG2D levels and NK cell activity. HHV8-latently infected endothelial cells overexpressed ligands of several NK cell receptors, including NKG2D ligands. The strong expression of NKG2D ligands by tumor cells was confirmed in situ by immunohistochemical staining of KS biopsies. However, no tumor-infiltrating NK cells were detected, suggesting a defect in NK cell homing or survival in the KS microenvironment. Among the known KS-derived immunoregulatory factors, we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 as a critical element responsible for the down-modulation of NKG2D expression on resting NK cells. Moreover, PGE2 prevented up-regulation of the NKG2D and NKp30 receptors on IL-15-activated NK cells, and inhibited the IL-15-induced proliferation and survival of NK cells. Altogether, our observations are consistent with distinct immunoevasion mechanisms that allow HHV8 to escape NK cell responses stepwise, first at early stages of infection to facilitate the maintenance of viral latency, and later to promote tumor cell growth through suppression of NKG2D-mediated functions. Importantly, our results provide additional support to the use of PGE2 inhibitors as an attractive approach to treat aggressive KS, as they could restore activation and survival of tumoricidal NK cells.

  13. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays to ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  14. Human Herpesvirus-8 Infection Associated with Kaposi Sarcoma, Multicentric Castleman's Disease, and Plasmablastic Microlymphoma in a Man with AIDS: A Case Report with Review of Pathophysiologic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS, multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma, are all linked to human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 infection and HIV-induced immunodeficiency. Herein, we describe the case of a Kenyan man diagnosed with HIV in 2000. He deferred highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and remained in good health until his CD4+ count declined in 2006. He was hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia in 2008, after which he agreed to take HAART but did so sporadically. In 2010, he was hospitalized with fever, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia, and an elevated HHV-8 viral load. A lymph node biopsy showed findings consistent with KS, MCD, and plasmablastic microlymphoma. Eight months after starting liposomal doxorubicin, Rituximab, and a new HAART regimen, he has improved clinically, and his HIV and HHV-8 viral loads are suppressed. These three conditions, found in the same lymph node, underscore the inflammatory and malignant potential of HHV-8, particularly in the milieu of HIV-induced immunodeficiency.

  15. KSHV G protein-coupled receptor inhibits lytic gene transcription in primary-effusion lymphoma cells via p21-mediated inhibition of Cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, M; Cesarman, E; Boshoff, C

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) remains the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa especially, this aggressive endothelial-cell tumor is a cause of widespread morbidity and mortality. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is now known to be an etiologic force behind KS and primary-effusion lymphoma (PEL). Over time, KSHV has pirated many human genes whose products regulate angiogenesis, inflammation, and the cell cycle. One of these, the KSHV vGPCR, ...

  16. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Plasma Wake Acceleration will be held at CERN, Switzerland from 23-29 November, 2014.   This course will be of interest to staff and students in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies working in or having an interest in the field of new acceleration techniques. Following introductory lectures on plasma and laser physics, the course will cover the different components of a plasma wake accelerator and plasma beam systems. An overview of the experimental studies, diagnostic tools and state of the art wake acceleration facilities, both present and planned, will complement the theoretical part. Topical seminars and a visit of CERN will complete the programme. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/PlasmaWake2014/CERN-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/285444/

  17. The direction of acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  18. San Francisco Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Where are today's challenges in accelerator physics?' was the theme of the open session at the San Francisco meeting, the largest ever gathering of accelerator physicists and engineers

  19. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  20. Standing wave linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is being given to standing wave linear accelerator containing generator, phase shifter, two accelerating resonator sections, charged particle injector and waveguide bridge. Its first arm is oined up with generator via the phase shifter, the second and the third ones-with accelerating sections and the fourth one - with HF-power absorber. HF-power absorber represents a section of circular diaphragmatic wavequide with transformer with input wave and intrawaveguide output load located between injector and the first accelerating section. The section possesses holes in side walls lying on accelerator axis. The distances between centers of the last cell of the fast accelerating section and the first cell of the second accelerating sectiOn equal (2n+3)lambda/4, where n=1, 2, 3..., lambda - wave length of generator. The suggested system enables to improve by one order spectral characteristics of accelerators as compared to the prototype in which magnetrons are used as generator

  1. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  2. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  3. Maximal Acceleration Is Nonrotating

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Don N.

    1997-01-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer that Fermi-Walker transports its acceleration vector is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer, and conversely if the spacetime is also symmetric under reversing both t and phi together. Thus a congruence of Nonrotating Acceleration Worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a Stationary Congruence Accelerating Locally Extremely (SCALE). These congruenc...

  4. A Solid state accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible, but channeling radiation limits the maximum attainable energy to 105 TeV for protons. Beam dechanneling due to multiple scattering is substantially reduced by the high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed

  5. Applications of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators are now widely used in a variety of applications for scientific research, applied physics, medicine, industrial processing, while possible utilisation in power engineering is envisaged. Earlier presentations of this subject, given at previous CERN Accelerator School sessions have been updated with papers contributed to the first European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology (ECAART) held in September 1989 in Frankfurt and to the Second European Particle Accelerator Conference in Nice in June 1990. (orig.)

  6. Accelerators at school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latest subject covered by the CERN Accelerator School was 'Applied Geodesy of Particle Accelerators', which attracted an impressive number of outside participants to CERN for a week in April. Since the forerunners of today's particle accelerators were demonstrated over 50 years ago, the positioning of accelerator components has progressed from the laboratory bench-top to tunnels tens of kilometres long. Despite this phenomenal growth in size, sub-millimetre accuracy is still required

  7. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  8. The CERN Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction to accelerator physics The CERN Accelerator School: Introduction to Accelerator Physics, which should have taken place in Istanbul, Turkey, later this year has now been relocated to Budapest, Hungary.  Further details regarding the new hotel and dates will be made available as soon as possible on a new Indico site at the end of May.

  9. Accelerators and Dinosaurs

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Michael Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Using naturally occuring particles on which to research might have made accelerators become extinct. But in fact, results from astrophysics have made accelerator physics even more important. Not only are accelerators used in hospitals but they are also being used to understand nature's inner workings by searching for Higgs bosons, CP violation, neutrino mass and dark matter (2 pages)

  10. Far field acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  11. Direct Laser Acceleration in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, the direct laser acceleration (DLA) of ionization-injected electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) operating in the quasi-blowout regime has been investigated through experiment and simulation. In the blowout regime of LWFA, the radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can push a majority of the plasma electrons out and around the main body of the pulse. The expelled plasma electrons feel the electrostatic field of the relatively-stationary ions and are t...

  12. The Accelerator Reliability Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdeke, Andreas; Giachino, R

    2014-01-01

    A high reliability is a very important goal for most particle accelerators. The biennial Accelerator Reliability Workshop covers topics related to the design and operation of particle accelerators with a high reliability. In order to optimize the over-all reliability of an accelerator one needs to gather information on the reliability of many different subsystems. While a biennial workshop can serve as a platform for the exchange of such information, the authors aimed to provide a further channel to allow for a more timely communication: the Particle Accelerator Reliability Forum [1]. This contribution will describe the forum and advertise it’s usage in the community.

  13. Induction linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typicallymarriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  14. Relationship between open reading frame 26 subtypes in human herpesvirns-8 and Kaposi's sarcoma%人类疱疹病毒8型ORF26基因亚型与Kaposi肉瘤的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秀娟; 普雄明; 吴卫东

    2008-01-01

    Objective To learn the subtypes of open reading frame 26 (ORF26) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, and to evaluate the relationship of ORF26 subtypes to clinical types and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma. Methods Thirty-two paraffin-embeded tissue speci-mens of Kaposi's sarcoma were collected in the Department of Dermatology, People's Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, from 1996 to 2007. DNA was extracted from these specimens, nested-PCR was used to amplify HHV-8 DNA. PCR products were subjected to bi-directional sequencing after extraction from agarose gels. Phylogenetic analysis was carded out by using the software DNAStar, program Clustal W and PHYLIP package for the determination of ORF26 subtype. Fisher's exact test was performed to evaluate the relationship of ORF26 subtypes to clinical types and invasiveness of Kaposi's sarcoma. Results Of the 32 specimens, 30 were positive for HHV-8 DNA with a positivity rate of 93.75%, and 6 specimens of AIDS related Kaposi's sarcoma were all positive. ORF26 A subtype was detected in the HHV-8 DNA of 17 posi-tive specimens, and C subtype in that of other 13 specimens. Neither the incidence of mucosal lesions nor the distribution of clinical subtypes was of significant difference between patients with ORF26 A subtype and those with ORF26 C subtype (both P > 0.05). Conclusions A and C may be the predominate subtypes of ORF 26 in HHV-8 of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, and the ORF26 subtype is unrelated to the presence of mucosal lesions in or the clinical types of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma.%目的 明确Kaposi肉瘤患者感染的人类疱疹病毒8型(HHV-8)ORF26基因亚型分类,初步探讨其与Kaposi肉瘤不同临床分型及侵袭性的相关性.方法 对32例Kaposi肉瘤石蜡包埋组织进行HHV-8 DNA抽提、扩增、双向测序,使用DNAStar软件、Clustal W软件和PHYLIP软件包对测序结果进行系统发生学分析,从而确定HHV-8 ORF26基因亚型,

  15. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given

  16. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opelka, J.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Marmer, G.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Siskind, B.; Kikta, M.J.

    1979-12-01

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given.

  17. An introduction to acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic fields, i.e., by fields that are produced by the motion of other charged particles driven by some power source. The mechanisms that are discussed include: Ponderamotive Forces, Acceleration, Plasma Beat Wave Acceleration, Inverse Free Electron Laser Acceleration, Inverse Cerenkov Acceleration, Gravity Acceleration, 2D Linac Acceleration and Conventional Iris Loaded Linac Structure Acceleration

  18. Acroangiodermatite (pseudossarcoma de Kaposi: uma condição raramente reconhecida. Um caso na planta do pé associado a insuficiência venosa crônica Acroangiodermatitis (pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma: a rarely-recognized condition. A case on the plantar aspect of the foot associated with chronic venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Fernandes Pimentel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A acroangiodermatite ou pseudossarcoma de Kaposi é entidade angioproliferativa incomum relacionada a insuficiência venosa crônica, fístulas arteriovenosas, membros paralisados, cotos de amputação, síndromes vasculares e condições trombóticas. Apresenta-se, em geral, como máculas, pápulas ou placas purpúricas no dorso dos pés (especialmente hálux e maléolos. Relatamos um caso de acroangiodermatite afetando a região plantar, por dois anos sem diagnóstico, para o qual a coloração histológica por hematoxilina-eosina e a marcação imuno-histoquímica com CD34 foram decisivas. A paciente tinha insuficiência venosa crônica e a lesão respondeu bem ao uso de bandagens elásticas e repouso com a perna elevadaAcroangiodermatitis, often known as pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma, is an uncommon angioproliferative entity related to chronic venous insufficiency, arteriovenous fistulae, paralysed limbs, amputation stumps, vascular syndromes and conditions associated with thrombosis. It presents most frequently as purple macules, papules or plaques in the dorsal aspects of the feet, especially the toes, and the malleoli. We report a case of acroangiodermatitis in the plantar aspect of the foot, misdiagnosed for two years, in which haematoxylin-eosin hystopathological stain and immunolabeling with CD34 histochemistry examination were decisive for diagnosis. Patient had chronic venous insufficiency. The lesion responded well to the treatment with a combination of leg elevation and compression

  19. Accelerator reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, L.; Duru, Ph.; Koch, J.M.; Revol, J.L.; Van Vaerenbergh, P.; Volpe, A.M.; Clugnet, K.; Dely, A.; Goodhew, D

    2002-07-01

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop.

  20. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium

  1. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  2. Leaky Fermi accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Kushal; Rom-Kedar, Vered; Turaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    A Fermi accelerator is a billiard with oscillating walls. A leaky accelerator interacts with an environment of an ideal gas at equilibrium by exchange of particles through a small hole on its boundary. Such interaction may heat the gas: we estimate the net energy flow through the hole under the assumption that the particles inside the billiard do not collide with each other and remain in the accelerator for sufficiently long time. The heat production is found to depend strongly on the type of the Fermi accelerator. An ergodic accelerator, i.e. one which has a single ergodic component, produces a weaker energy flow than a multi-component accelerator. Specifically, in the ergodic case the energy gain is independent of the hole size, whereas in the multi-component case the energy flow may be significantly increased by shrinking the hole size.

  3. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  4. Accelerator reliability workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 80 experts attended this workshop, which brought together all accelerator communities: accelerator driven systems, X-ray sources, medical and industrial accelerators, spallation sources projects (American and European), nuclear physics, etc. With newly proposed accelerator applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, replacement of nuclear power plants and others. Reliability has now become a number one priority for accelerator designers. Every part of an accelerator facility from cryogenic systems to data storage via RF systems are concerned by reliability. This aspect is now taken into account in the design/budget phase, especially for projects whose goal is to reach no more than 10 interruptions per year. This document gathers the slides but not the proceedings of the workshop

  5. Genotypic analysis on the ORF-K1 gene of human herpesvirus 8 from patients with Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Zhang; Xiongming Pu; Weidong Wu; Ying Jin; Xiujuan Wu

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HH'V-8) is thought to be essential for the development of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). HHV-8 DNA is present virtually in all KS tumor biopsy samples. Genes at both ends of the HHV-8 genome have been shown to vary considerably. Seve nmajor molecular subtypes of HHV-8 were defined based on the amino acid sequence of the open reading frame K1 (ORF-Kl), generally known as A, B, C, D, E, E and Z. Most strains collected worldwide were clustered into two subtypes (A and C). Here, the Kl/VRl region of HHV-8 was amplified by nested PCR in 22 (81.48%) of 27 cases from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, a province in northwest-ern China. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of the KI/VRI amino acid sequence indicated that the majority of these KS patients were infected by subtype C HHV-8 (n = 18, including 15 belonging to the C2 group), and several by subtype A (n = 4, including 3 being the Al group). This is the fast report of subtype A HHV-g in China. Furthermore, the correlations between different forms and lesions of KS and different subtypes of HHV-8 were analyzed. The findings showed that subtype A HHV-8 resulted in significantly more frequent mucosal KS lesions than subtype C. However, there was no obvious correlation between different forms of KS and different subtypes of HHV-8.

  6. Task Shifting and Skin Punch for the Histologic Diagnosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Public Health Solution to a Public Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker-Oketta, Miriam O; Wenger, Megan; Semeere, Aggrey; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Kambugu, Andrew; Lukande, Robert; Asirwa, F Chite; Busakhala, Naftali; Buziba, Nathan; Diero, Lameck; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Strother, Robert Matthew; Bwana, Mwebesa; Muyindike, Winnie; Amerson, Erin; Mbidde, Edward; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Fueled by HIV, sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the world. Despite this, KS diagnosis in the region is based mostly on clinical grounds. Where biopsy is available, it has traditionally been excisional and performed by surgeons, resulting in multiple appointments, follow-up visits for suture removal, and substantial costs. We hypothesized that a simpler approach - skin punch biopsy - would make histologic diagnosis more accessible. To address this, we provided training and equipment for skin punch biopsy of suspected KS to three HIV clinics in East Africa. The procedure consisted of local anesthesia followed by a disposable cylindrical punch blade to obtain specimens. Hemostasis is facilitated by Gelfoam®. Patients removed the dressing after 4 days. From 2007 to 2013, 2,799 biopsies were performed. Although originally targeted to be used by physicians, biopsies were performed predominantly by nurses (62%), followed by physicians (15%), clinical officers (12%) and technicians (11%). There were no reports of recurrent bleeding or infection. After minimal training and provision of inexpensive equipment (USD 3.06 per biopsy), HIV clinics in East Africa can integrate same-day skin punch biopsy for suspected KS. Task shifting from physician to non-physician greatly increases access. Skin punch biopsy should be part of any HIV clinic's essential procedures. This example of task shifting may also be applicable to the diagnosis of other cancers (e.g., breast) in resource-limited settings. PMID:25765812

  7. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  8. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low power microwave cold test and high power, high gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  9. Accelerator Modeling with MATLAB Accelerator Toolbox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces Accelerator Toolbox (AT)--a collection of tools to model storage rings and beam transport lines in the MATLAB environment. The objective is to illustrate the flexibility and efficiency of the AT-MATLAB framework. The paper discusses three examples of problems that are analyzed frequently in connection with ring-based synchrotron light sources

  10. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  11. Racetrack linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved recirculating electron beam linear accelerator of the racetrack type is described. The system comprises a beam path of four straight legs with four Pretzel bending magnets at the end of each leg to direct the beam into the next leg of the beam path. At least one of the beam path legs includes a linear accelerator. (UK)

  12. COLLECTIVE-FIELD ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1969-07-04

    Diverse methods proposed for the acceleration of particles by means of collective fields are reviewed. A survey is made of the various currently active experimental programs devoted to investigating collective acceleration, and the present status of the research is briefly noted.

  13. KEK digital accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  14. Asia honours accelerator physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "Steve Meyers of Cern and Jie Wei of Beijing's Tsinghua University are the first recipients of a new prize for particle physics. The pair were honoured for their contributions to numerous particle-accelerator projects - including Cern's Large Hadron Collider - by the Asian Committee for Future Accelerators (ACFA)..." (1 paragraph)

  15. Accelerators for energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tremendous progress of accelerators for these several decades, has been motivated mainly by the research on subnuclear physics. The culmination in high energy accelerators might be SSC, 20 TeV collider in USA, probably the ultimate accelerator being built with the conventional principle. The technology cultivated and integrated for the accelerator development, can now stably offer the high power beam which could be used for the energy problems. The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with high current, 10 kA and short pulse, 20 ns heavy ion beam (HIB) of mass number ∼200, would be the most promising application of accelerators for energy production. In this scenario, the fuel containing D-T mixture, will be compressed to the high temperature, ∼10 keV and to the high density state, ∼1000 times the solid density with the pressure of ablative plasma or thermal X ray produced by bombarding of high power HIB. The efficiency, beam power/electric power for accelerator, and the repetition rate of HIB accelerators could be most suitable for the energy production. In the present paper, the outline of HIB ICF (HIF) is presented emphasizing the key issues of high current heavy ion accelerator system. (author)

  16. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  17. Maximal Acceleration Is Nonrotating

    CERN Document Server

    Page, D N

    1998-01-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer that Fermi-Walker transports its acceleration vector is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer, and conversely if the spacetime is also symmetric under reversing both t and phi together. Thus a congruence of Nonrotating Acceleration Worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a Stationary Congruence Accelerating Locally Extremely (SCALE). These congruences are defined completely locally, unlike the case of Zero Angular Momentum Observers (ZAMOs), which requires knowledge around a symmetry axis. The SCALE subcase of a Stationary Congruence Accelerating Maximally (SCAM) is made up of stationary worldlines that may be considered to be locally most nearly at rest in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. Formulas for the angular velocity and other properties of the SCALEs are given explicitly on a generalization of an equatorial plane, infinitesimally near a symmetry...

  18. Linear induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines a new layout for the injector and accelerating sectins of a linear induction accelerator. The sections are combined in a single housing: an induction system with a current-pulse generator based on double strip shaping lines laid over ferromagnetic cores; a multichannel spark discharger with forced current division among channels; and a system for core demagnetization and electron-beam formation and transport. The results of formation of an electron beam in the injector system and its acceleration in the first accelerating section of the accelerator for injection of beams with energies of 0.2-0.4 MeV, currents of 1-2 kA, and pulse durations of 60 nsec are given

  19. Collinear wake field acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Voss-Weiland scheme of wake field acceleration a high current, ring-shaped driving bunch is used to accelerate a low current beam following along on axis. In such a structure, the transformer ratio, i.e., the ratio of maximum voltage that can be gained by the on-axis beam and the voltage lost by the driving beam, can be large. In contrast, it has been observed that for an arrangement in which driving and driven bunches follow the same path, and where the current distribution of both bunches is gaussian, the transformer ratio is not normally greater than two. This paper explores some of the possibilities and limitations of a collinear acceleration scheme. In addition to its application to wake field acceleration in structures, this study is also of interest for the understanding of the plasma wake field accelerator. 11 refs., 4 figs

  20. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  1. The miniature accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The image that most people have of CERN is of its enormous accelerators and their capacity to accelerate particles to extremely high energies. But thanks to some cutting-edge studies on beam dynamics and radiofrequency technology, along with innovative construction techniques, teams at CERN have now created the first module of a brand-new accelerator, which will be just 2 metres long. The potential uses of this miniature accelerator will include deployment in hospitals for the production of medical isotopes and the treatment of cancer. It’s a real David-and-Goliath story.   Serge Mathot, in charge of the construction of the "mini-RFQ", pictured with the first of the four modules that will make up the miniature accelerator. The miniature accelerator consists of a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), a component found at the start of all proton accelerator chains around the world, from the smallest to the largest. The LHC is designed to produce very high-intensity beams ...

  2. Large electrostatic accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  3. Accelerator programme at CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Programme at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore, has very broad based concept under which all types of accelerators are to be taken up for design and fabrication. This centre will be housing a wide variety of accelerators to serve as a common facility for the universities, national laboratories in addition to laboratories under the Department of Atomic Energy. In the first phase of the programme, a series of electron accelerators are designed and fabricated. They are synchrotron radiation sources of 450 MeV (INDUS-I) and of 2 GeV (INDUS-II), microtron upto energy of 20 MeV, linear accelerator upto 20 MeV, and DC Accelerator for industrial irradiation upto 750 KeV and 20 KW. A proton accelerator of 300 MeV with 20 MeV linac injector is also designed. CAT is also developing a strong base for support technologies like ultra high vacuum, radio frequency and microwaves, DC pulsed and superconducting magnets, power supplies and controls etc. These technologies are very useful for other industrial applications also. To develop user groups to utilise INDUS-II synchrotron radiation source, a batch production of rotating Anode X-ray generators with power supplies has been initiated. So also, the sputter ion pumps, electron guns, turbo molecular pumps are brought into batch production. (author)

  4. Collective ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress achieved in the understanding and development of collective ion acceleration is presented. Extensive analytic and computational studies of slow cyclotron wave growth on an electron beam in a helix amplifier were performed. Research included precise determination of linear coupling between beam and helix, suppression of undesired transients and end effects, and two-dimensional simulations of wave growth in physically realizable systems. Electrostatic well depths produced exceed requirements for the Autoresonant Ion Acceleration feasibility experiment. Acceleration of test ions to modest energies in the troughs of such waves was also demonstrated. Smaller efforts were devoted to alternative acceleration mechanisms. Langmuir wave phase velocity in Converging Guide Acceleration was calculated as a function of the ratio of electron beam current to space-charge limiting current. A new collective acceleration approach, in which cyclotron wave phase velocity is varied by modulation of electron beam voltage, is proposed. Acceleration by traveling Virtual Cathode or Localized Pinch was considered, but appears less promising. In support of this research, fundamental investigations of beam propagation in evacuated waveguides, of nonneutral beam linear eigenmodes, and of beam stability were carried out. Several computer programs were developed or enhanced. Plans for future work are discussed

  5. Accelerator Toolbox for MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces Accelerator Toolbox (AT)--a collection of tools to model particle accelerators and beam transport lines in the MATLAB environment. At SSRL, it has become the modeling code of choice for the ongoing design and future operation of the SPEAR 3 synchrotron light source. AT was designed to take advantage of power and simplicity of MATLAB--commercially developed environment for technical computing and visualization. Many examples in this paper illustrate the advantages of the AT approach and contrast it with existing accelerator code frameworks

  6. Hadron accelerators in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaldi, U. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). Accelerator School; Silari, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadron-therapy Project is then described in some detail, with reference ro both the National Centre for Oncological Hadron-therapy and the design of different types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large umber of hospitals. (author) 28 refs.

  7. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  8. Entropic accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easson, Damien A., E-mail: easson@asu.ed [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Department of Physics and School of Earth and Space Exploration and Beyond Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: frampton@physics.unc.ed [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Smoot, George F., E-mail: gfsmoot@lbl.go [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Institute for the Early Universe, Ewha Womans University and Advanced Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chaire Blaise Pascale, Universite Paris Denis Diderot, Paris (France)

    2011-01-31

    To accommodate the observed accelerated expansion of the universe, one popular idea is to invoke a driving term in the Friedmann-Lemaitre equation of dark energy which must then comprise 70% of the present cosmological energy density. We propose an alternative interpretation which takes into account the entropy and temperature intrinsic to the horizon of the universe due to the information holographically stored there. Dark energy is thereby obviated and the acceleration is due to an entropic force naturally arising from the information storage on the horizon surface screen. We consider an additional quantitative approach inspired by surface terms in general relativity and show that this leads to the entropic accelerating universe.

  9. ACCELERATORS: School prizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated to its goal of encouraging scientists and students to work in the field of particle accelerators, the US Particle Accelerator School (operating since 1981) has switched to a new format. Starting this year, it will offer in alternate years basic accelerator physics plus advanced subjects in both university and symposium styles over four weeks. Expanding the school from two to four weeks gives additional flexibility, and undergraduate participation should be encouraged by university credits being offered for particular courses. In the intervening years, the school will organize six-day topical courses

  10. Auroral electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two theories of auroral electron acceleration are discussed. Part 1 examines the currently widely held view that the acceleration is an ordered process in a quasi-static electric field. It is suggested that, although there are many factors seeming to support this theory, the major qualifications and uncertainties that have been identified combine to cast serious doubt over its validity. Part 2 is devoted to a relatively new interpretation in terms of stochastic acceleration in turbulent electric fields. This second theory, which appears to account readily for most known features of the electron distribution function, is considered to provide a more promising approach to this central question in magnetospheric plasma physics. (author)

  11. The particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Palais de la Decouverte (in Paris) is the sole scientific vulgarization establishment in the world to operate an actual particle accelerator able to provoke different types of nuclear reactions, the author recalls some historical aspects of the concerned department since the creation of the 'Radioactivity - Atom synthesis' department in 1937. He recalls the experiments which were then performed, the installation of the particle accelerator in 1964 and its renewal. He describes what's going on in this accelerator. He gives an overview of the difficulties faced after it has been decided to move it, of the works which had to be performed, and of radiation protection measures

  12. Efficacy Analysis of Combination therapy treatment of Kaposi Varicelliform Eruption%联合用药治疗Kaposi水痘样疹疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芝爱; 李虹; 齐薛浩

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨采用单磷酸阿糖腺苷联合人免疫球蛋白治疗Kaposi水痘样疹的临床疗效.方法:选择Kaposi水痘样疹患儿54例,随机分为对照组和观察组.对照组采取单磷酸阿糖腺苷治疗(5mg/kg),治疗组采用单磷酸阿糖腺苷联合人免疫球蛋白治疗.治疗前及经治疗后分别检查两组患儿的恢复情况、不良反应、血常规及C-反应蛋白.结果:观察组治疗后体温恢复正常时间、新发皮疹控制时间、水泡结痴时间较对照组均有显著性缩短(P<0.05),两组治疗后白细胞计数较治疗前有显著下降,但仍在正常范围内,观察组治疗后WBC计数较对照组有显著性升高(P<0.05).两组不良反应发生率无差异(P>0.05),对照组平均用药时间12.4天,观察组平均用药8.7天,观察组较对照组显著缩短(P<0.05).结论:联合使用人免疫球蛋白可减少单磷酸阿糖腺苷用药时间及自然病程,疗效佳且耐受性好.%Objective To explore the clinical efficacy after use of Ara-adenosine combined human immunoglobulin for treatment of Kaposi varicelliform eruption. Methods 54 cases of Kaposi varicelliform eruption children were randomly divided into control group and observation group. Control group accepted the single Ara-AMP treatment (5mg/kg), treatment group accepted the single-Ara-AMP and human immunoglobulin treatment. Before treatment and after treatment the recovery of the two groups of children were examined, adverse reactions, blood and C-reactive protein were also detected. After treatment, body temperature of observation group returned to normal time, new rash control time, the blisters scab were significantly shorter than the control group(P0.05), the average treatment time of control group was 12.4 days, it was average 8.7 days in the observation group , significantly shorter than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The combined use of human immunoglobulin can reduce the Ara AMP medication time and the

  13. Role of radiotherapy in local control of non-AIDS associated Kaposi's sarcoma patients in Korea: a single institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    There has been no definite consensus on standard treatment, either local or systemic, for the Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Radiotherapy (RT) can be a good local therapeutic choice especially in non-AIDS associated KS (NAKS) for its indolent behavior. Medical records of 17 KS patients treated with RT at the Seoul National University Hospital from February 1998 to January 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. One human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ patient with 3 lesions was excluded. The total number of the lesion was 23 among the 16 patients. The median follow-up period was 27.9 months. Correlation between response and variables was analyzed using the logistic regression model. Median age of the patients was 75 years. All the 23 lesions were located at the extremities. Fourteen (61%) of those had pain or local swelling as the initial presentation. Ten patients had possible causes of immunodeficiency and were regarded as iatrogenic, and other 6 were classic KS. Median dose of RT was 36 Gy. No KS-related death was observed. Excluding 2 with short-term follow-up only, complete response and partial response were obtained in 2 (9%) and 19 (73%) lesions, respectively. Of those, 3 lesions underwent local progression. Six had out-of-field recurrence after RT. Symptom improvement was achieved in 13 (93%) of 14 patients. Grade 2 skin toxicities were found in 9 lesions but all got improvement after treatment. When divided into responsive and progressive group, free from progression was not related to any of the possible variables. RT is effective in local control of NAKS resulting great response rate.

  14. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 antibodies in women from São Paulo, Brazil: association with behavioral factors and Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterino-de-Araujo Adele

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the spread of AIDS, many HIV-infected women have been diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, especially in Africa. Since the discovery of a novel herpesvirus as the causative agent of KS (human herpesvirus 8 - HHV-8 several seroepidemiological studies have been conducted to identify groups at risk for KS. The risk for women in Brazil has not been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched for HHV-8 antibodies in sera obtained from a bank made up of samples from 3 groups of individuals: Group I: 163 HIV-1-infected women attended at an ambulatory clinic in 1994; Group II: 108 children born to HIV-1-infected mothers from 1990 to 1992, their antibodies reflected maternal infection, and Group III: 630 HIV-1-seronegative, healthy women. In-house immunofluorescence and Western-Blot assays based on the BCBL-1 cell line were used to detect anti-latent and anti-lytic HHV-8 antibodies. RESULTS: Group I had an overall frequency of antibodies of 8.6%, with a 1.2% frequency of anti-latent antibodies and an 8.0% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. Similar results were detected in Group II, i.e., no cases with anti-latent antibodies and a 7.4% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. In contrast, prevalences of 1.1% anti-latent antibodies and 0.3% anti-lytic antibodies were observed in Group III. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiologic pattern of HHV-8 in women from São Paulo varies according to behavioral factors, with emphasis on the sexual and blood routes of virus transmission/acquisition. Although HHV-8 anti-lytic antibodies were found in HIV-1-infected women, no case of KS was detected. Protective factors against KS are probably related to gender and/or to antiretroviral therapies introduced in Brazil since 1994.

  15. Poussée de maladie de Kaposi et élévation du CA 19-9: penser à la tuberculose!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajili, Faida; Hariz, Héla; Souissi, Asmahen; Abid, Rim; Boussetta, Najeh; Laabidi, Besma; Battikh, Riadh; Louzir, Bassem; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    La maladie de Kaposi (MK) est une entité pathologique qui peut survenir chez les patients VIH positifs et dans le cadre d'une immunodépression, d'origine tuberculeuse très rarement. On décrit le cas d'une MK chez un patient VIH négatif au décours d'une tuberculose. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient âgé de 81 ans, VIH négatif, ayant présenté deux nodules angiomateux de l'avant bras gauche dont la biopsie cutanée était en faveur d'une MK. L’évolution était marquée 2 mois plus tard, par l'apparition de placards angiomateux extensifs des deux membres supérieurs et d'adénopathies cervicales jugulo-carotidiennes bilatérales. La biopsie ganglionnaire était en faveur d'une tuberculose ganglionnaire. Par ailleurs, il avait un taux sérique élevé des CA 19-9. La régression de l’étendue des lésions au niveau des membres supérieurs et la normalisation du taux sérique des CA 19-9 ont été obtenues sous traitement anti-tuberculeux. Chez les patients atteints d'une MK avec une élévation des CA 19-9, il faut penser à la tuberculose. PMID:24711871

  16. Identification of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV) vIRF1 Protein as a Novel Interaction Partner of Human Deubiquitinase USP7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavoshi, Sara; Egorova, Olga; Lacdao, Ira Kay; Farhadi, Sahar; Sheng, Yi; Saridakis, Vivian

    2016-03-18

    Viral interferon regulatory factor 1 (vIRF1), a Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus protein, destabilizes p53 by inhibiting p53 acetylation and Hdm2 phosphorylation. This leads to increased ubiquitination and degradation of p53 by Hdm2, which cripples the cellular p53-mediated antiviral response. Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) deubiquitinates p53 and Hdm2 and regulates their stability. We identified an EGPS consensus sequence in vIRF1, which is identical to that found in Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) that interacts with the N-terminal domain of USP7 (USP7-NTD). GST pulldown assays demonstrated that vIRF1 interacts with USP7-NTD via its EGPS motif. NMR heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) analysis revealed chemical perturbations after titration of USP7-NTD with vIRF1 (44)SPGEGPSGTG(53) peptide. In contrast, these perturbations were reduced with a mutant vIRF1 peptide, (44)SPGEGPAGTG(53). Fluorescence polarization analysis indicated that the vIRF1 peptide interacted with USP7-NTD with a Kd of 2.0 μm. The crystal structure of the USP7-NTD·vIRF1 peptide complex revealed an identical mode of binding as that of the EBNA1 peptide to USP7-NTD. We also showed that USP7 interacts with vIRF1 in U2OS cells. Decreased levels of p53, but not Hdm2 or ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), were seen after expression of vIRF1, but not with a vIRF1 mutant protein. Our results support a new role for vIRF1 through deregulation of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 to inhibit p53-mediated antiviral responses.

  17. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8202397: View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  18. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  19. Rejuvenating CERN's Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the coming years and especially in 2005, CERN's accelerators are going to receive an extensive renovation programme to ensure they will perform reliably and effectively when the LHC comes into service.

  20. Dimension Driven Accelerating Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, S

    2009-01-01

    The current acceleration of the universe leads us to investigate higher dimensional gravity theory, which is able to explain acceleration from a theoretical view point without the need of introducing dark energy by hand. We argue that the terms containing higher dimensional metric coefficients produce an extra negative pressure that apparently drives an acceleration of the 3D space, tempting us to suggest that the accelerating universe seems to act as a window to the existence of extra spatial dimensions. Interesting to point out that in this case our cosmology apparently mimics the well known quintessence scenario fuelled by a generalised Chaplygin-type of fluid where a smooth transition from a dust dominated model to a de Sitter like one takes place. Correspondence to models generated by a tachyonic form of matter is also briefly discussed.

  1. Revisiting Caianiello's Maximal Acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Papini, G.

    2003-01-01

    A quantum mechanical limit on the speed of orthogonality evolution justifies the last remaining assumption in Caianiello's derivation of the maximal acceleration. The limit is perfectly compatible with the behaviour of superconductors of the first type.

  2. Joint International Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2014-01-01

    The CERN and US Particle Accelerator Schools recently organised a Joint International Accelerator School on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection, held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November 2014. This Joint School was the 13th in a series of such schools, which started in 1985 and also involves the accelerator communities in Japan and Russia.   Photo courtesy of Alfonse Pham, Michigan State University.   The school attracted 58 participants representing 22 different nationalities, with around half from Europe and the other half from Asia and the Americas. The programme comprised 26 lectures, each of 90 minutes, and 13 hours of case study. The students were given homework each day and had an opportunity to sit a final exam, which counted towards university credit. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and quality of their lectures. Initial dis...

  3. A symmetrical rail accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igenbergs, E. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Raumfahrttechnik, Richard-Wagner-Strasse 18, 8000 Muenchen 2 (DE))

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the symmetrical rail accelerator that has four rails, which are arranged symmetrically around the bore. The opposite rails have the same polarity and the adjacent rails the opposite polarity. In this configuration the radial force acting upon the individual rails is significantly smaller than in a conventional 2-rail configuration and a plasma armature is focussed towards the axis of the barrel. Experimental results indicate a higher efficiency compared to a conventional rail accelerator.

  4. Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference proceedings represent the results of theThird Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held in PortJefferson, New York. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S.Department of Energy, the Office of Navel Research and BrookhavenNational Laboratory. The purpose was to assess new techniques forproduction of ultra-high gradient acceleration and to addressengineering issues in achieving this goal. There are eighty-onepapers collected in the proceedings and all have been abstractedfor the database

  5. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  6. Accelerating Cosmologies from Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, P K; Townsend, Paul K.; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2003-01-01

    A solution of the (4+n)-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations is found for which spacetime is compactified on a compact hyperbolic manifold of time-varying volume to a flat four-dimensional FLRW cosmology undergoing accelerated expansion in Einstein conformal frame. This shows that the `no-go' theorem forbidding acceleration in `standard' (time-independent) compactifications of string/M-theory does not apply to `cosmological' (time-dependent) hyperbolic compactifications.

  7. Designing reliability into accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future accelerators will have to provide a high degree of reliability. Quality must be designed in right from the beginning and must remain a central theme throughout the project. The problem is similar to the problems facing US industry today, and examples of the successful application of quality engineering will be given. Different aspects of an accelerator project will be addressed: Concept, Design, Motivation, Management Techniques, and Fault Diagnosis. The importance of creating and maintaining a coherent team will be stressed

  8. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    OpenAIRE

    Prošek T.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS) test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical p...

  9. Accelerating News Issue 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kahle, K; Wildner, E

    2012-01-01

    In this summer issue we look at how developments in collimator materials could have applications in aerospace and beyond, and how Polish researchers are harnessing accelerators for medical and industrial uses. We see how the LHC luminosity upgrade is linking with European industry and US researchers, and how the neutrino oscillation community is progressing. We find out the mid-term status of TIARA-PP and how it is mapping European accelerator education resources.

  10. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  11. Accelerators for America's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  12. Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Reconnection Acceleration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A.; Stone, E.; Decker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shock waves, as shown by simulations and observations, can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence, including magnetic islands. We consider a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes as an energization mechanism for charged particles. Observations of electron and ion distributions downstream of interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) are frequently inconsistent with the predictions of classical DSA. We utilize a recently developed transport theory for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets. Particle energization associated with the anti-reconnection electric field, a consequence of magnetic island merging, and magnetic island contraction, are considered. For the former only, we find that (i) the spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed, and (ii) the downstream solution is constant. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, (i) the accelerated spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed; (ii) the particle intensity for a given energy peaks downstream of the shock, and the distance to the peak location increases with increasing particle energy, and (iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x,c/{c}0)/f(0,c/{c}0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA, but increases with increasing particle energy. The general solution combines both the reconnection-induced electric field and plasmoid contraction. The observed energetic particle intensity profile observed by Voyager 2 downstream of the HTS appears to support a particle acceleration mechanism that combines both DSA and magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes.

  13. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  14. Accelerating nondiffracting beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shaohui; Li, Manman; Yao, Baoli, E-mail: yaobl@opt.ac.cn; Yu, Xianghua; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Yang, Yanlong; Min, Junwei; Peng, Tong

    2015-06-05

    We present a set of beams which combine the properties of accelerating beams and (conventional) diffraction-free beams. These beams can travel along a desired trajectory while keeping an approximately invariant transverse profile, which may be (higher-order) Bessel-, Mathieu- or parabolic-nondiffracting-like beams, depending on the initial complex amplitude distribution. A possible application of these beams presented here may be found in optical trapping field. For example, a higher-order Bessel-like beam, which has a hollow (transverse) pattern, is suitable for guiding low-refractive-index or metal particles along a curve. - Highlights: • A set of beams having arbitrary trajectories of accelerating and nondiffracting behaviors are generalized and presented. • Bessel-like accelerating beams are generalized to the higher-order (hollow) version. • Mathieu-like accelerating beams and parabolic-nondiffracting-like accelerating beams are presented. • A possible application of these beams may be found in optical trapping and guiding of particles.

  15. Dielectric laser accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  16. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  17. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas

  18. Superconducting accelerator magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles and correction magnets are necessary to achieve the high magnetic fields required for big accelerators presently in construction or in the design phase. Different designs of superconducting accelerator magnets are described and the designs chosen at the big accelerator laboratories are presented. The most frequently used cosθ coil configuration is discussed in detail. Approaches for calculating the magnetic field quality including coil end fields are presented. Design details of the cables, coils, mechanical structures, yokes, helium vessels and cryostats including thermal radiation shields and support structures used in superconducting magnets are given. Necessary material properties are mentioned. Finally, the main results of magnetic field measurements and quench statistics are presented. (orig.)

  19. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Particle Accelerator Physics is an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. Part I gathers the basic tools, recalling the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part II is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed in Part III by the introduction and description of the main beam parameters. Part IV is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part V discusses the details of charged particle accleration. Part VI and Part VII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and the description of very intense beams. Part VIII is an exhaustive treatment of radiation from accelerated charges and introduces important sources of coherent radiation such as synchrotrons and free-electron lasers. Part IX collects the appendices gathering useful mathematical and physical formulae, parameters and units. Solutions to many end-of-chapter problems are give...

  20. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  1. Uniform Acceleration in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  2. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  3. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  4. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa -2, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency

  5. Intermittent Sea Level Acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Olivieri, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia; Spada, G.; Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Fondamenti, Università di Urbino Carlo Bo, Urbino

    2013-01-01

    Using instrumental observations from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), we provide a new assessment of the global sea{level acceleration for the last 2 centuries (1820-2010). Our results, obtained by a stack of tide gauge time series, con firm the existence of a global sea level acceleration (GSLA) and, coherently with independent assessments so far, they point to a value close to 0:01 mm/yr2. However, di fferently from previous studies, we discuss how change points or ...

  6. Seismic surveying and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with an investigation into the impact of earth vibrations on charged particle beams in modern colliders. It is ascertained that the displacement of accelerator magnetic elements from the perfect position results in the excitation of betatron oscillations and distortion of particle orbit position. The results of experimental investigations into seismic noises are presented for ASR, SSC, DESY and KEK. The rms orbit displacement in accelerators is estimated relying on the law of earth diffusion motion, according to which the variance of relative displacements is proportional to the distance between these points and time of observation. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8302397: View from the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138. Giacomo Primadei stands on the left.

  9. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  10. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn

  11. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Christiane Lefèvre

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  12. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  13. The Bevalac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are the characteristics of the Bevatron and SuperHilac heavy ion accelerators in a very general manner. Some aspects of their application in the field of biological medicine and some of the interesting results obtained in experiments on nuclear physics are mentioned. (Author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  14. The CERN Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

      Introduction to accelerator physics This course will take place in Istanbul, Turkey, from 18 to 30 September 2016. It is now open for registration, and further information can be found here: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Turkey-2016/Turkey-advert.html

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  16. Accelerators in the sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author surveys the large body of evidence showing that there are very efficient mechanisms capable of accelerating particles to high energies under very different astrophysical conditions. The circumstances whereby huge amounts of relativistic and ultrarelativistic particles such as one finds in a) cosmic rays, b) supernova remnants and c) radio galaxies and quasars are produced are considered. (Auth.)

  17. Prospects for Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Accelerator technology today is a greater than US$5 billion per annum business. Development of higher-performance technology with improved reliability that delivers reduced system size and life cycle cost is expected to significantly increase the total accelerator technology market and open up new application sales. Potential future directions are identified and pitfalls in new market penetration are considered. Both of the present big market segments, medical radiation therapy units and semiconductor ion implanters, are approaching the "maturity" phase of their product cycles, where incremental development rather than paradigm shifts is the norm, but they should continue to dominate commercial sales for some time. It is anticipated that large discovery-science accelerators will continue to provide a specialty market beset by the unpredictable cycles resulting from the scale of the projects themselves, coupled with external political and economic drivers. Although fraught with differing market entry difficulties, the security and environmental markets, together with new, as yet unrealized, industrial material processing applications, are expected to provide the bulk of future commercial accelerator technology growth.

  18. Heavy ion accelerator GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents GANIL, a large national heavy ion accelerator. The broad problems of nuclear physics, atomic physics, astrophysics and physics of condensed media which can be approached and studied with this machine are discussed first, after which the final construction project is described. The project comprises a circular injector, a separated sector cyclotron up beam stripper, and a second separated cyclotron downstream

  19. Superconducting traveling wave accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note considers the applicability of superconductivity to traveling wave accelerators. Unlike CW operation of a superconducting standing wave or circulating wave accelerator section, which requires improvement factors (superconductor conductivity divided by copper conductivity) of about 106 in order to be of practical use, a SUperconducting TRaveling wave Accelerator, SUTRA, operating in the pulsed mode requires improvement factors as low as about 103, which are attainable with niobium or lead at 4.2K, the temperature of liquid helium at atmospheric pressure. Changing from a copper traveling wave accelerator to SUTRA achieves the following. (1) For a given gradient SUTRA reduces the peak and average power requirements typically by a factor of 2. (2) SUTRA reduces the peak power still further because it enables us to increase the filling time and thus trade pulse width for gradient. (3) SUTRA makes possible a reasonably long section at higher frequencies. (4) SUTRA makes possible recirculation without additional rf average power. 8 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  20. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  1. The CERN Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction to accelerator physics This course will take place in Budapest, Hungary, from 2 to 14 October 2016. It is now open for registration and further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Hungary2016/Hungary-advert.html and http://indico.cern.ch/event/532397/.

  2. Menopause accelerates biological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Chen, Brian H; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D J; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Horvath, Steve

    2016-08-16

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the "epigenetic clock"), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at Mumbai pelletron accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme and the related developments based on the Mumbai Pelletron accelerator are described. The initial results of the measurement of the ratio, 36Cl / Cl in water samples are presented. (author)

  4. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under contract number AC05-85ER40216-8, is currently in the third year of its three-year funding cycle. This Renewal Proposal requests DOE support for the next three-year period from June 1, 1991 to May 31, 1994. It documents the progress made during the past year and outlines the proposed research program for the next three years. The program consisted of the following three tasks: Task A, ''Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' Task B, ''Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' Task C, ''Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders.'' These tasks will be discussed in this paper

  5. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  6. Accelerated Parallel Texture Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Da Huang; Xin Tong; Wen-Cheng Wang

    2007-01-01

    Texture optimization is a texture synthesis method that can efficiently reproduce various features of exemplar textures. However, its slow synthesis speed limits its usage in many interactive or real time applications. In this paper, we propose a parallel texture optimization algorithm to run on GPUs. In our algorithm, k-coherence search and principle component analysis (PCA) are used for hardware acceleration, and two acceleration techniques are further developed to speed up our GPU-based texture optimization. With a reasonable precomputation cost, the online synthesis speed of our algorithm is 4000+ times faster than that of the original texture optimization algorithm and thus our algorithm is capable of interactive applications. The advantages of the new scheme are demonstrated by applying it to interactive editing of flow-guided synthesis.

  7. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  8. Accelerating QDP++ using GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) are getting increasingly important as target architectures in scientific High Performance Computing (HPC). NVIDIA established CUDA as a parallel computing architecture controlling and making use of the compute power of GPUs. CUDA provides sufficient support for C++ language elements to enable the Expression Template (ET) technique in the device memory domain. QDP++ is a C++ vector class library suited for quantum field theory which provides vector data types and expressions and forms the basis of the lattice QCD software suite Chroma. In this work accelerating QDP++ expression evaluation to a GPU was successfully implemented leveraging the ET technique and using Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation. The Portable Expression Template Engine (PETE) and the C API for CUDA kernel arguments were used to build the bridge between host and device memory domains. This provides the possibility to accelerate Chroma routines to a GPU which are typically not subject to special optimisation. As an ...

  9. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ''Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ''Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ''Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  10. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  11. Accelerator research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report for the Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland covers the second year (June 1, 1989 to May 31, 1990) of the current three-year contract period from June 1, 1988 to May 31, 1991, funded by the Department of Energy under Contract No. AC05-85ER40216. The research program is divided into three separate tasks, as follows: the study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams; the study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pulse-Powered Plasma Focus; the study of Microwave Sources and Parameter Scaling for High-Frequency Linacs. This report consists of three sections in which the progress for each task is documented separately. An introduction and synopsis is presented at the beginning of the progress report for each task

  12. NEW ACCELERATION METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    But a glance at the Livingston chart, Fig. 1, of accelerator particle energy as a function of time shows that the energy has steadily, exponentially, increased. Equally significant is the fact that this increase is the envelope of diverse technologies. If one is to stay on, or even near, the Livingston curve in future years then new acceleration techniques need to be developed. What are the new acceleration methods? In these two lectures I would like to sketch some of these new ideas. I am well aware that they will probably not result in high energy accelerators within this or the next decade, but conversely, it is likely that these ideas will form the basis for the accelerators of the next century. Anyway, the ideas are stimulating and suffice to show that accelerator physicists are not just 'engineers', but genuine scientists deserving to be welcomed into the company of high energy physicists. I believe that outsiders will find this field surprisingly fertile and, certainly fun. To put it more personally, I very much enjoy working in this field and lecturing on it. There are a number of review articles which should be consulted for references to the original literature. In addition there are three books on the subject. Given this material, I feel free to not completely reference the material in the remainder of this article; consultation of the review articles and books will be adequate as an introduction to the literature for references abound (hundreds are given). At last, by way of introduction, I should like to quote from the end of Ref. 2 for I think the remarks made there are most germane. Remember that the talk was addressed to accelerator physicists: 'Finally, it is often said, I think by physicists who are not well-informed, that accelerator builders have used up their capital and now are bereft of ideas, and as a result, high energy physics will eventually--rather soon, in fact--come to a halt. After all, one can't build too many

  13. RFQ accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have established themselves as highly efficient and potential tools for delivering intense beams of the order of 100 mA or more. They are being employed as injectors to high energy machines used for basic sciences, spallation neutron sources, fusion devices and accelerator breeders. They have also made their mark as neutron generators, ion implanters, x-ray generators, etc. Realising the importance of this programme, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre initiated a totally indigenous effort to develop RFQs for the light as well as heavy ion beams. A low power RFQ for the proton and deuteron beams is already in the final phase of commissioning. (author). 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    This book by Helmut Wiedemann is a well-established, classic text, providing an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. The present 4th edition has been significantly revised, updated and expanded. The newly conceived Part I is an elementary introduction to the subject matter for undergraduate students. Part II gathers the basic tools in preparation of a more advanced treatment, summarizing the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part III is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed, in Part IV, by an introduction and description of the main beam parameters and including a new chapter on beam emittance and lattice design. Part V is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part VI then discusses the details of charged particle acceleration. Parts VII and VIII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and describe very intense bea...

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. Particle acceleration by pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evidence that pulsars accelerate relativistic particles is reviewed, with emphasis on the γ-ray observations. The current state of knowledge of acceleration in strong waves is summarized, with emphasis on the inability of consistent theories to accelerate very high energy particles without converting too much energy into high energy photons. The state of viable models for pair creation by pulsars is summarized, with the conclusion that pulsars very likely lose rotational energy in winds instead of in superluminous strong waves. The relation of the pair creation models to γ-ray observations and to soft X-ray observations of pulsars is outlined, with the conclusion that energetically viable models may exist, but none have yet yielded useful agreement with the extant data. Some paths for overcoming present problems are discussed. The relation of the favored models to cosmic rays is discussed. It is pointed out that the pairs made by the models may have observable consequences for observation of positrons in the local cosmic ray flux and for observations of the 511 keV line from the interstellar medium. Another new point is that asymmetry of plasma supply from at least one of the models may qualitatively explain the gross asymmetry of the X-ray emission from the Crab nebula. It is also argued that acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei by pulsars, while energetically possible, can occur only at the boundary of the bubbles blown by the pulsars, if the cosmic ray composition is to be anything like that of the known source spectrum

  17. GPU accelerated face detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkelä, J.

    2013-01-01

    Graphics processing units have massive parallel processing capabilities, and there is a growing interest in utilizing them for generic computing. One area of interest is computationally heavy computer vision algorithms, such as face detection and recognition. Face detection is used in a variety of applications, for example the autofocus on cameras, face and emotion recognition, and access control. In this thesis, the face detection algorithm was accelerated with GPU using OpenCL. The goal was...

  18. Accelerator Experiments for Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Many recent discoveries in astrophysics involve phenomena that are highly complex. Carefully designed experiments, together with sophisticated computer simulations, are required to gain insights into the underlying physics. We show that particle accelerators are unique tools in this area of research, by providing precision calibration data and by creating extreme experimental conditions relevant for astrophysics. In this paper we discuss laboratory experiments that can be carried out at the S...

  19. Compact pulsed accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of fast pulses from a current charged transmission line and opening switch is described. By employing a plasma focus as an opening switch and diode in the prototype device, a proton beam of peak energy 250 keV is produced. The time integrated energy spectrum of the beam is constructed from a Thomson spectrograph. Applications of this device as an inexpensive and portable charged particle accelerator are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Laser plasma accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Malka, V.

    2012-01-01

    Research activities on laser plasma accelerators are paved by many significant breakthroughs. This review article provides an opportunity to show the incredible evolution of this field of research which has, in record time, allowed physicists to produce high quality electron beams at the GeV level using compact laser systems. I will show the scientific path that led us to explore different injection schemes and to produce stable, high peak current and high quality electron beams with control ...

  1. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  2. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  3. Future Accelerator Magnet Needs

    CERN Document Server

    Devred, Arnaud; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting magnet technology is continually evolving in order to meet the demanding needs of new accelerators and to provide necessary upgrades for existing machines. A variety of designs are now under development, including high fields and gradients, rapid cycling and novel coil configurations. This paper presents a summary of R&D programs in the EU, Japan and the USA. A performance comparison between NbTi and Nb3Sn along with fabrication and cost issues are also discussed.

  4. Shock accelerated vortex ring

    CERN Document Server

    Haehn, N; Oakley, J; Anderson, M; Rothamer, D; Bonazza, R

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a spherical density inhomogeneity leads to the development of a vortex ring through the impulsive deposition of baroclinic vorticity. The present fluid dynamics videos display this phenomenon and were experimentally investigated at the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory's (WiSTL) 9.2 m, downward firing shock tube. The tube has a square internal cross-section (0.25 m x 0.25 m) with multiple fused silica windows for optical access. The spherical soap bubble is generated by means of a pneumatically retracted injector and released into free-fall 200 ms prior to initial shock acceleration. The downward moving, M = 2.07 shock wave impulsively accelerates the bubble and reflects off the tube end wall. The reflected shock wave re-accelerates the bubble (reshock), which has now developed into a vortex ring, depositing additional vorticity. In the absence of any flow disturbances, the flow behind the reflected shock wave is stationary. As a result, any observed motion of the vortex rin...

  5. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Eddy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the "multiple segment Viterbi" (MSV algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call "sparse rescaling". These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches.

  6. Optimizing accelerator technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A new EU-funded research and training network, oPAC, is bringing together 22 universities, research centres and industry partners to optimize particle accelerator technology. CERN is one of the network’s main partners and will host 5 early-stage researchers in the BE department.   A diamond detector that will be used for novel beam diagnostics applications in the oPAC project based at CIVIDEC. (Image courtesy of CIVIDEC.) As one of the largest Marie Curie Initial Training Networks ever funded by the EU – to the tune of €6 million – oPAC extends well beyond the particle physics community. “Accelerator physics has become integral to research in almost every scientific discipline – be it biology and life science, medicine, geology and material science, or fundamental physics,” explains Carsten P. Welsch, oPAC co-ordinator based at the University of Liverpool. “By optimizing the operation of accelerators, all of these...

  7. Accelerated GLAS exposure station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is being developed by NASA/GSFC to measure the dynamics of the ice sheet mass balance, land, and cloud and atmospheric properties. An instrument altimetric resolution of 10 cm per shot is required. The laser transmitter will be a diode pumped, Q-switched, Nd:YAG laser producing 1064 nm, 100 mJ, 4 ns pulses at 40 Hz repetition rate in a TEM∞ mode. A minimum lifetime goal of 2 billion shots is required per laser transmitter. The performance of the GLAS laser can be limited by physical damage to the optical components caused by the interaction of intense laser energy with the optical coatings and substrates. Very little data exists describing the effects of long duration laser exposure, of 4 ns pulses, on an optical component. An Accelerated GLAS Exposure Station (AGES) is being developed which will autonomously operate and monitor the GLAS laser at an accelerated rate of 500 Hz. The effects of a large number of laser shots will be recorded. Parameters to be monitored include: laser power, pulsewidth, beam size, laser diode drive current and power, Q-switch drive voltage, temperature, and humidity. For comparison, one set of AGES-sister optical components will be used in the non-accelerated GLAS laser and another will be evaluated by a commercial optical damage test facility

  8. Linac transport and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration of intense bunches maintaining high brightness is limited both by single-particle effects, e.g., misalignments, injection errors, and rf-steering, and collective phenomena, where the effects of the longitudinal and transverse wakefield on particles within a single bunch are the most severe. The working group has considered both problems and potentials of linac acceleration from ∼50 MeV to 1 GeV for free electron laser (FEL) applications, as well as from a few Gev to 1 TeV for linear colliders. The outlook for free electron lasers is bright: no fundamental problems seem to arise in the acceleration of peak currents in excess of 100 A with small emittance and low momentum spread. The situation of linear colliders is more complex and more difficult. Two examples, one operating at 11.4 GHz, the other at 30 GHz, are used to illustrate some of the difficulties and the exceedingly tight tolerances required. Both examples are based on round beams, and thus neither benefit from the advantages of flat beams nor address the increased care required in transporting beams of very small emittance in one plane. The working group acknowledges, but did not explore, promising concepts for colliders based on RF superconductivity

  9. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresnyak, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  10. Laser driven particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation summarizes the last ten years of research at the Laboratory of Applied Optics on laser-plasma based electron acceleration. The main result consists of the development and study of a relativistic electron source with unique properties: high energy (100-300 MeV) in short distances (few millimeters), mono-energetic, ultra-short (few fs), stable and tunable. The manuscript describes the steps that led to understanding the physics, and then mastering it in order to produce this new electron source. Non linear propagation of the laser pulse in the plasma is first presented, with phenomena such as non linear wakefield excitation, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing in the short pulse regime, self-compression. Acceleration and injection of electrons are then reviewed from a theoretical perspective. Experimental demonstrations of self-injection in the bubble regime and then colliding pulse injection are then presented. These experiments were among the first to produce monoenergetic, high quality, stable and tunable electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator. The last two chapters are dedicated to the characterization of the electron beam using transition radiation and to its applications to gamma radiography and radiotherapy. Finally, the perspectives of this research are presented in the conclusion. Scaling laws are used to determine the parameters that the electron beams will reach using peta-watt laser systems currently under construction. (author)

  11. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  12. CESR Test Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  13. Laser-driven electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following possibilities are discussed: inverse free electron laser (wiggler accelerator); inverse Cerenkov effect; plasma accelerator; dielectric tube; and grating linac. Of these, the grating acceleraton is considered the most attractive alternative

  14. Electron accelerators for environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this publication is to provide information suitable for electron accelerators implementation in facilities applying radiation technology for environmental protection. It should be noticed that radiation processing has been successfully used in the fields of crosslinking polymer curing and medical products sterilization for more than 40 years. Practical application of radiation technology today extends on SO2 and NOx removal from the flue gas (one of major power intensive radiation processing), destruction and removal of organic chemicals from water, decreasing bacteria content in the irradiated sludge and waste water. On the other hand the increased awareness of environmental pollution hazards and more stringent waste regulations in many countries may open stronger support for environmentally oriented technologies. This publication provides an evaluation of electron accelerators capabilities in respect of environmental applications where technological and economical criteria are now well defined. In order to determine the potential of electron accelerators, the literature data were examined as well visits and meetings with various accelerator manufacturers were performed by the author. Experience of the author in accelerator facilities construction and exploitation including those which were used for environmental protection are significant part of this publication. The principle of accelerator action was described in Chapter 1. Early development, accelerator classification and fields of accelerators application were included to this chapter as well. Details of accelerator construction was described in Chapter 2 to illustrate physical capability of accelerators to perform the function of ionizing radiation source. Electron beam extraction devices, under beam equipment, electron beam parameters and measuring methods were characterized in this chapter as well. Present studies of accelerator technology was described in Chapter 3, where direct

  15. Accelerating in de Sitter spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Cotaescu, Ion I

    2014-01-01

    We propose a definition of uniform accelerated frames in de Sitter spacetimes exploiting the Nachtmann group theoretical method of introducing coordinates on these manifolds. Requiring the transformation between the static frame and the accelerated one to depend continuously on acceleration in order to recover the well-known Rindler approach in the flat limit, we obtain a result with a reasonable physical meaning.

  16. Kaposi’s sarcoma in Brazilian AIDS patients: a study of 144 cases Sarcoma de Kaposi em pacientes com AIDS: estudo de 144 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther G. BIRMAN

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and forty-four Brazilian AIDS patients presenting with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS were evaluated with respect to the frequency of oral neoplasms and their clinical features. The majority of the patients were young male adults (age range: 21-40 years old, from which 11.1 % presented with oral KS (OKS exclusively. Oral and skin lesions were associated in 25% of the cases, while only four patients showed association between oral and visceral KS; 49.3% of the cases were exclusively dermatological. The hard palate was the main site affected, followed by the oropharynx. The localization of KS was found to be similarly frequent in the tongue, gingiva and other sites of the oral mucosa. Candidosis was the prevailing fungal disease; in 20% of the cases it was restricted to the oral mucosa and in 80% it was systemic. No high frequency of paracoccidioidomicosis and cryptococcosis was detected. The prevailing bacterial disease was Tuberculosis and there was only one case of syphilis. Among the viral diseases, the most frequently detected was herpes simplex, followed by molusco contagiosum, condiloma acuminatum and cytomegaloviroses at lower frequencies. Pneumonia caused by Pneumocystes carinii and toxoplasmosis were also identified. The authors emphasise the importance of oral examination in HIV-infected patients bearing in mind several aspects related especially to KS, and stress the need for an interdisciplinary team in the management of these patients, in order to provide better quality of life as well as rapid diagnosis and treatment.Foram estudados pacientes brasileiros portadores de SIDA apresentando sarcoma de Kaposi (SK. O perfil de idade mostrou um grupo com média de idade entre 21 e 40 anos, sendo que 11,1% da amostra apresentava SK exclusivamente na cavidade bucal, observando-se em 25% da amostra uma associação de lesões bucais e na pele. Somente quatro pacientes apresentaram associação de lesões bucais e viscerais, enquanto 49

  17. APT accelerator. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century

  18. VLHC accelerator physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  19. APT accelerator. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D. [comp.] [ed.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  20. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Power Converters will be held in Baden, Switzerland, from 7 to 14 May 2014. Please note that the deadline for applications is 7 FEBRUARY 2014. A course on Introduction to Accelerator Physics will be held in Prague, Czech Republic, from 31 August to 12 September 2014. Applications are now open for this school; the application deadline is 25 APRIL 2014. Further information on these schools and other CAS events can be found on the CAS website and on the Indico page. For further information please contact Barbara.strasser@cern.ch

  1. Accelerating abelian gauge dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen Louis

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest a new acceleration method for Abelian gauge theories based on linear transformations to variables which weight all length scales equally. We measure the autocorrelation time for the Polyakov loop and the plaquette at β=1.0 in the U(1) gauge theory in four dimensions, for the new method and for standard Metropolis updates. We find a dramatic improvement for the new method over the Metropolis method. Computing the critical exponent z for the new method remains an important open issue.

  2. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  3. Hardware Accelerated Power Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Coburn, Joel; Raghunathan, Anand

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present power emulation, a novel design paradigm that utilizes hardware acceleration for the purpose of fast power estimation. Power emulation is based on the observation that the functions necessary for power estimation (power model evaluation, aggregation, etc.) can be implemented as hardware circuits. Therefore, we can enhance any given design with "power estimation hardware", map it to a prototyping platform, and exercise it with any given test stimuli to obtain power consumption estimates. Our empirical studies with industrial designs reveal that power emulation can achieve significant speedups (10X to 500X) over state-of-the-art commercial register-transfer level (RTL) power estimation tools.

  4. Medical applications of accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Sandro

    1998-01-01

    At Present, about five thousands accelerators are devoted to biomedical applications. They are mainly used in radiotherapy, research and medical radioisotopes production. In this framework oncological hadron-therapy deserves particular attention since it represents a field in rapid evolution thanks to the joint efforts of laboratories with long experiences in particle physics. It is the case of CERN where the design of an optimised synchrotron for medical applications has been pursued. These lectures present these activities with particular attention to the new developments which are scientifically interesting and/or economically promising.

  5. How Is Kaposi Sarcoma Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the procedure, and spending hours in the bathroom. Just before the procedure, you will be given ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  6. Acceleration without Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Alaric

    2015-01-01

    We show that while some non-uniformly accelerating observers (NUAOs) do indeed see a Bose-Einstein distribution of particles for the expectation value of the number operator in the Minkowski vacuum state, the density matrix is non-thermal and therefore a definition of temperature is not warranted. This is due to the fact that our NUAOs do not see event horizons in the spacetime. More specifically, the Minkowski vacuum state is perceived by our NUAOs as a single-mode squeezed state as opposed to the two-mode squeezed state characteristic of uniformly accelerating observers. Both single and two-mode squeezed states are pure quantum states; however, tracing over degrees of freedom in one of the modes of the two-mode squeezed state reduces the pure density matrix to a thermal density matrix. It is this property in the two-mode squeezed state that allows one to consistently define a temperature. In the single-mode case, an equivalent tracing is neither required nor available.

  7. Accelerator School Success

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator specialists don't grow on trees: training them is the job of the CERN Accelerator School (CAS). Group photo during visit to the Daresbury Laboratory. CAS and the CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory jointly organised a specialised school on Power Converters in Warrington, England from 12-18 May 2004. The last CAS Power Converter course was in 1990, so there was plenty of ground to cover. The challenging programme proposed a review of the state of the art and the latest developments in the field, including 30 hours of tuition. The school also included a visit to the CCLRC Daresbury laboratory, a one-day excursion to Liverpool and Chester and a themed (Welsh medieval) dinner at the school's closure. A record attendance of 91 students of more than 20 different nationalities included not only participants from Europe and North America but also from Armenia, Taiwan, India, Turkey, Iran and for the first time, fee-paying students from China and Australia. European industry showed a welcome and solid interest in...

  8. 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Document Server

    JAS - Joint US-CERN-Japan-Russia Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    Many particle accelerators operate with very high beam power and very high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, the beam power in high intensity accelerators will further increase. The protection of the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of the energy is essential. This was the motivation for organizing a first school on beam losses and accelerator protection (in general referred to as machine protection). During the school the methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy were presented. At the completion of the school the participants should have been able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and to analyze an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and the corresponding risk mitigation and management strategie...

  9. Accelerator Technology: Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Missiaen, D

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.9 Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.9 Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators 8.9.1 Introduction 8.9.2 Reference and Co-ordinate Systems 8.9.3 Definition of the Beam Line on the Accelerator Site 8.9.4 Geodetic Network 8.9.5 Tunnel Preliminary Works 8.9.6 The Alignment References 8.9.7 Alignment of Accelerator Components 8.9.8 Permanent Monitoring and Remote Alignment of Low Beta Quadrupoles 8.9.9 Alignment of Detector Components

  10. Acceleration in Linear and Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellington, S. H.; Docherty, W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a simple accelerometer and explains its use in demonstrating acceleration, deceleration, constant speed, measurement of acceleration, acceleration and the inclined plane and angular and radial acceleration. (GS)

  11. Investigation on laser accelerators. Plasma beat wave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Hagiwara, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sudo, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-04-01

    Laser accelerator technology has characteristics of high energy, compact, short pulse and high luminescence{center_dot}low emittance. This means potential many applications in wide ranges of fields as well as high energy and nuclear physics. High power short laser pulses are injected to a plasma in the typical example of laser accelerators. Large electric fields are induced in the plasma. Electrons in the plasma are accelerated with the ponderomotive force of the electric field. The principles of interaction on beat wave, wakefield accelerators, inverse free electron laser and inverse Cherenkov radiation are briefly introduced. The overview of plasma beat wave accelerator study is briefly described on the programs at Chalk River Laboratories(Canada), UCLA(USA), Osaka Univ. (Japan) and Ecole Polytechnique (France). Issues of the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed from the viewpoint of application. Existing laser technologies of CO{sub 2}, YAG and YFL are available for the present day accelerator technology. An acceleration length of beat wave interaction is limited due to its phase condition. Ideas on multi-staged acceleration using the phasing plasma fiber are introduced. (Y. Tanaka)

  12. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Advanced accelerator physics. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This advanced course on general accelerator physics is the second of the biennial series given by the CERN Accelerator School and follows on from the first basic course given at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris, in 1984. Stress is placed on the mathematical tools of Hamiltonian mechanics and the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, which are widely used in accelerator theory. The main topics treated in this present work include: nonlinear resonances, chromaticity, motion in longitudinal phase space, growth and control of longitudinal and transverse beam emittance, space-charge effects and polarization. The seminar programme treats some specific accelerator techniques, devices, projects and future possibilities. (orig.)

  13. CERN Accelerator School: Registration open for Advanced Accelerator Physics course

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s Advanced Accelerator Physics course to be held in Warsaw, Poland from 27 September to 9 October 2015.   The course will be of interest to physicists and engineers who wish to extend their knowledge of accelerator physics. The programme offers core lectures on accelerator physics in the mornings and a practical course with hands-on tuition in the afternoons.  Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Poland2015/Warsaw-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/361988/

  14. CERN Accelerator School: Registration open for Advanced Accelerator Physics course

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s Advanced Accelerator Physics course to be held in Warsaw, Poland from 27 September to 9 October 2015.   The course will be of interest to physicists and engineers who wish to extend their knowledge of Accelerator Physics. The programme offers core lectures on accelerator physics in the mornings and a practical course with hands-on tuition in the afternoons.  Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Poland2015/Warsaw-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/361988/

  15. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Advanced accelerator physics. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This advanced course on general accelerator physics is the second of the biennial series given by the CERN Accelerator School and follows on from the first basic course given at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris, in 1984. Stress is placed on the mathematical tools of Hamiltonian mechanics and the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, which are widely used in accelerator theory. The main topics treated in this present work include: nonlinear resonances, chromaticity, motion in longitudinal phase space, growth and control of longitudinal and transverse beam emittance, space-charge effects and polarization. The seminar programme treats some specific accelerator techniques, devices, projects and future possibilities. (orig.)

  16. Lectures in accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved

  17. Accelerator vacuum system elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some elements of vacuum systems are investigated. Considerable attention has been given to the investigation into peculiarities in pumping out of a ionoguide for transportation of an accelerated charged particles beam the spread of which often attains a considerable length. The number of pumps over the ionoguide length is experimentally determined. It is shown that as a result of ionoguide warm-up the pumping out time is considerably reduced maximum permissible pressure is decreased by two orders and lesser rate of pump pumping out is required. The investigations have shown that when operating the ionoguide there is no necessity in setting up seals between the ionoguide and magnetodischarged pump. The causes of the phenomenon in which the pressure near the pump is greater than in the end of the ionoguide, are impurities carried in by the pump into the ionoguide volume and the pumping out capacity of the pressure converter

  18. ACCELERATING NANO-TECHNOLOGICAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Stissing; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which concludes...... of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support “incubation rooms” or marked niches in order...... for the different elements of the TIS to evolve. This could involve nano-visioning including scenarios of future technological applications and industrial dynamics....

  19. Testing Gravity on Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    Weak equivalence principle (WEP) is one of the cornerstones of the modern theories of gravity, stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. Even though WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision, it has never been experimentally confirmed for relativistic matter and antimatter. We make an attempt to constrain possible deviations from WEP utilizing the modern accelerator technologies. We analyze the (absence of) vacuum Cherenkov radiation, photon decay, anomalous synchrotron losses and the Compton spectra to put limits on the isotropic Lorentz violation and further convert them to the constraints on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the relativistic electrons/positrons. Our main result is the 0.1% limit on the mentioned difference.

  20. Self-accelerated Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kosyakov, B P

    2005-01-01

    It is widely believed that the large redshifts for distant supernovae are explained by the vacuum energy dominance, or, in other words, by the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations, which is responsible for the anti-gravitation effect. A tacit assumption is that particles move along a geodesic for the background metric. This is in the same spirit as the consensus regarding the uniform Galilean motion of a free electron. However, there is a runaway solution to the Lorentz--Dirac equation governing the behavior of a radiating electron, in addition to the Galilean solution. Likewise, a runaway solution to the entire system of equations, both gravitation and matter equations of motion including, may provide an alternative explanation for the accelerated expansion of the Universe, without recourse to the hypothetic cosmological constant.

  1. The entangled accelerating universe

    CERN Document Server

    González-Díaz, Pedro F

    2009-01-01

    Using the known result that the nucleation of baby universes in correlated pairs is equivalent to spacetime squeezing, we show in this letter that there exists a T-duality symmetry between two-dimensional warp drives, which are physically expressible as localized de Sitter little universes, and two dimensional Tolman-Hawking and Gidding-Strominger baby universes respectively correlated in pairs, so that the creation of warp drives is also equivalent to spacetime squeezing. Perhaps more importantly, it has been also seen that the nucleation of warp drives entails a violation of the Bell's inequalities, and hence the phenomena of quantum entanglement, complementarity and wave function collapse. These results are generalized to the case of any dynamically accelerating universe filled with dark or phantom energy whose creation is also physically equivalent to spacetime squeezing and to the violation of the Bell's inequalities, so that the universe we are living in should be governed by essential sharp quantum the...

  2. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  3. Accelerator Technology for the Mankind

    CERN Document Server

    Sultansoy, S

    2006-01-01

    Particle accelerators technology is one of the generic technologies which is locomotive of the development in almost all fields of science and technology. According to the U.S. Department of Energy: "Accelerators underpin every activity of the Office of Science and, increasingly, of the entire scientific enterprise. From biology to medicine, from materials to metallurgy, from elementary particles to the cosmos, accelerators provide the microscopic information that forms the basis for scientific understanding and applications. The combination of ground and satellite based observatories and particle accelerators will advance our understanding of our world, our galaxy, our universe, and ourselves." Because of this, accelerator technology should become widespread all over the world. Existing situation shows that a large portion of the world, namely the South and Mid-East, is poor on the accelerator technology. UNESCO has recognized this deficit and started SESAME project in Mid-East, namely Jordan. Turkic Acceler...

  4. Electrostatic accelerators fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Electrostatic accelerators are an important and widespread subgroup within the broad spectrum of modern, large particle acceleration devices. They are specifically designed for applications that require high-quality ion beams in terms of energy stability and emittance at comparatively low energies (a few MeV). Their ability to accelerate virtually any kind of ion over a continuously tunable range of energies make them a highly versatile tool for investigations in many research fields including, but not limited to, atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, heavy ion reactions, accelerator mass spectroscopy as well as ion-beam analysis and modification. The book is divided into three parts. The first part concisely introduces the field of accelerator technology and techniques that emphasize their major modern applications. The second part treats the electrostatic accelerator per se: its construction and operational principles as well as its maintenance. The third part covers all relevant applications in which electrosta...

  5. Accelerating Universe and Event Horizon

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xiao-Gang(INPAC, SKLPPC and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China)

    2001-01-01

    It has been argued in the literature that if a universe is expanding with an accelerating rate indefinitely, it presents a challenge to string theories due to the existence of event horizons. We study the fate of a currently accelerating universe. We show that the universe will continue to accelerate indefinitely if the parameter $\\omega = p/\\rho$ of the equation of state is a constant, no matter how many different types of energy (matter, radiation, quintessence, cosmological constant and et...

  6. Project X: Accelerator Reference Design

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, S D; Chase, B; Gollwitzer, K; Johnson, D; Kaducak, M; Klebaner, A; Kourbanis, I; Lebedev, V; Leveling, A; Li, D; Nagaitsev, S; Ostroumov, P; Pasquinelli, R; Patrick, J; Prost, L; Scarpine, V; Shemyakin, A; Solyak, N; Steimel, J; Yakovlev, V; Zwaska, R

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". Part 1 contains the volume Preface and a description of the conceptual design for a high-intensity proton accelerator facility being developed to support a world-leading program of Intensity Frontier physics over the next two decades at Fermilab. Subjects covered include performance goals, the accelerator physics design, and the technological basis for such a facility.

  7. Stationary plasma accelerator - ATON engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of a stationary plasma accelerator (engine) with closed electron drift are described. The accelerator has record integral characteristics. A method for analysis of operating process features in the integral characteristics is proposed. Results are presented of local measurements of the plasma parameters in the accelerator channel and in the leaving plasma jet Main attention is paid to determination of the part of twice ionized ions in the plasma flow

  8. Accelerator control systems in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three accelerator facilities were built in the past few years, the 2.8 GeV electron positron collider BEPC, the heavy ion SSC cyclotron accelerator HIRFL and the 800 MeV synchrotron radiation storage ring HESYRL. Aimed at different research areas, they represent a new generation of accelerator in China. This report describes the design philosophy, the structure, performance as well as future improvements of the control systems of the these facilities. (author)

  9. Accelerator science in medical physics

    OpenAIRE

    Peach, K.; Wilson, P.; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered sin...

  10. Superposed-laser electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration by using two superposed laser beams in vacuum. In this mechanism, an electron is accelerated by the longitudinal component of the wave electric field in the overlapped region of two laser beams. Single-particle computations and analytical works are performed in order to demonstrate the viability. These results show that the electron can be accelerated well in this proposed mechanism. (author)

  11. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT–SSX, and more than half of SYT–SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT–SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue

  12. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT–SSX, and more than half of SYT–SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT–SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue.

  13. Recent advances in understanding Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    OpenAIRE

    Dissinger, Nathan J.; Blossom Damania

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus. KSHV is associated with three cancers in the human population: KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD). KS is the leading cause of cancer in HIV-infected individuals. In this review, we discuss the most recent discoveries behind the mechanisms of KSHV latency maintenance and lytic replication. We also review current therapies for KSHV-associated cancers.

  14. Histiocytic Sarcoma Associated with Coombs Negative Acute Hemolytic Anemia: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen C.; Nassiri, Mehdi; Qureshi, Amna; Markel, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) rarely involves extranodal sites, such as the spleen. We report a unique pediatric case of massive splenomegaly and refractory Coombs negative hemolytic anemia (CNHA) secondary to HS. The CNHA resolved completely after an emergent splenectomy. Next generation sequencing (NGS) revealed novel ASXL1, PTPN11, KIT, and TP53 mutations, unmasking a clonal heterogeneity within the same neoplasm. PMID:27429816

  15. Accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs

  16. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    OpenAIRE

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass $m$ has the upper limit $\\mathcal{A}_m=2mc^3/\\hbar$. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to $\\mathcal{A}_m$ and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws du...

  17. Thomas Precession by Uniform Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    We determine the nonlinear transformations between coordinate systems which are mutually in a constant symmetrical accelerated motion. The maximal acceleration limit follows from the kinematical origin and it is an analogue of the maximal velocity in special relativity. We derive the dependence of mass, length, time, Doppler effect, Cherenkov effect and transition radiation angle on acceleration as an analogue phenomena in special theory of relativity. The last application of our method is the Thomas precession by uniform acceleration with the possible role in the modern physics and cosmology. The comparison of derived results with other relativistic methods is necessary.

  18. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Acceleration Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SRF cavities enable accelerators to increase particle beam energy levels while minimizing the use of electrical power by all but eliminating electrical resistance....

  19. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Second general accelerator physics course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The course on general accelerator physics given at Aarhus is basically a repeat of that organised by the CERN Accelerator School at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris in September 1984 and whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Report 85-19 (1985). However, the opportunity was taken to improve or extend certain subjects while introducing new ones and it is these which are included in the present proceedings. The lectures treated here include accelerator optics, insertions, image and space charge forces, neutralisation, diagnostics and intra-beam scattering while the seminar programme includes a number of specialised accelerator topics. Reports on a separate series of seminars organised by the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and devoted to advanced technology arising from general accelerator physics are also included, as well as errata to CERN 85-19. (orig.)

  20. CAS CERN Accelerator School superconductivity in particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the objectives of the CERN Accelerator School is to run courses on specialised topics in the particle accelerator field. The present volume contains the proceedings of one such course, this time organized in conjunction with the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) on the subject of superconductivity in particle accelerators. This course reflects the very considerable progress made over the last few years in the use of the technology for the magnet and radio-frequency systems of many large and small accelerators already in use or nearing completion, while also taking account of the development work now going on for future machines. The lectures cover the theory of superconductivity, cryogenics and accelerator magnets and cavities, while the seminars include superfluidity, superconductors, special magnets and the prospects for high-temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  1. COMPASS Accelerator Design Technical Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Emilio; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Neilson, Jeff; /SLAC

    2016-03-14

    This report is a survey of technical options for generating a MeV-class accelerator for space based science applications. The survey was performed focusing on the primary technical requirements of the accelerator in the context of a satellite environment with its unique challenges of limited electrical power (PE), thermal isolation, dimensions, payload requirement and electrical isolation.

  2. Correct and efficient accelerator programming

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Albert; Donaldson, Alistair F.; Huisman, Marieke; Katoen, Joost-Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 13142 “Correct and Efficient Accelerator Programming”. The aim of this Dagstuhl seminar was to bring together researchers from various sub-disciplines of computer science to brainstorm and discuss the theoretical foundations, design and implementation of techniques and tools for correct and efficient accelerator programming.

  3. Software for virtual accelerator designing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses appropriate technologies for software implementation of the Virtual Accelerator. The Virtual Accelerator is considered as a set of services and tools enabling transparent execution of computational software for modeling beam dynamics in accelerators on distributed computing resources. Distributed storage and information processing facilities utilized by the Virtual Accelerator make use of the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) according to a cloud computing paradigm. Control system tool-kits (such as EPICS, TANGO), computing modules (including high-performance computing), realization of the GUI with existing frameworks and visualization of the data are discussed in the paper. The presented research consists of software analysis for realization of interaction between all levels of the Virtual Accelerator and some samples of middle-ware implementation. A set of the servers and clusters at St.-Petersburg State University form the infrastructure of the computing environment for Virtual Accelerator design. Usage of component-oriented technology for realization of Virtual Accelerator levels interaction is proposed. The article concludes with an overview and substantiation of a choice of technologies that will be used for design and implementation of the Virtual Accelerator. (authors)

  4. Shadows of a maximal acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Papini, G.

    2002-01-01

    A quantum mechanical upper limit on the value of particle accelerations, or maximal acceleration (MA), is applied to compact stars. A few MA fermions are at most present in canonical white dwarfs and neutron stars. They drastically alter a star's stability conditions.

  5. Shadows of a maximal acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papini, G

    2002-12-16

    A quantum mechanical upper limit on the value of particle accelerations, or maximal acceleration (MA), is applied to compact stars. A few MA fermions are at most present in canonical white dwarfs and neutron stars. They drastically alter a star's stability conditions.

  6. Lorentz contraction and accelerated systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tartaglia, Angelo; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the problem of the Lorentz contraction in accelerated systems, in the context of the special theory of relativity. Equal proper accelerations along different world lines are considered, showing the differences arising when the world lines correspond to physically connected or disconnected objects. In all cases the special theory of relativity proves to be completely self-consistent

  7. Thomas Edison Accelerated Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Henry M.; Chasin, Gene

    This paper describes early outcomes of a Sacramento, California, elementary school that participated in the Accelerated Schools Project. The school, which serves many minority and poor students, began training for the project in 1992. Accelerated Schools were designed to advance the learning rate of students through a gifted and talented approach,…

  8. New directions in linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current work on linear particle accelerators is placed in historical and physics contexts, and applications driving the state of the art are discussed. Future needs and the ways they may force development are outlined in terms of exciting R and D challenges presented to today's accelerator designers. 23 references, 7 figures

  9. Accelerator technology for the mankind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Particle accelerators technology is one of the generic technologies which is locomotive of the development in almost all fields of science and technology. According to the U. S. Department of Energy: Accelerators underpin every activity of the Office of Science and, increasingly, of the entire scientific enterprise. From biology to medicine, from materials to metallurgy, from elementary particles to the cosmos, accelerators provide the microscopic information that forms the basis for scientific understanding and applications. The combination of ground and satellite based observatories and particle accelerators will advance our understanding of our world, our galaxy, our universe, and ourselves. Because of this, accelerator technology should become widespread all over the world. Existing situation shows that a large portion of the world, namely the South and Mid-East, is poor on the accelerator technology. UNESCO has recognized this deficit and started SESAME project in Mid-East, namely Jordan. Turkic Accelerator Complex (TAC) project is more comprehensive and ambitious project, from the point of view of it includes light sources, particle physics experiments and proton and secondary beam applications. At this stage, TAC project includes: Linac-ring type charm factory; Synchrotron light source based on positron ring; Free electron laser based on electron linac; GeV scale proton accelerator; TAC-Test Facility

  10. Analysis of Accelerated Gossip Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Anderson, B.D.O.; Cao, M.; Morse, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates accelerated gossip algorithms for distributed computations in networks where shift-registers are utilized at each node. By using tools from matrix analysis, we prove the existence of the desired acceleration and establish the fastest rate of convergence in expectation for two

  11. An In Vitro System for Studying Murid Herpesvirus-4 Latency and Reactivation

    OpenAIRE

    May, Janet S.; Bennett, Neil J; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2010-01-01

    The narrow species tropisms of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and the Kaposi's Sarcoma -associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) have made Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) an important tool for understanding how gammaherpesviruses colonize their hosts. However, while MuHV-4 pathogenesis studies can assign a quantitative importance to individual genes, the complexity of in vivo infection can make the underlying mechanisms hard to discern. Furthermore, the lack of good in vitro MuHV-4 latency/reactivation systems w...

  12. An Interaction between KSHV ORF57 and UIF Provides mRNA-Adaptor Redundancy in Herpesvirus Intronless mRNA Export

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Brian R.; Boyne, James R.; Marko Noerenberg; Adam Taylor; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Walsh, Matthew J; Rachel Wheat; Blackbourn, David J.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Adrian Whitehouse

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Herpesviruses hijack cellular components to enhance viral gene expression. This is particularly important for the efficient nuclear export of herpesvirus intronless mRNAs to allow the production of viral proteins. We have previously demonstrated that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes a conserved protein, ORF57, which recruits essential cellular mRNA export proteins onto the viral intronless mRNAs to form an export competent viral ribonucleoprotein particle. Specif...

  13. A Heparan-Dependent Herpesvirus Targets the Olfactory Neuroepithelium for Host Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Milho; Bruno Frederico; Stacey Efstathiou; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Herpesviruses are supremely successful mammalian parasites. Yet their infections rarely present until well established, so how new hosts are first infected has been unclear. Understanding this is likely to be crucial for infection control. Using Murid Herpesvirus-4, a relative of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus, we identified the olfactory neuroepithelium as a major portal of host entry. Heparan sulfate (HS) binding, which is common to many herpesviruses, played a k...

  14. Recombinant Murine Gamma Herpesvirus 68 Carrying KSHV G Protein-Coupled Receptor Induces Angiogenic Lesions in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Zhang; Lining Zhu; Xiaolu Lu; Feldman, Emily R.; Keyes, Lisa R.; Yi Wang; Hui Fan; Hao Feng; Zanxian Xia; Jiya Sun; Taijiao Jiang; Shou-Jiang Gao; Tibbetts, Scott A; Pinghui Feng

    2015-01-01

    Human gamma herpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are capable of inducing tumors, particularly in in immune-compromised individuals. Due to the stringent host tropism, rodents are resistant to infection by human gamma herpesviruses, creating a significant barrier for the in vivo study of viral genes that contribute to tumorigenesis. The closely-related murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (γHV68) efficiently infects laboratory mouse strai...

  15. Proteomic characterization of murid herpesvirus 4 extracellular virions.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Vidick; Baptiste Leroy; Leonor Palmeira; Bénédicte Machiels; Jan Mast; Sylvie François; Ruddy Wattiez; Alain Vanderplasschen; Laurent Gillet

    2013-01-01

    Gammaherpesvirinae, such as the human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are highly prevalent pathogens that have been associated with several neoplastic diseases. As EBV and KSHV are host-range specific and replicate poorly in vitro, animal counterparts such as Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) have been widely used as models. In this study, we used MuHV-4 in order to improve the knowledge about proteins that compose gammaherpesviruses virions. To this...

  16. Murine Gamma-Herpesvirus 68 Hijacks MAVS and IKKβ to Initiate Lytic Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaonan Dong; Hao Feng; Qinmiao Sun; Haiyan Li; Ting-Ting Wu; Ren Sun; Tibbetts, Scott A; Chen, Zhijian J; Pinghui Feng

    2010-01-01

    Upon viral infection, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS)-IKKbeta pathway is activated to restrict viral replication. Manipulation of immune signaling events by pathogens has been an outstanding theme of host-pathogen interaction. Here we report that the loss of MAVS or IKKbeta impaired the lytic replication of gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68), a model herpesvirus for human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. gammaHV68 infection activated IKKbeta in a MAVS...

  17. The entangled accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estacion Ecologica de Biocosmologia, Pedro de Alvarado, 14, 06411-Medellin (Spain)], E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es; Robles-Perez, Salvador [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estacion Ecologica de Biocosmologia, Pedro de Alvarado, 14, 06411-Medellin (Spain)

    2009-08-31

    Using the known result that the nucleation of baby universes in correlated pairs is equivalent to spacetime squeezing, we show in this Letter that there exists a T-duality symmetry between two-dimensional warp drives, which are physically expressible as localized de Sitter little universes, and two-dimensional Tolman-Hawking and Gidding-Strominger baby universes respectively correlated in pairs, so that the creation of warp drives is also equivalent to spacetime squeezing. Perhaps more importantly, it has been also seen that the nucleation of warp drives entails a violation of the Bell's inequalities, and hence the phenomena of quantum entanglement, complementarity and wave function collapse. These results are generalized to the case of any dynamically accelerating universe filled with dark or phantom energy whose creation is also physically equivalent to spacetime squeezing and to the violation of the Bell's inequalities, so that the universe we are living in should be governed by essential sharp quantum theory laws and must be a quantum entangled system.

  18. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, S. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    2012-10-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium), and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  19. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  20. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  1. Accelerating quantum universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmichev, V E

    2007-01-01

    The exactly solvable quantum model of the homogeneous, isotropic and closed universe filled with a uniform scalar field and a perfect fluid which defines a reference frame is considered. The equations of the model are reduced to the form which allows a direct comparison between them and the equations of the Einstein classical theory of gravity. It is shown that matter in the universe has a component in a form of a condensate of massive zero-momentum excitation quanta of oscillations of a primordial scalar field which behaves as an antigravitating medium. The theory predicts an accelerating expansion of the universe even if the vacuum energy density vanishes. An antigravitating effect of a condensate has a purely quantum nature. It is ensured by quantum transitions between close states of the universe with different masses of a condensate. It is shown that in a state with large quantum numbers (in semi-classical approximation) the universe has to look effectively like spatially flat with a deceleration paramet...

  2. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations. Fifty candles for CERN, an international laboratory renowned for fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting exhibitions of plastic arts and performances entitled: Accelerated Particles. Several works will be exhibited and performed in two 'salons'. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts From Tues 12 October to Wed 3 November 2004 Tuesdays to Fridays: 16:00 to 19:00 Saturdays: 14:00 to 18:00 Exhibition open late on performance nights, entrance free Salon des particules: Musical and visual performances Tues 12 and Mon 25 October from 20:00 to 23:00 Preview evening for both events: Tues 12 October from 18:...

  3. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. The fiftieth anniversary of a world famous organization like CERN, an international laboratory specializing in fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting two "salons" consisting of an exhibition of plastic arts and evenings of music and visual arts performances with the collective title of "Accelerated Particles". Several works will be exhibited and performed. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts Until Wednesday 3 November 2004. Tuesdays to Fridays: 4.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. Saturdays: 2.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. Doors open late on the evening of the performances. Salon des ...

  4. The entangled accelerating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the known result that the nucleation of baby universes in correlated pairs is equivalent to spacetime squeezing, we show in this Letter that there exists a T-duality symmetry between two-dimensional warp drives, which are physically expressible as localized de Sitter little universes, and two-dimensional Tolman-Hawking and Gidding-Strominger baby universes respectively correlated in pairs, so that the creation of warp drives is also equivalent to spacetime squeezing. Perhaps more importantly, it has been also seen that the nucleation of warp drives entails a violation of the Bell's inequalities, and hence the phenomena of quantum entanglement, complementarity and wave function collapse. These results are generalized to the case of any dynamically accelerating universe filled with dark or phantom energy whose creation is also physically equivalent to spacetime squeezing and to the violation of the Bell's inequalities, so that the universe we are living in should be governed by essential sharp quantum theory laws and must be a quantum entangled system.

  5. LHC Dipoles Accelerate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Andrezej Siemko (left), Peter Sievers (centre), and Lucio Rossi (right), have the exciting challenge of preparing and testing 2000 magnets for the LHC. The LHC is going to require a lot of powerful magnets by the time it begins operation in 2006. More specifically, it is going to need 130 special magnets, 400 quadrupoles, and a whopping 1250 dipoles! Preparing and testing these magnets for the conditions they will encounter in the LHC is not an easy task. But evaluation of the most recently received magnet, from the German company Noell, is showing that while the monumental task of receiving and testing nearly 2000 magnets is going to be exhausting, the goals are definitely attainable. At the moment and over the next year, pre-series magnets (the magnets that CERN uses to fine tune performance) are arriving slowly (90 in total will arrive), but by 2003 the rate of series magnet arrival will accelerate to 9 per week, that's over 450 in a single year! And working with these magnets when they arrive is tough. ...

  6. Pulsed Superconductivity Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Liepe, M

    2000-01-01

    The design of the proposed linear collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities, operated in pulsed mode. Within the framework of an international collaboration the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) has been set up at DESY, providing the infrastructure for cavity R&D towards higher gradients. More than 60 nine-cell cavities were tested, accelerating gradients as high as 30 MV/m were measured. In the second production of TTF-cavities the average gradient was measured to be 24.7 MV/m. Two modules, each containing eight resonators, are presently used in the TTF-linac. These cavities are operated in pulsed mode: 0.8 ms constant gradient with up to 10 Hz repetitions rate. We will focus on two aspects: Firstly, the cavity fabrication and treatment is discussed, allowing to reach high gradients. Latest results of single cell cavities will be shown, going beyond 40 MV/m. Secondly, the pulsed mode operation of superconducting cavities is reviewed. This includes Lorentz force detuning, mechanic...

  7. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  8. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  9. Heavy ion accelerators at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the Unilac heavy ion linear accelerator at GSI, Darmstadt is given. A schematic overall plan view of the Unilac is shown and its systems are described. List of isotopes and intensities accelerated at the Unilac is presented. The experimental possibilities at GSI should be considerably extended by a heavy ion synchrotron (SIS 18) in combination with an experimental storage ring (ESR). A prototype of the rf-accelerating system of the synchrotron has been built and tested. Prototypes for the quadrupole and dipole magnets for the ring are being constructed. The SIS 18 is desigmed for a maximum magnetic rigidity of 18Tm so that neon can be accelerated to 2 GeV/W and uranium to 1 GeV/u. The design allows also the acceleration of protons up to 4.5 GeV. The ESR permits to storage fully stripped uranium ions up to an energy of approximately R50 MeV/u

  10. Industrial accelerators and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hamm, Marianne E

    2012-01-01

    This unique new book is a comprehensive review of the many current industrial applications of particle accelerators, written by experts in each of these fields. Readers will gain a broad understanding of the principles of these applications, the extent to which they are employed, and the accelerator technology utilized. The book also serves as a thorough introduction to these fields for non-experts and laymen. Due to the increased interest in industrial applications, there is a growing interest among accelerator physicists and many other scientists worldwide in understanding how accelerators are used in various applications. The government agencies that fund scientific research with accelerators are also seeking more information on the many commercial applications that have been or can be developed with the technology developments they are funding. Many industries are also doing more research on how they can improve their products or processes using particle beams.

  11. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass $m$ has the upper limit $\\mathcal{A}_m=2mc^3/\\hbar$. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to $\\mathcal{A}_m$ and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  12. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  13. The ISAC post-accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  14. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  15. Ion sources for electrostatic accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maybe the most important part of an electrostatic accelerator system, and also often the most tricky part is the ion source. There has been a rapid growth in activity in ion-source research and development during the last two to three decades. Some of these developments have also been of benefit to electrostatic accelerator users. In this report some of the different types of ion sources used in electrostatic accelerators are described. The list is not complete but more an overview of some of the more commonly used sources. The description is divided into two groups; positive ion sources for single stage electrostatic accelerators and negative ion sources for two stages (i.e. tandem) accelerators

  16. Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2013-01-01

    We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

  17. Accelerated coffee pulp composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, G; Olguín, E J; Mercado, G

    1999-02-01

    The effect of two abundant, easily available and very low-cost agro-industrial organic residues, i.e., filter cake from the sugar industry and poultry litter, on the composting stabilization time of coffee pulp and on the quality of the produced compost, was evaluated. Piles of one cubic meter were built and monitored within the facilities of a coffee processing plant in the Coatepec region of the State of Veracruz, Mexico. Manual aeration was carried out once a week. A longer thermophilic period (28 days) and a much lower C/N ratio (in the range of 6.9-9.1) were observed in the piles containing the amendments, as compared to the control pile containing only coffee pulp (14 days and a C/N ratio of 14.4, respectively). The maximum assimilation rate of the reducing sugars was 1.6 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.5 to 5.3%) during the first two weeks when accelerators were present in the proportion of 20% filter cake plus 20% poultry litter, while they accumulated at a rate of 1.2 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.4 to 9.13%) during the same period in the control pile. The best combination of amendments was 30% filter cake with 20% poultry litter, resulting in a final nitrogen content as high as 4.81%. The second best combination was 20% filter cake with 10% poultry litter, resulting in a compost which also contained a high level of total nitrogen (4.54%). It was concluded that the use of these two residues enhanced the composting process of coffee pulp, promoting a shorter stabilization period and yielding a higher quality of compost.

  18. Operation of the accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, R.C.; Batzka, B.; Billquist, P.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 was the first year of seven-day operation since ATLAS became a national user facility in 1985. ATLAS made the most of the opportunity this year by providing 5200 hours of beam on-target to the research program. A record number of 60 experiments were completed and the {open_quotes}facility reliability{close_quotes} remained near the 90% level. Seven-day operation was made possible with the addition to the staff of two operator positions providing single-operator coverage during the weekend period. The normally scheduled coverage was augmented by an on-call list of system experts who respond to emergencies with phone-in advice and return to the Laboratory when necessary. This staffing approach continues but we rearranged our staffing patterns so that we now have one cryogenics engineer working a shift pattern which includes 8-hour daily coverage during the weekend. ATLAS provided a beam mix to users consisting of 26 different isotopic species, 23% of which were for A>100 in FY 1994. Approximately 60% of the beam time was provided by the Positive Ion Injector, slightly less than the usage rate of FY 1993. Experiments using uranium or lead beams accounted for 16.4% of the total beam time. The ECR ion source and high-voltage platform functioned well throughout the year. A new technique for solid material production in the source was developed which uses a sputtering process wherein the sample of material placed near the plasma chamber wall is biased negatively. Plasma ions are accelerated into the sample and material is sputtered from the surface into the plasma. This technique is now used routinely for many elements. Runs of calcium, germanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, and uranium were carried out with this technique.

  19. Accelerating DSMC data extraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2006-10-01

    In many direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations, the majority of computation time is consumed after the flowfield reaches a steady state. This situation occurs when the desired output quantities are small compared to the background fluctuations. For example, gas flows in many microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have mean speeds more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal speeds of the molecules themselves. The current solution to this problem is to collect sufficient samples to achieve the desired resolution. This can be an arduous process because the error is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of samples so we must, for example, quadruple the samples to cut the error in half. This work is intended to improve this situation by employing more advanced techniques, from fields other than solely statistics, for determining the output quantities. Our strategy centers on exploiting information neglected by current techniques, which collect moments in each cell without regard to one another, values in neighboring cells, nor their evolution in time. Unlike many previous acceleration techniques that modify the method itself, the techniques examined in this work strictly post-process so they may be applied to any DSMC code without affecting its fidelity or generality. Many potential methods are drawn from successful applications in a diverse range of areas, from ultrasound imaging to financial market analysis. The most promising methods exploit relationships between variables in space, which always exist in DSMC due to the absence of shocks. Disparate techniques were shown to produce similar error reductions, suggesting that the results shown in this report may be typical of what is possible using these methods. Sample count reduction factors of approximately three to five were found to be typical, although factors exceeding ten were shown on some variables under some techniques.

  20. "small ACCELERATORS" 24 May - 2 June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CERN Accelerator School and Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) Groningen, the Netherlands announce a course on "Small Accelerators", Hotel Golden Tulip Drenthe, Zeegse, the Netherlands, 24 May - 2 June 2005. This specialised course is dedicated to the physics and the main applications of small accelerators. The course will review the different accelerator types as well as their specificities in terms of accelerator physics.

  1. Application of electron accelerator worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electron accelerator is an important radiation source for radiation technology, which covers broad fields such as industry, health care, food and environmental protection. There are about 1,000 electron accelerators for radiation processing worldwide. Electron accelerator has advantage over Co-60 irradiator in term of high dose rate and power, assurance of safety, and higher economic performance at larger volume of irradiation. Accelerator generating higher energy in the range of 10 MeV and high power electron beam is now commercially available. There is a trend to use high-energy electron accelerator replacing Co-60 in case of large through-put of medical products. Irradiated foods, in particular species, are on the commercial market in 35 countries. Electron accelerator is used efficiently and economically for production of new or modified polymeric materials through radiation-induced cross-linking, grafting and polymerization reaction. Another important application of electron beam is the curing of surface coatings in the manufacture of products. Electron accelerators of large capacity are used for cleaning exhaust gases in industrial scale. Economic feasibility studies of this electron beam process have shown that this technology is more cost effective than the conventional process. It should be noted that the conventional limestone process produce gypsum as a by-product, which cannot be used in some countries. By contrast, the by-product of the electron beam process is a valuable fertilizer. (Y. Tanaka)

  2. Application of electron accelerator worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron accelerator is an important radiation source for radiation technology, which covers broad fields such as industry, health care, food and environmental protection. There are about 1,000 electron accelerators for radiation processing worldwide. Electron accelerator has advantage over Co-60 irradiator in term of high dose rate and power, assurance of safety, and higher economic performance at larger volume of irradiation. Accelerator generating higher energy in the range of 10 MeV and high power electron beam is now commercially available. There is a trend to use high-energy electron accelerator replacing Co-60 in case of large through-put of medical products. Irradiated foods, in particular species, are on the commercial market in 35 countries. Electron accelerator is used efficiently and economically for production of new or modified polymeric materials through radiation-induced cross-linking, grafting and polymerization reaction. Another important application of electron beam is the curing of surface coatings in the manufacture of products. Electron accelerators of large capacity are used for cleaning exhaust gases in industrial scale. Economic feasibility studies of this electron beam process have shown that this technology is more cost effective than the conventional process. It should be noted that the conventional limestone process produce gypsum as a by-product, which cannot be used in some countries. By contrast, the by-product of the electron beam process is a valuable fertilizer. (Y. Tanaka)

  3. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  4. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  5. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The US-CERN-JAPAN-RUSSIA Joint International Accelerator School is organising a course on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection to be held in Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November, 2014.    This school is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design, construction, and/or operation of accelerators with high power photon or particle beams and/or accelerator sub-systems with large stored energy. Application deadlines are 15 August and 4 September. Further information on this Joint School can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/JAS/Newport%20Beach%202014/NPBadvert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/287647/ http://uspas.fnal.gov/programs/JAS/JAS14.shtml

  6. CAS CERN Accelerator School second advanced accelerator physics course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced course on general accelerator physics given in West Berlin closely followed that organised by the CERN Accelerator School at Oxford in September 1985 and whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Report 87-03 (1987). However, certain subjects were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while some new ones were introduced and it is all of these which are included in the present proceedings. The lectures include particle-photon interactions, high-brilliance lattices and single/multiple Touschek effect, while the seminars are on the major accelerators presently under construction or proposed for the near future, applications of synchrotron radiation, free-electron lasers, cosmic accelerators and crystal beams. Also included are errata, and addenda to some of the lectures, of CERN 87-03. (orig.)

  7. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Stochastic modeling of Lagrangian accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy

    2002-11-01

    It is shown how Sawford's second-order Lagrangian stochastic model (Phys. Fluids A 3, 1577-1586, 1991) for fluid-particle accelerations can be combined with a model for the evolution of the dissipation rate (Pope and Chen, Phys. Fluids A 2, 1437-1449, 1990) to produce a Lagrangian stochastic model that is consistent with both the measured distribution of Lagrangian accelerations (La Porta et al., Nature 409, 1017-1019, 2001) and Kolmogorov's similarity theory. The later condition is found not to be satisfied when a constant dissipation rate is employed and consistency with prescribed acceleration statistics is enforced through fulfilment of a well-mixed condition.

  9. Particle acceleration in modified shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient particle acceleration in shocks must modify the shock structure with consequent changes in the particle acceleration. This effect is studied and analytic solutions are found describing the diffusive acceleration of particles with momentum independent diffusion coefficients in hyperbolic tangent type velocity transitions. If the input particle spectrum is a delta function, the shock smoothing replaces the truncated power-law downstream particle spectrum by a more complicated form, but one which has a power-law tail at high momenta. For a cold plasma this solution can be made completely self-consistent. Some problems associated with momentum dependent diffusion coefficients are discussed. (author)

  10. Electromagnetic acceleration of permanent magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dolya, S N

    2015-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of the permanent magnets, consisting of neodymium iron boron by means of the running magnetic field gradient. It is shown that the specific magnetic moment per nucleon in neodymium iron boron is determined by the remained magnetization of the substance. The maximum accessable gradient of the magnetic field accelerating the permanent magnets is determined by the coercive force thirty kilogauss. For the neodymium iron boron magnets this gradient is equal to twenty kilogauss divided by one centimeter. The finite velocity of the magnets six kilometers per second, the length of acceleration is six hundred thirty-seven meters.

  11. The wake field acceleration mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wake fields of dense bunches of relativistic electrons are used to accelerate secondary beams of positrons and electrons. The basic principle is the transformation of wake forces by means of geometric structures with different impedances at different locations. In such wake field transformers beams of a few GeV energy can accelerate secondary beams to ten times the energy of the driving particles. Two 50 GeV colliding beam linear accelerators based on this mechanism occupy less than 1300 meters total length. (orig.)

  12. New type of collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collective accelerator based on magnetically confined plasma rings is described. Typical rings which have been produced and which have 10 kJ magnetic energy and 0.1 to 10 coulombs of nuclei are predicted to be accelerated magnetically to 10 MJ or higher in acceleration lengths of 100 m if the final power delivered to the ring is 1012 W. Applications are discussed of current drive in Tokamak fusion reactions, fueling and heating magnetic fusion reactors, transuranic element synthesis, and, for focused rings, a high energy density driver for inertial confinement fusion

  13. Oncovirus Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) represses tumor suppressor PDLIM2 to persistently activate nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and STAT3 transcription factors for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fan; Xiao, Yadong; Qu, Zhaoxia

    2015-03-20

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most common cause of malignancies among AIDS patients. However, how KSHV induces tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that one important mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of KSHV is through transcriptional repression of the tumor suppressor gene PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2). PDLIM2 expression is repressed in KSHV-transformed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells as well as in KSHV-associated cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Importantly, PDLIM2 repression is essential for KSHV-induced persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and subsequent tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance. Our mechanistic studies indicate that PDLIM2 repression by KSHV involves DNA methylation. Notably, the epigenetic repression of PDLIM2 can be reversed by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and vitamin D to suppress KSHV-associated cancer cell growth. These studies not only improve our understanding of KSHV pathogenesis but also provide immediate therapeutic strategies for KSHV-mediated cancers, particularly those associated with AIDS.

  14. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio Alessandro; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators is dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency (RF) accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV/m gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional RF structures. However, laser-driven electron accelerators require intense sources and suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here, we demonstrate the first linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically-generated terahertz (THz) pulses. THz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. Increasing the operational frequency of accelerators into the THz band allows for greatly increased accelerating ...

  15. SNEAP 80: symposium of Northeastern Accelerator personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports of operations are presented for twenty-seven facilities, along with reports on accelerators in progress, ion sources, insulating gases, charging systems, stripping foils, accelerating tubes, and upgraded accelerator systems

  16. SNEAP 80: symposium of Northeastern Accelerator personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billen, J.H. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Reports of operations are presented for twenty-seven facilities, along with reports on accelerators in progress, ion sources, insulating gases, charging systems, stripping foils, accelerating tubes, and upgraded accelerator systems. (GHT)

  17. Accelerator technology working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented of workshop deliberations on basic scaling, the economic viability of laser drive power for HEP accelerators, the availability of electron beam injectors for near-term experiments, and a few very general remarks on technology issues

  18. 1988 linear accelerator conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers presented at the 1988 Linear Accelerator Conference. A few topics covered are beam dynamics; beam transport; superconducting components; free electron lasers; ion sources; and klystron research

  19. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  20. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gluckstern, R. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Ko, K.; Kroll, N. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  1. Quantum aspects of accelerator optics

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Present understanding of accelerator optics is based mainly on classical mechanics and electrodynamics. In recent years quantum theory of charged-particle beam optics has been under development. In this paper the newly developed formalism is outlined.

  2. Electrodynamics acceleration of electrical dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolya, S N

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the acceleration of electric dipoles consisting of thin metal plates and dielectric (barium titanate). The dipoles are of a cylindrical shape with a diameter of the cylinder two centimeters and length one centimeter. Capacity of the parallel-plate capacitor is three hundred picofarads and it is charged up to the voltage of two hundred eighty kilovolts. Pre-acceleration of the electric dipoles till velocity one kilometer per second is reached by the gas-dynamic method. The finite acceleration is produced in a spiral waveguide, where the pulse is travelling with voltage amplitude seven hundreds kilovolts and power one hundred twenty-five megawatts. This pulse travels via the spiral waveguide and accelerates the injected electric dipoles in the longitudinal direction till the finite velocity eight and a half kilometers per second over length seven hundred and seventy meters.

  3. drift tube for linear accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    A drift tube from the Linac 1. This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  4. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  5. Prototype of industrial electrons accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest and the necessity of Mexico's industry in the use of irradiation process has been increased in the last years. As examples are the irradiation of combustion gases (elimination of NOx and SO2) and the polymer cross-linking between others. At present time at least twelve enterprises require immediately of them which have been contacted by electron accelerators suppliers of foreign countries. The first project step consisted in to identify the electrons accelerator type that in can be constructed in Mexico with the major number of possible equipment, instruments, components and acquisition materials local and useful for the major number of users. the characteristics of the accelerator prototype are: accelerator type transformer with multiple secondary insulated and rectifier circuits with a potential of 0.8 MV of voltage, the second step it consisted in an economic study that permitted to demonstrate the economic feasibility of its construction. (Author)

  6. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  7. Particle accelerator; the Universe machine

    CERN Multimedia

    Yurkewicz, Katie

    2008-01-01

    "In summer 2008, scientists will switch on one of the largest machines in the world to search for the smallest of particle. CERN's Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator has the potential to chagne our understanding of the Universe."

  8. IGBT accelerated aging data set.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Preliminary data from thermal overstress accelerated aging using the aging and characterization system. The data set contains aging data from 6 devices, one device...

  9. Accelerated Development of Organizational Talent

    OpenAIRE

    Korotov, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    This working paper explores the challenges of accelerated development of organizational talent. The meaning of the word "accelerated" is that such development takes place at a pace that is significantly higher than that of "traditional" development that allows an individual to learn the intricacies of the current job, observe incumbents in a higher level position (usually, one level up), practice elements of the boss' job when being delegated tasks, undergoing formal training, or benefiting f...

  10. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics...

  11. Caianiello's maximal acceleration. Recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Papini, G.

    2004-01-01

    A quantum mechanical upper limit on the value of particle accelerations is consistent with the behavior of a class of superconductors and well known particle decay rates. It also sets limits on the mass of the Higgs boson and affects the stability of compact stars. In particular, type-I superconductors in static conditions offer an example of a dynamics in which acceleration has an upper limit.

  12. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  13. Particle accelerators and scientific culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical review of fifty years of physics around particle accelerators, from the first nuclear reactions produced by beams of artificially accelerated particles to the large multinational projects now under discussion. The aim is to show how our description of natural phenomena has been shaped by advances in theoretical understanding, the development of new techniques, and the characters of men. Large use has been made of quotations from many of the scientists involved. (Auth.)

  14. Particle accelerators and scientific culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical review of fifty years of physics around particle accelerators, from the first nuclear reactions produced by beams of artificially accelerated particles to the large multinational projects now under discussion. The aim is to show how the description of natural phenomena has been shaped by advances in theoretical understanding, the development of new techniques, and the characters of men. Large use has been made of quotations from many of the scientists involved. (Auth.)

  15. The Beta Tech electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After describing the background of the Swedish Electron Sterilization Centre, the proposed linear accelerator sterilization plant is outlined. The accelerator will produce electrons of energy 10 MeV and a beam power of 30 KW. The handling system, control and identification systems are also described. Documentation will be designed around a bar code system on line to a computer. The various uses of dosimetry in plant performance and process control are described. (U.K.)

  16. Dark Energy or local acceleration?

    CERN Document Server

    Feoli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We find that an observer with a suitable acceleration relative to the frame comoving whit the cosmic fluid, in the context of the FRW decelerating universe, measures the same cosmological redshift as the LambdaCDM model. The estimated value of this acceleration is beta = 1.4x10^-9m/s^2. The problem of a too high peculiar velocity can be solved assuming, for the observer, a sort of helical motion.

  17. The acceleration of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of acceleration mechanisms are discussed including stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, laminar shock acceleration and acceleration by shocks in scattering media. The self-consistent problem is analysed and it is concluded that provided the cosmic rays are scattered effectively and provided energy losses are not too severe, they can be very efficiently accelerated by shock waves in the interstellar medium. (C.F.)

  18. Test accelerator for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEK has proposed to build Test Accelerator Facility (TAF) capable of producing a 2.5 GeV electron beam for the purpose of stimulating R ampersand D for linear collider in TeV region. The TAF consists of a 1.5 GeV S-band linear accelerator, 1.5 GeV damping ring and 1.0 GeV X-band linear accelerator. The TAF project will be carried forward in three phases. Through Phase-I and Phase-II, the S-band and X-band linacs will be constructed, and in Phase-III, the damping ring will be completed. The construction of TAF Phase-I has started, and the 0.2 GeV S-band injector linac has been almost completed. The Phase-I linac is composed of a 240 keV electron gun, subharmonic bunchers, prebunchers and traveling buncher followed by high-gradient accelerating structures. The SLAC 5045 klystrons are driven at 450 kV in order to obtain the rf-power of 100 MW in a 1 μs pulse duration. The rf-power from a pair of klystrons are combined into an accelerating structure. The accelerating gradient up to 100 MeV/m will be obtained in a 0.6 m long structure. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Ponderomotive Acceleration by Relativistic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Calvin; Yeh, Po-Chun; Luk, Onnie; McClenaghan, Joseph; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Tajima, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    In the extreme high intensity regime of electromagnetic (EM) waves in plasma, the acceleration process is found to be dominated by the ponderomotive acceleration (PA). While the wakefields driven by the ponderomotive force of the relativistic intensity EM waves are important, they may be overtaken by the PA itself in the extreme high intensity regime when the dimensionless vector potential $a_0$ of the EM waves far exceeds unity. The energy gain by this regime (in 1D) is shown to be (approximately) proportional to $a_0^2$. Before reaching this extreme regime, the coexistence of the PA and the wakefield acceleration (WA) is observed where the wave structures driven by the wakefields show the phenomenon of multiple and folded wave-breakings. Investigated are various signatures of the acceleration processes such as the dependence on the mass ratio for the energy gain as well as the energy spectral features. The relevance to high energy cosmic ray acceleration and to the relativistic laser acceleration is conside...

  20. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  1. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  2. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  3. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  4. CAS Accelerator Physics (RF for Accelerators) in Denmark

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Strasser

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and Aarhus University jointly organised a specialised course on RF for Accelerators, at the Ebeltoft Strand Hotel, Denmark from 8 to 17 June 2010.   Caption The challenging programme focused on the introduction of the underlying theory, the study and the performance of the different components involved in RF systems, the RF gymnastics and RF measurements and diagnostics. This academic part was supplemented with three afternoons dedicated to practical hands-on exercises. The school was very successful, with 100 participants representing 25 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and excellent quality of their lectures. In addition to the academic programme, the participants were able to visit a small industrial exhibition organised by Aarhus University and take part in a one-day excursion consisting of a visit of the accelerators operated ...

  5. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; /Cornell U., LNS; Bates, D.A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wolski, A.; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Schmidt, F.; /CERN; Walker, N.J.; /DESY; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; /Jefferson Lab; Pelaia, T.; /Oak Ridge; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2006-10-06

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator based mass spectrometry (ABMs) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half life and available in small amount. The 14 U D Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out ABMs studies with heavy isotopes like 36Cl and 129I. Cosmogenic radio isotope 36Cl is widely being detected using ABMs as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc. As a part of the ongoing ABMs programme at 14UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has been developed. Further progress made in this programme is discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. CAS CERN Accelerator School third general accelerator physics course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general course on accelerator physics given in Salamanca, Spain, closely followed those organised by the CERN Accelerator School at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris in 1984, and at Aarhus, Denmark in 1986 and whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Reports 85-19 (1985) and 87-10 (1987) respectively. However, certain topics were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while some new ones were introduced and it is all of these which are included in the present proceedings. The lectures include beam-cooling concepts, Liouville's theorem and emittance, emittance dilution in transfer lines, weak-betatron coupling, diagnostics, while the seminars are on positron and electron sources, linac structures and the LEP L3 experiment, together with industrial aspects of particle accelerators. Also included are errata and addenda to the Yellow Reports mentioned above. (orig.)

  8. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Fourth general accelerator physics course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth CERN Accelerator School (CAS) basic course on General Accelerator Physics was given at KFA, Juelich, from 17 to 28 September 1990. Its syllabus was based on the previous similar courses held at Gif-sur-Yvette in 1984, Aarhus 1986, and Salamanca 1988, and whose proceedings were published as CERN Reports 85-19, 87-10, and 89-05, respectively. However, certain topics were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while new subjects were introduced. All of these appear in the present proceedings, which include lectures or seminars on the history and applications of accelerators, phase space and emittance, chromaticity, beam-beam effects, synchrotron radiation, radiation damping, tune measurement, transition, electron cooling, the designs of superconducting magnets, ring lattices, conventional RF cavities and ring RF systems, and an introduction to cyclotrons. (orig.)

  9. CAS CERN Accelerator School. Third advanced accelerator physics course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third version of the CERN Accelerator School's (CAS) advanced course on General Accelerator Physics was given at Uppsala University from 18-29 September, 1989. Its syllabus was based on the previous courses held in Oxford, 1985 and Berlin, 1987 whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Reports 87-03 and 89-01 respectively. However, the opportunity was taken to emphasize the physics of small accelerators and storage rings, to present some topics in new ways, and to introduce new seminars. Thus the lectures contained in the present volume include chromaticity, dynamic aperture, kinetic theory, Landau damping, ion-trapping, Schottky noise, laser cooling and small ring lattice problems while the seminars include interpretation of numerical tracking, internal targets and living with radiation. (orig.)

  10. Industrial Electron Accelerators Type ILU

    CERN Document Server

    Auslender, Vadim; Cheskidov, Vladimir; Faktorovich, Boris; Gorbunov, Vladimir; Gornakov, Igor; Nekhaev, V E; Panfilov, Alexander; Sidorov, Alexander; Tkachenko, Vadim; Tuvik, Alfred; Voronin, Leonid

    2005-01-01

    The report describes the electron accelerators of ILU series covering the energy range from 0.5 to 5 MeV with beam power up to 50 kW. The pulse linear accelerators type ILU are developed since 1970 in Budker institute of Nuclear Physics and are supplied to the industry. The ILU machines are purposed for wide application in various technological processes and designed for long continuous and round-the-clock work in industrial conditions. A principle of acceleration of electrons in the gap of HF resonator is used in the ILU machines. The HF resonator has toroidal form. The electron gun is placed in one of the protruding electrodes forming the accelerating gap of the resonator. The resonator is fed from HF autogenerator realized on the industrial triode, the feedback signal is given from the resonator. The absence of outer beam injection and usage of self-excited HF generator simplify the design of accelerator and ensure its reliable operation.

  11. A variable acceleration calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  12. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P., E-mail: eplee@lbl.gov

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design. After a summary of dynamical considerations, two major topics are addressed here: transportable current limits, which determine the choice of focal system for the linac, and longitudinal control of the beams, which are potentially destabilized by their interaction with the pulsed power system.

  13. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  14. 38 CFR 9.14 - Accelerated Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE AND VETERANS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE § 9.14 Accelerated Benefits. (a) What is an Accelerated Benefit? An Accelerated Benefit is a payment of a portion of your Servicemembers' Group Life...? ____ Yes__ No__ The patient applied for an accelerated benefit under his/her government life...

  15. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects

  16. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  17. Superconducting magnet technology for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review article on superconducting magnets for accelerators should first answer the question, why superconductivity. The answer revolves around two pivotal facts: (1) fields in the range of 2 T to 10 T can be achieved; and (2) the operating cost can be less than conventional magnets. The relative importance of these two factors depends on the accelerator. In the case where an upgrade of an accelerator at an existing facility is planned, the ability to obtain fields higher than conventional magnets leads directly to an increase in machine energy for the given tunnel. In the case of a new facility, both factors must be balanced for the most economical machine. Ways to achieve this are discussed

  18. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  19. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  20. Accelerator science in medical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-12-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  1. Linear accelerator for radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hamm, R.W.; Stovall, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    A 200- to 500-..mu..A source of 70- to 90-MeV protons would be a valuable asset to the nuclear medicine program. A linear accelerator (linac) can achieve this performance, and it can be extended to even higher energies and currents. Variable energy and current options are available. A 70-MeV linac is described, based on recent innovations in linear accelerator technology; it would be 27.3 m long and cost approx. $6 million. By operating the radio-frequency (rf) power system at a level necessary to produce a 500-..mu..A beam current, the cost of power deposited in the radioisotope-production target is comparable with existing cyclotrons. If the rf-power system is operated at full power, the same accelerator is capable of producing an 1140-..mu..A beam, and the cost per beam watt on the target is less than half that of comparable cyclotrons.

  2. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  3. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  4. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  5. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Developments in laser-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hooker, Simon Martin

    2014-01-01

    Laser-driven plasma accelerators provide acceleration gradients three orders of magnitude greater than conventional machines, offering the potential to shrink the length of accelerators by the same factor. To date, laser-acceleration of electron beams to particle energies comparable to those offered by synchrotron light sources has been demonstrated with plasma acceleration stages only a few centimetres long. This article describes the principles of operation of laser-driven plasma accelerators, and reviews their development from their proposal in 1979 to recent demonstrations. The potential applications of plasma accelerators are described and the challenges which must be overcome before they can become a practical tool are discussed.

  7. The Diffusive Shock Acceleration Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is generally accepted that diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) is the dominant mechanism for particle acceleration at shocks. This is despite the overwhelming observational evidence that is contrary to predictions of DSA models. For example, our most recent survey of hourly-averaged, spin-averaged proton distribution functions around 61 locally observed shocks in 2001 at 1 AU found that in 21 cases no particles were accelerated. Spectral indices (γ ) of suprathermal tails on the velocity distributions around the 40 shocks that did accelerate particles, showed none of the DSA-predicted correlations of γ with the shock compression ratio and the shock normal to magnetic field angle. Here we will present ACE/SWICS observations of three sets of 72 consecutive one-hour averaged velocity distributions (in each of 8 SWICS spin sectors). Each set includes passage of one or more shocks or strong compression regions. All spectra were properly transformed to the solar wind frame using the detailed, updated SWICS forward model, taking into account the hourly-averaged directions of the solar wind flow, the magnetic field and the ACE spin axis (http://www.srl.caltech.edu/ACE/ASC/). The suprathermal tails are observed to be a combination of locally accelerated and remote tails. The local tails are power laws. The remote tails are also power laws with rollovers at higher energies. When local tails are weak (as is the case especially upstream of strong shocks or compression regions) the remote tails also have a rollover at low energies due to modulation (transport effects). Among our main findings are that (1) the spectral indices of both the local and remote tails are -5 within the uncertainties of the measurements, as predicted by our pump acceleration mechanism, and (2) the velocity distributions are anisotropic with the perpendicular (to the magnetic field) pressure greater than the parallel pressure.

  8. Harmonic ratcheting for fast acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, N.; Brennan, J. M.; Peggs, S.

    2014-04-01

    A major challenge in the design of rf cavities for the acceleration of medium-energy charged ions is the need to rapidly sweep the radio frequency over a large range. From low-power medical synchrotrons to high-power accelerator driven subcritical reactor systems, and from fixed focus alternating gradient accelerators to rapid cycling synchrotrons, there is a strong need for more efficient, and faster, acceleration of protons and light ions in the semirelativistic range of hundreds of MeV/u. A conventional way to achieve a large, rapid frequency sweep (perhaps over a range of a factor of 6) is to use custom-designed ferrite-loaded cavities. Ferrite rings enable the precise tuning of the resonant frequency of a cavity, through the control of the incremental permeability that is possible by introducing a pseudoconstant azimuthal magnetic field. However, rapid changes over large permeability ranges incur anomalous behavior such as the "Q-loss" and "f-dot" loss phenomena that limit performance while requiring high bias currents. Notwithstanding the incomplete understanding of these phenomena, they can be ameliorated by introducing a "harmonic ratcheting" acceleration scheme in which two or more rf cavities take turns accelerating the beam—one turns on when the other turns off, at different harmonics—so that the radio frequency can be constrained to remain in a smaller range. Harmonic ratcheting also has straightforward performance advantages, depending on the particular parameter set at hand. In some typical cases it is possible to halve the length of the cavities, or to double the effective gap voltage, or to double the repetition rate. This paper discusses and quantifies the advantages of harmonic ratcheting in general. Simulation results for the particular case of a rapid cycling medical synchrotron ratcheting from harmonic number 9 to 2 show that stability and performance criteria are met even when realistic engineering details are taken into consideration.

  9. Electron accelerators for radiation sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial radiation processes using high power electron accelerators are attractive because the throughput rates are very high and the treatment costs per unit of product are often competitive with more conventional chemical processes. The utilization of energy in e-beam processing is more efficient than typical thermal processing. The use of volatiles or toxic chemicals can be avoided. Strict temperature or moisture controls may not be needed. Irradiated materials are usable immediately after processing. These capabilities are unique in that beneficial changes can be induced rapidly in solid materials and preformed products. In recent years, e-beam accelerators have emerged as the preferred alternative for industrial processing as they offer advantages over isotope radiation sources, such as (a) increased public acceptance since the storage, transport and disposal of radioactive material is not an issue; (b) the ability to hook up with the manufacturing process for in-line processing; (c) higher dose rates resulting in high throughputs. During the 1980s and 1990s, accelerator manufacturers dramatically increased the beam power available for high energy equipment. This effort was directed primarily at meeting the demands of the sterilization industry. During this era, the perception that bigger (higher power, higher energy) was always better prevailed, since the operating and capital costs of accelerators did not increase with power and energy as fast as the throughput. High power was needed to maintain low unit costs for the treatment. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, advances in e-beam technology produced new high energy, high power e-beam accelerators suitable for use in sterilization on an industrial scale. These newer designs achieved high levels of reliability and proved to be competitive with gamma sterilization by 60Co and fumigation with EtO. In parallel, technological advances towards 'miniaturization' of accelerators also made it possible to

  10. Plasma-based and novel accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a collection of papers presented at Workshop on Plasma-Based and Novel Accelerators held at National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya, on December 19-20, 1991. Plasma-based accelerators are attracting considerable attention in these days a new, exciting field of plasma applications. The study gives rise to and spurs study of other unique accelerators like laser-based accelerators. The talks in the Workshop encompassed beat-wave accelerator (BWA), plasma wake field accelerator (PWFA), Vp x B accelerator, laser-based accelerators and some novel methods of acceleration. They also covered the topics such as FEL, cluster acceleration and plasma lens. Small scale experiments as those in universities have exhibited brilliant results while larger scale experiments like BWA in Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, and PWFA in KEK start showing significant results as well. (J.P.N.)

  11. State of accelerator for therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Maruhashi, A

    2002-01-01

    21 facilities carry out particle radiotherapy in the world and 6 facilities will start in the next year. They are shown in the table. 6 facilities of them exist in Japan. Small accelerator for proton therapy is developed. The area of them becomes smaller than 100 m sup 2. 5 makers, form, kinds of accelerator, length of track, beam energy of them are shown. States of particle radiotherapy in 4 facilities in Japan are explained by the kinds of particle, energy, beam intensity, time structure and radiation room. The important problems are reconsideration of building and compact rotating gantry. The problems of radiotherapy are explained. (S.Y.)

  12. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors

  13. OpenMP for Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, J C; Stotzer, E J; Hart, A; de Supinski, B R

    2011-03-15

    OpenMP [13] is the dominant programming model for shared-memory parallelism in C, C++ and Fortran due to its easy-to-use directive-based style, portability and broad support by compiler vendors. Similar characteristics are needed for a programming model for devices such as GPUs and DSPs that are gaining popularity to accelerate compute-intensive application regions. This paper presents extensions to OpenMP that provide that programming model. Our results demonstrate that a high-level programming model can provide accelerated performance comparable to hand-coded implementations in CUDA.

  14. Seismic response of linear accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Collette, Christophe; Artoos, Kurt; Guinchard, Michael; Hauviller, Claude

    2010-01-01

    This paper is divided into two parts. The first part presents recent measurements of ground motion in the LHC tunnel at CERN. From these measurements, an update of the ground motion model currently used in accelerator simulations is presented. It contains new features like a model of the lateral motion and the technical noise. In the second part, it is shown how this model can be used to evaluate the seismic response of a linear accelerator in the frequency domain. Then, the approach is valid...

  15. Geometric integration for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a very personal view of the field of geometric integration in accelerator physics-a field where often work of the highest quality is buried in lost technical notes or even not published; one has only to think of Simon van der Meer Nobel prize work on stochastic cooling-unpublished in any refereed journal. So I reconstructed the relevant history of geometrical integration in accelerator physics as much as I could by talking to collaborators and using my own understanding of the field. The reader should not be too surprised if this account is somewhere between history, science and perhaps even fiction

  16. Channel guiding for advanced accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, H.M. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology (United States); Durfee, C.G. III [Institute for Physical Science and Technology (United States); Antonsen, T.M. [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, (United States) 20742; Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    1996-02-01

    The recent demonstration of optical guiding of high intensity laser pulses in plasma waveguides [C. G. Durfee III and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett 71, 2409 (1993)] has opened the way to new advances in the development of compact laser-driven electron particle accelerators. We review plasma waveguide properties relevant to intense pulse guiding and electron acceleration and show that the shock driven channels described here are well suited for stabilization of a large class of laser-plasma instabilities deleterious to high intensity guiding over long distances. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Calorimetry at industrial electron accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Kovacs, A.

    1985-01-01

    Calorimetry is a convenient way to measure doses at industrial electron accelerators, where high absorbed doses (1-100 kGy) are delivered at dose rates of 102-105 Gy s-1 or even higher. Water calorimeters have been used for this purpose for several years, but recently other materials such as grap......Calorimetry is a convenient way to measure doses at industrial electron accelerators, where high absorbed doses (1-100 kGy) are delivered at dose rates of 102-105 Gy s-1 or even higher. Water calorimeters have been used for this purpose for several years, but recently other materials...

  18. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, M A

    2013-01-01

    We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire "ECLOUD" series [122]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  19. Thermodynamics of Accelerating Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Appels, Michael; Kubiznak, David

    2016-01-01

    We address a long-standing problem of describing the thermodynamics of a charged accelerating black hole. We derive a standard first law of black hole thermodynamics, with the usual identification of entropy proportional to the area of the event horizon -- even though the event horizon contains a conical singularity. This result not only extends the applicability of black hole thermodynamics to realms previously not anticipated, it also opens a possibility for studying novel properties of an important class of exact radiative solutions of Einstein equations describing accelerated objects. We discuss the thermodynamic volume, stability and phase structure of these black holes.

  20. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  1. Host transcript accumulation during lytic KSHV infection reveals several classes of host responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chandriani

    Full Text Available Lytic infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is associated with an extensive shutoff of host gene expression, mediated chiefly by accelerated mRNA turnover due to expression of the viral SOX protein. We have previously identified a small number of host mRNAs that can escape SOX-mediated degradation. Here we present a detailed, transcriptome-wide analysis of host shutoff, with careful microarray normalization to allow rigorous determination of the magnitude and extent of transcript loss. We find that the extent of transcript reduction represents a continuum of susceptibilities of transcripts to virus-mediated shutoff. Our results affirm that the levels of over 75% of host transcripts are substantially reduced during lytic infection, but also show that another approximately 20% of cellular mRNAs declines only slightly (less than 2-fold during the course of infection. Approximately 2% of examined cellular genes are strongly upregulated during lytic infection, most likely due to transcriptional induction of mRNAs that display intrinsic SOX-resistance.

  2. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Prakash; T S Datta; B P Ajith Kumar; J Antony; P Barua; J Chacko; A Choudhury; G K Chadhari; S Ghosh; S Kar; S A Krishnan; Manoj Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; A Mandal; D S Mathuria; R S Meena; R Mehta; K K Mistri; A Pandey; M V Suresh Babu; B K Sahu; A Sarkar; S S K Sonti; A Rai; S Venkatramanan; J Zacharias; R K Bhowmik; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed sufficiently. Details of the entire accelerator system including the cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indigenously, and present status of the project are presented.

  3. Essay: Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  4. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development

  5. Geometrically focused neutral beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A more reliable 40 kV, 65 A power supply drain at 0.4 A/cm2, neutral-beam accelerator was developed for the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). Multiple slotted aperture grids of 60% transparency are fabricated from refractory metal wires mounted to form a spherical surface. This geometrically focuses the beam by aiming individual beamlets at the center of curvature of the spherical grid (r = 3.2 m). We attain greater reliability and faster conditioning with geometrical focusing than with the previous technique of electrostatically steering beamlets to a common point. Electrostatic steering, accomplished by offsetting grid wires, is satisfactory if the offset of a beamlet is much less than the distance from the beamlet to the grids. It was found that Pierce Angle entrance grids performed better if sharper edged. A redesigned accelerator grid support structure reduced the number of ceramic-to-metal vacuum joints, and eliminated O rings between precisely aligned parts. The suppressor grid feedthrough is required to withstand a maximum voltage of 15 kV occurring during breakdown, greatly exceeding the operating voltage of 1.5 kV. Convenient fabrication and assembly techniques have been developed. Assembly of accelerators and plasma sources in a clean room appears to reduce the conditioning time. Following the successful testing of the prototype, eight 40 kV accelerators were built for TMX. Furthermore, ten 20 kV versions were built that are modifiable to 40 kV by exchanging the entrance grid

  6. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  7. Repair of overheating linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkley, Walter; Baldwin, William; Bennett, Gloria; Bitteker, Leo; Borden, Michael; Casados, Jeff; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Gorman, Fred; Johnson, Kenneth; Kurennoy, Sergey; Martinez, Alberto; O’Hara, James; Perez, Edward; Roller, Brandon; Rybarcyk, Lawrence; Stark, Peter; Stockton, Jerry

    2004-01-01

    Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a proton accelerator that produces high energy particle beams for experiments. These beams include neutrons and protons for diverse uses including radiography, isotope production, small feature study, lattice vibrations and material science. The Drift Tube Linear Accelerator (DTL) is the first portion of a half mile long linear section of accelerator that raises the beam energy from 750 keV to 100 MeV. In its 31st year of operation (2003), the DTL experienced serious issues. The first problem was the inability to maintain resonant frequency at full power. The second problem was increased occurrences of over-temperature failure of cooling hoses. These shortcomings led to an investigation during the 2003 yearly preventative maintenance shutdown that showed evidence of excessive heating: discolored interior tank walls and coper oxide deposition in the cooling circuits. Since overheating was suspected to be caused by compromised heat transfer, improving that was the focus of the repair effort. Investigations revealed copper oxide flow inhibition and iron oxide scale build up. Acid cleaning was implemented with careful attention to protection of the base metal, selection of components to clean and minimization of exposure times. The effort has been very successful in bringing the accelerator through a complete eight month run cycle allowing an incredible array of scientific experiments to be completed this year (2003-2004). This paper will describe the systems, investigation analysis, repair, return to production and conclusion.

  8. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stygar, William A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cuneo, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Headley, Daniel I. (Albuquerque, NM); Ives, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell (Albuquerque, NM); Leeper, Ramon J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM); Porter, John L. (Sandia Park, NM); Wagoner; Tim C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  9. Calorimetry at industrial electron accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Kovacs, A.

    1985-01-01

    Calorimetry is a convenient way to measure doses at industrial electron accelerators, where high absorbed doses (1-100 kGy) are delivered at dose rates of 102-105 Gy s-1 or even higher. Water calorimeters have been used for this purpose for several years, but recently other materials such as...

  10. Advanced Accelerator Applications in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    besides the original purpose on development of particle acceleratora as research tools in nuclear and high-energy physics, there are large variety of accelerators used in various fileds from fundamental research to industrial usesand applications chemistry, biology and medicine. Pratical accelators used in various field of medical applications since serveral decades. Even through, a large fraction of applications is emphasized on cancer therappy, the number of accelerators used in midicine for other diagnostics and treatments has increased steady over the years. Several types of accelerated particles are used including electron, proton, neutron and ions. Presently, relativistic electron beams and radiation from linear accelerators (linas) are widely used. A combination of positron emission tomography (PRT) and radiotherapy is an example of excellent invention early detection and treat of cancer tumors. The most developments for proton and heavy ion therapy as well as a modern boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are also great incoming effective systems. This talk will focus on developments of the accelrator systems as well as overview on biophysical properties and medical aspects of the diacnostics and treatments.

  11. Accelerating cosmology in Rastall's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Capone, Monica; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to look for a viable mechanism leading to a present day accelerated expansion, we investigate the possibility that the observed cosmic speed up may be recovered in the framework of the Rastall's theory, relying on the non - conservativity of the stress - energy tensor, i.e. $T^{\\mu}_{\

  12. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Lykken, J D

    2000-01-01

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  13. Cosmological Acceleration from Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marochnik, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the classical gravitational waves of super-horizon wavelengths are able to form the de Sitter accelerated expansion of the empty (with no matter fields) Universe. The contemporary Universe is about 70% empty and asymptotically is going to become completely empty, so the effect caused by emptiness should be already very noticeable. It could manifest itself as the dark energy.

  14. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  15. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  16. Accelerator applications in energy and security

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2015-01-01

    As accelerator science and technology progressed over the past several decades, the accelerators themselves have undergone major improvements in multiple performance factors: beam energy, beam power, and beam brightness. As a consequence, accelerators have found applications in a wide range of fields in our life and in our society. The current volume is dedicated to applications in energy and security, two of the most important and urgent topics in today's world. This volume makes an effort to provide a review as complete and up to date as possible of this broad and challenging subject. It contains overviews on each of the two topics and a series of articles for in-depth discussions including heavy ion accelerator driven inertial fusion, linear accelerator-based ADS systems, circular accelerator-based ADS systems, accelerator-reactor interface, accelerators for fusion material testing, cargo inspection, proton radiography, compact neutron generators and detectors. It also has a review article on accelerator ...

  17. CAS - CERN Accelerator School: Advanced Accelerator Physics Course

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Course on Advanced Accelerator Physics organized by the CERN Accelerator School. The course was held in Trondheim, Norway from 18 to 29 August 2013, in collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Its syllabus was based on previous courses and in particular on the course held in Berlin 2003 whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Report CERN- 2006-002. The field has seen significant advances in recent years and some topics were presented in a new way and other topics were added. The lectures were supplemented with tutorials on key topics and 14 hours of hands on courses on Optics Design and Corrections, RF Measurement Techniques and Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics. These courses are a key element of the Advanced Level Course.

  18. Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure for a Superconducting Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, Alex; Solyak, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    We are presenting a superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure (STWA) concept, which may prove to be of crucial importance to the International Linear Collider. Compared to the existing design of a TESLA cavity, the traveling wave structure can provide ~20-40% higher accelerating gradient for the same aperture and the same peak surface magnetic RF field. The recently achieved SC structure gradient of 35 MV/m can be increased up to ~50 MV/m with the new STWA structure design. The STWA structure is supposed to be installed into the superconducting resonance ring and is fed by the two couplers with appropriate phase advance to excite a traveling wave inside the structure. The system requires two independent tuners to be able to adjust the cavity and feedback waveguide frequencies and hence to reduce the unwanted backward wave. In this presentation we discuss the structure design, optimization of the parameters, tuning requirements and plans for further development.

  19. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Power converters for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume presents the proceedings of the fifth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School, the subject on this occasion being power converters for particle accelerators. The course started with lectures on the classification and topologies of converters and on the guidelines for achieving high performance. It then went on to cover the more detailed aspects of feedback theory, simulation, measurements, components, remote control, fault diagnosis and equipment protection as well as systems and grid-related problems. The important topics of converter specification, procurement contract management and the likely future developments in semiconductor components were also covered. Although the course was principally directed towards DC and slow-pulsed supplies, lectures were added on fast converters and resonant excitation. Finally the programme was rounded off with three seminars on the related fields of Tokamak converters, battery energy storage for electric vehicles, and the control of shaft generators in ships. (orig.)

  20. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Superconductivity in particle accelerators. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the ninth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the topic this time being ''Superconductivity in Particle Accelerators''. This course is basically a repeat of that given at the same location in 1988 whose proceedings were published as CERN 89-04. However, the opportunity was taken to improve the presentation of the various topics and to introduce the latest developments in this rapidly expanding field. First the basic theory of superconductivity is introduced. A review of the materials used for sc magnetics is followed by magnet design requirements, the influence of eddy and persistent currents, and the methods used to provide quench protection. Next follows the basic theory of sc cavities, their materials, high-gradient limitations, the problem of field emission and then their power couplers. After an introduction to cryogenics and cryoplants, the theory of superfluidity is presented followed by a review of the use of superfluid helium. Finally, two seminars detail the impact of superconductors in the design of the LHC and LEP2 accelerators. (orig.)