WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy

  1. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Friedman, William A.; Bova, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1985 and June 1994, 70 adult patients with pathologically confirmed malignant glioma (75% glioblastoma multiforme, 25% anaplastic astrocytoma) suitable for high-dose therapy were selected for treatment with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy, 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total target dose of 60 Gy. Two patients were excluded from analysis (one patient had a fatal pulmonary embolism after 18 Gy; one patient discontinued therapy after 28.5 Gy against medical advice and without sequelae or progression). The 68 patients in the study group had a median age of 52 years and a median Karnofsky performance status of 90. Stereotactic implant ( 125 I) or stereotactic radiosurgery boosts were delivered to 16 patients (24%) in the study group. Minimum follow-up was 6 months. Results: Median survival was 13.8 months and median progression-free survival was 7.4 months. The absolute Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 16% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis for the prognostic impact of age, gender, histology, Karnofsky performance status, symptomatology, surgical resection vs. biopsy, and boost vs nonboost therapy revealed that Karnofsky performance status ≥ 90, boost therapy, and surgical excision predicted significantly improved outcome. No severe toxicity occurred in patients treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, although 5% required steroids temporarily for edema. Progression occurred during treatment in one patient (1.5%). Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy is well tolerated and leads to results comparable with those of standard therapy. The rate of disease progression during treatment is significantly better (p = 0.001) than is reported for patients treated with standard fractionation, with or without chemotherapy. This regimen is a reasonable starting point

  2. Assessment of long-term quality of life of esophageal carcinoma patients treated with continuous accelerated hyperfractionated and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; He Shaoqin; Shi Xuehui; Jiang Kaida; Yao Weiqiang; Wang Ying

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the long-term quality of life in esophageal carcinoma patients treated with continuous accelerated hyperfractionated (CAHF) and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy. Methods: Subjective and Objective Management Analysis (SOMA) scale, Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and Life Satisfaction Index A (LSIA) questionnaire were mailed to the long survivors in both CAHF and LCAF groups to assess the long-term quality of life including symptoms, psychological status and life satisfaction. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in the score of quality of life such as late radiation reaction, SCL-90 and LSI-A. Conclusions: 1. It is reasonable to assess the quality of life with these scales for esophageal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy, 2. Preliminary results demonstrate that there is no significant difference in long-term quality of life between the CAHF and LCAF radiotherapy groups, 3. Methods of evaluating the long-term quality of life for esophageal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy needs further investigation, preferably involving more patients and setting on control arm

  3. Preoperative concurrent CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yosuke; Hatano, Kazuo; Togawa, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Between 1994 and 2000, 28 patients with T3/T4 squamus cell carcinoma of the maxillary region (maxillary sinus, 22; maxillary gingiva, 4; maxillary bone, 1; buccal mucosa, 1) had accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with simultaneous CBDCA chemotherapy preoperatively, at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital. The protocol consisted of combined therapy with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation of 1.6 Gy, twice a day, to a total dose of 32.0-51.2 Gy and concurrent intra-arterial or intravenous infusion of CBDCA 20-30 mg/body/day for a cumulative total dose of 270-480 mg. After completion of the preoperative combined therapy, the clinical CR rate was 17.9%, and the good PR·CR rate was 32.1%. According to the initial findings and response to the combined therapy, all patients had maxillectomy (subtotal, 3; total, 16; extended, 9) 4 weeks after completion of the preoperative combined therapy. Postoperatively, the complete pathologic response (Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification, grade III and IV) rate was 28.6%. And the actuarial local control rate was 85.7%, with a mean follow-up of 46.2 months. Based on these results, we believe this preoperative therapy with CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation is a significant choice as treatment for squamous cell cancer of the maxillary region. (author)

  4. Preoperative concurrent CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Graduate School; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yosuke; Hatano, Kazuo; Togawa, Takashi

    2001-11-01

    Between 1994 and 2000, 28 patients with T3/T4 squamus cell carcinoma of the maxillary region (maxillary sinus, 22; maxillary gingiva, 4; maxillary bone, 1; buccal mucosa, 1) had accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with simultaneous CBDCA chemotherapy preoperatively, at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital. The protocol consisted of combined therapy with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation of 1.6 Gy, twice a day, to a total dose of 32.0-51.2 Gy and concurrent intra-arterial or intravenous infusion of CBDCA 20-30 mg/body/day for a cumulative total dose of 270-480 mg. After completion of the preoperative combined therapy, the clinical CR rate was 17.9%, and the good PR{center_dot}CR rate was 32.1%. According to the initial findings and response to the combined therapy, all patients had maxillectomy (subtotal, 3; total, 16; extended, 9) 4 weeks after completion of the preoperative combined therapy. Postoperatively, the complete pathologic response (Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification, grade III and IV) rate was 28.6%. And the actuarial local control rate was 85.7%, with a mean follow-up of 46.2 months. Based on these results, we believe this preoperative therapy with CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation is a significant choice as treatment for squamous cell cancer of the maxillary region. (author)

  5. Safety and adverse events of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo; Beppu, Naohito; Yanagi, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    We presented good tolerability and short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART; 25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with chemotherapy in a total of 73 patients with lower rectal cancer. Age, gender, tumor differentiation, and the type of surgery seemed to have no apparent effects on toxicity of SC-HART. SC-HART appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. (author)

  6. Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Uterine Cervix Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Seong Yul

    2008-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of the use of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHRT) for locally advanced uterine cervix cancers. Between May 2000 and September 2002, 179 patients were identified with FIGO stage IIB, IIIB, and IVA cancers. Of the 179 patients, 45 patients were treated with AHRT (AHRT group) and 134 patients were treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT group), respectively. Patients undergoing the AHRT regimen received a dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions (1.5 Gyx2 fractions/day) to the whole pelvis. Subsequently, with a midline block, we administered a parametrial boost with a dose of 20 Gy using 2 Gy fractions. Patients also received two courses of low-dose-rate brachytherapy, up to a total dose of 85∼90 Gy to point A. In the CRT group of patients, the total dose to point A was 85∼90 Gy. The overall treatment duration was a median of 37 and 66 days for patients that received AHRT and CRT, respectively. Statistical analysis was calculated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Chi-squared test. For patients that received cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the local control rate at 5 years was 100% and 79.2% for the AHRT and CRT group of patients, respectively (p=0.028). The 5-year survival rate for patients with a stage IIB bulky tumor was 82.6% and 62.1% for the AHRT group and CRT group, respectively (p=0.040). There was no statistically significant difference for severe late toxicity between the two groups (p=0.561). In this study, we observed that treatment with AHRT with concurrent chemotherapy allows a significant advantage of local control and survival for locally advanced uterine cervix cancers

  7. Hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy followed by radical surgery in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, U.; Biertz, I.; Tribius, S.; Alberti, W.; Flinzberg, S.; Schmelzle, R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the outcome of hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy and subsequent planned primary tumor resection and radical neck dissection in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and Methods: this retrospective analysis evaluates 126 subsequent patients who were treated between 1988 and 1997 for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity (with extension into the oropharynx in 17 patients), 34 (27%) AJCC stage III and 92 (73%) stage IV. Primary tumor and nodal metastases were irradiated with 1.4 Gy bid to a median total dose of 72.8 Gy (range 58.8-75.6 Gy). Then, planned radical surgery of the primary site according to the initial tumor extent and cervical nodes was performed. Median follow-up of living patients was 6 years (range 1-11 years). Results: 4 weeks after radiotherapy, 14 patients (11%) had complete tumor remission, 92 (73%) partial remission, 15 (12%) no change, and five (4%) progressive disease. Complete resection was achieved in 117 (93%) patients (nine incomplete resections). 5-year locoregional control rate was 62 ± 9%, overall survival 36 ± 9%. Surgery-related morbidity occurred in 42 patients (33%; mainly delayed wound healing and fistulae), overall severe treatment-related morbidity in 46 patients (36%). 24/84 relapse-free patients (29%) required a percutaneous gastrostomy or nasal tube ≥ 1 year after therapy. Conclusion: in this study, the outcome of combined curative radiotherapy and planned surgery of the primary tumor and neck nodes was comparable to reported results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without salvage surgery of the neck nodes with respect to locoregional control and overall survival. Planned surgery carries a substantial risk of morbidity and seems to offer no benefit in comparison to salvage surgery of the neck nodes only. Therefore, salvage surgery is preferred. (orig.)

  8. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) for Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Toxicity and Survival Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandekar, Prasad [Head and Neck/Thyroid Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harmer, Clive; Barbachano, Yolanda [Department of Clinical Research and Development, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher [Head and Neck-Thyroid Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Chelsea, London (United Kingdom); Newbold, Kate [Head and Neck/Thyroid Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Chelsea, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the current protocol of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy was initiated to improve survival while limiting toxicities. Methods and Materials: All patients with ATC from 1991 to 2002 were accrued and received megavoltage radiotherapy from the mastoid processes to the carina up to 60 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.8 and 2 Gy, 6 hours apart. Results: Thirty-one patients were accrued with a median age of 69 years, and 55% were women. Debulking was performed in 26%, and total thyroidectomy, in 6%, whereas 68% received radical radiotherapy alone. Local control data were available for 27 patients: 22% had a complete response, 26% had a partial response, 15% showed progressive disease, and 37% showed static disease. Median overall survival for all 31 patients was 70 days (95% confidence interval, 40-99). There was no significant difference in median survival between patients younger (70 days) and older than 70 years (42 days), between men (70 days) and women (49days), and between patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (77 days) and radical radiotherapy alone (35 days). Grade III or higher skin erythema was seen in 56% patients; desquamation in 21%; dysphagia in 74%; and esophagitis in 79%. Conclusion: The current protocol failed to offer a significant survival benefit, was associated with severe toxicities, and thus was discontinued. There is a suggestion that younger patients with operable disease have longer survival, but this would require a larger study to confirm it.

  9. Late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LCAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiayun; Liu Taifu; He Shaoqin; Huan Sulan; Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To study the efficacy of late course accelerated fractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The end-points were local control, radiation-induced complications, and factors influencing survival. Patients and methods: Between December 1995 and April 1998, 178 consecutive NPC patients were admitted for radiation treatment. The radiation beam used was 60 Co γ or 6 MV X rays. For the first two-thirds of the treatment, two daily fractions of 1.2 Gy were given to the primary lesion, with an interval of ≥6 h, 5 days per week to a total dose of 48 Gy/40 fractions, over a period of 4 weeks. For the last third of the treatment, i.e., beginning the 5th week of treatment, an accelerated hyperfractionated schedule was carried out. The dose per fraction was increased to 1.5 Gy, 2 fractions per day with an interval of ≥6 h, the total dose for this part of the protocol was 30 Gy/20 fractions over 2 weeks. Thus the total dose was 78 Gy in 60 fractions in 6 weeks. Results: All patients completed the treatment. Acute mucositis: none in 2 cases, Grade 1 in 43 cases, Grade 2 in 78 cases, Grade 3 in 52 cases, and Grade 4 in 3 cases. Local control rate: the 5 year nasopharyngeal local control rate was 87.7%, and the cervical lymph nodes local control rate was 85.7%. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 26.1%, and 5 year survivals were 67.9%, 16 (9%) patients had radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy, 7(4%) patients had temporal lobe or brainstem damage. Conclusions: With this treatment schedule, patients' tolerance was good, local control and 5 year survivals were better than conventional fractionation schedules, and radiation-related late complications did not increase, as 5-year survival rates of conventional fractionation radiotherapy were only 58%. Randomized clinical trials are being carried out to further confirm the efficacy of LCAF for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  10. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Kowalska, T.; Glinski, C.

    2000-01-01

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  11. Continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (chart) in localized cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Melanie E.B.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Saunders, Michele I.; Foy, Christopher J.W.; Dische, Stanley

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) in locoregional control compared with a historical group of patients treated with conventionally fractionated radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1994, 54 patients with localized esophageal cancer were treated with CHART. Twenty-eight patients received CHART alone (54 Gy in 36 fractions over 12 consecutive days) and 15 were given intravenous mitomycin C and cisplatin on days 10 and 13, respectively. Eleven patients received 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions over 9 days, followed by a single high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy insertion of 15 Gy at 1 cm. Results: Acute toxicity was well tolerated and dysphagia was improved in 35 patients (65%), with 28 (52%) eating a normal diet by week 12. This compares with an improvement in dysphagia score in 72% of the conventionally treated group. The median duration of relief of dysphagia was 7.8 months (range 0-41.4) in the CHART group compared with 5.5 months (range 0-48) in the controls. Strictures developed in 29 patients (61%) and 18 were confirmed on biopsy to be due to recurrent disease. Median survival was 12 months (range 0.5-112) in the CHART group and 15 months (range 3.6-56) in the control patients. Conclusion: CHART is well tolerated and achieves a high rate of local control. Palliation in the short overall treatment time of esophageal cancer is an advantage in these patients whose median survival is only 12 months

  12. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  13. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  14. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budach V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX to radiotherapy (RT and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Methods Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in Results Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p Conclusion RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as single drug or combinations of 5-FU with one of the other drugs results in a large survival advantage irrespective the employed radiation schedule. If radiation therapy is used as single modality, hyperfractionation leads to a significant improvement of overall survival. Accelerated radiation therapy alone, especially when given as split course radiation schedule or extremely accelerated treatments with decreased total dose, does not increase overall survival.

  15. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  16. Gemcitabine, cisplatin, and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitter, Matjaz; Kovac, Viljem; Smrdel, Uros; Strojan, Primoz

    2006-09-01

    Due to potent radiosensitization and potential serious or fatal toxicity, concurrent gemcitabine and irradiation should only be applied within clinical trials. We here present experience from a phase I-II clinical trial for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent low-dose gemcitabine. Eligible patients had locally advanced inoperable NSCLC without pleural effusion, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, were chemotherapy naïve and had no previous radiotherapy to the chest, and had adequate hematopoietic, liver, and kidney function. Routine brain computed tomography was not performed, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography was not available. Treatment consisted of three parts: induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in standard doses, local treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Patients were irradiated with opposed AP-PA and oblique fields, using 2.5-D treatment planning. Although corrections for inhomogeneous tissue were made, volume of total lung receiving > or =20 Gy (V20) could not be determined. The trial started as phase I, aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximal tolerated dose (MTD) for concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.4 Gy twice daily) and gemcitabine 55 mg/m twice weekly as a radiosensitizer. Phase II of the trial then continued at the level of MTD. Twenty-eight patients with NSCLC, nine patients with stage IIIA, 16 patients with IIIB, and three patients with an inoperable recurrence after previous surgery, entered the trial. The first 12 patients entered Phase I of the trial at the initial level of 42 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity was acute esophagitis; 47.6 Gy in 34 fractions in 3.5 weeks was the MTD for this regimen of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In phase II of the trial, this dose was applied

  17. Late course accelerated fractionation in radiotherapy of esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, X.-H.; Yao, W.; Liu, T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adding accelerated fractionation after completing two thirds of routine fractionated radiotherapy in esophageal carcinoma.Methods and materials: From April 1988 to April 1990, 85 patients with histologically confirmed carcinoma of the esophagus were randomized into two groups. (1) The conventional fractionation (CF) group, received 1.8 Gy per day five times a week to a total dose of 68.4 Gy in 7-8 weeks, and (2) the late course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) group which received the same schedule as the CF group during the first two thirds of the course of radiotherapy to a dose of 41.4 Gy/23 fx/4 to 5 weeks. This was then followed by accelerated hyperfractionation using reduced fields. In the LCAF portion of the radiotherapeutic course, the irradiation schedule was changed to 1.5 Gy twice a day, with an interval of 4 h between fractions, to a dose of 27 Gy/18 fx. Thus the total dose was also 68.4 Gy, the same as the CF group, but the course of radiotherapy was shorter, being only 6.4 weeks. The same Cobalt 60 teletherapy unit was used to treat all the cases.Results: The 5 year actuarial survival and disease-free survival rates in the LCAF group were 34% and 42%, as compared to 15% and 15% respectively in the CF group, all statistically significant. Better local control was seen in the LCAF group than in the CF group, the 5 year control rates being 55% versus 21% (P=0.003). The acute reactions were increased but acceptable in the LCAF patients, the radiation treatments could be completed without any breaks. The late reactions as observed after 5 years were not increased in comparison with the CF patients.Conclusions: The results from this study show that the late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy regime can improve results in esophageal carcinoma, with acceptable acute reactions as compared to conventional radiotherapy. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and radical surgery in advanced head and neck cancer: A prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, Paula; Valavaara, Ritva; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kulmala, Jarmo; Laine, Juhani; Elomaa, Liisa; Sillanmaeki, Lauri; Minn, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate whether preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) combined with major radical surgery is feasible and successful in the treatment of advanced primary head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Ninety four patients with histologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in the oral cavity (41/96; 43%), supraglottis (14/96; 15%), glottis (5/96; 5%), oropharynx (16/96; 17%), nasal cavity/paranasal sinuses (8/96; 8%), nasopharynx (3/96; 3%), hypopharynx (7/96; 7%) and two (2%) with unknown primary tumour and large cervical lymph nodes entered into the study. 21/96 patients (22%) had stage II, 17/96 (18%) stage III and 58/96 patients (60%) stage IV disease. The patients received preoperative hyperfractionated RT 1.6 Gy twice a day, 5 days a week to a median tumour dose of 63 Gy with a planned break for 11 days (median) after the median dose of 37 Gy. Then, after a median of 27 days the patients underwent major radical surgery of the primary tumour and metastatic lymph nodes including reconstructions with pedicled or microvascular free flaps when indicated as a part of the scheduled therapy. 12/96 patients had only ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissections. Results: After a median follow-up time of 37.2 mos 77/96 (80.2%) patients had complete locoregional control. All but 2 patients had complete histological remission after surgery. 40/96 pts were alive without disease, two of them after salvage surgery. 32/96 patients had relapsed; 15 had locoregional and 13 distant relapses, 4 patients relapsed both locoregionally and distantly. Fifty patients have died; 29 with locoregional and/or distant relapse, eight patients died of second malignancy, and 19 had intercurrent diseases. Disease-specific and overall survival at 3 years was 67.7 and 51%, respectively. Acute grade three mucosal reactions were common, but transient and tolerable. Late grade 3-4 adverse effects were few. Conclusions: Preoperative

  19. Hyperfractionation as an altered fractionation regimen in primary radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, V.; Smichkoska, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of hyperfractionation as altered fractionation treatment schedule in comparison with conventional fractionation in primary definitive radiotherapy for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. From March 1999 to December 2000, a group of 28 patients with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx were irradiated with conventional fractionation to to total doses of 66 to 70 Gy in 33 to 35 fraction/6.5 to 7 weeks, 2 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week. From January 2001 to June 2004, the other 27 patients with the same diagnosis, were treated prospectively with hyperfractionation receiving radiotherapy delivered at 1.2 Gy/fraction, twice daily, 5 days/week to 74.4 to 79.2 Gy/62 to fractions/6.2 to 7 weeks. Complete response rates after two mounts of radiotherapy completion were 78.6% (22 of 28) and 66.7% (18 of 27) in the conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation group, respectively (Fisher exact test; P=0.246). The two year loco-regional control rates were 61 .0%±18.1 (95% CI) in the conventional fractionation group and 45.0%±18.8 (95% CI) in the hyperfractionation group (long-rank test; P=0.075). Overall survival rate at two years was 71.0%±16.8 (95% CI) for the conventional group and 43.0%±18.7 (95% CI) for the hyperfractionation group (long- rank test; P=0.071). The absence of statistically significant differences either in loco-regional control or overall survival observed between the two treatment modalities suggested that hyperfractionation regimen was not more efficacious than conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for previously untreated carcinoma of the larynx.

  20. Angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy: experience with hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigenberg, Steven J.; Price Mendenhall, Nancy; Reith, John D.; Ward, Jon R.; Copeland, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report our promising results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) in conjunction with surgery for angiosarcoma occurring after breast-conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Since 1997, 3 cases of angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy have been managed at the University of Florida. The histologic specimens in each case were reviewed and graded by one of us (J.D.R.). Results: Explosive growth of discolored skin lesions coincident with histologic evidence of angiosarcoma characterized all 3 cases but was preceded by a fairly indolent period (almost 2 years) of atypical vascular hyperplasia in 2 patients. All 3 patients were treated initially with radical surgery for the angiosarcoma, but extensive recurrences were noted within 1 to 2 months of surgery. Because of the extremely rapid growth noted before and after surgery, hyperfractionated RT was used. Two of the patients underwent planned resection after RT, and neither specimen demonstrated any evidence of high-grade angiosarcoma. All 3 patients were alive without any recurrent disease 22, 38, and 39 months after treatment. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated irradiation appears to be effective treatment for rapidly proliferating angiosarcoma. For previously untreated angiosarcoma, we now recommend hyperfractionated RT followed by surgery to enhance disease control and remove as much reirradiated tissue as possible

  1. Randomized phase III trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy vs accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Kamnerdsupaphon, Pimkhuan; Pukanhapan, Nantaka; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Vongtama, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) vs accelerated hyperfractionation with concomitant boost (CCB) as a primary treatment for patients with Stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). A total of 85 non-metastatic advanced SCCHN patients were accrued from January 2003 to December 2007. Of these, 48 and 37 patients received CCRT and CCB, respectively. The patients were randomized to receive either three cycles of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus conventional radiotherapy (CCRT, 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks) or hybrid accelerated radiotherapy (CCB, 70 Gy in 6 weeks). The primary endpoint was determined by locoregional control rate. The secondary endpoints were overall survival and toxicity. With a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 3-102), the 5-year locoregional control rate was 69.6% in the CCRT arm vs 55.0% in the CCB arm (P = 0.184). The 5-year overall survival rate was marginally significantly different (P = 0.05): 76.1% in the CCRT arm vs 63.5% in the CCB arm. Radiotherapy treatment interruptions of more than three days were 60.4% and 40.5% in the CCRT arm and CCB arm, respectively. The median total treatment time was 55.5 days in the CCRT arm and 49 days in the CCB arm. The rate of Grade 3 - 4 acute mucositis was significantly higher in the CCB arm (67.6% vs 41.7%, P = 0.01), but no high grade hematologic toxicities were found in the CCB arm (27.2% vs 0%). CCRT has shown a trend of improving outcome over CCB irradiation in locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  2. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone for clinical stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Acimovic, Ljubisa; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), those treated with conventional radiotherapy show poorer prognosis than those treated by surgery. To improve the prognosis of such patients, we have used hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1993, 49 patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy with 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 69.6 Gy. All patients were technically operable, but 29 had medical problems and 20 refused surgery. The median age and Karnofsky Performance Status was 63 years and 90, respectively. No patient received chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Prophylactic mediastinal irradiation was not given. Results: The median survival time was 33 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 30%. The rate at 5 years for freedom from each of relapse, local recurrence, mediastinal lymphnode metastasis, and distant metastasis was 41%, 55%, 89%, and 75%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that higher Karnofsky Performance Status score, absence of weight loss before treatment, and T1 stage were associated with better survival, although the T stage became insignificant on multivariate analysis. There were two Grade 3 acute toxicities and three Grade 3 late toxicities, but there was no Grade 4-5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this study compare favorably with those of most previous studies employing conventional fractionation. Further studies on hyperfractionation seem to be warranted for Stage I NSCLC

  3. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, W; Hehr, T; Budach, V; Belka, C; Dietz, K

    2006-01-01

    Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as

  4. Altered fractionated radiotherapy has a survival benefit for head and neck cancers. Is it true?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Araki, Hitoshi; Doi, Katsuyuki; Asano, Takanori; Fujikawa, Akira

    2007-01-01

    There was a significant survival benefit with altered fractionated radiotherapy, corresponding to an absolute benefit of 3.4% at 5 years. The benefit was significantly higher with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (8% at 5 years) than with accelerated radiotherapy (2% with accelerated fractionation without total dose reduction and 1.7% with total dose reduction at 5 years). The effect was greater for the primary tumor than for nodal disease. The effect was also more pronounced in younger patients and in those with good performance status. Hyperfractionation seemed to yield a more consistent advantage for survival than accelerated fractionated radiotherapy. However, accelerated radiotherapy might be associated with higher non-cancer related death. We have to evaluate whether the benefit of hyperfractionated radiotherapy versus standard radiotherapy persists when combined with concomitant chemotherapy and the benefit of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with altered fractionation. (author)

  5. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  6. High-dose, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy using a concurrent boost for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer: unusual toxicity and promising early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen C.; Acker, Jeffrey C.; Kussin, Peter S.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Weeks, Kenneth J.; Leopold, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with conventional radiotherapy (RT) results in inadequate local tumor control and survival. We report results of a Phase II trial designed to treat patients with a significantly increased total dose administered in a reduced overall treatment time using a hyperfractionated, accelerated treatment schedule with a concurrent boost technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/IIIB (38 patients) or medically inoperable Stage I/II (11 patients) NSCLC were prospectively enrolled in this protocol. Radiation therapy was administered twice daily, 5 days/week with > 6 h between each treatment. The primary tumor and adjacent enlarged lymph nodes were treated to a total dose of 73.6 Gy in 46 fractions of 1.6 Gy each. Using a concurrent boost technique, electively irradiated nodal regions were simultaneously treated with a dose of 1.25 Gy/fraction for the first 36 fractions to a total dose of 45 Gy. Results: Median survival for the entire group of 49 patients is 15.3 months. Actuarial survival at 2 years is 46%: 60% for 11 Stage I/II patients, 55% for 21 Stage IIIA patients, and 26% for 17 Stage IIIB patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression at 2 years is 64% for the entire group of 49 patients: 62% for Stage I/II patients, 70% for Stage IIIA patients, and 55% for Stage IIIB patients. Patients who underwent serial bronchoscopic reevaluation (4 Stage I/II, 8 Stage IIIA, and 6 Stage IIIB) have an actuarial rate of local control of 71% at 2 years. The median total treatment time was 32 days. Nine of 49 patients (18%) experienced Grade III acute esophageal toxicity. The 2-year actuarial risk of Grade III or greater late toxicity is 30%. The 2-year actuarial rate of severe-late pulmonary and skin-subcutaneous toxicity is 20% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion: This treatment regimen administers a substantially higher biologically effective dose compared with

  7. Angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy: long-term outcomes with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Morris, Christopher G; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Copeland, Edward M; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2010-04-15

    With breast-conserving therapy (BCT) as the standard of care for patients with noninvasive and early stage invasive breast cancer, a small incidence of post-BCT angiosarcoma has emerged. The majority of therapeutic interventions have been unsuccessful. To the authors' knowledge, there is no consensus in the medical literature to date regarding the treatment of this malignancy. The current study was conducted to report the long-term outcomes of a novel approach using hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy (HART) for angiosarcoma developing after BCT. The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 14 patients treated with HART with or without surgery at the University of Florida between November 1997 and March 2006 for angiosarcoma that developed after BCT. At the time of last follow-up, 9 patients had remained continuously without evidence of disease for a median of 61 months after HART (range, 36-127 months). Five patients had further manifestations of angiosarcoma after HART at a median of 1 month (range, 1-28 months): 3 with progressive pulmonary and/or mediastinal disease that was likely present before HART and 2 with local or regional disease extension. Progression-free survival rates for the 14 patients at 2 years and 5 years were 71% and 64%, respectively. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 86% at 2 years and 5 years. To the best of the authors' knowledge, HART with or without subsequent surgery, as documented in the current series, is the first approach to provide a high rate of local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival after the development of post-BCT angiosarcoma. The authors believe the success noted with this approach is related to both the hyperfractionation and acceleration of the RT. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  8. Intensified hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy limits the additional benefit of simultaneous chemotherapy--results of a multicentric randomized German trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staar, S; Rudat, V; Stuetzer, H; Dietz, A; Volling, P; Schroeder, M; Flentje, M; Eckel, H E; Mueller, R P

    2001-08-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of radiochemotherapy (RCT) as the first choice of treatment for advanced unresectable head-and-neck cancer. To prove an expected benefit of simultaneously given chemotherapy, a two-arm randomized study with hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HF-ACC-RCT) vs. hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HF-ACC-RT) was initiated. The primary endpoint was 1-year survival with local control (SLC). Patients with Stage III and IV (UICC) unresectable oro- and hypopharyngeal carcinomas were randomized for HF-ACC-RCT with 2 cycles of 5-FU (600 mg/m(2)/day)/carboplatinum (70 mg/m(2)) on days 1--5 and 29--33 (arm A) or HF-ACC-RT alone (arm B). In both arms, there was a second randomization for testing the effect of prophylactically given G-CSF (263 microg, days 15--19) on mucosal toxicity. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days, with a concomitant boost regimen (weeks 1--3: 1.8 Gy/day, weeks 4 and 5: b.i.d. RT with 1.8 Gy/1.5 Gy). Between July 1995 and May 1999, 263 patients were randomized (median age 56 years; 96% Stage IV tumors, 4% Stage III tumors). This analysis is based on 240 patients: 113 patients with RCT and 127 patients with RT, qualified for protocol and starting treatment. There were 178 oropharyngeal and 62 hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Treatment was tolerable in both arms, with a higher mucosal toxicity after RCT. Restaging showed comparable nonsignificant different CR + PR rates of 92.4% after RCT and 87.9% after RT (p = 0.29). After a median observed time of 22.3 months, l- and 2-year local-regional control (LRC) rates were 69% and 51% after RCT and 58% and 45% after RT (p = 0.14). There was a significantly better 1-year SLC after RCT (58%) compared with RT (44%, p = 0.05). Patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas showed significantly better SLC after RCT (60%) vs. RT (40%, p = 0.01); the smaller group of hypopharyngeal carcinomas had no statistical benefit of RCT (p = 0.84). For both tumor locations

  9. Effects of continuous hyperfractionated accelerated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy on the parotid and submandibular salivary glands of rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Stephens, L.C.; Peters, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for head and neck cancer. It is often not possible to exclude the salivary glands from the treatment fields. The unique susceptibility of the serous cells of the salivary glands to irradiation often results in xerostomia with ensuing secondary complications and discomfort to the patients. Recent reports have suggested that continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) can lead to considerably less reduction in salivary flow of the parotid salivary gland than conventional radiotherapy. This study was undertaken to assess histologic changes of salivary glands induced by CHART and conventional radiation fractionation schedules. The parotid and submandibular salivary glands of adult rhesus monkeys were irradiated with cobalt-60 γ radiation at 50 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks, 55 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, or 54 Gy/36 fractions/12 days (CHART). Salivary tissues were harvested at 16 weeks following irradiation and evaluated histopathologically. Microscopically, the glands receiving 50 Gy, 55 Gy, or CHART were virtually indistinguishable. There was severe atrophy and fibrosis of all glands. Quantitative analysis revealed that 50 Gy, 55 Gy, and CHART induced a reduction of serous acini in parotid glands by 86.4%, 84.8%, and 88.8%, respectively. In submandibular glands, serous acini were reduced by 99.4%, 99.0%, and 100%, respectively. The corresponding reduction in mucous acini were 98.4%, 98.4%, and 99.2%, respectively. These histopathologic and quantitative morphologic studies show that the magnitude of serous gland atrophy in the parotid and submandibular salivary glands of rhesus monkeys was similar at 16 weeks after receiving 50 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 25 fractions, or CHART

  10. Intensified hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy limits the additional benefit of simultaneous chemotherapy--results of a multicentric randomized German trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staar, Susanne; Rudat, Volker; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Dietz, Andreas; Volling, Peter; Schroeder, Michael; Flentje, Michael; Eckel, Hans Edmund; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the efficacy of radiochemotherapy (RCT) as the first choice of treatment for advanced unresectable head-and-neck cancer. To prove an expected benefit of simultaneously given chemotherapy, a two-arm randomized study with hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HF-ACC-RCT) vs. hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HF-ACC-RT) was initiated. The primary endpoint was 1-year survival with local control (SLC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III and IV (UICC) unresectable oro- and hypopharyngeal carcinomas were randomized for HF-ACC-RCT with 2 cycles of 5-FU (600 mg/m 2 /day)/carboplatinum (70 mg/m 2 ) on days 1-5 and 29-33 (arm A) or HF-ACC-RT alone (arm B). In both arms, there was a second randomization for testing the effect of prophylactically given G-CSF (263 μg, days 15-19) on mucosal toxicity. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days, with a concomitant boost regimen (weeks 1-3: 1.8 Gy/day, weeks 4 and 5: b.i.d. RT with 1.8 Gy/1.5 Gy). Between July 1995 and May 1999, 263 patients were randomized (median age 56 years; 96% Stage IV tumors, 4% Stage III tumors). Results: This analysis is based on 240 patients: 113 patients with RCT and 127 patients with RT, qualified for protocol and starting treatment. There were 178 oropharyngeal and 62 hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Treatment was tolerable in both arms, with a higher mucosal toxicity after RCT. Restaging showed comparable nonsignificant different CR + PR rates of 92.4% after RCT and 87.9% after RT (p=0.29). After a median observed time of 22.3 months, l- and 2-year local-regional control (LRC) rates were 69% and 51% after RCT and 58% and 45% after RT (p=0.14). There was a significantly better 1-year SLC after RCT (58%) compared with RT (44%, p=0.05). Patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas showed significantly better SLC after RCT (60%) vs. RT (40%, p=0.01); the smaller group of hypopharyngeal carcinomas had no statistical benefit of RCT (p=0.84). For both

  11. Costs of conventional radical radiotherapy versus continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer or carcinoma of the bronchus. Medical Research Council CHART Steering Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, D; Drummond, M F

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the costs of treatment with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) and those of conventional radiotherapy for patients with (1) head and neck cancer and (2) carcinoma of the bronchus. The study was conducted concurrently with two multicentre randomized controlled trials. Data were collected on the use of hospital and community service resources and patients' travel for treatment. Data on resource use up to 3 months after entry to the study were available for 526 head and neck patients (314 receiving CHART and 212 conventional therapy) and 284 bronchus patients (175 CHART and 109 conventional therapy). For patients with head and neck cancer, CHART cost Pounds 1092 (P hostel facilities. The results of this cost analysis will help to facilitate a decision about whether the benefits of CHART, as determined by the clinical trials, are worth the additional costs of hospital-based resource use. The collection of detailed patient-specific resource-use data from a number of centres allows the determination of ways for reducing the cost differential between therapies and making CHART a more cost effective treatment alternative.

  12. Concomitant Cisplatin and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: 10-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Phase III Trial (SAKK 10/94)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Simcock, Mathew; Studer, Gabriela; Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Bernier, Jacques; Töpfer, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank; Betz, Michael; Glanzmann, Christoph; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term outcome of treatment with concomitant cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy versus treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 1994 to July 2000, a total of 224 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone (median total dose, 74.4 Gy; 1.2 Gy twice daily; 5 days per week) or the same radiotherapy combined with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 for 5 consecutive days during weeks 1 and 5). The primary endpoint was the time to any treatment failure; secondary endpoints were locoregional failure, metastatic failure, overall survival, and late toxicity assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 9.5 years (range, 0.1–15.4 years). Median time to any treatment failure was not significantly different between treatment arms (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.9–1.7; p = 0.17]). Rates of locoregional failure-free survival (HR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.1–2.1; p = 0.02]), distant metastasis-free survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.1–2.5; p = 0.02]), and cancer-specific survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.0–2.5; p = 0.03]) were significantly improved in the combined-treatment arm, with no difference in major late toxicity between treatment arms. However, overall survival was not significantly different (HR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.9–1.8; p = 0.11]). Conclusions: After long-term follow-up, combined-treatment with cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy maintained improved rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival compared to that of hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, with no difference in major late toxicity.

  13. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  14. Thyroid dysfunction as a late effect in childhood medulloblastoma: a comparison of hyperfractionated versus conventionally fractionated craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Corrias, Andrea; Einaudi, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sandri, Alessandro; Cordero Di Montezemolo, Luca; Besenzon, Luigi; Madon, Enrico; Urgesi, Alessandro

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Primary hypothyroidism is a common sequela of craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma. Due to the strong radiobiologic rationale, hyperfractionation can reduce the delayed effects of radiation injury. Methods and Materials: The authors compared the incidence of thyroid dysfunction after conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (Group A, n=20 patients) vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy (Group B, n=12 patients) in a group of pediatric patients with posterior fossa primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Results: The mean age at the time of tumor diagnosis was 7.4 years in Group A and 8.4 years in Group B. Thyroid function was evaluated yearly, with ultrasonographic examination every 2 years. The patients were followed after diagnosis for a mean of 10.8 years for Group A and 6.0 years for Group B. Approximately 80% of the Group A (16/20) and 33.3% of the Group B (4/12) patients developed primary hypothyroidism within a similar period after irradiation (4.2 vs. 3.5 years, respectively). Analysis by cumulative incidence function demonstrated a significant difference in the risk of developing thyroid dysfunction between these two groups of patients (p<0.05). Ultrasonography showed reduced thyroid volume in 7 Group A patients and structural changes in 21 patients (17 Group A, 4 Group B cases); a thyroid benign nodule was detected in 2 Group A patients. Conclusions: The current study findings suggest that the use of hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma is associated with a lower risk of these patients' developing late thyroid dysfunction

  15. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  16. Hyperfractionated abdominal radiotherapy in children. Efficacy and tolerance in 13 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, J.L.; Roullet, B.; Cosset, J.M.; Sarrazin, D.; Lemerle, J.

    1984-01-01

    The experience at IGR has shown that hyperfractionation, especially abdominal has been well tolerated in adult patients. This finding led to employ this technic in the pediatric population who had failed standard treatment. An experience with hyperfractionated radiotherapy of the abdomen and liver in children, is reported. The children were treated 4 days per week, receiving 5 fractions daily of 0.7 Gy, with a 2 hours interval between each treatment. A total dose of 28 Gy was delivered in 40 fractions over 12 days. A second course of irradiation was delivered in 5 patients, 3 with abdominal treatment and 2 with liver irradiation. The vital organs were shielded with blocks at normal dose tolerance levels. The results are encouraging since an immediate efficacy was observed in 8 of 13 patients. Long term survivals were observed in 4 patients with nephroblastomas and 1 patient with a hepatoblastoma. On the other hand acute gastrointestinal tolerance seemed less good in the children than previously observed in the adults. Five radiation hepatitis appeared, immediately after the irradiation, whom four children irradiated to the entire abdomen [fr

  17. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL RADIATIOTHERAPY AND ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED RADIATIOTHERAPY IN CHEMORADIATION TREATMENT FOR SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 5-year treatment outcomes of 69 patients with stage IIA–IIIA locally advanced small cell lung cancer have been presented. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered in the uneven daily dose fractionation (single dose of 1 + 1,5 Gy with a 5–6hour interval to a total dose of 60–70 Gy depending on the health status and lung function. The complete response was achieved in 13 (42 % patients, the median survival was 28 months and the 5-year survival rate was 26,2 %. Grade III lung and pericardium toxicities (according to RTOG toxicity scale were observed in 3,2 % and 6,5 % of patients, respectively. No grade III–IV radiation-induced blood and esophageal damages were found.

  18. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck ca...

  19. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy (2100 cGY) for stage 4 neuroblastoma as part of intensive multimodality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollamudi, S.V.; Kushner, B.H.; Merchant, T.E.; LaQuaglia, M.; Lindsley, K.; Rosenfield, N.; Abramson, S.; Kramer, K.; Cheung, N.K.V.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To retrospectively evaluate the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy to the primary site following induction chemotherapy and aggressive surgical resection in patients (pts) with stage 4 neuroblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 48 previously untreated children (median age at diagnosis 3 yo, range 1-10 yo) with stage 4 neuroblastoma achieved a complete-, near-complete-, or partial-remission after multimodality therapy (protocol N4: 6 pts, N5: 7 pts, N6: 27 pts, or N7: 8 pts). All protocols included a regimen consisting of dose-intensive multiagent chemotherapy, maximal surgical debulking, followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Most pts then underwent consolidation with either autologous marrow transplantation (N4 and N5), or immunotherapy (N6 and N7) with radioimmunotherapy (N7). Of 48 pts, 46 had microscopic disease at the primary site prior to beginning radiotherapy (45 underwent gross total resection of the primary, and one had no residual primary disease after chemotherapy alone). One pt had a partial resection, and one remained unresectable after mutimodality therapy. The pre-chemotherapy volume of the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 2100cGy delivered twice-daily in 150 cGy fractions over 7 treatment days. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 32.5 months (range= 8-145 months), local-regional control was achieved in 44 of the 48 pts. Of the pts who are progression-free, median follow-up was 53.5 months. Overall, 24 of 48 pts progressed, three with local-regional recurrence as the first site of relapse, one with distant failure first and subsequent local-regional recurrence, and 21 with distant failure only. The probability of local-regional control at 32 months was 83%. One of the four pts with local-regional relapse never achieved a complete remission with either systemic therapy, surgical resection or radiotherapy. The progression-free survival at 32 months was 46%. Median time to overall progression was 16

  20. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm 3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm 3 ). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  1. To hyperfractionate or not to hyperfractionate-Is it really a question?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Merlano, Marco C

    2016-01-01

    Despite technical advances the last decade, patients with HPV/p16 negative head and neck cancer (being smokers and having affected performance and co-morbidities), still have a poor outcome after treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin might be a reasonable way to purs...

  2. Phase I/II Trial of Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Radiotherapy for Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Takano, Shingo; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Hashii, Haruko; Kanemoto, Ayae; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Akira; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial GBM met the following criteria: (1) a Karnofsky performance status of ≥60; (2) the diameter of the enhanced area before radiotherapy was ≤40 cm; and (3) the enhanced area did not extend to the brain stem, hypothalamus, or thalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T 2 -weighted high area (clinical tumor volume 3 [CTV3]) was treated by x-ray radiotherapy in the morning (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). More than 6 hours later, 250 MeV proton beams were delivered to the enhanced area plus a 10-mm margin (CTV2) in the first half of the protocol (23.1 GyE in 14 fractions) and to the enhanced volume (CTV1) in the latter half (23.1 GyE in 14 fraction). The total dose to the CTV1 was 96.6 GyE. Nimustine hydrochloride (80 mg/m2) was administered during the first and fourth weeks. Results: Acute toxicity was mainly hematologic and was controllable. Late radiation necrosis and leukoencephalopathy were each seen in one patient. The overall survival rates after 1 and 2 years were 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. The median survival period was 21.6 months. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival rates were 45.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The median MRI change-free survival was 11.2 months. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy (96.6 GyE in 56 fractions) for GBM was tolerable and beneficial if the target size was well considered. Further studies are warranted to pursue the possibility of controlling border region recurrences.

  3. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  4. Final report of a randomized trial on altered-fractionated radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma prematurely terminated by significant increase in neurologic complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Peter Man Lung; Leung, Sing Fai; Chan, Anthony Tak Cheung; Leung, Thomas Wai Tong; Choi, Peter Ho Keung; Kwan, Wing Hong; Lee, Wai Yee; Chau, Ricky Ming Chun; Yu, Peter Kau Wing; Johnson, Philip James

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the survival, local control and complications of conventional/accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy and conventional radiotherapy in nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: From February 1993 to October 1995, 159 patients with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic (M0) NPC with N0 or 4 cm or less N1 disease (Ho's N-stage classification, 1978) were randomized to receive either conventional radiotherapy (Arm I, n = 82) or conventional/accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy (Arm II, n = 77). Stratification was according to the T stage. The biologic effective dose (10 Grays) to the primary and the upper cervical lymphatics were 75.0 and 73.1 for Arm I and 84.4 and 77.2 for Arm II, respectively. Results: With comparable distribution among the T stages between the two arms, the free from local failure rate at 5 years after radiotherapy was not significantly different between the two arms (85.3%; 95% confidence interval, 77.2-93.4% for Arm I; and 88.9%; 95% confidence interval, 81.7-96.2% for Arm II). The two arms were also comparable in overall survival, relapse-free survival, and rates of distant metastasis and regional relapse. Conventional/accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy was associated with significantly increased radiation-induced damage to the central nervous system (including temporal lobe, cranial nerves, optic nerve/chiasma, and brainstem/spinal cord) in Arm II. Although insignificant, radiation-induced cranial nerve(s) palsy (typically involving VIII-XII), trismus, neck soft tissue fibrosis, and hypopituiturism and hypothyroidism occurred more often in Arm II. In addition, the complications occurred at significantly shorter intervals after radiotherapy in Arm II. Conclusion: Accelerated hyperfractionation when used in conjunction with a two-dimensional radiotherapy planning technique, in this case the Ho's technique, resulted in increased radiation damage to the central

  5. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  6. Parotid gland function following accelerated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, M.D.; Dische, S.

    1991-01-01

    The function of parotid glands in patients treated by 3 different schedules of radiotherapy was studied 9 months or more after its conclusion. All had received radiotherapy for a malignancy confined to 1 side of the head and neck region and only the gland on the side of the lesion was in the treatment volume; the contralateral gland acted as an internal control. Saliva was selectively collected from the parotid glands and the stimulated flow rate and pH of the saliva determined. Flow rates were expressed in each case as a percentage of that of the contralateral ('untreated') gland. Twelve glands that had received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60-66 Gy showed a mean percentage flow of 20 percent and a significant fall in the pH of the saliva produced. Six glands that had received CHART (Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated RadioTherapy) and 8 conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 35-40 Gy showed mean percentage flows of 57 and 65 percent respectively, with only slight and non-significant falls in saliva pH. The results show that in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck the use of CHART can lead to considerable less late change in the function of the parotid gland. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. MVP Chemotherapy and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Randomized for maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation; Preliminary Report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Euk Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Suh, Cheol Won

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of MVP chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), authors have conducted a prospective randomized study since January 1991. Stage IIIa or IIIb unresectable NSCLC patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID) up to 6500 cGY following 3 cycles of induction MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 ) and randomized for either observation or 3 cycles of maintenance MVP chemotherapy. Until August 1991, 18 patients were registered to this study. 4 cases were stage IIIa and 14 were stage IIIb. Among 18 cases 2 were lost after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and 16 were analyzed for this preliminary report. The response rate of induction chemotherapy was 62.5%; partial response, 50% and minimal response, 12.5%. Residual tumor of the one partial responder was completely disappeared after radiotherapy. Among 6 cases who were progressed during induction chemotherapy, 4 of them were also progressed after radiotherapy. All patients were tolerated BID radiotherapy without definite increase of acute complications, compared with conventional radiotherapy group. But at the time of this report, one patient expired in two month after the completion of the radiotherapy because of treatment related complication. Although the longer follow up is needed, authors are encouraged with higher response rate and acceptable toxicity of this treatment. Authors believe that this study is worthwhile to continue

  8. Comparison of two dimensional and three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elena M.; Joy Williams, Frances; Ethan Lyn, Basil; Aird, Edwin G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer being treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less (CHARTWEL) were planned and treated with a three dimensional (3D) conformal protocol and comparison made with two dimensional (2D) planning, as used previously, to compare past practice and methods. Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were planned initially using 3D and then replanned using a 2D system. The 2D plans were transferred onto the 3D system and recalculated. Dose volume histograms could then be constructed of planning target volumes for phases 1 and 2 (PTV 1 and 2, respectively), lung and spinal cord for the 2D plans and compared with the 3D plans. Results: There was a significantly lower absolute dose to the isocentre with 2D compared to 3D planning with dose reductions of 3.9% for phase 1, 4.4% for phase 2 and 4.7% for those treated with a single phase. Maximum dose to spinal cord was greater in 17 of the 24 2D plans with a median dose reduction of 0.82 Gy for 3D (P=0.04). The percentage volume of whole lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ) was greater in 16 of the 24 2D plans with a median reduction in V 20 of 2.4% for 3D (P=0.03). Conclusions: A lower dose to tumour was obtained using 2D planning due to the method of dose calculation and spinal cord and lung doses were significantly higher

  9. ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT FOR INOPERABLE, LOCALLY ADVANCED GASTRIC CANSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Litinskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to compare survival of patients with locally advanced inoperable gastric cancer (LAIGC, receiving accelerated hyperfractionated (AHF or conventionally fractionated (CF radiation therapy (RT. Methods and Materials. Between November 1993 and March 2010, 137 patients with LAIGC receiving CF (2 Gy daily or AHF (1.3 Gy b.i.d. to total at least 50 Gy RT in combination or without chemotherapy were retrospectively selected from the hospital database of Arkhangelsk clinical oncological dispensary. Overall survival (OS assessed using actuarial analysis, Kaplan – Meier method and Cox regression. results. The CF and AHF groups were 102 and 35 patients, respectively. Median follow-up time for all patients was 12 years. By the time of analysis 123 (90 % patients of all cohort died. Median, 7-year survival were 24 (95 % confidence intervals (CI, 17–31 vs 16 (95 % CI, 11–21 months, hazard ratio (HR=0.71 (95 % CI, 0.46–1.06, р=0.097; and 19 % (95 % CI 8–34 % vs 6% (95 % CI 2–13 % in the AHF and CF groups, respectively. In multivariate OS model the difference decreased to HR=0.87 (95 % CI, 0.49–1.55. The location of the tumor in median third (HR=0.60, 95 % CI, 0.37–0.99 in refer to upper third was the only independent factor influencing survival.  There was no influence of the total dose in chosen level on survival. conclusion. Our retrospective shows trend towards better OS for those LAIGC patients receiving RT in AHF regimen compared to CF. The prospective randomized study with conformal radiation technics is necessary to confirm these findings.

  10. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Sung B.; Park, Seung I.; Kim, Dong K.; Song, Ho Y.; Jung, Hwoon Y.; Min, Young I.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rates, survival rates, and patterns of failure for esophageal cancer patients receiving preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 through January 1997, 94 patients with resectable esophageal cancers received continuous hyperfractionated radiation (4,800 cGy/40 fx/4 weeks), with concurrent FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1 g/m 2 /day, days 2-6, 30-34, CDDP 60 mg/m 2 /day, days 1, 29) followed by esophagectomy 3-4 weeks later. If there was evidence of disease progression on preoperative re-evaluation work-up, or if the patient refused surgery, definitive chemoradiotherapy was delivered. Minimum follow-up time was 2 years. Results: All patients successfully completed preoperative treatment and were then followed until death. Fifty-three patients received surgical resection, and another 30 were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Eleven patients did not receive further treatment. Among 91 patients who received clinical reevaluation, we observed 35 having clinical complete response (CR) (38.5%). Pathologic CR rate was 49% (26 patients). Overall survival rate was 59.8% at 2 years and 40.3% at 5 years. Median survival time was 32 months. In 83 patients who were treated with surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy, the esophagectomy group showed significantly higher survival, disease-free survival, and local disease-free survival rates than those in the definitive chemoradiation group. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in this trial showed improved clinical and pathologic tumor response and survival when compared to historical results. Patients who underwent esophagectomy following chemoradiation showed decreased local recurrence and improved survival and disease-free survival rates compared to the definitive chemoradiation group

  11. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  12. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  13. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concomitant Boost Technique for Unresectable Non-Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    1991-01-01

    Twenty five patients with unresectable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung have been treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique since September, 1989. Those patients with history of previous surgery or chemotherapy, pleural effusion or significant weight loss (greater than 10% of body weight) were excluded from the study. Initially, 27 Gy were delivered in 15 fractions in 3 weeks to the large field. Thereafter, large field received 1.8 Gy and cone down boost field received 1.4Gy with twice a day fractinations up to 49.4Gy. After 49.4Gy, only boost field was treated twice a day with 1.8 and 1.4 Gy. Total tumor doses were 62.2Gy for 12 patients and 65.4Gy for remaining 13 patients. Follow up period was ranged from 6 to 24 month. Actuarial survival rates at 6, 12, and 18 month were 88%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. Corresponding disease free survival rates were 88%, 41%, and 21%, respectively. Actuarial cumulative local failure rates at 9,12 and 15 month were 36%, 42%, and 59%, respectively. No significant increase of acute or late complications including radiation pneumonitis was noted with maximum follow up of 24 month. Although the longer follow up is needed, it is worthwhile to try the prospective randomized study to evaluate the efficacy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique for unresectable non-small cell lung cancers in view of excellent tolerance of this treatment. In the future, further increase of total radiation dose might be necessary to improve local control for non-small cell lung cancer

  14. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a pediatric oncology group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Lynda R.; Kadota, Richard; Freeman, Carolyn; Douglass, Edwin C.; Fontanesi, James; Cohen, Michael E.; Kovnar, Edward; Burger, Peter; Sanford, Robert A.; Kepner, James; Friedman, Henry; Kun, Larry E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a phase III study, POG-9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem tumor treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for a diffusely infiltrating pontine lesion. Treatment consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy (arm 1) or a twice a day regimen of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG-8495) (arm 2). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the phase I cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG-9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during weeks 3 and 5. One hundred thirty eligible patients were treated on protocol, 66 on arm 1 and 64 on arm 2. Results: The results we report are from time of diagnosis through October 1997. For patients treated on arm 1, the median time to disease progression (defined as time to off study) was 6 months (range 2-15 months) and the median time to death 8.5 months (range 3-24 months); survival at 1 year was 30.9% and at 2 years, 7.1%. For patients treated on arm 2, the corresponding values were 5 months (range 1-12 months) and 8 months (range 1-23 months), with 1- and 2-year

  15. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Random iced for Adjuvant Chemotherapy vs. Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do

    1993-01-01

    Since Jan. 1991 a prospective randomized study for Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) has been conducted to evaluate the response rate and tolerance of induction chemotherapy with MVP followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of maintenance chemotherapy in Asan Medical Center. All patients in this study were treated with hypefractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID, 0480 cGy/54 fx) following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy, MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m2, Vinblastin B mg/ m2, Cisplatin 60 Mg/ m2) and then the partial and complete responders from induction chemotherapy were randomized to 3 cycles of adjuvant MVP chemotherapy group and observation group. 48 patients were registered to this study until December 1992; among 48 patients 3 refused further treatment after induction chemotherapy and 6 received incomplete radiation therapy because of patient refusal, 39 completed planned therapy. Twenty-three(58%) patients including 2 complete responders showed response from induction chemotherapy. Among the 21 patients who achieved a partial response after induction chemotherapy, 1 patient rendered complete clearance of disease and 10 patients showed further regression of tumor following hypefractionated radiotherapy. Remaining 10 patients showed stable disease or progression after radiotherapy. Of the sixteen patients judged to have stable disease or progression after induction chemotherapy, seven showed more than partial remission after radiotherapy but nine showed no response in spite of radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients who completed induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 25 patients(64%) including 3 complete responders showed more than partial remission. Nineteen patients were randomized after radiotherapy. Nine patients were allocated to adjuvant chemotherapy group and 4/9 shewed further regression of tumor after adjuvant chemotherapy. For the time being, there is no suggestion of a difference between the adjuvant

  16. Analysis of late complications after rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Panis, X.; Froissart, D.; Legros, M.; Coninx, P.; Loirette, M.

    1988-01-01

    Late effects were analyzed in a series of 39 patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up who were treated by rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The total dose was 66-72 Gy delivered in two series of 33-36 Gy separated by a 2-4 week rest interval. The number of daily fractions ranged from 8 to 6 and the interval between each fraction was 2 hr. Late complications consisted of cervical fibrosis, mucosal necrosis, bone necrosis, trismus, and laryngeal edema. Seventy percent of patients experienced late complications, and in 54% of cases, these reactions were considered severe, causing death in 13% of patients. No relationship was found between field sizes, dosimetric data and type and frequency of late effects. It is therefore suggested that the interval between two daily sessions in any multifractionated protocol may be of critical importance

  17. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several trials have studied the role of unconventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but the effect of such treatment on survival is not clear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether this type of radiotherapy could improve survival. M...

  18. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy with late intensification in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glicksman, Arvin S.; Wanebo, Harold J.; Slotman, Gus; Liu Li; Landmann, Christine; Clark, Jeffrey; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lohri, Andreas; Probst, Rudolf

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a course of hyperfractionated radiation therapy concomitant with escalated radiosensitizing platinum compounds can be administered with acceptable morbidity and achieve a high rate of loco-regional control for Stage III and IV head and neck cancer and whether the patients can be tumor free at the primary site after initial therapy and cured by the additional chemoradiation without radical resection of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III/IV head and neck cancer were treated in this multicenter Phase II Study with 1.8 Gy fraction radiotherapy for 2 weeks, with escalation to 1.2 Gy b.i.d. hyperfractionation to 46.8 Gy. Concomitant continuous infusion cisplatinum (CDDP) 20 mg per meter square on day 1 to 4 and 22 to 25 was given. Reassessment by biopsy of primary and nodes was done. Patients with a complete response continued with hyperfractionated radiotherapy to 75.6 Gy with simultaneous carboplatinum (Carbo), 25 mg per meter square b.i.d. for 12 consecutive treatment days. Patients with residual disease at 46.8 Gy required curative surgery. Seventy-four patients were treated at the three institutions; 20 were Stage III and 54 were Stage IV. All patients had daily mouth care, nutritional, and psychosocial support. Results: This regime was well tolerated. Eighty-five percent of toxicities were Grade 1 or 2 and there was only one Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Late toxicities included xerostomia in 25 patients, dysplasia in 18, and mild speech impediment in 11. Biopsies of primary site were done after the first course of treatment in 59 patients. Neck dissections were performed in 35 patients. Forty-four of 59 (75%) primary sites and 16 of 35 (46%) lymph nodes had pathologically complete response (CR). Of the 74 patients, only 12 required surgical resection of the primary site. Thirty-five of the 50 node positive patients had neck dissections, 16 of these were CRs at surgery. At 4 years (median follow-up of 26

  19. A randomized phase III study of accelerated hyperfractionation versus standard in patients with unresected brain metastases: a report of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 9104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Kevin J.; Scott, Charles; Greenberg, Harvey M.; Emami, Bahman; Seider, Michael; Vora, Nayana L.; Olson, Craig; Whitton, Anthony; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 1-year survival and acute toxicity rates between an accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) radiotherapy (1.6 Gy b.i.d.) to a total dose of 54.4 Gy vs. an accelerated fractionation (AF) of 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions in patients with unresected brain metastasis. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients to a Phase III comparison of accelerated hyperfractionation vs. standard fractionation from 1991 through 1995. All patients had histologic proof of malignancy at the primary site. Brain metastasis were measurable by CT or MRI scan and all patients had a Karnofsky performance score (KPS) of at least 70 and a neurologic function classification of 1 or 2. For AH, 32 Gy in 20 fractions over 10 treatment days (1.6 Gy twice daily) was delivered to the whole brain. A boost of 22.4 Gy in 14 fractions was delivered to each lesion with a 2-cm margin. Results: The average age in both groups was 60 years; nearly two-thirds of all patients had lung primaries. Of the 429 eligible and analyzable patients, the median survival time was 4.5 months in both arms. The 1-year survival rate was 19% in the AF arm vs. 16% in the AH arm. No difference in median or 1-year survival was observed among patients with solitary metastasis between treatment arms. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes have previously been identified and patients with a KPS of 70 or more, a controlled primary tumor, less than 65 years of age, and brain metastases only (RPA class I), had a 1-year survival of 35% in the AF arm vs. 25% in the AH arm (p = 0.95). In a multivariate model, only age, KPS, extent of metastatic disease (intracranial metastases only vs. intra- and extracranial metastases), and status of primary (controlled vs. uncontrolled) were statistically significant (at p < 0.05). Treatment assignment was not statistically significant. Overall Grade III or IV toxicity was equivalent in both arms, and one fatal toxicity at 44 days secondary

  20. Phase II, two-arm RTOG trial (94-11) of bischloroethyl-nitrosourea plus accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (64.0 or 70.4 Gy) based on tumor volume (> 20 or ≤ 20 cm2, respectively) in the treatment of newly-diagnosed radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.; Scott, C.; Langer, C.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Rubin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survivorship, and acute and delayed toxicities following radiation therapy (RT) of radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with tumor volume-influenced, high-dose accelerated, hyperfractionated RT plus bischloroethyl-nitrosourea (BCNU), using prior RTOG malignant glioblastoma patients as historical controls. Methods and Materials: One hundred four of 108 patients accrued from June 1994 through May 1995 from 26 institutions were analyzable. Patients were histologically confirmed with GBM, and previously untreated. Treatment assignment (52 patients/arm) was based on tumor mass (TM), defined as the product of the maximum diameter and greatest perpendicular dimension of the titanium-gadolinium-enhanced postoperative MRI: Arm A, 64 Gy, TM > 20 cm 2 ; or Arm B, 70.4 Gy, TM ≤ 20 cm 2 . Both Arms A and B received BCNU (80 mg/m 2 , under hyperhydration) days 1-3, 56-58, then 4 cycles, each 8 weeks, for a total of 6 treatment series. Results: During the 24 months immediately post-treatment, the overall median survival was 9.1 months in Arm A (64 Gy) and 11.0 months in Arm B (70.4 Gy). Median survival in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class III/IV was 10.4 months in Arm A and 12.2 months in Arm B, while RPA Class V/VI was 7.6 months in Arm A and 6.1 months in Arm B. There were no grade 4 neurological toxicities in Arm A; 2 grade 4 neurological toxicities were observed in Arm B (1 motor deficit, 1 necrosis at 157 days post-treatment). Conclusion: This strategy of high-dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy shortens overall RT treatment times while allowing dose escalation, and it provides the potential for combination with currently available, as well as newer, chemotherapy agents. Survival is comparable with previously published RTOG data, and toxicities are within acceptable limits.

  1. Is it time to rethink the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly-diagnosed brainstem glioma?: Results of a Pediatric Oncology Group Phase III trial comparing conventional VS. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, L.; Kadota, R.; Douglass, E.C.; Fontanesi, J.; Freeman, C.; Cohen, M.; Kovnar, E.; Burger, P.; Sanford, R.A.; Kepner, J.; Friedman, H.; Kun, L.

    1997-01-01

    Purposes/Objective: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a Phase III study, POG 9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem glioma treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional Cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The trial was closed in March 1996, having achieved its accrual goal. Materials and Methods: Patients (pts) eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for diffusely infiltrating pontine glioma. Treatment (Rx) consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment (Rx 1) of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy or a twice a day regimen (Rx 2) of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG 8495). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, Cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the Phase I Cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG 9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during Weeks 3 and 5. Of the 132 pts accrued to the study, 94 are eligible for review based upon time since entry, 47 in each Rx arm. In Rx 1, there were 23 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 40 to 161 mo (median, 77 mo); in Rx 2, there were 20 males and 27 females, ranging in age from 41 to 212 mo (median, 77 mo). As of 4/18/96, the study coordinator had not yet verified eligibility and assessed the evaluability of the remaining pts. Results: All results are from time of diagnosis

  2. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, Matthew; Nankivell, Matthew; Lyn, Ethan; Falk, Stephen; Pugh, Cheryl; Navani, Neal; Stephens, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  3. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacas, Benjamin; Bourhis, Jean; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing...... the greatest benefit. This update aims to confirm and explain the superiority of hyperfractionated radiotherapy over other altered fractionation radiotherapy regimens and to assess the benefit of altered fractionation within the context of concomitant chemotherapy with the inclusion of new trials. METHODS......: For this updated meta-analysis, we searched bibliography databases, trials registries, and meeting proceedings for published or unpublished randomised trials done between Jan 1, 2009, and July 15, 2015, comparing primary or postoperative conventional fractionation radiotherapy versus altered fractionation...

  4. Preventing radiation retinopathy with hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, Alan T.; Bhandare, Niranjan; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with the development of radiation retinopathy in a large series of patients with head-and-neck cancer. In particular, we addressed whether the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy was effective in reducing the risk of retinopathy. Methods and materials: One hundred eighty-six patients received a significant dose to the retina as part of curative radiotherapy. Primary sites included: nasopharynx, 46; paranasal sinus, 64; nasal cavity, 69; and palate, 7. Prescription doses varied depending on primary site and histology. Hyperfractionated (twice-daily) radiation was delivered to 42% of the patients in this study, typically at 1.10 to 1.20 Gy per fraction. The remainder were treated once-daily. Retinal doses were determined from computerized dosimetry plans when available. For all other patients, retinal doses were retrospectively calculated using reconstructed off-axis dosimetry taken from contours through the center of the globes. Retinal dose was defined as the minimum dose received by at least 25% of the globe. The median retinal dose was 56.85 Gy. Patients were followed for a median of 7.6 years. Results: Thirty-one eyes in 30 patients developed radiation retinopathy, resulting in monocular blindness in 25, bilateral blindness in 1, and decreased visual acuity in 4. The median time to the diagnosis of retinopathy was 2.6 years (range, 11 months to 5.3 years). The actuarial incidence of developing radiation retinopathy was 20% at both 5 and 10 years. The incidence of developing ipsilateral blindness due to retinopathy was 16% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. Site-specific incidences varied considerably, with ethmoid sinus (9 of 25, 36%), nasal cavity (13 of 69, 19%), and maxillary sinus (6 of 35, 17%) being the most common sites associated with radiation retinopathy. Three of 72 patients (4%) receiving retinal doses less than 50 Gy developed retinopathy. Higher retinal doses resulted in a

  5. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchter, Richard M.; Scholtens, Denise; Adak, Sudeshna; Wagner, Henry; Cella, David F.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  6. Acute tolerance of hyperfractionated accelerated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, D.; Schraube, P.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1996-01-01

    Background: Acute side effects of total body irradiation lead to intense molestations of the patients. Therefore, it is desirable to take measures to reduce these side effects. In a retrospective study the frequency on acute side effects of a hyperfractionated accelerated total body irradiation was assessed and compared to frequencies of other exposure schedules published in the literature. Additionally the influence of ondansetron on the frequency of nausea and vormiting was investigated. Patients and Method: From 1989 to 1992, 76 patients (47 male, 29 female; median age 38 years) underwent total body irradiation before autologeous bone marrow transplantation. They received 3 daily doses of 1.20 Gy each every 4 h on 4 successive days to a total dose of 14,40 Gy. Thirty-nine patients received 3x8 mg (daily, intravenous or per os) ondansetron during the whole course of irradiation. Results: The most relevant side effects were nausea and vomiting. Patients, who did not receive ondansetron (n=37) showed a nausea and emesis rate of 73%. With ondansetron (n=39) nausea and emesis were reduced to 38%. Also the grade of severity of these side effects was reduced. Conclusions: Ondansetron proved to be an effective medicament for relieving nausea and vormiting during total body irradiation. The results obtained are in concordance with those published in the literature. (orig.) [de

  7. Enhanced response rates in pancreatic cancer with concurrent continuous infusion(CI) low dose chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronn, Donald G.; Franklin, Roman; Krishnan, Rajan S.; Richardson, Ralph W.; Conlin, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer are not offered any therapeutic intervention other than surgical bypass due to very poor prognosis, poor patient tolerance to current therapeutic regimens, and a dismal tumor response to therapy. In view of these circumstances, an acceptable treatment regimen for pancreatic cancer must first demonstrate an ability to obtain a rapid tumor response with a regimen that will be well tolerated enabling the patient to maintain a good quality of life with full ambulatory status. Materials and Methods: Nine unresectable pancreatic cancer patients ((4(9)) had liver metastases) with an average age of 62 (range: 41-79) were treated with a concurrent regimen consisting of 5-Fluorouracil (CI 200-250 mg/m 2 /24 hrs) and Cisplatin (CI 5mg/24 hrs: 2 weeks on, 1 week off) given simultaneously with 3-D planned BID hyperfractionated radiotherapy to the pancreas (5940 cGy/66 fractions/6.5 weeks), and whole liver (1980 cGy/22 fractions/2 weeks), plus additional dose to the partial liver in metastatic disease. Continuous infusion combination chemotherapy was continued alone after radiotherapy for a total of six months. Chemotherapy was delivered by dual light weight portable external pumps. Hyperalimentation was used as needed to maintain nutritional status and warfarin thromboembolic prophylaxis was also utilized. Tumor response was monitored by monthly abdominal CAT scans, serum markers (CEA, CA 19-9), weight gain, and symptomatology. Full radiographic resolution of tumor mass was considered to be a complete response (CR), whereas 50% or greater radiographic decrease in size was considered a partial response (PR). Evaluation was done by independent diagnostic radiologists. Results: CR and PR of the pancreatic mass was achieved in 88% of all patients ((8(9))). CR was achieved in 44% of all patients ((4(9))). Patients with liver metastases exhibited 75% ((3(4))) PR in liver masses and either CR or PR in the primary site. All

  8. Digital linear accelerator: The advantages for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.; Maksimovic, M.; Dekic, M.; Clark, T.

    1998-01-01

    Technical performances of Digital Linear Accelerator were presented to point out its advantages for clinical radiotherapy treatment. The accelerator installation is earned out at Military Medical Academy, Radiotherapy Department, by Medes and Elekta companies. The unit offers many technical advantages with possibility of introduction new conformal treatment techniques as stereotactic radiosurgery, total body and total skin irradiation. In the paper are underlined advantages in relation to running conventional accelerator units at Yugoslav radiotherapy departments, both from technical and medical point of view. (author)

  9. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  10. Prognostic factors and therapeutic options of radiotherapy in pediatric brain stem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Ming; Shiau, Cheng-Ying; Wong, Tai-Tong; Wang, Ling-Wei; Wu, Le-Jung; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Chen, Kuang Y.; Yen, Sang-Hue [Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    1998-08-01

    A retrospective analysis was made to clarify the relationship between prognosis, radiation dose and survival of brain stem gliomas. From 1983 to 1995, 22 children with brain stem tumors were treated by radiotherapy in the Veterans General Hospital-Taipei. Twelve patients had pathology proof and the remainder were diagnosed by computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Seven patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Fifteen patients had radiotherapy as primary management, five of whom had adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients received 4000-7060 cGy, either in conventional daily or hyperfractionated twice daily radiotherapy. Survival from date of diagnosis was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses and multivariate analyses were calculated by the log rank test and the Cox proportional hazard model, respectively. Most patients showed improvement following treatment. The overall 2-year survival rate was 55.5% with a median survival of 27.1 months. Two-year survival for patients with primary management of operation and radiotherapy (n=7), radiotherapy alone (n=10) and radiotherapy with adjuvant chemotherapy (n=5) were 66.7, 50 and 53.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the study revealed that the growth pattern of tumors and the simultaneous presence of cranial neuropathy and long tract sign were significant prognostic factors (P=0.017 and 0.036). A trend of better outcome with radiation dose >6600 cGy and the hyperfractionation scheme was also noted in our study (P=0.0573 and 0.0615). However, only the hyperfractionation scheme showed significance in multivariate analyses (P=0.0355). Survival was not significantly affected by age, gender or method of diagnosis. Radiotherapy appears to be an effective treatment modality of brain stem tumors. Patients with both cranial neuropathy and long tract signs had a poorer outcome. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy may give better local control and lead to better survival. (author)

  11. Prognostic factors and therapeutic options of radiotherapy in pediatric brain stem gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Ming; Shiau, Cheng-Ying; Wong, Tai-Tong; Wang, Ling-Wei; Wu, Le-Jung; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Chen, Kuang Y.; Yen, Sang-Hue

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was made to clarify the relationship between prognosis, radiation dose and survival of brain stem gliomas. From 1983 to 1995, 22 children with brain stem tumors were treated by radiotherapy in the Veterans General Hospital-Taipei. Twelve patients had pathology proof and the remainder were diagnosed by computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Seven patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Fifteen patients had radiotherapy as primary management, five of whom had adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients received 4000-7060 cGy, either in conventional daily or hyperfractionated twice daily radiotherapy. Survival from date of diagnosis was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses and multivariate analyses were calculated by the log rank test and the Cox proportional hazard model, respectively. Most patients showed improvement following treatment. The overall 2-year survival rate was 55.5% with a median survival of 27.1 months. Two-year survival for patients with primary management of operation and radiotherapy (n=7), radiotherapy alone (n=10) and radiotherapy with adjuvant chemotherapy (n=5) were 66.7, 50 and 53.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the study revealed that the growth pattern of tumors and the simultaneous presence of cranial neuropathy and long tract sign were significant prognostic factors (P=0.017 and 0.036). A trend of better outcome with radiation dose >6600 cGy and the hyperfractionation scheme was also noted in our study (P=0.0573 and 0.0615). However, only the hyperfractionation scheme showed significance in multivariate analyses (P=0.0355). Survival was not significantly affected by age, gender or method of diagnosis. Radiotherapy appears to be an effective treatment modality of brain stem tumors. Patients with both cranial neuropathy and long tract signs had a poorer outcome. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy may give better local control and lead to better survival. (author)

  12. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  13. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henríquez Hernández, Luis Alberto; Lara, Pedro Carlos; Pinar, Beatriz; Bordón, Elisa; Gallego, Carlos Rodríguez; Bilbao, Cristina; Pérez, Leandro Fernández; Morales, Amílcar Flores

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  14. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  15. Neurocognitive outcome in brain metastases patients treated with accelerated-fractionation vs. accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy: an analysis from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 91-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regine, W.F.; Scott, C.; Murray, K.; Curran, W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate neurocognitive outcome as measured by the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) among patients with unresectable brain metastases randomly assigned to accelerated fractionation (AF) vs. accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients with unresectable brain metastases to a Phase III comparison of AH (1.6 Gy b.i.d. to 54.4 Gy) vs. AF (3 Gy q.d. to 30 Gy). All had a KPS of ≥ 70 and a neurologic function status of 0-2. Three hundred fifty-nine patients had MMSEs performed and were eligible for this analysis. Changes in the MMSE were analyzed according to criteria previously defined in the literature. Results: The median survival was 4.5 months for both arms. The average change in MMSE at 2 and 3 months was a drop of 1.4 and 1.1, respectively, in the AF arm as compared to a drop of 0.7 and 1.3, respectively, in the AH arm (p=NS). Overall, 91 patients at 2 months and 23 patients at 3 months had both follow-up MMSE and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging documentation of the status of their brain metastases. When an analysis was performed taking into account control of brain metastases, a significant effect on MMSE was observed with time and associated proportional increase in uncontrolled brain metastases. At 2 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.6 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 1.9 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.47). At 3 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.5 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 6.3 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.02). Conclusion: Use of AH as compared to AF-WBRT was not associated with a significant difference in neurocognitive function as measured by MMSE in this patient population with unresectable brain metastases and

  16. The selection of patients for accelerated radiotherapy on the basis of tumor growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Kang-Sow Chan

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical modelling was used to reach qualitative conclusions concerning the relative rate of local tumor control that might be achieved by using accelerated fractionation to treat only the patients with the most rapidly growing rumors, compared with the control rated that could be expected from either conventional or accelerated radiotherapy alone. The results suggest that concomitant boost therapy is equally or more effective than conventional dose fractionation for all tumors, regardless of their growth kinetics. For tumors with very short clonogen doubling times, CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy) may be even more effective than concomitant boost treatment, but CHART is less effective than conventional or concomitant boost therapy for tumors with longer clonogen doubling times. Thus, there is a rationale for using a predictive assay of tumor clonogen doubling times to identify the patients who should be treated with CHART. However, improvements in local tumor control resulting from concomitant boost treatment or the selective use of CHART are not likely to be apparent in the population as a whole, because the overall control rated are largely determined by refractory tumors having little chance of control with any of the treatments and by higher responsive tumors that are likely to be controlled regardless of the treatment choice. Differences in control rated with different treatment strategies are most apparent in the stochastic fraction of the population, which excludes those patients for whom there is either very little change (e.g. 99%) of achieving local control with both treatments. The stochastic fraction can be approximated by excluding those patients with the most radioresistant and the most radiosensitive tumors, since intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity appears to be the single most important factor determining treatment outcome. (author). 32 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  17. Hyperfractionated external radiation therapy in stage IIIB carcinoma of uterine cervix: a prospective pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Ferrigno, Robson

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Brazil has one of the highest incidence of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. Half of the patients have advanced stages at the diagnosis. Due to this large number of patients we decided to conduct a prospective pilot study to investigate the tolerance to and survival rate with hyperfractionated external radiotherapy only in patients with Stage IIIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: Between January 1991 and December 1993, 23 patients underwent hyperfractionated external beam radiotherapy without brachytherapy. All cases were biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of cervix clinically Staged as IIIB (FIGO). Hyperfractionation (HFX) was given with 1.2 Gy doses, twice daily at 6-h interval, 5 days/week, to the whole pelvis up to 72 Gy within 30 working days. Complications were evaluated by an adaptation of the RTOG Radiation Morbidity Scoring Table graded as 1 = none/mild; 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe. Results: Follow-up ranged from 27 to 50 months (median 40 months) on the 9 to 23 living patients at the time of the analysis in December 1995. There was no severe acute toxicity, but moderate acute reaction was high: 74%. The commonest site of complication was the intestine where severe late toxicity occurred in 2 of 23 (9%). Overall survival rate at 27 months was 48% and at 40 months was 43%. Discussion: There is little information in literature about HFX in carcinoma of the cervix. This is the third published study about it and the one that gave the highest total dose with external HFX of 60 x 1.2 Gy = 72 Gy. Theoretically, through the linear quadratic formula this schedule of HFX would be equivalent to 30 x 2 Gy = 60 Gy of standard fractionation, both treatments given in 30 working days. HFX schedules must be tested to establish their safety. Present results suggest being possible to further increase the total dose in the pelvis with hyperfractionated irradiation

  18. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in esophageal cancer followed by transhiatal esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.S.; Choi, E.K.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Min, Y.I.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Park, S.I.; Lee, I.; Song, H.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A prospective study for localized esophageal cancer using hyperfractionated radiotherapy(1.2Gy/fx, BID, 48Gy/4wks) with concurrent chemotherapy FP(CDDP 60mg/M 2 /d, d1 and d29, 5-FU 1gm/M 2 /d, continuous infusion d2-6 and d30-34) followed by esophagectomy has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation followed by surgery and curative potential of transhiatal esophagecomy. We analyze the clinical/pathological response and toxicity of preoperative regimen and report the patterns of failure and the survival of patients in esophagectomy group compared with patients who treated with definitive radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Since May 1993, 48 patients with localized esophageal cancer entered on this trial and 42 patients were evaluated for response and toxicity in 4 weeks after completion of preoperative regimen. 15 patients underwent surgery and 5 are waiting for surgery. Among 22 patients who refused the surgery, 11 patients received the definitive radiotherapy (≥60Gy) and 11 of them refused further therapy. In 41 men and 1 women with median age of 61 years old (range 41-75 years), 8 patients were staged as SI, 22 SII, and 12 SIII with endoscopic, histologic and radiologic evaluation. Results: Clinical tumor response was observed in 79%((33(42))) and 66%((23(35))) of patients who had histologic evaluation showed complete pathologic response. (13(15)) who underwent surgery achieved complete resection and surgical specimen of 7(47%) patients showed no histologic evidence of disease. 20% ((3(15))) surgical mortality was observed. Among 15 patients who underwent surgery, 53% ((8(15))) are alive NED in 3-19 months (median 7 months), 1 patient is alive with disease in 3 months, 2 patients died of progression, 3 postoperative mortality and 1 patient died of lung cancer in 5 months. Among 11 patients who received curative radiotherapy, 6 are alive with good performance, NED in 9-15 months (median 10 months), 3 are alive

  19. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Hanna, Gerard G; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; Harrow, Stephen; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2016-04-15

    The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of 'isotoxic' radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West-Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. NCT01836692; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  20. Hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma and other primitive neuroectodermal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Jeffrey C.; Donahue, Bernadine; DaRosso, Robert; Nirenberg, Anita

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This single-institution Phase I/II study conducted from 1989 to 1995 evaluates the feasibility of a multi-modality protocol combining hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (HFRT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in 23 patients with newly diagnosed primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising in the central nervous system. Methods and Materials: All 23 patients had a histologically confirmed PNET and were over 3 years of age at diagnosis. The eligibility criteria for PNET patients with cerebellar primaries (medulloblastoma) included either a high T stage (T3b or 4) or high M stage (M1-3). All patients with noncerebellar primaries were eligible regardless of T or M stage. The median age of the 23 patients was 9 years (mean 3-25); 11 were female. The primary tumor arose in the cerebellum in 19. Of these medulloblastoma patients, 15 had high T stages (T3b or T4) with large locally invasive tumors and no evidence of metastases (M0), constituting Group 1. Thirteen (86%) of these patients had gross total resections. Four other medulloblastoma patients had both high T and high M stages, constituting Group 2. Group 3 consisted of four other patients with exocerebellar primaries (two brain, one brain stem, and one cauda equina), three of whom were M3. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered within 4 weeks of surgery. Twice-daily 1-Gy fractions were administered separated by 4-6 h. The total dose to the primary intracranial tumor and other areas of measurable intracranial disease was 72 Gy. The prophylactic craniospinal axis dose was 36 Gy, and boosts of 44-56 Gy were administered to metastatic spinal deposits. Following radiotherapy, monthly courses of multiagent chemotherapy were administered sequentially (cyclophosphamide-vincristine followed by cisplatin-etoposide followed by carboplatin-vincristine) for a total of 9 months. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy as planned. Only three patients lost >10% of their body weight. One patient

  1. Locoregionally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx: conventional radiotherapy vs. accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy vs. concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy - a multicenter randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, Patrizia; Crispino, Sergio; Fallai, Carlo; Torri, Valter; Rossi, Francesca; Bolner, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Signor, Marco; Taino, Raffaella; Squadrelli, Massimo; Colombo, Alessandro; Ardizzoia, Alessandro; Ponticelli, Pietro; Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Gobitti, Carlo; Atzeni, Guido; Gava, Alessandro; Flann, Monica; Marsoni, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare conventional fractionation radiation therapy (RT), Arm A, vs. split-course accelerated hyperfractionated RT (S-AHF), Arm B, vs. conventional fractionation RT plus concomitant chemotherapy (CT), Arm C, in terms of survival and toxicity for advanced, unresectable epidermoid tumors of oropharynx. Methods and Materials: Between January 1993 and June 1998, 192 previously untreated patients affected with Stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma (excluding T1N1 and T2N1) were accrued in a multicenter, randomized Phase III trial (ORO 93-01). For Arms A and C, 66-70 Gy in 33-35 fractions, 5 days a week, were administered in 6.5-7 weeks to tumor and positive nodes. In Arm B, the dose delivered to tumor and involved nodes was 64-67.2 Gy, giving 2 fractions of 1.6 Gy every day with an interfraction interval of at least 4 h and preferably 6 h, 5 days a week. At 38.4 Gy, a 2-week split was planned; after the split, RT was resumed with the same modality. In Arm C, CT regimen consisted of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CBDCA 75 mg/m 2 , Days 1-4; 5-FU 1,000 mg/m 2 i.v. over 96 h, Days 1-4, recycling every 28 days (at 1st, 5th, and 9th week). Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival (p=0.129): 40% Arm A vs. 37% Arm B vs. 51% Arm C were alive at 24 months. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of event-free survival (p=0.196): 20% for Arm A, 19% for Arm B, and 37% for Arm C were event free at 24 months. On the contrary, the 2-year disease-free survival was significantly different among the three arms (p = 0.022), with a superiority for Arm C. At 24 months, the proportion of patients without relapse was 42% for Arm C vs. 23% for Arm A and 20% for Arm B. Patients in Arm A less frequently developed G3+ acute mucositis than their counterparts in Arm B or C (14.7% vs. 40.3% vs. 44%). Regarding the CT-related acute toxicity, apart from 1 case of fatal nephrotoxicity, only hematologic G3+ (Grade 3

  2. Effectiveness of surgery and individualized high-dose hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy on survival in clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A propensity score matched analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Marcelo F.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Novoa, Nuria M.; Varela, Gonzalo; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with poor pulmonary function or other comorbidities are treated with radiotherapy. The objective of this investigation is to compare the 3-year survival of two early-stage NSCLC populations treated in two different hospitals, either by surgical resection (lobectomy) or by individualized high-dose accelerated radiotherapy, after matching patients by propensity scoring analysis. Methods: A retrospective comparative study has been performed on two series of consecutive patients with cytohistological diagnosis of NSCLC, clinically staged IA by means of PET-scan (radiotherapy group) and pathologically staged IA (surgery group). Results: A total of 157 cases were initially selected for the analysis (110 operated and 47 treated by radiotherapy). Patients in the radiotherapy group were older, with higher comorbidity and lower FEV1% with 3-years probability of survival for operated patients higher than that found for patients treated by radiotherapy. After matching by propensity scoring (using age and FEV1%), differences disappear and 3-years probability of survival had no statistical differences. Conclusions: Although this is a non-randomized retrospective analysis, we have not found 3-years survival differences after matching cases between surgery and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, data presented here support the continuous investigation for non-surgical alternatives in this disease.

  3. Phase II study of tolerance and efficacy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and paclitaxel (Taxol) in stage III and IV inoperable and/or unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma: A-2 protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abitbol, Andre; Abdel-Wahab, May; Lewin, Alan; Troner, Michael; Rodrigues, Maria-Amelia; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Markoe, Arnold

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the toxicity and efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, and paclitaxel (Taxol) and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients were entered into this Phase II trial. Eligible patients had Stage III or IV head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma arising from the oral cavity, hypopharynx, oropharynx, nasopharynx, or larynx. The plan of treatment consisted of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (74.4 Gy at twice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy). Chemotherapy was given on Weeks 1, 5, and 8 as follows: 5-FU at 750 mg/m 2 as a constant infusion for 24 h for 3 days; cisplatin at 50 mg/m 2 in 250-500 mL D5 0.5 NS or NS infusion during 2-4 h, and paclitaxel at 70 mg/m 2 infused in 500 mL NS during 3 h. Results: The overall survival rate of the entire group was 81.5%, 66.7%, and 63% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. The median follow-up was 40.2 months (range 30-62). Of the 27 patients, 19 (70%) had a complete response and an overall survival rate of 100% at 1 year and 94% at 2 and 3 years. The disease-free survival rate of the latter group was 95% at 1 year and 84% at 2 and 3 years. Of the 27 patients, 18 (67%) maintained the complete response until the last follow-up visit or death. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency occurred for a median of 7.1 months. Grade 3 and 4 mucositis occurred in 20 and 3 patients, respectively. Six patients were hospitalized for leukopenic fever. Late toxicities included L'Hermitte syndrome (n=3), osteoradionecrosis (n=1), hypothyroidism (n=4), paresthesias (n=1), aspiration pneumonia (n=3), and esophageal strictures (8 patients underwent dilation). Conclusion: Combining hyperfractionated radiotherapy concurrently with 5-FU, cisplatin, and paclitaxel results in acceptable efficacy and toxicity. However, although a locoregional control benefit is suggested by the preliminary results of this trial, it needs to be

  4. Radio-chemotherapy in advanced tumors of the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, G.; Schnabel, T.

    1992-01-01

    Among combined radio-chemotherapy regimens of advanced head and neck tumors four modalities can be discriminated: 1. Induction chemotherapy, 2. simultaneous radio-chemotherapy, 3. adjuvant chemotherapy, 4. accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The results of the presently available randomized trials are as follows: 1. Induction chemotherapy has no influence on long-term recurrence-free survival. 2. With respect to simultaneous radio-chemotherapy, recurrence-free survival has been unproved with 5-FU and Mitomycin C. 3. There is evidence that adjuvant cis-platin therapy improves recurrence-free survival. 4. No results are available to date using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy regimens in combination with chemotherapy. (orig.) [de

  5. Human normal tissue reactions in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniike, Keiko

    1990-01-01

    Acute and late normal tissue reactions in radiotherapy have not been considered to be major problems with conventional fractionation. But they may cause certain problems when newer schedules such as hyperfractionation or accelerated fractionation are used. In opposing parallel radiotherapy, the dose fractionation of skin or subcutaneous connective tissue are different between in one portal and two portals daily. So we examined acute skin erythema and late connective tissue fibrosis in the two groups (one and two portals) of the patients with uterus cancer. Acute skin erythema and late connective tissue fibrosis were slightly stronger in case of one portal daily. In relation to the anatomical site of skin, acute skin erythema was stronger at the buttocks than the lower abdomen, but late fibrosis was reverse to that. So the degree of acute skin erythema did not predict the degree of late connective tissue fibrosis. The number of Time Dose Fractionation Factor could roughly estimate the degree of erythema and fibrosis. Late fibrosis in 36 fractions increased with an increase of abdominal thickness, but acute erythema did not. (author)

  6. The hyperfractionation in the oropharynx carcinomas treatment: stages III and IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, L.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    From April 1986 until May 1989. 112 patients with stages III and IV oropharynx carcinomas were included in a protocol comparing the use of Hyperfractionation and Conventional Fractionation. The doses were 6600 rad in 33 fractions of 200 rad for the conventional fractionation and 7040 rad in 64 fractions, two fractions of 110 rad per day for the hyperfractionation. As of January 1990 an analysis was performed in 98 patients, with a median follow-up of 14 months. The probability of complete responses in the oropharynx was 74%, with 84% for the hyperfractionation and 64% for the conventional fractionation ( p < 0,05). Survival was improved in 42 months for those patients treated with hyperfractionation: 27% versus 8% (p < 0,05). In patients with lesions out of the base of the tongue and in those with Karnofsky performance status of 50%, 60% and 70%, survival was improved with the use of hyperfractionation (p = 0,02 and p 0,006 respectively. The study demonstrates the superiority of hyperfractionation over the classical fractionation in the treatment of patients with carcinoma of the oropharynx. (author)

  7. Malignant astrocytoma: hyperfractionated and standard radiotherapy with chemotherapy in a randomized prospective clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, D.G.; Simpson, W.J.; Keen, C.; Platts, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A prospective randomized trial of 157 patients with malignant astrocytomas (Grade III or IV) was carried out at a single institution. The minimization technique ensured balanced distribution of prognostic factors between the treatment groups. All received oral lomustine (CCNU, 80 mg/m 2 ) six weekly and hydroxyurea (HU, 3.5 gm/m 2 over 5 days) three weekly, for one year or until recurrence, with doses adjusted for myelosuppression. Patients were randomized to daily (5000 rad in 25 fractions (fr) in 5 weeks) or Q3h (every 3 hours) Cobalt 60 irradiation (3600-4000 rad in 36-40 fr of 100 rad each, given 4 fr per day at 3-hour intervals over two weeks). Steroid therapy (up to 16 mg day dexamethasone) was permitted. Complications were moderate and equivalent in the two groups. No significant survival or toxicity differences were seen between the two groups. Age, initial performance status, and extent of surgical resection were found to be significant (P<0.01) prognostic factors for survival. Median survival of the whole group was 48 weeks with a minimum follow-up of one year. There was no advantage to large radiation fields. The hyperfractionation and daily regimes had similar efficacy and toxicity. Hyperfractionation with chemotherapy offers a useful alternative approach in the management of this disease

  8. Assessment of quality of life in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allal, A S; Dulguerov, P; Bieri, S; Lehmann, W; Kurtz, J M

    2000-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and functional outcome in patients with carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Between January 1991 and September 1996, 21 patients treated with accelerated concomitant boost RT schedule (69.9 Gy in 5. 5 weeks) for laryngeal (n = 10) or hypopharyngeal (n = 11) carcinomas and who remained free of disease at 1-year minimum follow-up were evaluated. The functional outcome was assessed by the subjective Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck cancer (PSSHN) and general QOL by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core QOL questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). The median length of follow-up was 37 months (range, 13 to 75). The PSSHN scores were 89, 84, and 86, respectively, for eating in public, understandability of speech and normalcy of diet (100 = normal function). Significantly lower scores for understandability of speech were observed in patients with advanced and laryngeal carcinomas. Normalcy of diet was affected negatively by the severity of xerostomia. All mean functional scale scores of the EORTC QLQ-C30 module were 20% to 25% below the higher score. Most of these scale scores were significantly affected by the severity of xerostomia. Patients treated with concomitant boost RT for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas appear to have similar QOL and functional outcome to those reported for patients treated with conventional or hyperfractionated RT. As expected, many QOL scales were affected by the severity of xero- stomia.

  9. Predictive value of the flow cytometric PCNA - assay (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) in head and neck tumors after accelerated-hyperfractionated radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, F; Lohr, F; Rudat, V; Dietz, A; Flentje, M; Wannenmacher, M

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: Proliferation of surviving tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy may limit tumor control, especially in rapidly proliferating tumors. It has been widely accepted, that this may play a major role in head and neck tumors. Several methods for the assessment of tumor proliferation have been developed, however, most of them are either laborious, invasive or potentially toxic. Today, the gold standard is the flow cytometric BrdUrd assay. We present a flow cytometric method for detection of PCNA, which is an intranuclear proliferation associated protein, in solid human head and neck tumors and how these data correlate with outcome. Materials and Methods: Pretherapeutic biopsies of 20 inoperable patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (T3-4N2M0) were examined. The tissue was disaggregated with pepsin/HCl, antibody staining was performed using the clone PC10. Biparametric flow cytometry was performed after a FITC conjugated secondary antibody and propidiumjodine staining was applied. The PCNA-index (i.e. percentage PCNA-positive cells), the DNA-index and the S-phase fraction (SPF, euploid tumors only) were determined. The therapy consisted of combined accelerated-hyperfractionated radiochemotherapy (66 Gy in 5 wks, concomittant boost of 1.6 Gy/d in wks 4+5, Carboplatin in wks 1+5). The median follow-up time was 14 mths (5 - 28), the clinical partners (V.R., A.D.) were 'blinded' towards the PCNA-values. Results: 13 patients suffered from disease progession and 11 died. The actuarial median survival and disease free survival (DFS) were 14.4 and 10.7 mths, respectively. The PCNA-values ranged from 3.2 to 70% (median 9%), there were 7 aneuploid and 13 euploid tumors. SFP in the euploid tumors ranged from 4 to 14.5% (median 10.5%). Neither SFP nor ploidy had a significant influence on the outcome. The patients were divided according to their PCNA-value in higher (n=10) and lower (n=10) than the median. The survival and DFS were 13

  10. Late Toxicities after Conventional Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Elloumi, F.; Daoud, J.; Ghorbel, A.; Mnif, J.; Frikha, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. To determine the incidence and analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective analysis was performed on 239 NPC patients treated between 1993 and 2004 in our institution. One hundred and fifty-seven patients were treated with conventional fractionation (2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week) and eighty-two patients with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.6 Gy per fraction twice a day, 5 days per week). One hundred fifty nine patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin based chemotherapy. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC score. Results. Xerostomia was the most common related complication (98.7%). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy did not increase late toxicities. Multivariate analyses showed that radiation dose was a significant factor for hearing impairment, younger age for trismus, initial node status for neck fibrosis, and initial dental hygiene for dental complications. Female gender was associated with significantly higher incidence of trismus and hearing impairment. Conclusion. Conventional radiotherapy was associated with a high rate of late toxicities which affect patients’ quality of life. With the development of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy, a reduced incidence of radiation related complications could be expected.

  11. Post irradiation eardrum: a rare complication of the radiotherapy of naso-pharynx carcinomas; Necrose tympanique postradique: une complication rare de la radiotherapie des carcinomes nasopharynges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Daoud, J. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Oncologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Khabir, A. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, A. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' ORL, Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    The eardrum necrosis is a serious and dreadful complication but rarely described after irradiation of cavum cancers. We report in this work five cases of eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy of nasopharynx carcinomas. Patients and methods: between february 1993 and december 2004 239 patients suffering of anon metastatic nasopharynx cancer have been treated by classical irradiation associated or not to a chemotherapy. The radiotherapy was delivered at the dose of 70 to 75 Gy in the cavum and the ganglions initially reached according a classical modality of hyperfractionated one. We analysed retrospectively the delayed complications occurred six months or more after the radiotherapy beginning. Results: Five cases of eardrum necrosis were reported sixty five months after the end of radiotherapy. these patients suffered of hypoacusia and buzzing. The clinical examination allowed to bring out the eardrum perforation that did not exist before radiotherapy. The total dose of irradiation was 75 Gy for a patient and 71.5 Gy according a hyperfractionated modality for four patients. Three patients had an hearing prosthesis in order to improve their quality of life. Conclusion: the eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer is a rare and unusual complication, very few reported in the literature. The total dose of irradiation is considered as the principal factor of occurrence risk in such complication. (N.C.)

  12. Hyperfractionation in carcinoma of the cervix: tumor control and late bowel complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Faith Rangad; Varghese, Cherian; Peedicayil, Abraham; Lakshmanan, Jeyaseelan; Narayan, Viswanathan Perungulam

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Hyperfractionation has been advocated to improve local tumor control by increasing radiation dose without increasing late normal tissue complications. The aim of this study was to determine if hyperfractionation decreased late bowel complications. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with Stage II and III cervical cancer were randomized to receive either hyperfractionation or conventional fractionation. Patients were followed for 5 years and monitored for tumor control, recurrence, and bowel complications. The relative risks of tumor control and bowel complications were computed at 1 year and 5 years of follow-up. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted to determine probabilities of being tumor-free and bowel complication-free. Results: There were 15 patients in each group. At 1 year of follow-up, 2 patients in the hyperfractionation group (13%) and 7 patients in the conventional treatment group (45%) had tumor (relative risk [RR] 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1, 1.1; p = 0.054). Delayed bowel complications were seen in 8 patients in the hyperfractionation group and 1 patient in the conventional treatment group (RR 7.5; 95% CI 1.1, 52; p = 0.014). At 5 years, 2 patients in the hyperfractionation group and 8 patients in the conventional treatment group had tumor (RR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1, 1.1; p = 0.04). Delayed bowel complications (Grades 2 and 3) occurred in 9 women in the hyperfractionation group and 2 patients in the conventional group (RR 5.4; 95% CI 1.5, 19.5; p 0.0006). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the hyperfractionation group had significantly more bowel complications over the 5 years of follow-up (p 0.024). Conclusion: Hyperfractionation may result in better tumor control both at 1 year and at 5 years following treatment of cervical cancer. However, hyperfractionation could lead to increased late bowel complications and must be used judiciously in the treatment of cervical cancer

  13. Kinetic considerations in the choice of treatment schedules for neuraxis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Neuraxis radiotherapy of radiosensitive tumours such as medulloblastoma is usually carried out using conventionally sized fractions and a shrinking field technique. Plowman and Doughty (Br.J.Radiol., 64 (1991) 603-607) have proposed a partial transmission block (PTB) technique which entails the use of small daily doses over a conventional time period. Radiobiological analysis suggests that, although the PTB technique may be adequate for slowly growing tumours, therapeutic efficacy is likely to be compromised where the tumour doubling time is short. Accelerated hyperfractionation (twice daily fractions) provides a possible alternative to both conventional scheduling and the PTB technique. Direct measurement of the kinetics of tumour cells in CSF, where possible, may provide useful guidance in the choice of regimes. (author)

  14. Alterations of total non stimulated salivary flow in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx submitted to hyperfractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guebur, Maria Isabela; Rapoport, Abrao; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir; Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir de; Ramos, Gyl Henrique Albrecht; Pereira, Jose Carlos Gasparin

    2004-01-01

    Prevention and early diagnosis are actually the most effective measures that we dispose to improve the prognostic of the malignant tumors. The mouth and oropharynx tumors are treated with success, when early diagnosed. The radiotherapy is almost always one of the selected treatments for these tumors. When cancer is diagnosed in advanced stages, many a time the treatment needs to be carried out swiftly to be efficient, and consequently the radio therapist use the hyperfractionated therapy, with the patient receiving two lower doses of radiation in two sessions daily, amounting to a higher daily dosage, of about 160 cGy/2x/day. When the major salivary glands are present in the radiated field, the xerostomia appears by the second week of treatment (1500 to 2000 cGy), changing the patient's health, and causing difficulties for him to eat, speak and sleep. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quantitative alterations of the total non stimulated salivate flow of patients who underwent hyperfractionated therapy for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of mouth and oropharynx. Samples of twelve male patients saliva from Erasto Gaertner Hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil, were examined. Two samples of saliva were collected from each patient, the first one before the beginning of the radiotherapy, and the second at the end of the treatment. As a result, we obtained salivary loss in 91.7% of the patients, with a percentage of total salivary flow loss of 62.9%, registered in the second collection. We concluded that the hyperfractionated therapy causes a marked xerostomia when the major salivary glands are in the radiated field. (author)

  15. Post irradiation eardrum: a rare complication of the radiotherapy of naso-pharynx carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Daoud, J.; Khabir, A.; Ghorbel, A.; Frikha, M.

    2009-01-01

    The eardrum necrosis is a serious and dreadful complication but rarely described after irradiation of cavum cancers. We report in this work five cases of eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy of nasopharynx carcinomas. Patients and methods: between february 1993 and december 2004 239 patients suffering of anon metastatic nasopharynx cancer have been treated by classical irradiation associated or not to a chemotherapy. The radiotherapy was delivered at the dose of 70 to 75 Gy in the cavum and the ganglions initially reached according a classical modality of hyperfractionated one. We analysed retrospectively the delayed complications occurred six months or more after the radiotherapy beginning. Results: Five cases of eardrum necrosis were reported sixty five months after the end of radiotherapy. these patients suffered of hypoacusia and buzzing. The clinical examination allowed to bring out the eardrum perforation that did not exist before radiotherapy. The total dose of irradiation was 75 Gy for a patient and 71.5 Gy according a hyperfractionated modality for four patients. Three patients had an hearing prosthesis in order to improve their quality of life. Conclusion: the eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer is a rare and unusual complication, very few reported in the literature. The total dose of irradiation is considered as the principal factor of occurrence risk in such complication. (N.C.)

  16. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  17. Induction chemotherapy followed by simultaneous hyperfractionated radiochemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.; Medical Univ. Gdansk; De Braud, F.; Gasparetto, M.; De Pas, T.; Tradati, N.; Leonardi, M.C.; Marsiglia, H.R.; Orecchia, R.; Milan Univ.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated irradiation in locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken comprising 3 cycles of cisplatinum (100 mg/m 2 , day 1) and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m 2 in continuous intravenous infusion over the first 120 h) followed by bifractionated radiotherapy applied to tumor/involved lymph nodes up to the dose of 74.4 Gy given in 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily for 5 days a week combined with concomitant weekly cisplatinum infusion (50 mg/m 2 ). Results: Six patients were enrolled in the study. All of them completed the protocol therapy. Severe mucositis and myelotoxicity were the most common acute side effects observed in all and in 5 of the patients, respectively. Acute toxicity required interruption of concomitant chemotherapy in 5 cases and in 2 interruption of radiotherapy was necessary. Opioid analgesic parenteral therapy was administered in 4 patients. Three of them had to be hospitalized. One patient experienced cerebral stroke 1 day after the completion of therapy and died 7 days later. Due to high acute toxicity, patient accrual was terminated after 6 patients. At the mean follow-up of 17 months, 4 patients are alive, 3 of them are free of disease and in 1 local progression has been diagnosed. Conclusions: High acute toxicity of induction cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil followed by concomitant cisplatinum and hyperfractionated irradiation calls for less toxic treatment schedules in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer. (orig.) [de

  18. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  19. A Phase II Study of Preradiotherapy Chemotherapy Followed by Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group (CCG 9931)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Jeffrey; Donahue, Bernadine; Mehta, Minesh; Miller, Douglas C.; Rorke, Lucy B.; Jakacki, Regina; Robertson, Patricia; Sposto, Richard; Holmes, Emi; Vezina, Gilbert; Muraszko, Karin; Puccetti, Diane; Prados, Michael; Chan, K.-W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To verify feasibility and monitor progression-free survival and overall survival in children with high-risk medulloblastoma and noncerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) treated in a Phase II study with preradiotherapy chemotherapy (CHT) followed by high-dose, hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (CSRT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included age >3 years at diagnosis, medulloblastoma with either high M stage and/or >1.5 cm 2 postoperative residual disease, and all patients with noncerebellar PNET. Treatment was initiated with five alternating monthly cycles of CHT (A [cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and vincristine], B [carboplatin and etoposide], A, B, and A) followed by hyperfractionated CSRT (40 Gy) with a boost to the primary tumor (72 Gy) given in twice-daily 1-Gy fractions. Results: The valid study group consisted of 124 patients whose median age at diagnosis was 7.8 years. Eighty-four patients (68%) completed the entire protocol according to study guidelines (within 9 months), and the median time to complete CSRT was 1.6 months. Major reasons for failure to complete CHT included progressive disease (17%) and toxic death (2.4%). The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 43% ± 5% and 52% ± 5%, respectively. No significant differences were detected in subset analysis related to response to CHT, site of primary tumor, postoperative residual disease, or M stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of this intensive multimodality protocol was confirmed, and response to pre-RT CHT did not impact on survival. Survival data from this protocol can not be compared with data from other studies, given the protocol design.

  20. Early termination of prostate cancer hyperfractionated dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D; Porter, Arthur T; Kocheril, Paul; Grignon, David; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerable dose of hyperfractionated radiation in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3-T4 Nx, 0, 1 M0 and/or Gleason Score ≥ 8) were treated on the first two steps of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum dose of 78Gy to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) including the prostate, seminal vesicle and a 5mm margin at 1.3Gy b.i.d. The second group (24 patients) received a minimum dose to the CTV of 82.8Gy at 1.15Gy b.i.d. Twenty eight patients received neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with their radiation (8 of 25 patients at 78Gy and 20 of 24 patients at 82.8Gy). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading scale. Efficacy was evaluated by PSA levels and ultrasound guided biopsies. Median follow up was 36 and 18 months for the 78Gy and 82.8Gy dose levels, respectively. Results: No grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity was noted. At 36 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity were 16 and 20%, respectively. Twelve to 18 months following radiation, 41 patients (86%) underwent ultrasound guided biopsy. At 78Gy, 60% of 20 patients had a biopsy which was negative or showed a marked therapeutic effect. At 82.8Gy, these combined rates were 95% in the 21 patients who had biopsies. Nine patients (50%) who did not receive neo-adjuvant hormones had positive biopsies. No patient who received neo-adjuvant hormones plus 78Gy (5 patients) or 82.8Gy (18 patients) had a positive biopsy. Conclusion: Proceeding to the next dose level (87.4Gy) was justified by the lack of severe chronic toxicity. However, in view of the high rate of histologic sterilization when hyperfractionated irradiation was given in conjunction with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, it was felt to be unethical to

  1. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Buttmann, Mathias [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Vince, Giles H. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2011-09-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  2. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Buttmann, Mathias; Vince, Giles H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  3. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  4. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J.; Becker, A.; Bloching, M.; Passmann, M.; Lotterer, E.

    2003-01-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m 2 on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m 2 twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 ± 61 cm 3 . The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m 2 paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m 2 twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30 of neutropenic infection

  5. In vivo cell kinetic measurements in a randomized trial of continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with or without mitomycin C in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrowsky, Werner; Dobrowsky, Eva; Wilson, George D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor cell repopulation is still considered to be a major cause of failure in radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated the influence of cell kinetic parameters on the outcome of patients treated in a randomized trial of accelerated fractionation, with or without mitomycin C, vs. conventional fractionation. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients were studied using administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), and cell kinetic parameters were measured using flow cytometry. The patients were treated with either 70 Gy for 7 weeks or 55.3 Gy for 17 continuous days (V-CHART) with or without 20 mg/m 2 mitomycin C on day 5. Results: The potential doubling time (Tpot) and labeling index (LI) failed to provide any prognostic information with regard to local control or survival. However, the duration of the S phase (Ts) revealed patients whose tumors had a long Ts had significantly worse local control (p = 0.028) and survival (p = 0.034) irrespective of treatment. A similar trend was evident within the different treatment arms particularly associated with overall survival. Conclusions: The Ts values of head-and-neck squamous cell cancers provided prognostic information that predicted clinical outcome irrespective of treatment schedule in this study. This neglected parameter of the Tpot method might provide information related to redistribution of cells during fractionated radiotherapy

  6. Classical spreading-fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation: let us attempt to be practical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.; Baillet, F.

    1986-01-01

    The so-called classical spreading-fractionation (5 sessions of 2 Gy per week) was elaborated originally by the first generation of radiotherapists at the beginning of the century. It is a remarkable fact that even today the most up-to-date radiobiologists are in agreement that this regimen usually represents the best possible compromise between antitumoral efficacy and toxicity to healthy tissue. Hyperfractionation is still in the clinical trial stage with the aim of defining its precise place in clinical practice. At the present there is only one formal indication apart from within this framework: tumors with very rapid times for doubling in size, since hyperfractionation alone can deliver a high dose in a short period of time (accelerated treatment). Hypofractionation can be highly recommended for palliative treatment, because of its simplicity and efficacy. In contrast, when large size tumours (particularly digestive) are treated in patients with an elevated expected rate of recovery, this technique may provoke late complications and should, a priori, be avoided. For small size tumours however (ENT, breast) it would appear possible to elaborate hypofractio - nation protocols allowing local control to a similar degree to that obtained with the classical regimen, without significantly increasing late complications, on the condition that radiation parameters (dose, spread, fractionation) be cho - sen with the greatest care [fr

  7. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  8. A pilot study of hyperfractionated radiotherapy for infants with retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Meadows, Anna T.; Shields, Jerry; D'Angio, Giulio J.; Goldwein, Joel W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the use of twice daily fractionated radiotherapy using low doses per fraction in the treatment of intraocular retinoblastoma in infants in terms of local control, ocular complications and bony growth disturbances. Methods: Children were irradiated using standard techniques including en face electrons (3 patients) or opposed lateral photon fields to one or both orbits (7 patients). Patients were treated with 100 cGy twice daily with an inter fraction interval of 4 or more hours to total doses of 43 to 45 Gy. No patients received chemotherapy. Results: Ten children under the age of 13 months were entered onto the twice daily radiation protocol from 4/87 through 6/90. Nine patients presented with nonfamilial bilateral retinoblastoma; one later failed in the pineal region representing trilateral retinoblastoma. The tenth patient had advanced unilateral disease. Of 19 eyes involved with tumor, 13 were group V and all patients had at least one eye with advanced disease (group III-V). Two patients underwent enucleation of the more advanced eye up front and received radiation to the intact eye only. Overall survival was 8 of 10 patients with a median follow-up of 28 months (range 12-47 months). Two patients died of distant metastases, one with local recurrence and one with trilateral disease but local control. Local recurrence after initial external beam radiation therapy only was seen in 8 of 19 eyes (42%). Failures occurred in 6 of 13 group V eyes, 1 of 2 group IV eyes and 1 of 2 group III eyes. Further local therapy included plaque therapy in 3 eyes, cryotherapy in 3 eyes and enucleation in one eye. Surgery was refused for one patient with bilateral recurrences. Ultimate local control after external beam irradiation plus additional local therapies was 16 of 19 eyes (84%). Post-irradiation ocular loss occurred in 5 of 19 eyes. Therefore, overall local control with ocular preservation was achieved in 14 of 19 eyes (74%). Vision

  9. Quality assurance protocol for linear accelerators used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkovska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a modality of choice for treatment of malignant diseases. Linear accelerators are the most common devices for implementing external radiation therapy. Taking into account the fact during the treatment, healthy tissue will inevitably be exposed to ionizing radiation, predicted dose in each radiotherapy case should be delivered with the greatest possible accuracy. Medical requirement for quality treatment achieving means as mach as possible dose into volume of interest and the greatest possible healthy tissue protection. From radiation protection point of view, occupational exposure of the staff involved in radiotherapy process should be minimized. To be able to reach it, consistent adherence to the Quality Assurance Programme is necessary. It should be in accordance with higher national and international protocols, because they give guidelines on the necessary standards, procedures, processes, resources and responsibilities that should be defined in structuring the overall radiotherapy quality management. As a part of this Master thesis, quality management as well as Quality Assurance Programme that is necessary to be applied in each radiotherapy center have been prepared. Mandatory dosimetry measurements included in the internal recommendations are also emphasized. Measurement results and external audit by IAEA indicated high accuracy and quality radiotherapy dose delivering in Macedonia. Based on the measurements and analysis, the aim of this Master thesis is offering a Quality Assurance Protocol for external beam radiotherapy that can be used on the national level in Republic of Macedonia. (Author)

  10. Intracellular recovery - basis of hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, U.; Guttenberger, R.; Kummermehr, J.

    1988-01-01

    The radiobiological basis fo a hyperfractionated radiation therapy versus conventional fractionation with respect to therapeutic gain, i.e., improved normal tissue sparing for the same level of tumour cell inactivation, will be presented. Data on the recovery potential of various tissues as well as the kinetics of repair will be given. The problem of incomplete repair with short irradiation intervals will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. The HYP-RT Hypoxic Tumour Radiotherapy Algorithm and Accelerated Repopulation Dose per Fraction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Harriss-Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The HYP-RT model simulates hypoxic tumour growth for head and neck cancer as well as radiotherapy and the effects of accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation. This report outlines algorithm design, parameterisation and the impact of accelerated repopulation on the increase in dose/fraction needed to control the extra cell propagation during accelerated repopulation. Cell kill probabilities are based on Linear Quadratic theory, with oxygenation levels and proliferative capacity influencing cell death. Hypoxia is modelled through oxygen level allocation based on pO2 histograms. Accelerated repopulation is modelled by increasing the stem cell symmetrical division probability, while the process of reoxygenation utilises randomised pO2 increments to the cell population after each treatment fraction. Propagation of 108 tumour cells requires 5–30 minutes. Controlling the extra cell growth induced by accelerated repopulation requires a dose/fraction increase of 0.5–1.0 Gy, in agreement with published reports. The average reoxygenation pO2 increment of 3 mmHg per fraction results in full tumour reoxygenation after shrinkage to approximately 1 mm. HYP-RT is a computationally efficient model simulating tumour growth and radiotherapy, incorporating accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation. It may be used to explore cell kill outcomes during radiotherapy while varying key radiobiological and tumour specific parameters, such as the degree of hypoxia.

  12. Commercial Prospect of Hadronic Radiotherapy Using Ion Accelerator in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunto-Wiharto; N-Supriana; R-Susworo; G-Suyitno

    2000-01-01

    In order to anticipate the construction of accelerator based laboratory of which one of its applications is for radiotherapy of cancer patients at Research and Development Center for Advanced Technology belonging to National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta, in the next 7th. Five Year Development Plan (Repelita VII), it is considered important to perform a study on its commercial prospect. It is found, through calculations based on the available data and realistic assumptions, that patients from neighboring countries are needed to make the operation of radiotherapy facility effective and efficient. (author)

  13. Concurrent chemotherapy, accelerated hyperfractionated split course radiation therapy and surgery for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Adelstein, D.J.; Rice, T.W.; Kirk, M.A. van; Kirby, T.J.; Koka, A.; Tefft, M.; Zuccaro, G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A prospective single arm trial was undertaken to determine the toxicity, the clinical and pathologic response rates and survival for patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy(CC) and accelerated hyperfractionated split course radiotherapy(AHFSCRT) followed by surgical resection. Materials and Methods: A prospective single arm trial was conducted between 1991 and 1995 for patients with T1-4, N0-1, M1(celiac or supraclavicular) adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. A total of 74 patients entered onto the protocol, and 72 are eligible and evaluable. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of two cycles of Cisplatin(20mg/m2/day) and 5-fluorouracil (1000mg/m2/day) given concurrently with AHSCRT 1.5Gy BID (at least 6 hour between fractions) to 2400cGy and 2100cGy, with cycles 1 and 2 of chemotherapy respectively. Patients were staged/restaged with barium esophagram(BS), computerized tomograph of the chest(CAT), upper endoscopy(EGD) with ultrasound (EUS) and evaluated for surgical resection. A single adjuvant course of concurrent chemotherapy and AHSCRT was delivered for those patients who were pathologic partial responders(pPR). Results: Initial clinical staging revealed one patient stage I, 24 patients' stage IIA, 2 patients' with stage IIB, 34 patients' with stage III and 6 patients' with stage IV disease. Five patients could not be staged adequately. The toxicity to neoadjuvant therapy included nausea in 85% (grade 3 in 1%), esophagitis 90% (grade 3 in 18%), neutropenia grade 3 of 43% (with fever 17%), thrombocytopenia grade 4 in 10% and nephrotoxicity in 8%. There was one death due to neoadjuvant therapy. Of the 72 evaluable patients, 67 underwent surgery, and 65(90%) had a complete resection. Twenty-seven percent were pathologic complete responders, including 22% with adenocarcinoma and 36% with squamous cell carcinoma. Complete pathologic response after neoadjuvant therapy was accurately predicted by

  14. The Quality of Curative-intent Radiotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleese, J; Baluch, S; Drinkwater, K

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the UK. The quality of curative-intent radiotherapy is associated with better outcomes. National quality standards from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) on patient work-up and treatment selection were used, with guidance from the Royal College of Radiologists on the technical delivery of radiotherapy, to assess the quality of curative-intent non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy and to describe current UK practice. Radiotherapy departments completed one questionnaire for each patient started on curative-intent radiotherapy for 8 weeks in 2013. Eighty-two per cent of centres returned a total of 317 proformas. Patient selection with positron emission tomography/computed tomography, performance status and Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1) was usually undertaken. Fifty-six per cent had pathological confirmation of mediastinal lymph nodes and 22% staging brain scans; 20% were treated with concurrent chemoradiation, 12% with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) and 8% with Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART). Sixty-three per cent of patients received 55 Gy/20 fractions. Although respiratory compensation was routinely undertaken, only 33% used four-dimensional computed tomography. Seventy per cent of patients were verified with cone beam computed tomography. There was consistency of practice in dosimetric constraints for organs at risk and follow-up. This audit has described current UK practice. The latest recommendations for patient selection with pathological confirmation of mediastinal lymph nodes, brain staging and respiratory function testing are not universally followed. Although there is evidence of increasing use of newer techniques such as four-dimensional computed tomography and cone beam image-guided radiotherapy, there is still variability in access. Efforts should be made to improve access to modern technologies and quality

  15. Radiotherapy management of brain metastases using conventional linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzenauer, Marcel; Vrana, David; Vlachova, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Kalita, Ondrej; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2016-09-01

    As treatments for primary cancers continue to improve life expectancy, unfortunately, brain metastases also appear to be constantly increasing and life expectancy for patients with brain metastases is low. Longer survival and improved quality of life may be achieved using localised radiological and surgical approaches in addition to low dose corticosteroids. Stereotactic brain radiotherapy is one rapidly evolving localized radiation treatment. This article describes our experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using a linear accelerator. We reviewed patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, from the time of its introduction into daily practice in our Department of Oncology in 2014. We collected the data on patient treatment and predicted survival based on prognostic indices and actual patient outcome. A total of 10 patients were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy, in one case in combination with whole brain radiotherapy and hippocampal sparing. There was no significant treatment related toxicity during the treatment or follow-up and due to the small number of fractions, the overall tolerance of the treatment was excellent. The patient intrafractional movement in all cases was under 1 mm suggesting that 1 mm margin around the CTV to create the PTV is sufficient and also that patient immobilization using the thermoplastic mask compared with invasive techniques, is feasible. We also found that prognostic indices such as the Graded Prognostic Assessment provide accurate predictions of patient survival. Based on our current evidence, patients with brain metastases fit enough, should be considered for stereotactic radiotherapy treatment.

  16. Linear accelerator Dynaray-CH: a central component of the BBC radiotherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.

    1983-01-01

    The author describes the newly developed range of linear accelerators Dynaray-CH 4 to 20. These modern installations for radiotherapy are used to generate photon and electron beams. The accelerators employ the proven BBC control system PROCONTIC (registered trademark), innovatory systems for movement control and actual-value display as well as the new radiation monitor system. (Auth.)

  17. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m 2 daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of ≥grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and highly

  18. Clinical application of AcMAR (accelerated multiple-arc radiotherapy) for head and neck tumors. Results of a randomized, two-dose study in Kitami Red-Cross General Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, Takuro; Yamazaki, Akira; Yonesaka, Akio; Matsuzawa, Tooru; Kanai, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced acute mucositis is the limiting factor for accelerated, hyperfractionated radiotherapy in head and neck (H and N) squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). We have developed a simple, new form of conformal radiotherapy, accelerated multiple arc radiotherapy (AcMAR), which covers the target volume by combined, segmental, and rotational arc fields. Two to three rotational fields were placed with CT guidance, each covering the primary tumor and lymph nodes separately. The optimal inter-isocenter distance was determined by 3D dose calculation. The surface area of oro-pharyngeal mucosa irradiated by more than a 50% dose by this method was reduced by 37-73% compared to that with a conventional parallel opposing technic. Dose searching, randomized two-dose study was initiated in Kitami Red-cross General Hospital (KRCGH) in January 1995, and 101 patients were registered and completed AcMAR in Oct 2000. All the patients were followed for up to 96 months (24-96 mo, median 48 mo) at the time of analysis. Fifty-one out of 101 patients were Stage III (17) and IV (34). Primary site of tumors were; 38 larynx, 25 oropharynx, 15 hypopharynx, 13 oral cavity, and 10 other miscellaneous sites. Patients were randomly allocated either to 60 Gy/24 fr/bid/3 wks to gross tumor volume (GTV) (Group A), or 66 Gy/33 fr/bid/4 wks to GTV (Group B). Forty Gy/16 fr/bid/2 wks was given to the volume of prophylactic'' irradiation in both groups of patients. Results were as follows: All the patients, except for one, completed AcMAR without treatment interruption. Acute mucositis at the site of high-dose irradiation was intense; 72% of Group A and 62.5% of Group B experienced World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 3 (confluent) mucositis focally. Fifty-one out of 53 in Group A and 48/48 in Group B, however, could maintain oral food intake (WHO Grade 1 or 2) even at the peak of their mucositis, because of the limited area of severe mucositis. With regard to late morbidity, however, 6/46 (followed >24 mo

  19. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  20. Novel applications of particle accelerators to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiner, A.J.; Burlon, A.A.; Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Villa Ballester

    2002-01-01

    Charged hadrons (protons and heavier ions) have very definite advantages over photons as far as radiotherapy applications are concerned. They allow for much better spatial dose localization due to their charge, relatively high mass and nature of the energy deposition process. In the frame of an attempt to promote the introduction of hadrontherapy in Argentina an external beam facility has been installed at our tandem accelerator TANDAR. The advantages of heavy ions can only be fully exploited for tumors of well defined localization. In certain types of malignancies, however, the region infiltrated by tumor cells is diffuse, with no sharp boundaries and with microscopic ramifications. In such cases (particularly in certain brain cancers) a more sophisticated scheme has been suggested called boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the use of the Tandar accelerator to produce neutrons for feasibility studies for BNCT through low-energy proton beams on a thick LiF target is being briefly described. Studies on the 13 C(d,n) reaction and a comparison with other neutron-producing reactions are also mentioned. Simulation work to optimize an accelerator-based neutron production target is discussed. A project is being prepared to develop a small proton accelerator in Argentina. Technical specifications of this machine are briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Predictors of severe late radiotherapy-related toxicity after hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concomitant cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Secondary retrospective analysis of a randomized phase III trial (SAKK 10/94)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Simcock, Mathew; Zimmermann, Frank; Betz, Michael; Bodis, Stephan; Bernier, Jacques; Studer, Gabriela; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: This secondary analysis was performed to identify predictive factors for severe late radiotherapy (RT)-related toxicity after treatment with hyperfractionated RT +/− concomitant cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Patients were retrospectively analyzed from the previously reported randomized phase III trial: SAKK 10/94. Severe late RT-related toxicity was defined as late RTOG ⩾ grade 3 toxicity starting 3 months after end of RT and/or potential treatment-related death within 3 years of randomization. Results: Two hundred and thirteen randomized patients were analyzed; 84 (39%) experienced severe late RT-related toxicity. With median follow-up of 9.7 years (range, 0.4–15.4 years), median time to severe late RT-related toxicity was 9.6 years. In the univariate Cox proportional hazards model the following variables were associated with severe late RT-related toxicity: advanced N-classification (p < 0.001); technically unresectable disease (p = 0.04); weight loss ratio (p = 0.003); supportive measures (p = 0.009) and severe acute dysphagia (p = 0.001). In the subsequent multivariate analysis all variables except use of supportive measures remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Chemotherapy did not appear to affect severe late RT-related toxicity, but advanced N-classification, technically unresectable disease, weight loss ratio, and severe acute dysphagia were independent predictive factors for severe late RT-related toxicity.

  2. TLD Intercomparison in accelerators for radiotherapy in three Latin american countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Azorin N, J.; Perez, M.A.; Picon, C.; Castellanos, E.; Plazas, M.C.; Murcia, G.; Archundia, L.

    1998-01-01

    In Radiotherapy one of the objectives is to establish and to give follow up to quality assurance programs which make sure that the doses administered to the patients with cancer are a high probability of a success in external radiation. Likewise, one of the present preoccupations of the United Nations Agencies as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Pan-American Health Organization is the optimal employment of the radiations in the treatment of cancer patients since the administered dose in Radiotherapy suffers considerable variations by the lack of quality assurance programs. The use of Electron linear accelerators requires a program of quality assurance that includes expert personnel, equipment and adequate facilities. The more used methodology for the dosimetry calibration and characterization of X-ray beams and high energy electrons for radiotherapy use is using a ionization chamber dosemeter calibrated in a regional secondary standardization laboratory. However, to establish and give follow up to the quality assurance programs it is necessary the dosimetric intercomparison through TLD. In this study it was designed plastic phantoms with TLD crystals and it was made its characterization to realize an absorbed dose analysis in the crystals exposed at X-ray beams 6 MV and high energy electrons 10 and 12 MeV to standardize the dosimetric procedures and proceeding to realize an International Pilot intercomparison of absorbed doses in TLD crystals in three Latin American countries: Mexico, Peru and Colombia with the participation of accelerators of five different institutions. The found results show that the majority of the measured doses with TLD in the different accelerators were in the 0.95-1.05 range though it had two cases outside of this range. The use of the phantoms with TLD crystals shows that they are of excellent aid to make analysis of the doses administered to the patients and an intercomparison of results to standardize procedures at

  3. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  4. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  5. Phase III trial of high- vs. low-dose-rate interstitial radiotherapy for early mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Shigetoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobile tongue cancer can be controlled with interstitial radiotherapy (ISRT). We carried out a Phase III trial to compare the treatment results of low-dose-rate (Ld) ISRT and high-dose-rate (HDR) ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 1992 through October 1996, 59 patients with cancer of the early mobile tongue were registered in this Phase III study. Eight patients were excluded from the evaluation because of violations of the requirements for this study. Of 51 eligible patients, 26 patients were treated with LDR-ISRT (70 Gy/4-9 days) and 25 patients with HDR-ISRT (60 Gy/10 fractions/1 week). For the hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT, the time interval between 2 fractions was more than 6 h. Results: Five-year local control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 84% and 87% respectively. Nodal metastasis occurred in 6 patients in each group. Five-year nodal control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 77% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer has the same local control compared with continuous LDR-ISRT. Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT is an alternative treatment for continuous LDR-ISRT

  6. Concurrent radiotherapy and carboplatin in non small-cell lung cancer: a pilot study using conventional and accelerated fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.; Bishop, J.; Crennan, E.; Olver, I.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen patients with unresectable non small cell lung cancer were treated with radical radiotherapy and carboplatin administered in order to ascertain the toxicity of concurent carboplatin/radiotherapy. The first 6 patients were treated to a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks, with carboplatin 70 mg/m 2 /day on days 1 to 5 during weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. The remaining 7 patients were given 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks, treating twice a day (accelerated fractionation). Carboplatin was given as above but only during week 1 of radiotherapy. Twelve patients completed radiotherapy without interruption but 2 patients developed grade 3 neutropenia. Major toxicity was oesophagitis, one patient requiring nasogastric feeding. Average duration of dysphagia (any grade) in the accelerated fractionation group was 21 weeks. Four patients achieved good partial responses even though initial tumour volume was large. It is concluded that this treatment is associated with increased but acceptable early mucosal toxicity. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  7. WE-G-BRD-09: Novel MRI Compatible Electron Accelerator for MRI-Linac Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gierman, S; Schmerge, J [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Holloway, L [Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Fahrig, R [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy is a rapidly growing field; however current linacs are not designed to operate in MRI fringe fields. As such, current MRI- Linac systems require magnetic shielding, impairing MR image quality and system flexibility. Here, we present a bespoke electron accelerator concept with robust operation in in-line magnetic fields. Methods: For in-line MRI-Linac systems, electron gun performance is the major constraint on accelerator performance. To overcome this, we propose placing a cathode directly within the first accelerating cavity. Such a configuration is used extensively in high energy particle physics, but not previously for radiotherapy. Benchmarked computational modelling (CST, Darmstadt, Germany) was employed to design and assess a 5.5 cell side coupled accelerator with a temperature limited thermionic cathode in the first accelerating cell. This simulation was coupled to magnetic fields from a 1T MRI model to assess robustness in magnetic fields for Source to Isocenter Distance between 1 and 2 meters. Performance was compared to a conventional electron gun based system in the same magnetic field. Results: A temperature limited cathode (work function 1.8eV, temperature 1245K, emission constant 60A/K/cm{sup 2}) will emit a mean current density of 24mA/mm{sup 2} (Richardson’s Law). We modeled a circular cathode with radius 2mm and mean current 300mA. Capture efficiency of the device was 43%, resulting in target current of 130 mA. The electron beam had a FWHM of 0.2mm, and mean energy of 5.9MeV (interquartile spread of 0.1MeV). Such an electron beam is suitable for radiotherapy, comparing favourably to conventional systems. This model was robust to operation the MRI fringe field, with a maximum current loss of 6% compared to 85% for the conventional system. Conclusion: The bespoke electron accelerator is robust to operation in in-line magnetic fields. This will enable MRI-Linacs with no accelerator magnetic shielding, and minimise

  8. Monte Carlo based simulation of LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator along with beam shaper applicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Heidarloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is one of the radiotherapy methods that delivers a high single fraction of radiation dose to the patient in one session during the surgery. Beam shaper applicator is one of the applicators that is recently employed with this radiotherapy method. This applicator has a considerable application in treatment of large tumors. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam produced by LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator in conjunction with this applicator have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation by MCNP code. The results showed that the electron beam produced by the beam shaper applicator would have the desirable dosimetric characteristics, so that the mentioned applicator can be considered for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the good agreement between the results of simulation and practical dosimetry, confirms the applicability of Monte Carlo method in determining the dosimetric parameters of electron beam  intraoperative radiotherapy

  9. On the Detectability of Acoustic Waves Induced Following Irradiation by a Radiotherapy Linear Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Susannah; Leger, Pierre; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-02-11

    Irradiating an object with a megavoltage photon beam generated by a clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) induces acoustic waves through the photoacoustic effect. The detection and characterization of such acoustic waves has potential applications in radiation therapy dosimetry. The purpose of this work was to gain insight into the properties of such acoustic waves by simulating and experimentally detecting them in a well-defined system consisting of a metal block suspended in a water tank. A novel simulation workflow was developed by combining radiotherapy Monte Carlo and acoustic wave transport simulation techniques. Different set-up parameters such as photon beam energy, metal block depth, metal block width, and metal block material were varied, and the simulated and experimental acoustic waveforms showed the same relative amplitude trends and frequency variations for such setup changes. The simulation platform developed in this work can easily be extended to other irradiation situations, and will be an invaluable tool for developing a radiotherapy dosimetry system based on the detection of the acoustic waves induced following linear accelerator irradiation.

  10. Dose characteristics of in-house-built collimators for stereotactic radiotherapy with a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrgaard, F. Stefan E.; Kulmala, Jarmo A.J.; Minn, Heikki R.I.; Sipilae, Petri M.

    1998-01-01

    Dose characteristics of a stereotactic radiotherapy unit based on a standard Varian Clinac 4/100 4 MV linear accelerator, in-house-built Lipowitz collimators and the SMART stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning software have been determined. Beam collimation is constituted from the standard collimators of the linear accelerator and a tertiary collimation consisting of a replaceable divergent Lipowitz collimator. Four collimators with isocentre diameters of 15, 25, 35 and 45 mm, respectively, were constructed. Beam characteristics were measured in air, acrylic or water with ionization chamber, photon diode, electron diode, diamond detector and film. Monte Carlo simulation was also applied. The radiation leakage under the collimators was less than 1% at 50 mm depth in water. Specific beam characteristics for each collimator were imported to SMART and dose planning with five non-coplanar converging 140 deg. arcs separated by 36 deg. angles was performed for treatment of a RANDO phantom. Dose verification was made with TLD and radiochromic film. The in-house-built collimators were found to be suitable for stereotactic radiotherapy and patient treatments with this system are in progress. (author)

  11. [Radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: State of the art and future directions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, U; Huguet, F; Pointreau, Y; Pradier, O

    2017-10-01

    Therapeutic principles of radiation therapy in head and neck carcinomas will be discussed in this review. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin should be standard. In case of contraindication to chemotherapy, cetuximab is an option, while hyperfractionation should be considered in patients unfit for concomitant treatment. Concomitant chemotherapy should be administered in the presence of extracapsular extensions and positive margins in the postoperative setting. Current research areas such as desescalation in human papillomavirus-positive tumours, adaptive radiotherapy, radiomics and immunotherapy will also be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Late neurotoxicity after nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Daoud, J.; Khabir, A.; Boudawara, T.; Ben Mahfoudh, K.; Ghorbel, A.; Frikha, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A retrospective analysis of risk factors for late neurological toxicity after nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy. Patients and methods Between 1993 and 2004, 239 patients with non metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated by radiotherapy associated or not to chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered with two modalities: hyperfractionated for 82 patients and conventional fractionation for 157 patients. We evaluated the impact of tumour stage, age, gender, radiotherapy schedule and chemotherapy on neurological toxicity. Results After a mean follow-up of 107 months (35-176 months), 21 patients (8.8%) developed neurological complications, such as temporal necrosis in nine cases, brain stem necrosis in five cases, optics nerve atrophy in two cases and myelitis in one case. Five- and ten-year free of toxicity survival was 95 and 84% respectively. Young patients had greater risk of temporal necrosis, and hyperfractionated radiotherapy was associated with a significantly higher risk of neurological complications (14.6% vs 5.7%, p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, hyperfractionation and age were insignificant. Conclusion Late neurological toxicity after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma was rare. Younger age and hyperfractionation were considered as risk factors of neurological toxicity in our study

  13. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy in Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.; Burgers, J.M.V.; Hawlicek, R.; Trott, K.R.; Juergens, H.

    1988-01-01

    In 1981, the German Society of Pediatric Oncology initiated a multi-institutional study for the treatment of Ewing's sarcoma. The protocol (Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study, CESS 81) consisted of four courses of a four-drug-regimen (VACA), each course taking nine weeks. Local therapy (radical surgery or resection plus irradiation or radiotherapy alone) was performed after the second course. The results of CESS 81 can be summarized as follows: VACA-chemotherapy is effective in controlling systemic disease. Initial tumor mass and response to initial chemotherapy are of major prognostic value for local control and survival. Permanent local control is a problem, especially in irradiated patients. The high local failure rate in irradiated patients in CESS 81 could be attributable to the following reasons: Late start of local therapy (after 18 weeks of chemotherapy), uneven distribution of prognostic parameters: Large tumors were more often irradiated than operated, protocol deviations in irradiated patients. (orig.)

  14. Variations in tumour oxygen tension (pO2) during accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, M.; Eschwege, F.; Luboinski, B.; Wibault, P.; Weeger, P.; Lusinchi, A.; Lartigau, E.

    1998-01-01

    The study was performed to assess the effect of accelerated radiotherapy on oxygenation of primary tumours and metastatic nodes in patients with advanced head and neck tumours. In 14 patients with head and neck tumour, oxygen tension (pO 2 ) was evaluated in normal tissues and tumours (primary tumour or metastatic neck node) before (0 Gy) and after 2 weeks (32 Gy) of accelerated radiotherapy (70 Gy in 3.5 weeks, with three daily fractions). Radiotherapy was combined with carbogen breathing in 5 patients. pO 2 was measured using a polarographic technique. For pooled normal tissues, median pO 2 was 38 mmHg before treatment and 46 mmHg after 2 weeks. For tumours, very low values ( 2 12 mmHg before treatment versus 26 mmHg after 2 weeks, P 2 was 44 mmHg at 2 weeks, compared with 13.5 mmHg before treatment (P=0.05). Very low pO 2 values, corresponding to tumour hypoxia, were found in the tumours (primary and metastatic neck nodes) prior to accelerated treatment. During the first 2 weeks of accelerated treatment, an increase in median pO 2 was found in nine of the 14 tumours, together with a decrease in the frequency of very low values. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall....... Key Words: Head and Neck cancer , Radiotherapy , Altered fractionation , Mitomycin C....

  16. Compliance to the prescribed dose and overall treatment time in five randomized clinical trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Azza A.; Bentzen, Soeren M.; Bernier, Jacques; Saunders, Michele I.; Horiot, Jean-Claude; Bogaert, Walter van den; Cummings, Bernard J.; Dische, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate compliance to the prescribed dose-fractionation schedule in five randomized controlled trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Individual patient data from 2566 patients participating in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22791, EORTC 22811, EORTC 22851, Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), and continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) head-and-neck trials were merged in the fractionation IMPACT (Intergroup Merger of Patient data from Altered or Conventional Treatment schedules) study database. The ideal treatment time was defined as the minimum time required to deliver a prescribed schedule. Compliance to the prescribed overall treatment time was quantified as the difference between the actual and the ideal overall time. An overall measure of compliance in an individual patient, the total dose lost (TDL), was calculated as the dose lost due to prolongation of therapy (assuming a D prolif of 0.64 Gy/day) plus the difference between the prescribed and the actual dose given. Results: The time in excess of the ideal ranged up to 97 days (average 3.9 days), and 25% of the patients had delays of 6 days or more. World Health Organization (WHO) performance status and nodal stage had a significant effect on TDL. TDL was significantly higher in the conventional than in the altered arm of the EORTC 22851 and CHART trials. In the PMH trial, TDL was significantly higher in the hyperfractionation than in the conventional arm. Centers participating in the three EORTC trials varied significantly in their compliance. There was a significant improvement in compliance in patients treated more recently. Conclusions: Even in randomized controlled trials, compliance to the prescribed radiation therapy schedule may be relatively poor, especially after conventional fractionation. This affects the interpretation of the outcome of these trials

  17. Alterations of total non stimulated salivary flow in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx submitted to hyperfractionated radiation therapy; Alteracoes do fluxo salivar total nao estimulado em pacientes portadores de carcinoma espinocelular de boca e orofaringe submetidos a radioterapia por hiperfracionamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guebur, Maria Isabela [Faculdades Integradas Espirita, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: isabelaguebur@aol.com; Rapoport, Abrao [Hospital Heliopolis (HOSPHEL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia e Traumatologia Buco-Maxico-Facial; Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir de; Ramos, Gyl Henrique Albrecht [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco; Pereira, Jose Carlos Gasparin [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2004-07-01

    Prevention and early diagnosis are actually the most effective measures that we dispose to improve the prognostic of the malignant tumors. The mouth and oropharynx tumors are treated with success, when early diagnosed. The radiotherapy is almost always one of the selected treatments for these tumors. When cancer is diagnosed in advanced stages, many a time the treatment needs to be carried out swiftly to be efficient, and consequently the radio therapist use the hyperfractionated therapy, with the patient receiving two lower doses of radiation in two sessions daily, amounting to a higher daily dosage, of about 160 cGy/2x/day. When the major salivary glands are present in the radiated field, the xerostomia appears by the second week of treatment (1500 to 2000 cGy), changing the patient's health, and causing difficulties for him to eat, speak and sleep. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quantitative alterations of the total non stimulated salivate flow of patients who underwent hyperfractionated therapy for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of mouth and oropharynx. Samples of twelve male patients saliva from Erasto Gaertner Hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil, were examined. Two samples of saliva were collected from each patient, the first one before the beginning of the radiotherapy, and the second at the end of the treatment. As a result, we obtained salivary loss in 91.7% of the patients, with a percentage of total salivary flow loss of 62.9%, registered in the second collection. We concluded that the hyperfractionated therapy causes a marked xerostomia when the major salivary glands are in the radiated field. (author)

  18. Fanconi's anemia and clinical radiosensitivity. Report on two adult patients with locally advanced solid tumors treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, M.; Karstens, J.H.; Schindler, D.; Gross, M.; Doerk, T.; Morlot, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA) may exhibit an increased clinical radiosensitivity of various degree, although detailed clinical data are scarce. We report on two cases to underline the possible challenges in the radiotherapy of FA patients. Case Report and Results: Two 24- and 32-year-old male patients with FA were treated by definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers. In the first patient, long-term tumor control could be achieved after delivery of 67 Gy with a - in part - hyperfractionated split-course treatment regimen and, concurrently, one course of carboplatin followed by salvage neck dissection. Acute toxicity was marked, but no severe treatment-related late effects occurred. 5 years later, additional radiotherapy was administered due to a second (squamous cell carcinoma of the anus) and third (squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck) primary, which the patient succumbed to. By contrast, the second patient experienced fatal acute hematologic toxicity after delivery of only 8 Gy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy. While the diagnosis FA could be based on flow cytometric analysis of a lymphocyte culture in the second patient, the diagnosis in the first patient had to be confirmed by hypersensitivity to mitomycin of a fibroblast cell line due to complete somatic lymphohematopoietic mosaicism. In this patient, phenotype complementation and molecular genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in the FANCA gene. The first patient has not been considered to have FA until he presented with his second tumor. Conclusion: FA has to be considered in patients presenting at young age with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or anus. The diagnosis FA is of immediate importance for guiding the optimal choice of treatment. Radiotherapy or even radiochemotherapy seems to be feasible and effective in individual cases. (orig.)

  19. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Vicioso, E.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  20. Prospective randomized comparison of single-dose versus hyperfractionated total-body irradiation in patients with hematologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, T.; Benhamou, E.; Bourhis, J.H.; Dhermain, F.; Guillot-Valls, D.; Ganansia, V.; Luboinski, M.; Perez, A.; Cosset, J.M.; Socie, G.; Baume, D.; Bouaouina, N.; Briot, E.; Baudre, A.; Bridier, A.; Pico, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of the two irradiation modes are similar, but the hyperfractionated irradiation seems superior in term of global and specific survival. The incidence rates of pneumopathies are not different between the two groups but the incidence rate of the liver vein-occlusive illness is superior in the group treated by non fractionated whole body irradiation. The cost of the hyperfractionated whole body irradiation is superior to this one of the non fractionated whole body irradiation around a thousand dollars. (N.C.)

  1. Physical-dosimetric enabling a dual linear accelerator 3D planning systems for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, Rodolfo; Martinez, William; Arelis, Lores; Morales, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The process of commissioning clinical linear accelerator requires a dual comprehensive study of the therapeutic beam parameters, both photons Electron. All information gained by measuring physical and dosimetric these beams must be analyzed, processed and refined for further modeling in computer-based treatment planning (RTPS). Of professionalism of this process will depend on the accuracy and precision of the calculations the prescribed doses. This paper aims to demonstrate availability clinical linear accelerator system-RTPS with late radiotherapy treatments shaped beam of photons and electrons. (author)

  2. Fanconi's anemia and clinical radiosensitivity. Report on two adult patients with locally advanced solid tumors treated by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, M.; Karstens, J.H. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schindler, D.; Gross, M. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics; Doerk, T. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Morlot, S. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics

    2003-11-01

    Background: Patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA) may exhibit an increased clinical radiosensitivity of various degree, although detailed clinical data are scarce. We report on two cases to underline the possible challenges in the radiotherapy of FA patients. Case Report and Results: Two 24- and 32-year-old male patients with FA were treated by definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers. In the first patient, long-term tumor control could be achieved after delivery of 67 Gy with a - in part - hyperfractionated split-course treatment regimen and, concurrently, one course of carboplatin followed by salvage neck dissection. Acute toxicity was marked, but no severe treatment-related late effects occurred. 5 years later, additional radiotherapy was administered due to a second (squamous cell carcinoma of the anus) and third (squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck) primary, which the patient succumbed to. By contrast, the second patient experienced fatal acute hematologic toxicity after delivery of only 8 Gy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy. While the diagnosis FA could be based on flow cytometric analysis of a lymphocyte culture in the second patient, the diagnosis in the first patient had to be confirmed by hypersensitivity to mitomycin of a fibroblast cell line due to complete somatic lymphohematopoietic mosaicism. In this patient, phenotype complementation and molecular genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in the FANCA gene. The first patient has not been considered to have FA until he presented with his second tumor. Conclusion: FA has to be considered in patients presenting at young age with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or anus. The diagnosis FA is of immediate importance for guiding the optimal choice of treatment. Radiotherapy or even radiochemotherapy seems to be feasible and effective in individual cases. (orig.)

  3. A proliferation saturation index to predict radiation response and personalize radiotherapy fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokopiou, Sotiris; Moros, Eduardo G.; Poleszczuk, Jan; Caudell, Jimmy; Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Latifi, Kujtim; Lee, Jae K.; Myerson, Robert; Harrison, Louis B.; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Although altered protocols that challenge conventional radiation fractionation have been tested in prospective clinical trials, we still have limited understanding of how to select the most appropriate fractionation schedule for individual patients. Currently, the prescription of definitive radiotherapy is based on the primary site and stage, without regard to patient-specific tumor or host factors that may influence outcome. We hypothesize that the proportion of radiosensitive proliferating cells is dependent on the saturation of the tumor carrying capacity. This may serve as a prognostic factor for personalized radiotherapy (RT) fractionation. We introduce a proliferation saturation index (PSI), which is defined as the ratio of tumor volume to the host-influenced tumor carrying capacity. Carrying capacity is as a conceptual measure of the maximum volume that can be supported by the current tumor environment including oxygen and nutrient availability, immune surveillance and acidity. PSI is estimated from two temporally separated routine pre-radiotherapy computed tomography scans and a deterministic logistic tumor growth model. We introduce the patient-specific pre-treatment PSI into a model of tumor growth and radiotherapy response, and fit the model to retrospective data of four non-small cell lung cancer patients treated exclusively with standard fractionation. We then simulate both a clinical trial hyperfractionation protocol and daily fractionations, with equal biologically effective dose, to compare tumor volume reduction as a function of pretreatment PSI. With tumor doubling time and radiosensitivity assumed constant across patients, a patient-specific pretreatment PSI is sufficient to fit individual patient response data (R 2 = 0.98). PSI varies greatly between patients (coefficient of variation >128 %) and correlates inversely with radiotherapy response. For this study, our simulations suggest that only patients with intermediate PSI (0.45–0.9) are

  4. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  5. Definitive Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Young; Park, Kyung Ran

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The effect of dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy on local control and survival was investigated in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Materials and Methods : Ninety eight patients with biopsy-proven unresectable non-small cell lung cancer without distant metastases or medically inoperable patients with lower-stage were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone. Group A were treated by thoracic irradiation, 6000 cGy or less in total tumor dose with daily fractions of 180 to 200 cGy: and group B was treated with 6500 cGy of same daily fractions. Results : The actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group was 54% at 1 year, 26.6% at 2 years and 16.4% at 3 years with a median survival time of 13 months. Statistically significant prognostic factors that affect survival rate were stage and N-stage. However, no improvement in local control and survival has been seen with higher dose radiotherapy(group B). Conclusion : Dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy was no effect on local control and survival rate. To increase the survival rate of non-small cell lung cancer hyperfractionated radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be considered

  6. Dose-response relationship with radiotherapy: an evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, B.; Rauglaudre, G. de; Mineur, L.; Alfonsi, M.; Reboul, F.

    2003-01-01

    The dose-response relationship is a fundamental basis of radiobiology. Despite many clinical data, difficulties remain to demonstrate a relation between dose and local control: relative role of treatment associated with radiation therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy), tumor heterogeneity, few prospective randomized studies, uncertainty of local control assessment. Three different situations are discussed: tumors with high local control probabilities for which dose effect is demonstrated by randomized studies (breast cancer) or sound retrospective data (soft tissues sarcomas), tumors with intermediate local control probabilities for which dose effect seems to be important according to retrospective studies and ongoing or published phase III trials (prostate cancer), tumors with low local control probabilities for which dose effect appears to be modest beyond standard doses, and inferior to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy (lung and oesophageal cancer). For head and neck tumors, the dose-response relationship has been explored through hyperfractionation and accelerated radiation therapy and a dose effect has been demonstrated but must be compared to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy. Last but not least, the development of conformal radiotherapy allow the exploration of the dose response relationship for tumors such as hepatocellular carcinomas traditionally excluded from the field of conventional radiation therapy. In conclusion, the dose-response relationship remains a sound basis of radiation therapy for many tumors and is a parameter to take into account for further randomized studies. (author)

  7. A multi-institutional phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: initial report of ECOG 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannehill, Scott P.; Froseth, Carrie; Wagner, Henry; Petereit, Dan P.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, acute toxicity, response and survival in a trial of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a t.i.d. regimen 5 days a week in an 8 hour schedule. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (pts) from 6 institutions were enrolled in this pilot trial. Pt characteristics: 24 male, 6 female; median age 67 yrs (range 47-84); ECOG PS 0 in 22 pts, 1 in 8 pts; weight loss >5% in 7 pts. Stage was II (inoperable) in 1 pt, IIIA in 12 pts, and IIIB in 17 pts. Radiation therapy (total 57.6 Gy/36 fx) encompassing gross disease and draining lymphatics to 36 Gy (1.5 Gy b.i.d., 8 hours apart) with daily off-cord concomitant boost to 21.6 Gy (1.8 Gy 4 hours after first fraction) was given over 12 treatment days (15 elapsed days). Results: (28(30)) (93%) pts completed radiation therapy on schedule without toxicity-related treatment interruptions. Two pts did not complete radiation therapy; 1 due to in-field progression and 1 due to fatal acute gastric bleed unrelated to therapy. Two additional pts died in the first 6 weeks: 1 due to a presumed acute cardiovascular event and another due to complications of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The major treatment-related toxicities were esophagitis in 6 pts (18%: 5 Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4) scored using a study specific esophagitis grading tool and 2 grade 3 dermatitis, in a total of 6 pts. Only 1 pt (3%) required hospitalization for IV hydration (Grade 4 esophagitis). Median weight loss at 6 weeks was 3 kg. Response data are pending in 2 pts and unavailable in 2 due to early death. Of the remaining 26 pts, local response analysis showed CR in 4, PR in 14, stable in 7 and progressive disease in 1 for an overall response rate of (18(26)) (69%). With a median potential follow-up of 13 months, the median survival has not yet been reached. The 1-yr actuarial survival is 63%. Exclusion of the 3 pts experiencing early death (in

  8. Lung damage following bone marrow transplantation after hyperfractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latini, Paolo; Aristei, Cynthia; Checcaglini, Franco; Maranzano, Ernesto; Panizza, B.M.; Perrucci, Elisabetta (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Radiation Oncology Service); Aversa, Franco; Martelli, M.F. (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Department of Haematology); Raymondi, Carlo (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Radiation Physics Service)

    1991-10-01

    From July 1985 to December 1989, 72 evaluable patients aged 6-51 (median age 27) suffering from hematological malignancies received allo-geneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) depleted of T-lymphocytes to reduce risks of graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD); 57 were matched and 15 mis-matched. Three different conditioning regiments were used in an effort to enhance cytoreduction without increase extramedullary toxicity. Mis-matched patients were treated with more immunosuppressive regimens. Total body irradiation (TBI) was given in 3 doses/day, 5 h apart over 4 days for a total of 12 fractions. The dose to the lungs was 14.4, 15.6 and 9 Gy according to the conditioning regimen. The incidence of inter-stitial pneumonia (IP) was 12.3 percent in matched and 46.7 in mis-matched patients. The results seem to indicate that lung toxicity is correlated with the intensity of the conditioning regimen, the stage of disease and, in mismatched patients, with the degree of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) disparity and the poor post-BMT reconstitution, rather than the radiotherapy dose delivered to the lungs. On the contrary, the hyperfractionated scheme adopted, the absence of GvHD and, perhaps, the post-TBI administration of cyclophosphamide all seem to have contributed to the low incidence of IP in the matched patients. (author). 30 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab.

  9. Lung damage following bone marrow transplantation after hyperfractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, Paolo; Aristei, Cynthia; Checcaglini, Franco; Maranzano, Ernesto; Panizza, B.M.; Perrucci, Elisabetta; Aversa, Franco; Martelli, M.F.; Raymondi, Carlo

    1991-01-01

    From July 1985 to December 1989, 72 evaluable patients aged 6-51 (median age 27) suffering from hematological malignancies received allo-geneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) depleted of T-lymphocytes to reduce risks of graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD); 57 were matched and 15 mis-matched. Three different conditioning regiments were used in an effort to enhance cytoreduction without increase extramedullary toxicity. Mis-matched patients were treated with more immunosuppressive regimens. Total body irradiation (TBI) was given in 3 doses/day, 5 h apart over 4 days for a total of 12 fractions. The dose to the lungs was 14.4, 15.6 and 9 Gy according to the conditioning regimen. The incidence of inter-stitial pneumonia (IP) was 12.3 percent in matched and 46.7 in mis-matched patients. The results seem to indicate that lung toxicity is correlated with the intensity of the conditioning regimen, the stage of disease and, in mismatched patients, with the degree of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) disparity and the poor post-BMT reconstitution, rather than the radiotherapy dose delivered to the lungs. On the contrary, the hyperfractionated scheme adopted, the absence of GvHD and, perhaps, the post-TBI administration of cyclophosphamide all seem to have contributed to the low incidence of IP in the matched patients. (author). 30 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Exclusive radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, P.; Bossi, A.; Molteni, M.; Richetti, A.; Tordiglione, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyse a retrospective series of 90 consecutive patients (pts) affected with locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma (T3-4, N0-3 - TNM, UICC 1978) who were radically irradiated from November 1979 to December 1986 at the Radiotherapy Department of the General Hospital of Varese. All the patients were treated with 60 Co and two opposed parallel lateral fields and progressive shrinkage: 66 conventional fractionation (2 Gy once a day, 5 times a week), 24 with an accelerated hyperfractionated regimen (1.5 Gy twice a day, 5 times a week). The median total dose delivered to the tumor and clinically involved nodes was 64 Gy (1678 reu, CRE). Median follow-up was 21 months (range: 3-113). The 5-year overall survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 40.5%. The 5-year disease-free survival, for 47 patients in complete remission at the end of radiotherapy, was 51.9% after irradiation alone and 56.7% with salvage surgery. There were no statistically significant differences in survival according to local spread (T3 vs T4), nodal status (N0 vs N1-3) and dose fractionation regimen (conventional vs accelerated hyper-fractionated). Isoeffect (CRE) values above 1751 reu obtained a 3-year loco-regional control rate was 33.3%. Relevant late sequelae were not observed. Our findings suggest that primary radiotherapy with salvage surgery in reserve could be considered as an effective choice for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma, at least in selected groups of patients

  11. A survey of the practice and management of radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A; Kearton, J; Hayman, O

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine current radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control (QC) practice in the UK, as a comparative benchmark and indicator of development needs, and to raise awareness of QC as a key performance indicator. All UK radiotherapy centres were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their local QC processes, and submit their QC schedules. The range of QC tests, frequency of measurements and acceptable tolerances in use across the UK were analysed, and consensus and range statistics determined. 72% of the UK's 62 radiotherapy centres completed the questionnaire and 40% provided their QC schedules. 60 separate QC tests were identified from the returned schedules. There was a large variation in the total time devoted to QC between centres: interquartile range from 13 to 26 h per linear accelerator per month. There has been a move from weekly to monthly testing of output calibration in the last decade, with reliance on daily constancy testing equipment. 33% of centres thought their schedules were in need of an update and only 30% used risk-assessment approaches to determine local QC schedule content. Less than 30% of centres regularly complete all planned QC tests each month, although 96% achieve over 80% of tests. A comprehensive "snapshot" of linear accelerator QC testing practice in the UK has been collated, which demonstrates reasonable agreement between centres in their stated QC test frequencies. However, intelligent design of QC schedules and management is necessary to ensure efficiency and appropriateness.

  12. A non-randomised, single-centre comparison of induction chemotherapy followed by radiochemotherapy versus concomitant chemotherapy with hyperfractionated radiotherapy in inoperable head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Reinhold; Hildebrandt, Bert; Tilly, Wolfgang; Riess, Hanno; Felix, Roland; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The application of induction chemotherapy failed to provide a consistent benefit for local control in primary treatment of advanced head and neck (H&N) cancers. The aim of this study was to compare the results of concomitant application of radiochemotherapy for treating locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma in comparison with the former standard of sequential radiochemotherapy. Between 1987 and 1995 we treated 122 patients with unresectable (stage IV head and neck) cancer by two different protocols. The sequential protocol (SEQ; 1987–1992) started with two courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin [CDDP] + 120-h continuous infusions (c.i.) of folinic acid [FA] and 5-fluorouracil [5-FU]), followed by a course of radiochemotherapy using conventional fractionation up to 70 Gy. The concomitant protocol (CON; since 1993) combined two courses of FA/5-FU c.i. plus mitomycin (MMC) concomitantly with a course of radiotherapy up to 30 Gy in conventional fractionation, followed by a hyperfractionated course up to 72 Gy. Results from the two groups were compared. Patient and tumor characteristics were balanced (SEQ = 70, CON = 52 pts.). Mean radiation dose achieved (65.3 Gy vs. 71.6 Gy, p = 0.00), response rates (67 vs. 90 % for primary, p = 0.02), and local control (LC; 17.6% vs. 41%, p = 0.03), were significantly lower in the SEQ group, revealing a trend towards lower disease-specific (DSS; 19.8% vs. 31.4%, p = 0.08) and overall (14.7% vs. 23.7%, p = 0.11) survival rates after 5 years. Mucositis grades III and IV prevailed in the CON group (54% versus 44%). Late toxicity was similar in both groups. Concurrent chemotherapy seemed more effective in treating head and neck tumors than induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation, resulting in better local control and a trend towards improved survival

  13. A non-randomised, single-centre comparison of induction chemotherapy followed by radiochemotherapy versus concomitant chemotherapy with hyperfractionated radiotherapy in inoperable head and neck carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Roland

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of induction chemotherapy failed to provide a consistent benefit for local control in primary treatment of advanced head and neck (H&N cancers. The aim of this study was to compare the results of concomitant application of radiochemotherapy for treating locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma in comparison with the former standard of sequential radiochemotherapy. Methods Between 1987 and 1995 we treated 122 patients with unresectable (stage IV head and neck cancer by two different protocols. The sequential protocol (SEQ; 1987–1992 started with two courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin [CDDP] + 120-h continuous infusions (c.i. of folinic acid [FA] and 5-fluorouracil [5-FU], followed by a course of radiochemotherapy using conventional fractionation up to 70 Gy. The concomitant protocol (CON; since 1993 combined two courses of FA/5-FU c.i. plus mitomycin (MMC concomitantly with a course of radiotherapy up to 30 Gy in conventional fractionation, followed by a hyperfractionated course up to 72 Gy. Results from the two groups were compared. Results Patient and tumor characteristics were balanced (SEQ = 70, CON = 52 pts.. Mean radiation dose achieved (65.3 Gy vs. 71.6 Gy, p = 0.00, response rates (67 vs. 90 % for primary, p = 0.02, and local control (LC; 17.6% vs. 41%, p = 0.03, were significantly lower in the SEQ group, revealing a trend towards lower disease-specific (DSS; 19.8% vs. 31.4%, p = 0.08 and overall (14.7% vs. 23.7%, p = 0.11 survival rates after 5 years. Mucositis grades III and IV prevailed in the CON group (54% versus 44%. Late toxicity was similar in both groups. Conclusion Concurrent chemotherapy seemed more effective in treating head and neck tumors than induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation, resulting in better local control and a trend towards improved survival.

  14. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  15. Radiotherapy for stage IV oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kaori; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Motegi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with stage IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy in our facility from January 1993 to August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of the patients was 34-84 (median 62) years old. Thirty-four were male and 14 were female. Subsite of the tumor was anterior: 16, lateral: 39, posterior: 1, and superior: 1. Forty-nine patients were treated with chemotherapy. Induction chemotherapy (ICT) was done in 25 patients, ICT+concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in 15 patients, and CCRT in 9 patients. A dose of 60-82 Gy (median 72 Gy) by hyperfractionated radiotherapy, at 1.2 Gy/fraction twice a day, was delivered in 37 patients, and 60-72 Gy (median 66 Gy) with a conventional daily fractionation in 20 patients. Salvage surgery was performed in 5 patients as a part of primary treatment after radiotherapy. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 52.9% and 51.4%, respectively. By univariate analysis, the impact of age, sex, T-stage, N-stage, histological differentiation, chemotherapy and fractionation of radiation therapy on survivals were evaluated. T-stage, N-stage and histological differentiation were significantly covariate correlated with survival. The treatment results were not satisfactory. Further investigation of the treatment strategy to improve the treatment outcome of advanced oropharyngeal cancer is desired. (author)

  16. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Henrique Lima; Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  17. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  18. Fifteen-year results of a randomized prospective trial of hyperfractionated chest wall irradiation versus once-daily chest wall irradiation after chemotherapy and mastectomy for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia; Domain, Delora; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tereffe, Welela; Singletary, S. Eva; Thomas, Eva; Buzdar, Aman U.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of a Phase III clinical trial that investigated whether a hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) schedule could reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1989, 200 patients with clinical Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer were enrolled in a prospective study investigating neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 179 patients treated with mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 108 participated in a randomized component of the trial that compared a dose-escalated, hyperfractionated (twice-daily, b.i.d.) chest wall RT schedule (72 Gy in 1.2-Gy b.i.d. fractions) with a once-daily (q.d.) schedule (60 Gy in 2-Gy q.d. fractions). In both arms of the study, the supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex were treated once daily to 50 Gy. The median follow-up period was 15 years. Results: The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence rate was 7% for the q.d. arm and 12% for the b.i.d. arm (p = 0.36). The rates of severe acute toxicity were similar (4% for q.d. vs. 5% for b.i.d.), but moist desquamation developed in 42% of patients in the b.i.d. arm compared with 28% of the patients in the q.d. arm (p = 0.16). The 15-year actuarial rate of severe late RT complications did not differ between the two arms (6% for q.d. vs. 11% for b.i.d., p = 0.54). Conclusion: Although the sample size of this study was small, we found no evidence that this hyperfractionation schedule of postmastectomy RT offered a clinical advantage. Therefore, we have concluded that it should not be further studied in this cohort of patients

  19. Present state of studies on FFAG accelerator for radiotherapy of cancer in National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misu, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    From 2001, developmental contract studies with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for a compact accelerator for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer started in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with use of fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator, which had been developed in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This paper describes the present state of those studies. Described are FFAG accelerator design for repeated acceleration for 200 Hz or more toward the carbon ion at 400 MeV/u with the range of 25 cm in water, FFAG optical systems for these purposes by linear analyses, and the present situation of the design. Technological problems yielded and future study plan are also commented. (N.I.)

  20. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprague Lisa D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %, one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 % and one fifth (19 % suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion. This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy. All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Results Forty patients (63 % received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d, respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 % had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 % suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient 10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. Conclusion The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in about 50 % of the patients with significant but acceptable toxicity. Most patients

  1. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-01-01

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol 'SCHARC' and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m 2 /d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m 2 /d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient < 1.0 g/nl) and the mean hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led

  2. Split course hyperfractionated accelerated radio-chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-12-07

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1-5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750-1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69-70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2-3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in

  3. Health related quality of life in locally advanced NSCLC treated with high dose radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy or cetuximab – Pooled results from two prospective clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallqvist, Andreas; Bergman, Bengt; Nyman, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage III, data on patient reported health-related quality of life (HRQL) are scarce, especially regarding concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Aims: To evaluate HRQL in patients treated with high dose radiotherapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy or the antibody cetuximab. Methods: The study population comprised all patients enroled in either of two phase II trials in locally advanced NSCLC performed in Sweden 2002–2007. The RAKET trial investigated three different ways of increasing local control (accelerated hyperfractionated treatment or concurrent daily or weekly chemotherapy). The Satellite trial evaluated the addition of cetuximab to thoracic irradiation. HRQL was measured at four time points: At baseline, before radiotherapy, 4–6 weeks after radiotherapy and at 3 months follow-up, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC14 set of questionnaires. Results: 154/220 patients (65%) who completed HRQL assessments at all time points were included in the longitudinal study. There was a significant decline over time regarding most functioning measures. Dyspnoea and fatigue gradually deteriorated without recovery after completed treatment. Chemotherapy related symptoms showed a transient deterioration, whereas radiotherapy related esophagitis had not fully recovered at 3 months. Patients with stage IIIA disease tended to recover better regarding global QL, fatigue and dyspnoea compared to patients with stage IIIB. Patients with WHO performance status (PS) 0 reported improved global QL and less fatigue over time compared with PS 1. Concurrent chemotherapy was associated with more pronounced fatigue and dysphagia, and worse global QL compared with concurrent cetuximab. Baseline physical functioning was an independent predictor of overall survival. Conclusion: Patients undergoing high dose thoracic radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy or cetuximab reported a gradual deterioration in functioning, dyspnoea and fatigue, while

  4. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  5. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [de

  6. Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Breast in Prone Position: Dosimetric Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Mitchell, James; Rosenstein, Barry; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the physics and dosimetry results of a trial of accelerated intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the whole breast with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in patients treated in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent computed tomography planning and treatment in the prone position on a dedicated treatment platform. The platform has an open aperture on the side to allow for the index breast to fall away from the chest wall. Noncontrast computed tomography images were acquired at 2.5- or 3.75-mm-thick intervals, from the level of the mandible to below the diaphragm. A dose of 40.5 Gy was delivered to the entire breast at 2.7-Gy fractions in 15 fractions. An additional dose of 0.5 Gy was delivered as a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy site, with a 1-cm margin, using inverse planning, for a total dose of 48 Gy in 15 fractions. No more than 10% of the heart and lung volume was allowed to receive >18 and >20 Gy, respectively. Results: Between September 2003 and August 2005, 91 patients were enrolled in the study. The median volume of heart that received ≥18 Gy was 0.5%, with a maximal value of 4.7%. The median volume of ipsilateral lung that received ≥20 Gy was 0.8%, with a maximum of 7.2%. Conclusion: This technique for whole breast radiotherapy is feasible and enables an accelerated regimen in the prone position while sparing the lung and heart

  7. Historical review of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  8. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  9. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  10. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  11. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1998-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m{sup 2} daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of {>=}grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and

  12. Results from the IRS-IV randomized trial of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with rhabdomyosarcoma--a report from the IRSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meza, Jane; Breneman, John C.; Crist, William M.; Laurie, Fran; Qualman, Stephen J.; Wharam, Moody

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and toxicity of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) vs. conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) in children with Group III rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifty-nine children were enrolled into the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV with Group III RMS. Sixty-nine were ineligible for the analysis because of incorrect group or pathologic findings. Of the 490 remaining, 239 were randomized to HFRT (59.4 Gy in 54 1.1-Gy twice daily fractions) and 251 to CFRT (50.4 Gy in 28 1.8-Gy daily fractions). The age range was <1-21 years. All patients received chemotherapy. RT began at Week 9 after induction chemotherapy for all but those with high-risk parameningeal tumors who received RT during induction chemotherapy. The patient groups were equally balanced. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Results: Analysis by randomized treatment assignment (intent to treat) revealed an estimated 5-year failure-free survival (FFS) rate of 70% and overall survival (OS) of 75%. In the univariate analysis, the factors associated with the best outcome were age 1-9 years at diagnosis; noninvasive tumors; tumor size <5 cm; uninvolved lymph nodes; Stage 1 or 2 disease; primary site in the orbit or head and neck; and embryonal histologic features (p=0.001 for all factors). No differences in the FFS or OS between the two RT treatment methods and no differences in the FFS or OS between HFRT and CFRT were found when analyzed by age, gender, tumor size, tumor invasiveness, nodal status, histologic features, stage, or primary site. Treatment compliance differed by age. Of the children <5 years, 57% assigned to HFRT received HFRT and 77% assigned to CFRT received CFRT. Of the children ≥5 years, 88% assigned to both HFRT and CFRT received their assigned treatment. The reasons for not receiving the appropriate randomized treatment were progressive disease, early death, parent or physician refusal, young age, or surgery. The

  13. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes for two different radiotherapy fractionation schedules given in the same overall time for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettington, Catherine S.; Bryant, Guy; Hickey, Brigid; Tripcony, Lee; Pratt, Gary; Fay, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To compare survival outcomes for two fractionation schedules of thoracic radiotherapy, both given over 3 weeks, in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). At Radiation Oncology Mater Centre (ROMC) and the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), patients with LS-SCLC treated with curative intent are given radiotherapy (with concurrent chemotherapy) to a dose of either 40Gy in 15 fractions ('the 40Gy/15⧣group') or 45Gy in 30 fractions ('the 45Gy/30⧣group'). The choice largely depends on institutional preference. Both these schedules are given over 3 weeks, using daily and twice-daily fractionation respectively. The records of all such patients treated from January 2000 to July 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and survival outcomes between the two groups compared. Of 118 eligible patients, there were 38 patients in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 41 patients in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The median relapse-free survival time was 12 months in both groups. Median overall survival was 21 months (95% CI 2–37 months) in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 26 months (95% CI 1–48 months) in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The 5-year overall survival rates were 20% and 25%, respectively (P=0.24). On multivariate analysis, factors influencing overall survival were: whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was given (P=0.01) and whether salvage chemotherapy was given at the time of relapse (P=0.057). Given the small sample size, the potential for selection bias and the retrospective nature of our study it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy compared with hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy however hypofractionated radiotherapy may result in equivalent relapse-free survival.

  14. Establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (photons): acceptance tests, dosimetry and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdaky, Mafalda Feliciano

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the operational part of the final process of the establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (6 MeV photon beams), including the acceptance tests, commissioning tests and the implementation of a quality control program through routine mechanical and radiation tests. All acceptance tests were satisfactory, showing results below the allowed limits of the manufacturer, the commissioning tests presented results within those of the international recommendations. The quality control program was performed during 34 months and showed an excellent stability of this accelerator. (author)

  15. Comparison of single, fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of fractionated thoracic irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rats was compared to that produced by single doses. Animals received a single dose of 15 Gy, 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (fractionation), or 30 Gy in 30 fractions of 1 Gy each 3 times a day (hyperfractionation). The treatments produced minimal lethality since a total of only 6 animals died between days 273 and 475 after the initiation of treatment, with no difference in survival observed between the control and any of the 3 treated groups. Despite the lack of lethality, evidence of lung damage was obtained by histological examination. Animals that had received either single doses or fractionated doses had more of the pulmonary parenchyma involved than did animals that had received hyperfractionated doses. The authors conclude that, in the rat lung model, a total radiation dose of 30 Gy fractionated over 14 days produces no more lethality nor damage to lung tissue than does 15 Gy delivered as a single dose. However, long-term effects as evidenced by deposits of collagen and development of fibrosis are significantly reduced by hyperfractionation when compared to single doses and daily fractionation

  16. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  17. Photoneutron intensity variation with field size around radiotherapy linear accelerator 18-MeV X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, H.; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Maalej, N. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    In X-ray radiotherapy accelerators, neutrons are produced mainly by ({gamma},n) reaction when high energy X-rays interact with high Z materials of the linear accelerator head. These materials include the lead (Pb) used as shielding in the collimator, tungsten (W) target used for the production of X-rays and iron (Fe) in the accelerator head. These unwanted neutrons contaminate the therapeutic beam and contribute to the patient dose during the treatment of a cancer patient. Knowing the neutron distribution around the radiotherapy accelerator is therefore desired. CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs) were used to study the variation of fast and thermal neutron relative intensities around an 18 MeV linear accelerator X-ray beam with the field sizes of 0, 10x10, 20x20, 30x30 and 40x40cm{sup 2}. For fast neutron detection, bare NTDs were used. For thermal neutron detection, NTDs were covered with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters. The NTDs were placed at different locations in the direction perpendicular to the treatment couch (transversal) and in the direction parallel to the treatment couch (longitudinal) with respect to the isocenter of the accelerator. The fast neutron relative intensity is symmetrical about the beam axis and exhibits an exponential-like drop with distance from the isocenter of the accelerator for all the field sizes. At the primary beam (isocenter), the relative fast neutron intensity is highest for 40x40cm{sup 2} field size and decreases linearly with the decrease in the field size. However, fast neutron intensities do not change significantly with beam size for the measurements outside the primary beam. The fast neutron intensity in the longitudinal direction outside the primary beam decreases linearly with the field size. The thermal neutron intensity, at any location, was found to be almost independent of the field size.

  18. Pilot study of human recombinant interferon gamma and accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Edward G.; Deming, Richard L.; Creagan, Edward T.; Nair, Suresh; Su, John Q.; Levitt, Ralph; Steen, Preston D.; Wiesenfeld, Martin; Mailliard, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Gamma interferon has a wide range of properties, including the ability to sensitize solid tumor cells to the effects of ionizing radiation. The North Central Cancer Treatment Group has previously completed pilot studies of accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy (AHTRT) in patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This Phase I study was designed to assess the toxicity of concomitant gamma interferon and AHTRT in a similar patient population. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and May 1992, 18 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B NSCLC were treated with daily gamma interferon (0.2 mg subcutaneously) concomitant with AHTRT (60 Gy given in 1.5 Gy twice daily fractions). All patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1 with weight loss < 5%. Eight patients had Stage IIIA and 10 had Stage IIIB disease. Results: Nine patients (50%) experienced severe, life-threatening, or fatal toxicities. Eight of the patients (44%) developed significant radiation pneumonitis, which was severe in six patients and fatal in two patients (11% treatment-related mortality). Two patients (11%) developed severe radiation esophagitis. With follow-up of 15-21 months, 2 patients are alive, and 16 have died. The median survival time and 1-year survival rate is 7.8 months and 38%, respectively. Conclusion: Gamma interferon appeared to sensitize normal lung tissue to the effects of radiation, as demonstrated by the high incidence of severe or fatal radiation pneumonitis. We do not recommend pursuing gamma interferon as a radiosensitizer in this setting

  19. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy

  20. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yavuz, Melek Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey); Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  1. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beom Ju; Kim, Jong Woo; Jeong, Hoi Bin; Bok, Seo Yeon; Kim, Young Eun; Ahn, G One [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy.

  2. Local control of T3 carcinomas after accelerated fractionation: a look at the 'gap'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.; Efird, Jimmy; Nakfoor, Bruce; Martins, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of midcourse treatment break or gaps related to the local control of T3 carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx following accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: All patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1979 through 1994 with treatment consisting of 1.6 Gy per fraction, two fractions a day for the treatment of T3 carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx. They were entered in the head and neck data base. Their treatment dates, treatment breaks, and doses vs. local control were analyzed and compared. A p-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 162 patients were available for review. Due to the acute severe mucosal effects, most of the patients required a midcourse pause or 'break' after a dose of 38.4-48 Gy before treatment could be resumed and completed. The data indicate that (a) prolongation of the treatment gap for more than 14 days, (b) total treatment course longer than 45 days, (c) total dose less than 67 Gy, and (d) male gender adversely affected local control. In spite of the gaps, the female patients with advanced carcinomas enjoyed the benefits of improved local control after the accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Conclusions: Accelerated hyperfractionation radiation therapy using 1.6 Gy per fraction/twice-a-day (b.i.d.) for a total dose of 70.4 Gy in 6 weeks is effective in achieving high local control of T3 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx. The midcourse treatment gap should be as short as possible with the projected total dose and time. Should the gaps be unduly prolonged due to various circumstances, further increase in the total dose, for example, 72-75 Gy, and/or increase of the fraction sizes, for example, 1.8-2.0 Gy/f b.i.d. after the gap may be necessary to compensate for the adverse effects of the tumor regeneration from the prolonged gap

  3. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  4. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Hanseo Univ., Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose.

  5. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose

  6. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  7. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  8. Determination of the neutron spectra in the treatment room of a linear accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Barquero, R.; Mendez, R.; Iniguez, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    By means of a series of measures and Monte Carlo calculations the dosimetric characteristics of the photoneutrons have been determined that take place in volume to a linear accelerator of radiotherapy of 18 MV, LINAC, mark Siemens Mevatron model. The measures were carried out with thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD 600 and TLD 700 that were naked exposed and confined with cover of Cd and Sn, inside a sphere of paraffin and inside spheres Bonner. (Author)

  9. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm 3 , occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy 2 using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy 2 using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  10. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  11. An improved method to accurately calibrate the gantry angle indicators of the radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Liyun; Ho, S.-Y.; Du, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-M.; Chen Tainsong

    2007-01-01

    The calibration of the gantry angle indicator is an important and basic quality assurance (QA) item for the radiotherapy linear accelerator. In this study, we propose a new and practical method, which uses only the digital level, V-film, and general solid phantoms. By taking the star shot only, we can accurately calculate the true gantry angle according to the geometry of the film setup. The results on our machine showed that the gantry angle was shifted by -0.11 deg. compared with the digital indicator, and the standard deviation was within 0.05 deg. This method can also be used for the simulator. In conclusion, this proposed method could be adopted as an annual QA item for mechanical QA of the accelerator

  12. Modelling altered fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The author discusses the conflicting requirements of hyperfractionation and accelerated fractionation used in radiotherapy, and the development of computer modelling to predict how to obtain an optimum of tumour cell kill without exceeding normal-tissue tolerance. The present trend is to shorten hyperfractionated schedules from 6 or 7 weeks to give overall times of 4 or 5 weeks as in new schedules by Herskovic et al (1992) and Harari (1992). Very high doses are given, much higher than can be given when ultrashort schedules such as CHART (12 days) are used. Computer modelling has suggested that optimum overall times, to yield maximum cell kill in tumours ((α/β = 10 Gy) for a constant level of late complications (α/β = 3 Gy) would be X or X-1 weeks, where X is the doubling time of the tumour cells in days (Fowler 1990). For median doubling times of about 5 days, overall times of 4 or 5 weeks should be ideal. (U.K.)

  13. The first clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy using a standard linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Caillet, Vincent; Hewson, Emily; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Bromley, Regina; Bell, Linda; Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Martin, Jarad; Booth, Jeremy T

    2018-04-01

    Until now, real-time image guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) has been the domain of dedicated cancer radiotherapy systems. The purpose of this study was to clinically implement and investigate real-time IGART using a standard linear accelerator. We developed and implemented two real-time technologies for standard linear accelerators: (1) Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM) that finds the target and (2) multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking that aligns the radiation beam to the target. Eight prostate SABR patients were treated with this real-time IGART technology. The feasibility, geometric accuracy and the dosimetric fidelity were measured. Thirty-nine out of forty fractions with real-time IGART were successful (95% confidence interval 87-100%). The geometric accuracy of the KIM system was -0.1 ± 0.4, 0.2 ± 0.2 and -0.1 ± 0.6 mm in the LR, SI and AP directions, respectively. The dose reconstruction showed that real-time IGART more closely reproduced the planned dose than that without IGART. For the largest motion fraction, with real-time IGART 100% of the CTV received the prescribed dose; without real-time IGART only 95% of the CTV would have received the prescribed dose. The clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy on a standard linear accelerator using KIM and MLC tracking is feasible. This achievement paves the way for real-time IGART to be a mainstream treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [de

  15. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Oncology, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Stransky, Jiri; Res, Oldrich [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Otolaryngology, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die Effektivitaet und Toxizitaet der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten stereotaktischen Wiederbestrahlung (re

  16. Tendencies the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Jimenez Medina, Jose

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors is based on the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) and that chemotherapy (QMT) is used even more, as well as the other drugs. A bibliographic review was made to update the knowledge on the current trends and perspectives of RT applied to CNS tumors. The following were found among them: a) combinations of RT and CMT; b) radiosensitizers incorporated to the radiant treatment; c) angiogenesis inhibitors associated with RT; d) the scale-up or increase of the RT doses thanks to the development of new technologies, such as 3 D conformal radiotherapy, intensity- modulated radiotherapy, surgery and others. Another field of research is that of the changes in the rhythm or fractioning of the RT: hyperfractionated, accelerated, combinations of both, etc., which will allow mainly to increase the dosage scale-up

  17. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedicini Piernicola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr, respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif, was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-9095% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.095% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6, 5.9 (6.6, 4.6 (6.1, 14.3 (12.9 days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29, 0.33 (0.29, 0.42 (0.31, 0.14 (0.15 Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck

  18. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Fiorentino, Alba; Improta, Giuseppina; Storto, Giovanni; Benassi, Marcello; Orecchia, Roberto; Salvatore, Marco; Nappi, Antonio; Strigari, Lidia; Alicia Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara; Alterio, Daniela; Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Vischioni, Barbara; Caivano, Rocchina

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr) and the reduction of the effective doubling time (T D ) during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT) is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR) for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of T D were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED) and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (H EGFr and L EGFr ), respectively. By obtaining the T D from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (T pot ) from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average T D for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (D prolif ), was estimated. The averages of T D were 77 (27-90) 95% days in L EGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.0) 95% days in H EGFr , if an onset of accelerated proliferation T K at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent H EGFr sub-sites’ T D were 5.9 (6.6), 5.9 (6.6), 4.6 (6.1), 14.3 (12.9) days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry) data of T pot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The D prolif for the H EGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29), 0.33 (0.29), 0.42 (0.31), 0.14 (0.15) Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy -1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced T D and D prolif for each head and neck sub-site

  19. The role of postradiotherapy neck dissection in supraglottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Annie W.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Carballo, Natalia; Montgomery, William; Wang, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our policy of performing neck dissection based on regional response after definitive radiotherapy in patients with supraglottic carcinoma and to identify the prognostic factors in this group of patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1995, 121 patients with node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Sixty-nine percent of patients presented with 1997 AJCC Stage IV disease. The N-stage distribution was N1, 49; N2, 62; and N3, 10. The median size of the lymph nodes was 3 cm (range, 0.5-8 cm). Forty-five patients received once-a-day treatment with a median total dose of 65 Gy (range, 58.0-70.8 Gy) in 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction over 48 days, and 76 patients received split-course accelerated hyperfractionation with a median total dose of 67.2 Gy (range, 63.2-73.6 Gy) in 1.6 Gy twice a day over 43 days. Patients whose lymph nodes were not clinically detectable at 4-6 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy (complete response) were followed without any neck dissection. Patients with persistent neck adenopathy (partial response) underwent neck dissection whenever possible. Mean follow-up of the living patients was 6.5 years. Results: Regional response was related to the size of lymph nodes at presentation. Eighty-seven percent of patients with nodal size of 3 cm or less had a complete response, whereas 43% of patients with nodal size greater than 3 cm had a partial response. The rate of regional control at 3 years for all patients in the study was 66%. The 3-year ultimate regional control rate after salvage neck dissection was 75%. A relapse in both the primary and regional sites was the most common pattern of relapse, accounting for 39% of all the failures. Local failure was associated with subsequent regional relapse with a relative risk of 4.3. For patients with completeresponse in whom postradiotherapy neck dissection was withheld, the regional control rates were 75% and 86

  20. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1988-12-15

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT.

  1. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun

    1988-01-01

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT

  2. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  3. Effect of single dose, fractionated, and hyperfractionated trunk irradiation on weight gain, respiration frequency, and survival in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Giri, P.G.S.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation of a single dose into two equal doses separated by 4-6 h produced a sparing effect of approx. 5Gy as measured by delay in weight gain; approx. 4Gy as measured by increased respiration frequency; and approx. 6Gy as measured by survival. Fractionation into daily doses or hyperfractionation into twice-daily doses permitted an approximate doubling of the dose required for the same suppression of weight gain. For the respiration rates and survival endpoints, fractionation or hyperfractionation produced an even greater sparing effect since there was no increase in the respiration frequency at twice the doses that would produce changes if delivered within a few hours; and since essentially no lethality was observed at twice the doses that would kill 70%-100% of animals if delivered in one day. (UK)

  4. LINEAR ACCELERATOR FOR USE IN RADIOTHERAPY TREATMENT: STUDY OF PROCESS INNOVATION IN A SUS HOSPITAL OF SERRA GAÚCHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Cristina Fermiano Fidelis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The growth of health structures and their complexity have led Clinical Engineering professionals to carry out studies to develop and implement health technology management programs. In this way, employees of this area, integrated with the health system teams, have contributed to make feasible the use of technologies that offer greater security, functionality and reliability. The radiotherapy area, with the increase in the incidence of new cases of cancer, together with the contingency of the financial resources for health, high cost and complexity of the equipment, motivate studies for its adequate management. This research aimed to identify the technologies applied in the radiotherapy treatment, in particular the linear accelerator, as well as the concept of innovation, innovation in services, innovation in processes and the competitiveness acquired with the aid of innovation. The method used in the research has a qualitative approach, with an exploratory and descriptive objective, with semistructured and open questions and involved bibliographic research on the topic of Innovation and on Linear Accelerator, document analysis, Unit of High Complexity in Oncology visit and interviews at the General Hospital of Caxias do Sul South, presenting, finally, the impacts suffered in the hospital and in the community after the arrival of the Line Accelerator. The results showed that there was process and product innovation, incrementally, in the services offered by the hospital.

  5. Fractionation and delivery schedules in combined radiotherapy-cisplatin for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, L.; Van Doorn, T.; Royal Adelaide Hospital,; Olver, I.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Since Rosenberg's initial discovery, cisplatin has become one of the most effective anticancer drugs, with particular significance in head and neck cancer. For advanced disease, where the tumour is unresectable, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, either singularly or combined, remain the possible therapeutic modalities. The majority of the trials using a combination of cisplatin and radiation obtained much better results than the single-agent trials. But the best schedule, dosage and timing between radiation and drug administration are still unknown. Many positive steps were however made to eliminate the cisplatin-produced side effects, as much as possible. The tendency in current trials is to fractionate the drug dose by daily administration and also to hyperfractionate the radiation. In this way the long-term benefits are improved and the toxicity is better tolerated

  6. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment

  7. TLD Intercomparison in accelerators for radiotherapy in three Latin american countries; Intercomparacion TLD en aceleradores para radioterapia en tres paises latinoamericanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E.; Azorin N, J.; Perez, M.A.; Picon, C.; Castellanos, E.; Plazas, M.C.; Murcia, G.; Archundia, L. [Depto. El Hombre y su Ambiente. Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Calz. Del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    In Radiotherapy one of the objectives is to establish and to give follow up to quality assurance programs which make sure that the doses administered to the patients with cancer are a high probability of a success in external radiation. Likewise, one of the present preoccupations of the United Nations Agencies as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Pan-American Health Organization is the optimal employment of the radiations in the treatment of cancer patients since the administered dose in Radiotherapy suffers considerable variations by the lack of quality assurance programs. The use of Electron linear accelerators requires a program of quality assurance that includes expert personnel, equipment and adequate facilities. The more used methodology for the dosimetry calibration and characterization of X-ray beams and high energy electrons for radiotherapy use is using a ionization chamber dosemeter calibrated in a regional secondary standardization laboratory. However, to establish and give follow up to the quality assurance programs it is necessary the dosimetric intercomparison through TLD. In this study it was designed plastic phantoms with TLD crystals and it was made its characterization to realize an absorbed dose analysis in the crystals exposed at X-ray beams 6 MV and high energy electrons 10 and 12 MeV to standardize the dosimetric procedures and proceeding to realize an International Pilot intercomparison of absorbed doses in TLD crystals in three Latin American countries: Mexico, Peru and Colombia with the participation of accelerators of five different institutions. The found results show that the majority of the measured doses with TLD in the different accelerators were in the 0.95-1.05 range though it had two cases outside of this range. The use of the phantoms with TLD crystals shows that they are of excellent aid to make analysis of the doses administered to the patients and an intercomparison of results to standardize procedures at

  8. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Jalali, Rakesh; Goswami, Savita; Nair, Vimoj; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children ≥5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5–14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56–70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16–58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  9. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  10. Repopulation response of mouse oral mucosa during unconventional radiotherapy protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, Wolfgang; Weber-Frisch, Marion

    1995-01-01

    Repopulation in mouse tongue epithelium was determined during unconventional fractionation schedules, i.e., hyperfractionation (2 x 1.5 and 2 x 1.75 Gy/day) and accelerated treatment (2 x 3 Gy/day). The residual tolerance of the epithelium at defined days of the fractionated treatment was tested by graded single test doses (top-up design). The dose required to induce complete epithelial denudation in 50% of the animals (ED50) was used to calculate the number of fractions repopulated during the preceding treatment. After the first week of hyperfractionation, tolerance was reduced compared to untreated epithelium. However, subsequently no further change was observed, indicating complete compensation of the weekly dose with all doses per fraction used. Epithelial cell density, defined by histological examination in additional experiments, in all fractionation arms decreased similarly by ∼40% during the first week and remained constant at 60-80% in the subsequent 2 weeks. During accelerated fractionation, the residual mucosal tolerance decreased continuously with treatment time and resulted in epithelial denudation after 12 fractions. However, a substantial repopulation effect was observed, compensating 1.5 fractions by day 2, and 5 fractions by day 5, respectively. After cessation of the therapy the repopulation rate clearly decelerated to compensate a dose equivalent to about 0.5 fractions per day. Cell density decreased linearly during the treatment with 5, 10 or 12 fractions at a rate close to normal cell loss. Marked cell production, dependent on the total fractionated dose, was seen from one day after the last fraction in each experimental arm. These results indicate that maximum stem cell repopulation occurs predominantly during treatment, while major production of differentiating cells takes place in treatment splits

  11. Accelerated fractionation radiotherapy for advanced haed and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, D.S.; Spry, N.A.; Gray, A.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Alexander, S.R.; Dally, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Between 1981 and 1986, 89 patients with advanced head and neck squamous cancer were treated with a continuous accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AFRT) regimen. Three fractions of 1.80 Gy, 4 h apart, were given on three treatment days per week, and the tumour dose was taken to 59.40 Gy in 33 fractions in 24-25 days. Acute mucosal reactions were generally quite severe, but a split was avoided by providing the patient with intensive support, often as an in-patient, until the reactions settled. Late radiation effects have been comparable to those obtained with conventional fractionation. The probability of local-regional control was 47% at 3 years for 69 previously untreated patients, whereas it was only 12% at one year for 20 patients treated for recurrence after radical surgery. Fifty-eight previously untreated patients with tumours arising in the upper aero-digestive tract were analysed in greated detail. The probability of local-regional control at 3 years was 78% for 17 Stage III patients and 15% for 31 Stage IV patients. This schedule of continuous AFRT is feasible and merits further investigation. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs.; 6 tabs

  12. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C.; Benites R, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  13. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A.

    1995-04-01

    The status of the sub-projetc 'Compact Accelerator' in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated 'Compact Accelerator' and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources

  14. Radioprotection of patients in radiotherapy: the gonadal doses resulting from treatments at electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuesslin, F.; Hassenstein, E.

    1977-01-01

    Using LiF-dosemeters in a polystyrene phantom dose profiles have been measured. The influence of the following parameters has been studied: accelerator type, primary beam quality (45 and 8 MV X-rays, 45, 18 and 10 MeV electrons), orientation of the phantom, depth in the phantom (0, 1 and 10 cm) and thickness of additional lead sheets put on the phantom surface. Because the dose distribution of the leakage radiation of the accelerator depends mainly on the mechanism of beam production, i.e. on the accelerator type, different anisotropic isodose-patterns have been found. For instance, in case of the betatron the dose maxima are located at opposite sides within the plane of electron orbits. On the other side, there does not exist any favourable direction femal patients should be positioned at to minimize the gonadal dose, because already at 10 cm depth in the phantom the isodose distributions are nearly isotropic. This is caused by the low penetrating capacity of the leakage radiation (2 to 0.6 mm Pb HVL thickness at 45 MV X-rays, depending on the lateral distance from the field). These findings suggest to cover the gonads of male patients undergoing radiotherapy with lead sheets of 1 or 2 mm thickness

  15. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy for inflammatory breast carcinoma: complete response predicts outcome and allows for breast conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Friedman, Richard B.; Wazer, David E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Amir, Cyrus; Bear, Harry D.; Hackney, Mary Helen; Smith, Thomas J.; Lawrence, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy and accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy were prospectively applied for inflammatory breast carcinoma with the intent of breast conservation. The efficacy, failure patterns, and patient tolerance utilizing this approach were analyzed. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1996, 52 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma presented to the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals of VCU and the New England Medical Center. Thirty-eight of these patients were jointly evaluated in multidisciplinary breast clinics and managed according to a defined prospectively applied treatment policy. Patients received induction chemotherapy, accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy, selected use of mastectomy, and concluded with additional chemotherapy. The majority were treated with 1.5 Gy twice daily to field arrangements covering the entire breast and regional lymphatics. An additional 18-21 Gy was then delivered to the breast and clinically involved nodal regions. Total dose to clinically involved areas was 63-66 Gy. Following chemoradiotherapy, patients were evaluated with physical examination, mammogram, and fine needle aspiration x 3. Mastectomy was reserved for those patients with evidence of persistent or progressive disease in the involved breast. All patients received additional chemotherapy. Results: Median age was 51 years. Median follow-up was 23.9 months (6-86) months. The breast preservation rate at the time of last follow-up was 74%. The treated breast or chest wall as the first site of failure occurred in only 13%, and the ultimate local control rate with the selected use of mastectomy was 74%. Ten patients underwent mastectomy, 2 of which had pathologically negative specimens despite a clinically palpable residual mass. Response to chemotherapy was predictive of treatment outcome. Of the 15 patients achieving a complete response, 87% remain locoregionally controlled without the use of mastectomy. Five-year overall survival for

  16. A randomised multicentre trial of CHART versus conventional radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dische, Stanley; Saunders, Michele; Barrett, Ann; Harvey, Angela; Gibson, Della; Parmar, Mahesh

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) has shown promise of improved tumour control and reduced late morbidity in pilot studies and has now been tested in a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial. Material and methods: Patients with squamous cell cancer in the main sites within the head and neck region with the general exception of early T1 N0 tumours were entered into the study by 11 centres. There was a 3:2 randomisation to either CHART, where a dose of 54 Gy was given in 36 fractions over 12 days, or to conventional therapy where 66 Gy was given in 33 fractions over 6.5 weeks. A total of 918 patients were included over a 5 year period from March 1990. Results: Acute Morbidity: Acute radiation mucositis was more severe with CHART, occurred earlier but settled sooner and was in nearly all cases healed by 8 weeks in both arms. Skin reactions were less severe and settled more quickly in the CHART treated patients. Tumour control and survival: Life table analyses of loco-regional control, primary tumour control, nodal control, disease-free interval, freedom from metastasis and survival showed no evidence of differences between the two arms. In exploratory subgroup analyses there was evidence of a greater response to CHART in younger patients (P = 0.041) and poorly differentiated tumours appeared to fare better with conventional radiotherapy (P = 0.030). In the larynx there was evidence of a trend towards increasing benefit with more advanced T stage (P = 0.002). Late treatment related morbidity: Osteoradionecrosis occurred in 0.4% of patients after CHART and 1.4% of patients after conventional radiotherapy. The incidence of chondritis or cartilage necrosis was similar in both arms. Life table analysis showed evidence of reduced severity in a number of late morbidities in favour of CHART. These were most striking for skin telangiectasia, superficial and deep ulceration of the mucosa and laryngeal oedema

  17. Characteristics of Philips SL-20 linear accelerator used for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Harold; Ganesh, T.; Joshi, R.C.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.; Chander, Subhash; Pant, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Commissioning of a stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) facility on a modified linear accelerator requires validation of mechanical parameters and establishment of parameters, such as tissue maximum ratio (TMR), relative output factors (OF), and off axis ratios (OAR). The mechanical and beam characteristics of Philips SL-20 linear accelerator modified for SRS/SRT were evaluated and presented. The SRS/SRT procedure carried on Philips SL-20 linear accelerator with Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) and relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) head frames along with the Radionics planning system was evaluated. The tertiary collimator consists of the actual treatment cones and their sizes vary from 12.5 mm to 40 mm diameter. The alignment of the auxillary collimator axis with mechanical axes and stability of the isocenter of Philips SL-20 machine was evaluated using Iso-Align device and mechanical isocenter standard (MIS). All the mechanical errors of the linear accelerator were within 1 mm, except the stability of the isocenter while rotating the couch. Alignment of auxiliary collimator axis with the central axis, gantry and couch axes were achieved. The TMR, OF and OAR for 6 MV x-rays from Philips SL-20 linear accelerator for different cone sizes were deduced using a Multidata water phantom with 0.015 cc ion chamber. The difference between 50% width of profiles in two major axes (x and y) were within ± 0.4 mm. The cone dimensions were accurate up to 0.7 mm. The penumbra width for different cones varies from 3.1 mm to 3.5 mm. Dose linearity of the monitoring system was ≤ 1% above 5 MU. The mechanical and beam characteristics including dose linearity of the SL-20 machine are presented. The beam characteristics of this machine are comparable with the other modified linear accelerators for SRS/SRT. The shift of isocenter during rotation of couch can be nullified by fine adjusting laser target localizing frame to the laser position using micrometer screws

  18. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dörr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universität Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  19. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G.; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A.; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life

  20. Quality of survival and growth in children and young adults in the PNET4 European controlled trial of hyperfractionated versus conventional radiation therapy for standard-risk medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    To compare quality of survival in "standard-risk" medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of patients with unresectable squamous head and neck cancer with induction chemotherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy; Traitement de patients atteints d'un cancer irresecable de la tete et du cou avec une chimiotherapie d'induction suivie d'une radiotherapie hyperfractionnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesia, R.; Majem, M.; Barretina Ginesta, M.P.; Montes, A.; Cardenal, F. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Medical Oncology, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Galiana, R.; Guedea, F. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Manos, M. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of ENT, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Monner, A. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Perez, J. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Clinical Investigation Unit, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: the contribution of induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy (h.f.R.T.) in unresectable squamous head and neck cancer has been evaluated in a single institution as an assistancial protocol. Patients and methods: from March 1994 to June 2000 all consecutive patients with unresectable disease were treated with four courses of platin plus fluorouracil based CT followed by h.f.R.T.. Tumor resectability and response was assessed by a multidisciplinary committee. Results: ninety-nine patients (pts) were treated. All of them had stage IV-M0 disease: 67 T4, 88 N2-N3. Tumor location: 62 oropharynx, 22 hypopharynx, eight oral cavity and seven larynx. Tumor response at the end of treatment: 61 patients complete response, 17 partial response, two stable disease, 10 progressive disease and nine unevaluated. With a median follow-up of 70 months the 5-year loco-regional control and overall survival was 30.3% (95% CI: 21.9-38.6) and 21.6% (95% CI: 13.4-29.8), respectively. Loco-regional control and overall survival is significantly influenced by prior response to induction CT. Main grade 3-4 toxicity related to CT was stomatitis, but there were five patients with an ischemic event. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: 47 stomatitis, 20 epithelitis. Chronic toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: six emergency tracheotomies due to laryngeal edema, five pneumonia and one mucous/soft-tissue necrosis. There were eight toxic related deaths. Conclusion: induction CT followed by h.f.R.T. might increase the overall survival rate in unresectable disease. H.f.R.T. resulted in a high rate of acute toxicity and its use would not be warranted in those patients with no response to induction CT who had a low probability of long-term control. (authors)

  2. IAEA-HypoX. A randomized multicenter study of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole concomitant with accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metwally, Mohamed Ahmed Hassan; Ali, Rubina; Kuddu, Maire

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can be improved by hypoxic modification using nimorazole (NIM) in association with accelerated fractionation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The protocol was activated in March 2012 as an international...

  3. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  4. High-energy accelerators in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Mandrillon, Pierre

    1992-05-04

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to "light ions" ( Carbon, Oxygen, Neon) has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. The rationale for this new radiotherapy, the high energy accelerators and the beam delivery systems are presented in these two lectures.

  5. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  6. The situation of radiotherapy in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    Published within the frame of the French 2009-2013 cancer plan, this report proposes an analysis of the situation of radiotherapy in France. More particularly, it analyses the French offer in terms of radiotherapy treatments and the French position in Europe. A second part analyses equipment (accelerators and other equipment) and techniques aimed at radiotherapy treatment preparation and delivery. The following techniques are addressed: three-dimensional conformational, intensity modulation, intracranial and extracranial stereotactic, image-guided, total body irradiation, hadron-therapy, and peri-operative radiotherapy. The last parts analyse the activity of radiotherapy centres in terms of treated patients, of patient age structure, of sessions and preparations, and of treated pathologies, the medical and paramedical personnel in charge of radiotherapy, and financial and cost aspects

  7. Incidence of interstitial pneumonia after hyperfractionated total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow/stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Schraube, P.; Wenz, F.; Flentje, M.; Kalle, K. von; Haas, R.; Hunstein, W.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Interstitial pneumonia (IP) is a severe complication after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with incidence rates between 10 % and 40 % in different series. It is a polyetiologic disease that occurs depending on age, graft vs. host disease (GvHD), CMV-status, total body irradiation (TBI) and immunosuppressive therapy after BMT. The effects of fractionation and dose rate are not entirely clear. This study evaluates the incidence of lethal IP after hyperfractionated TBI for autologous BMT or stem cell transplantation. Materials and Methods Between 1982 and 1992, 182 patients (60 % male, 40 % female) were treated with hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) before autologous bone marrow transplantation. Main indications were leukemias and lymphomas (53 % AML, 21 % ALL, 22 % NHL, 4 % others) Median age was 30 ys (15 - 55 ys). A total dose of 14.4 Gy was applied using lung blocks (12 fractions of 1.2 Gy in 4 days, dose rate 7-18 cGy/min, lung dose 9 - 9.5 Gy). TBI was followed by cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg). 72 % were treated with bone marrow transplantation, 28 % were treated with stem cell transplantation. Interstitial pneumonia was diagnosed clinically, radiologically and by autopsy. Results 4 patients died most likely of interstitial pneumonia. For another 12 patients interstitial pneumonia was not the most likely cause of death but could not be excluded. Thus, the incidence of lethal IP was at least 2.2 % but certainly below 8.8 %. Conclusion Lethal interstitial pneumonia is a rare complication after total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow transplantation in this large, homogeously treated series. In the autologous setting, total doses of 14.4 Gy can be applied with a low risk for developing interstitial pneumonia if hyperfractionation and lung blocks are used. This falls in line with data from series with identical twins or t-cell depleted marrow and smaller, less homogeneous autologous transplant studies. Thus

  8. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-wook; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity

  10. Time-dependent tumour repopulation factors in linear-quadratic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Tumour proliferation effects can be tentatively quantified in the linear-quadratic (LQ) method by the incorporation of a time-dependent factor, the magnitude of which is related both to the value of α in the tumour α/β ratio, and to the tumour doubling time. The method, the principle of which has been suggested by a numbre of other workers for use in fractionated therapy, is here applied to both fractionated and protracted radiotherapy treatments, and examples of its uses are given. By assuming that repopulation of late-responding tissues is significant during normal treatment strategies in terms of the behaviour of the Extrapolated Response Dose (ERD). Although the numerical credibility of the analysis used here depends on the reliability of the LQ model, and on the assumption that the rate of repopulation is constant throughout treatment, the predictions are consistent with other lines of reasoning which point to the advantages of accelerated hyperfractionation. In particular, it is demonstrated that accelerated fractionation represents a relatively 'foregiving' treatment which enables tumours of a variety of sensitivities and clonogenic growth rates to be treated moderately successfully, even though the critical cellular parameters may not be known in individual cases. The analysis also suggests that tumours which combine low intrinsic sensitivity with a very short doubling time might be bettter controlled by low dose-rate continuous therapy than by almost any form of accelerated hyperfractionation. (author). 24 refs.; 5 figs

  11. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y., E-mail: tseiwert@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Melotek, James M. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Blair, Elizabeth A. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Stenson, Kerstin M. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Witt, Mary Ellyn [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kocherginsky, Masha [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Villaflor, Victoria M. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Cohen, Ezra E.W. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Haraf, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  12. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Melotek, James M.; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Stenson, Kerstin M.; Salama, Joseph K.; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison; Lingen, Mark W.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  13. Single-centre experience of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for prolactinomas with the linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet Rosemary; Smee, Robert Ian

    2015-06-01

    Primary management of prolactinomas is usually medical, with surgery a secondary option where necessary. This study is a review of a single centre's experience with focused radiotherapy where benefit was not gained by medical or surgical approaches. Radiotherapy as an alternative and adjuvant treatment for prolactinomas has been performed at our institution with the linear accelerator since 1990. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients managed with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and 5 managed with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), as well as 5 managed with conventional radiotherapy, at the Prince of Wales Hospital. Patients with a histopathologically diagnosed prolactinoma were eligible. Those patients who had a confirmed pathological diagnosis of prolactinoma following surgical intervention, a prolactin level elevated above 500 μg/L, or a prolactin level persistently elevated above 200 μg/L with exclusion of other causes were represented in this review. At the end of documented follow-up (SRS median 6 years, FSRT median 2 years), no SRS patients showed an increase in tumour volume. After FSRT, 1 patient showed an increase in size, 2 showed a decrease in size and 2 patients showed no change. Prolactin levels trended towards improvement after SRS and FSRT, but no patients achieved the remission level of <20 μg/L. Seven of 13 patients in the SRS group achieved a level of <500 μg/L, whereas no patients reached this target after FSRT. A reduction in prolactin level is frequent after SRS and FSRT for prolactinomas; however, true biochemical remission is uncommon. Tumour volume control in this series was excellent, but this may be related to the natural history of the disease. Morbidity and mortality after stereotactic radiation were very low in this series. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  15. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Fruehauf, Stefan; Wildermuth, Susanne; Kampen, Michael van; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  16. Radiation therapy in Ewing's sarcoma: an update of the CESS 86 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, Juergen; Juergens, Herbert; Sauer, Rolf; Pape, Hildegard; Paulussen, Michael; Winkelmann, Winfried; Ruebe, Christian

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We present an update analysis of the multiinstitutional Ewing's sarcoma study CESS 86. Methods and Materials: From January 1986 through June 1991, 177 patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone, aged 25 years or less, were recruited. Chemotherapy consisted of four 9-week courses of vincristine, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, and adriamycin (VACA) in low-risk tumors (extremity tumors 3 ), or vincristine, actinomycin D, ifosfamide, and adriamycin (VAIA) in high-risk tumors (central tumors and extremity tumors ≥ 100 cm 3 ). Local therapy was an individual decision in each patient and was either radical surgery (amputation, wide resection) or resection plus postoperative irradiation with 45 Gy or definitive radiotherapy with 60 Gy (45 Gy plus boost). Irradiated patients were randomized concerning the type of fractionation in either conventional fractionation (once daily 1.8-2.0 Gy, break of chemotherapy) or hyperfractionated split-course irradiation simultaneously with the VACA/VAIA chemotherapy (twice daily 1.6 Gy, break of 12 days after 22.4 Gy and 44.8 Gy, total dose and treatment time as for conventional fractionation). For quality assurance in radiotherapy, a central treatment planning program was part of the protocol. Results: Forty-four patients (25%) received definitive radiotherapy; 39 (22%) had surgery, and 93 (53%) had resection plus postoperative irradiation. The overall 5-year survival was 69%. Thirty-one percent of the patients relapsed, 30% after radiotherapy, 26% after radical surgery, and 34% after combined local treatment. The better local control after radical surgery (100%) and resection plus radiotherapy (95%) as compared to definitive radiotherapy (86%) was not associated with an improvement in relapse-free or overall survival because of a higher frequency of distant metastases after surgery (26% vs. 29% vs. 16%). In irradiated patients, hyperfractionated split-course irradiation and conventional fractionation yielded the same

  17. Altered fractionation of hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma and failure patterns after treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsti, L.R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Pyrhoenen, S. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kajanti, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maentylae, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Mattson, K. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maasilta, P. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare malignancy with a bleak prognosis. The role of radiotherapy has not yet been clarified. Our aim was to study the effect of altered fractionation on mesothelioma. We have treated 57 patients, 41 males and 16 females, with hemithorax irradiation with six different fractionation schedules. All the patients have been included in a combined modality program consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and finally by hemithorax irradiation. The radiotherapy schedules used were: I. Conventional fractionation of 20 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days. II, Split-course radiotherapy 55 Gy in 25 fractions of 2.2 Gy over 7 weeks (a two weeks rest halfways) followed by a boost dose of 15 Gy over 8 days to the major tumour area. III. Hyperfractionation of 70 Gy over 7 weeks, 1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval and a 10-day rest halfways. IV. Combined hyperfractionation and hypofractionation, 35 Gy hyperfractionation in 28 fractions (1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval) over three weeks followed by 36 Gy hypofractionation 9 fractions of 4 Gy given every other day over 3 weeks to the major tumour areas only. V. Hypofractionation of 38.5 Gy over 15 days (9x3.5 Gy). VI. Combined conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionation with 20 Gy given conventionally in 10 fractions followed by 10 fractions of 3 Gy over two weeks, overall time 4 weeks. The 2-year survival rate of all patients was 21% and the 5-year survival rate 9%. Two patients are still alive more than 6 and 9 years after radiotherapy. Progression occurred after surgery in four patients, during and after chemotherapy in 22 patients and after completed radiotherapy in 29 patients. The pattern of progression was similar in each treatment group. (orig.).

  18. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, A.S. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Monney, M.; Rosset, A.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiographie; Guillemin, C. [Cantonal Radiotherapy Department Sion (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Wirksamkeit der akzelerierten Bestrahlung in bezug auf die Bewaeltigung der Tumorzellrepopulation waehrend einer Radiotherapie ist vor kurzem nachgewiesen worden. Das Verhaeltnis zwischen therapeutischem Effekt und Toxizitaet duerfte fuer fuenfwoechige Schemen

  19. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix and predictivity of empirical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the most common malignancy of women in India. Most of the patients attend for treatment at an advanced stage of the disease. The conventional fractionation schedule fails to give satisfactory tumour control rate in advanced malignancies. Twice daily fractionated radiotherapy (RT) with 1.2 Gy/F, 1.4 Gy/F and 1.6 Gy/F was tried in 40 cases each. The six months minimum follow-up shows that tumour control with 1.2 Gy/F twice daily (85.7%) is comparable with that of a conventional fractionation schedule (82.8%), whereas it is poor with 1.4 Gy/F (71.05%) and 1.6 Gy/F (68.0%) schedules. Attempts were made to apply time dose fractionation (TDF) and linear quadratic (LQ) models to observed tumour control rates. It was observed that time dose fractionation fails to correlate with the observed tumour control rate (p > 0.2). The extrapolated response dose (ERD) analysis also fails to correlate with the tumour control rate (p > 0.3). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Cushing's disease: a single centre's experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P J; Williams, J R; Smee, R I

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is hypercortisolaemia secondary to an adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. Primary management is almost always surgical, with limited effective medical interventions available. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiation is gaining popularity, with the bulk of the literature related to the Gamma Knife. We present the results from our own institution using the linear accelerator (LINAC) since 1990. Thirty-six patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), one patient who underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and for the purposes of comparison, 13 patients who had undergone conventional radiotherapy prior to 1990, were included in the analysis. Serum cortisol levels improved in nine of 36 (25%) SRS patients and 24 hour urinary free cortisol levels improved in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%). Tumour volume control was excellent in the SRS group with deterioration in only one patient (3%). The patient who underwent FSRT had a highly aggressive tumour refractory to radiation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. [Current status and potential perspectives in classical radiotherapy technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabić-Stanković, Kata M; Stanković, Jovan B; Radosević-Jelić, Ljiljana M

    2004-01-01

    After purchase of radiotherapy equipment in 2003, classic radiation therapy in Serbia will reach the highest world level. In order to define the highest standards in radiation technology, we analyzed the current status and potential perspectives of radiation therapy. An analysis of present situation in the USA, assumed as the most developed in the world, was done. Available data, collected in the last 3 years (equipment assortment, therapy modalities, workload and manpower) for 284 radiotherapy centers, out of potential 2050, were analyzed. Results were presented as crude percentage and matched to point current status. The analysis showed that CLINAC accelerators are the most popular (82.7%), as well as, ADAC (43.7%) and Focus (CMS) (27.4%) systems for therapy planning. Movement towards virtual simulation is evident (59.3%), although classic "simulation" is not fully eliminated from the radiotherapy chain. The most popular brachytherapy afterloader is Microselectron HDR (71%). About 64.4% centers use IMPAC communication/verification/record system that seems more open than Varis. All centers practice modern radiotherapy modalities and techniques (CPRT, IMRT, SRS/SRT, TBI, IORT, IVBHRT, HDR BHRT, etc.). CT and MRI availability is out of question, but PET is available in 3% of centers, however this percentage is rapidly growing. Up to 350 new patients per year are treated by one accelerator (about 35 pts. a day). Centers are relatively small and utilize 2-3 accelerators on average. Average FTE staffing norm is 4 radiation oncologists, 2-3 medical radiotherapy physicists, about 3 certified medical dosimetrists and about 6 radiotherapy technologists. In the past 5 years relative stagnation in classic radiotherapy has been observed. In spite of substantial investments in technology and consequent improvements, as well as wide introduction of computers in radiotherapy, radiotherapy results have not changed significantly. Vendor developement strategies do not point that

  2. Stability of electron-beam energy monitor for quality assurance of the electron-beam energy from radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Saito, Haruo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Mitsuya, Masatoshi; Sakakida, Hideharu; Yamada, Shogo; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Information on electron energy is important in planning radiation therapy using electrons. The Geske 3405 electron beam energy monitor (Geske monitor, PTW Nuclear Associates, Carle Place, NY, USA) is a device containing nine ionization chambers for checking the energy of the electron beams produced by radiotherapy accelerators. We wondered whether this might increase the likelihood of ionization chamber trouble. In spite of the importance of the stability of such a quality assurance (QA) device, there are no reports on the stability of values measured with a Geske monitor. The purpose of this paper was therefore to describe the stability of a Geske monitor. It was found that the largest coefficient of variation (CV) of the Geske monitor measurements was approximately 0.96% over a 21-week period. In conclusion, the stability of Geske monitor measurements of the energy of electron beams from a linear accelerator was excellent. (author)

  3. Construction of a remote radiotherapy planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Chiaki; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo; Seiji, Hiromasa; Sasaki, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    We constructed a remote radiotherapy planning system, and we examined the usefulness of and faults in our system in this study. Two identical radiotherapy planning systems, one installed at our institution and the other installed at an affiliated hospital, were used for radiotherapy planning. The two systems were connected by a wide area network (WAN), using a leased line. Beam data for the linear accelerator at the affiliated hospital were installed in the two systems. During the period from December 2001 to December 2002, 43 remote radiotherapy plans were made using this system. Data were transmitted using a file transfer protocol (FTP) software program. The 43 radiotherapy plans examined in this study consisted of 13 ordinary radiotherapy plans, 28 radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents, and 2 radiotherapy plans for emergency cases. There were ten minor planning changes made in radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents. Our remote radiotherapy planning system based on WAN using a leased line is useful for remote radiotherapy, with advantages for both radiation oncologists and medical residents. (author)

  4. Particle accelerators in the Czech lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janovsky, I.

    2007-01-01

    The paper is structured as follows: A short look into history of accelerators; Particle accelerators in the Czech lands (Accelerators at the Institute of Nuclear Physics; Accelerators at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University; Czechoslovak betatron, accelerators for non-destructive testing and radiotherapy; Czechoslovak high-frequency linear electron accelerator; Czechoslovak-Soviet microtron; Accelerators at the State Research Institute of Textiles; Accelerators at the Kablo Vrchlabi plant; and Cyclotrons in the medical sector. (P.A.)

  5. Time-dose modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kian Ang, K.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in fractionation schedule can be made by various approaches. However, from the first principle, it is anticipated that strategies of hyperfractionation and/or accelerated fractionation offer the most promised in improving the therapeutic ratio. Hyperfractionation is defined as a treatment schedule in which a large number of significantly reduced dose fractions (--1.2 Gy/fraction) is used to give a greater total dose in a conventional overall time period. The results of the pilot studies testing the efficacy of hyperfractionation have been encouraging. The most valid clinical trial of pure hyperfractionation, however, is that conducted by the EORTC. This study compared 70 Gy in 35 fractions or 80.5 Gy in 70 fractions over 7 weeks in the treatment of patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas. The local tumor control was significantly improved in the hyperfractionated arm without increasing the morbidity. Accelerated fractionation is defined as a schedule in which the overall time of treatment is reduced without significant changes in the total dose and fraction size. The strategy has been used to treat patients with malignant gliomas, melanomas and Head and Neck cancers. The data in Head and Neck Cancers seem to be promising

  6. The application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunasfi; Mudjiono; Irwati, Dwi; Hanifa

    2003-01-01

    The study of the application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia was carried out. Accelerator that used for therapy is an electron lintier accelerator (Linac) which can radiate electron beam and X-ray. This study shows that there are 8 unit of Linac distributed at 6 big hospitals in Indonesia, especially in Jakarta. This study also shows that radiotherapy facilities in Indonesia is un sufficient of. Therefore, providing radiotherapy facilities for hospitals, especially the big hospitals in Indonesia is necessary

  7. Prospective, longitudinal electroglottographic study of voice recovery following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for T1/T2 larynx cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Rehan [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, London (United Kingdom); Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Newbold, Kate; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kevinh@icr.ac.uk

    2008-05-15

    Background and purpose: To measure voice outcomes following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for larynx cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with T1/T2 glottic cancer underwent serial electroglottographic and acoustic analysis (sustained vowel/i/ and connected speech) before radiotherapy and 1, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Twenty-five normal subjects served as a reference control population. Results: Pre-treatment measures were significantly worse for larynx cancer patients. Median jitter (0.23% vs 0.97%, p = 0.001) and shimmer (0.62 dB vs 0.98 dB, p = 0.05) and differences in data ranges reflected greater frequency and amplitude perturbation in the larynx cancer patients. Pre-treatment Mean Phonation Time (MPT) was significantly reduced (21 s vs 14.8 s, p = 0.002) in larynx cancer patients. There was a trend towards improvement of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy at 12 months post-treatment. MPT improved but remained significantly worse than for normal subjects (21 s vs 16.4 s, p = 0.013). Average fundamental frequency resembled normal subjects, including improvement of the measured range (91.4-244.6 Hz in controls vs 100-201 Hz in post-treatment larynx cancer patients). Conclusions: This non-invasive technique effectively measures post-treatment vocal function in larynx cancer patients. This study demonstrated improvement of many key parameters that influence voice function over 12 months after radiotherapy.

  8. Prospective, longitudinal electroglottographic study of voice recovery following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for T1/T2 larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, Rehan; Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Newbold, Kate; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: To measure voice outcomes following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for larynx cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with T1/T2 glottic cancer underwent serial electroglottographic and acoustic analysis (sustained vowel/i/ and connected speech) before radiotherapy and 1, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Twenty-five normal subjects served as a reference control population. Results: Pre-treatment measures were significantly worse for larynx cancer patients. Median jitter (0.23% vs 0.97%, p = 0.001) and shimmer (0.62 dB vs 0.98 dB, p = 0.05) and differences in data ranges reflected greater frequency and amplitude perturbation in the larynx cancer patients. Pre-treatment Mean Phonation Time (MPT) was significantly reduced (21 s vs 14.8 s, p = 0.002) in larynx cancer patients. There was a trend towards improvement of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy at 12 months post-treatment. MPT improved but remained significantly worse than for normal subjects (21 s vs 16.4 s, p = 0.013). Average fundamental frequency resembled normal subjects, including improvement of the measured range (91.4-244.6 Hz in controls vs 100-201 Hz in post-treatment larynx cancer patients). Conclusions: This non-invasive technique effectively measures post-treatment vocal function in larynx cancer patients. This study demonstrated improvement of many key parameters that influence voice function over 12 months after radiotherapy

  9. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptman, Jason S., E-mail: jhauptman@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F. [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  10. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, Jason S.; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael; De Salles, Antonio A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  11. Double-blind randomized study of lonidamine and radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, L.; Terraneo, F.; Bertoni, F.; Tordiglione, M.; Bardelli, D.; Rosignoli, M.T.; Ciottoli, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    This Phase III double blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate whether lonidamine can increase the tumor control of radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer without any synergistic toxic effects on the exposed normal tissues. Ninety-seven patients with Stages II-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were enrolled. Separate analyses were done on the 96 eligible patients and the 90 patients who completed the prescribed treatment regimen. Patients received radiotherapy up to a planned total of 60-66 Gy, in 2 daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each and either lonidamine (450 mg p.o. in three divided daily doses) or placebo, given continuously for 3 months or up to 1 month after the end of radiotherapy. The rate of tumor clearance was 66% in the lonidamine group and 65% in the placebo group, while the subsequent failure rate was 50% and 77%, respectively. The 3 and 5 year locoregional control rates in the adequately treated patients achieving complete tumor clearance were 66% and 63% for lonidamine vs. 41% and 37% for placebo. The disease-free survival in adequately treated patients was significantly better in the lonidamine group, with 3 and 5 year rates of 44% and 40%, respectively, vs. 23% and 19% in the placebo group. The overall survival rate for all eligible patients at both 3 and 5 years was 44% in the lonidamine group and 44% and 31%, respectively, in the placebo group. Both acute and late radiation reactions were similar in the two groups. Myalgia and testicular pain were the most frequent side effects of lonidamine with an incidence of 8.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The addition of lonidamine to hyperfractionated radiotherapy was correlated with a statistically and clinically significant proportion of long-term disease-free patients. The toxicity of radiotherapy was not aggravated by the drug and the overall tolerance of the combined regimen was acceptable. 54 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  12. First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation, was organized by the Marie Curie Foundation, between the 14 to 16 june 2012, in the Cordoba city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: radiotherapy in breast cancer; interaction between systemic treatments and radiotherapy; interstitial brachytherapy.

  13. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines

  14. Results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Sadao [Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan); Mariya, Yasushi [and others

    1997-03-01

    A lot of clinical data about stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) were reported, however, standard fractionated schedules were not shown. In this paper, our clinical results of SRT, 3 fractions of 10 Gy, are reported. Between February 1992 and March 1995, we treated 41 patients with 7 arteriovenous malformations and 41 intracranial tumors using a stereotactic technique implemented by a standard 10MV X-ray linear accelerator. Average age was 47.4 years (range 3-80 years) and average follow-up time was 16.7 months (range 3.5-46.1 months). The patients received 3 fractions of 10 Gy for 3 days delivered by multiple arc narrow beams under 3 cm in width and length. A three-pieces handmade shell was used for head fixation without any anesthetic procedures. Three-dimensional treatment planning system (Focus) was applied for the dose calculation. All patients have received at least one follow-up radiographic study and one clinical examination. In four of the 7 patients with AVM the nidus has become smaller, 9 of the 21 patients with benign intracranial tumors and 9 of the 13 patients with intracranial malignant tumors have shown complete or partial response to the therapy. In 14 patients, diseases were stable or unevaluable due to the short follow-up time. In 5 patients (3 with astrocytoma, 1 each with meningioma and craniopharyngioma), diseases were progressive. Only 1 patient with falx meningioma had minor complication due to the symptomatic brain edema around the tumor. Although, further evaluation of target control (i.e. tumor and nidus) and late normal tissue damage is needed, preliminary clinical results indicate that SRT with our methods is safe and effective. (author)

  15. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H. [Universidad de la Frontera, Centro de Fisica e Ingenieria en Medicina, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Velasquez, J. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Zelada, G. [Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Av. Vitacura 5951, 13132 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Astudillo, R., E-mail: rodolfo.figueroa@ufrontera.cl [Hospital Base de Valdivia, C. Simpson 850, XIV Region de los Rios, Valdivia (Chile)

    2017-10-15

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  16. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H.; Velasquez, J.; Zelada, G.; Astudillo, R.

    2017-10-01

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  17. Hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation for Ph{sup 1}-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Akira; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science] [and others

    1998-12-01

    In two cases of Philadelphia-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph{sup 1} ALL), we performed allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (AlloBMT) with preconditioning regimen, including hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) (13.5 Gy, in 9 fractions). Their disease statuses at BMT were hematological relapse in case 1 and molecular relapse in case 2. Bone marrow donors were unrelated in case 1, and HLA was a partially mismatched mother in case 2. Regimen-related toxicity was tolerable in both cases. Hematological recovery was rapid, and engraftment was obtained on day 14 in case 1 and on day 12 in case 2. BCR/ABL message in bone marrow disappeared on day 89 in case 1 and on day 19 in case 2 and throughout their subsequent clinical courses. Although short-term MTX and Cy-A continuous infusion were used for GVHD prophylaxis, grade IV GVHD was observed in case 1 and grade III in case 2. Both cases experienced hemorrhagic cystitis because of adenovirus type 11 infection. Although case 1 died of interstitial pneumonitis on day 442, case 2 has been free of disease through day 231. AlloBMT for Ph{sup 1} ALL with preconditioning regimen including hyperfractionated high-dose TBI is considered to be worth further investigation. (author)

  18. Recommendations for standardized diagnostics, treatment and following care in tumor diseases. Diagnostics and therapy of tumor pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drings, P.; Isele, H.; Zimmermann, M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents different methods for treatment of the cancer pain. Radiotherapy is applicable for treatment of skeleton metastases and accompanying symptoms. Bone metastases are mainly due to six types of tumors: breast, lung, prostate, thyroid gland, kidney and bladder carcinoma. The pain relief mechanisms of low and high dose irradiation are different - low dose radiation has a direct (chemical) analgetic effect and high dose radiation leads to a restrain of the tumor growth and a remineralisation which contributes to pain relief, too. The treatment is with the routine fractionated irradiation with daily dose of 2Gy up to a total dose of 40Gy for 4 weeks. Other possible treatments are: accelerated fractionated irradiation with 15-20 Gy weekly or 30 Gy for 2 weeks, and hyper-fractionated with 2 -3 irradiations daily. After the radiotherapy a total elimination of the pain is observed in 50% of the cases and a significant reducing - in 30-40%

  19. Accelerated radiotherapy planners calculated by parallelization with GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinado, D.; Cozar, J.; Alonso, S.; Chinillach, N.; Cortina, T.; Ricos, B.; Diez, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we have developed and tested by a subroutine parallelization architectures graphics processing units (GPUs) to apply to calculations with standard algorithms known code. The experience acquired during these tests shall also apply to the MC calculations in radiotherapy if you have the code.

  20. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  1. Scattered fractions of dose from 18 and 25 MV X-ray radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobe, J.; Rodgers, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Jackson, J.; Popescu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, measurements have been made at a few energies to estimate the scattered fraction of dose from the patient in medical radiotherapy operations. This information has been a useful aid in the determination of shielding requirements for these facilities. With these measurements, known characteriztics of photons, and various other known parameters, Monte Carlo codes are being used to calculate the scattered fractions and hence the shielding requirements for the photons of other energies commonly used in radiotherapeutic applications. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) acquired a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (linac) which was previously located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. This linac provides an X-ray beam of 25 MV photons and electron beams with energies up to 32 MeV. The housing on the gantry was permanently removed from the accelerator during installation. A Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator was used to produce the 18 MV photons at the Frederick Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Therapy Center in Frederick, MD. This paper represents a study of the photon dose scattered from a patient in typical radiation treatment situations as it relates to the dose delivered at the isocenter in water. The results of these measurements will be compared to Monte Carlo calculations. Photon spectral measurements were not made at this time. Neutron spectral measurements were made on this Sagittaire machine in its previous location and that work was not repeated here, although a brief study of the neutron component of the 18 and 25 MV linacs was performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) to determine the isotropy of the neutron dose. (author)

  2. Probabilistic safety assessment of the radiotherapy treatment with a linear accelerator for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaragut Llanes, Juan Jose; Ferro Fernandez, Ruben; Rodriguez MartI, Manuel; Ramirez, Maria Luisa; Perez Mulas, Arturo; Barrientos Montero, Marta; Ortiz Lopez, Pedro; Somoano, Fernando; Delgado RodrIguez, Jose Miguel; Papadopulos, Susana B.; Pereira Jr, Pedro Paulo; Lopez Morones, Ramon; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo; Rivero Oliva, Jose de Jesus; Alemanny, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment to the radiotherapy treatment with an Electron Linear Accelerator for Medical Use, which was conducted in the framework of the Iberian-American Forum of Radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Agencies. Potential accidental exposures during the treatment of patients, workers and members of the public were assessed, although the study was mainly focused on patients. The methodology of failure modes and effects analysis was used to define accident initiating events and methods of event tree and fault tree analysis to determine the accident sequences that may occur. After quantifying the frequency of occurrence of the accident sequences, an important analysis was carried out in order to determine the most significant events from the point of view of safety. The major contributors to risk were identified as well as the most appropriate safety recommendations to reduce it. (author)

  3. A detrimental effect of a combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy approach in children with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Carolyn R.; Kepner, Jim; Kun, Larry E.; Sanford, Robert A.; Kadota, Richard; Mandell, Lynda; Friedman, Henry

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the proportion of patients that survive at least 1 year following treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HRT) to a dose of 70.2 Gy on Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) study no. 8495 with that of patients treated with similar radiotherapy plus cisplatinum given by continuous infusion on weeks 1, 3, and 5 of radiotherapy on POG no. 9239. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria for the two studies were identical and included age 3 to 21 years, previously untreated tumor involving the brain stem of which two-thirds was in the pons, history less than 6 months, and clinical findings typical for diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma, including cranial nerve deficits, long tract signs, and ataxia. The outcome of 57 patients who were treated at the 70.2 Gy dose level of POG no. 8495 between May 1986 and February 1988 was compared with that of 64 patients treated with identical radiotherapy plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 between June 1992 and March 1996. Results: The number of patients accrued to POG no. 9239 was determined to guarantee that the probability was at least 0.80 of correctly detecting that the 1-year survival rate exceeded that of patients on POG no. 8495 by 0.2. However, the z value for this test was -1.564, giving a p value of 0.9411. That is, there is almost sufficient evidence to conclude that survival for patients receiving HRT plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 was worse than that for patients receiving the same radiotherapy alone on POG no. 8495. Conclusion: The finding that patients who received cisplatinum given as a radiosensitizing agent concurrent with HRT fared less well than those receiving the same dose of HRT alone was unexpected and is clearly a cause for concern as many current protocols for patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas call for use of chemotherapeutic and/or biological agents given concurrent with radiotherapy

  4. Doses to organs at cerebral risks: optimization by robotized stereotaxic radiotherapy and automatic segmentation atlas versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondiau, P.Y.; Thariat, J.; Benezery, K.; Herault, J.; Dalmasso, C.; Marcie, S.; Malandain, G.

    2007-01-01

    The stereotaxic radiotherapy robotized by 'Cyberknife fourth generation' allows a dosimetric optimization with a high conformity index on the tumor and radiation doses limited on organs at risk. A cerebral automatic anatomic segmentation atlas of organs at risk are used in routine in three dimensions. This study evaluated the superiority of the stereotaxic radiotherapy in comparison with the three dimensional conformal radiotherapy on the preservation of organs at risk in regard of the delivered dose to tumors justifying an accelerated hypo fractionation and a dose escalation. This automatic segmentation atlas should allow to establish correlations between anatomy and cerebral dosimetry; This atlas allows to underline the dosimetry optimization by stereotaxic radiotherapy robotized for organs at risk. (N.C.)

  5. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  6. Peroperative radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguier, M.; Schlienger, M.; Houry, S.; Charron, R.

    1987-01-01

    7 patients presenting with unresected (6 cases) or resected (1 case) cancer of the pancreas were treated peroperatively by radiotherapy. Tumors were treated with 15 to 20 Gy delivered by a particle accelerator. There were no post-operative complications. Three patients who were experiencing pain before radiotherapy no longer had pain after radiotherapy and this effect was maintained. Five patients died during the follow-up period after 5 to 10 months. Two patients are still alive after 4 and 9 months follow-up. This experience with peroperative radiotherapy should be continued [fr

  7. Hyperfractionated total body irradiation for T-depleted HLA identical bone marrow transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Checcaglini, F.; Maranzano, E.; Aristei, C.; Panizza, B.M.; Gobbi, G.; Raymondi, C.; Aversa, F.; Martelli, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty patients suffering from malignant hemopathies (mean age 31.7 years) were given hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for T-depleted HLA identical allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. At an average of 12 months (range of 4.5-22 months) follow-up there were two cases of early death and two cases (11%) of rejection. There were no cases of acute or chronic graft versus host disease nor cases of interstitial pneumonitis. The average time for durable engraftment was 22 days. Disease-free survival at 12 months was 65%. To improve the results and further reduce the percent of rejection, the authors propose intensifying the immunosuppressive conditioning by increasing the cyclophosphamide dose and that of TBI so that a total dose of 1560 cGy is reached. 35 refs.; 1 figure

  8. Cost-benefit analysis on radiotherapy services for cancer treatment, with LINAC type equipments (linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Blois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work consists in analyzing the economic feasibility of the investment to implement a Radiotherapy sector for radiological of cancer treatment by type linear accelerators equipments, based on the case of a public hospital in São Paulo. From technical and financial details of the project and the survey reference values for health care to their procedures, the statistical outcome of treatment on patients' life expectancy and average income indicators of the state's population, were estimated to income (private and social and expenses of this health service and other elements that make up the flow of the investment project box. From these estimates we evaluated public and private investment return, ie, if it fits only on the public sector or if private sector could also implement this projects geared exclusively to free admittance.

  9. The spanish radiotherapy park: past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormo Ferrero, Manuel J.

    2001-01-01

    The present article has as objective to provide a general overview on the spanish radiotherapy park, presenting how was its start and evolution until the current state. Considering only the units of teletherapy and the accelerators. Actually in Spain there is 28 units of Cobalt therapy, in functioning during the last two decades, being advised a rapid substitution to accelerators

  10. What next in fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue injury can be seen by the progression from the ''cube root law'', through Strandqvist's slope of 0.22, to NSD, TDF and CRE which have separate time and fraction number exponents, to even better approximations now available. The dose-response formulae that can be used to define the effect of fraction size (and number) include (1) the linear quadratic (LQ) model (2) the two-component (TC) multi-target model and (3) repair-misrepair models. The LQ model offers considerable convenience, requires only two parameters to be determined, and emphasizes the difference between late and early normal-tissue dependence on dose per fraction first shown by exponents greater than the NSD slope of 0.24. Exponents of overall time, e.g. Tsup(0.11), yield the wrong shape of time curve, suggesting that most proliferating occurs early, although it really occurs after a delay depending on the turnover time of the tissue. Improved clinical results are being sought by hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation, or continuous low dose rate irradiation as in interstitial implants. (U.K.)

  11. Modelling of post-irradiation accelerated repopulation in squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, L; Doorn, T van; Olver, I

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms postulated to be responsible for the accelerated repopulation of squamous cell carcinomas during radiotherapy are the loss of asymmetry of stem cell division, acceleration of stem cell division, abortive division and/or recruitment of the non-cycling cell with proliferative capacity. Although accelerated repopulation was observed with recruitment and accelerated cell cycles, it was not sufficient to cause an observable change to the survival curve. However, modelling the loss of asymmetry in stem cell division has reshaped the curve with a 'growth' shoulder. Cell recruitment was not found to be a major contributor to accelerated tumour repopulation. A more significant contribution was provided through the multiplication of surviving tumour stem cells during radiotherapy, by reducing their cell cycle time, and due to loss of asymmetry of stem cell division

  12. Phase I and pharmacologic study of 72-hour infused 5-fluorouracil and hyperfractionated cyclical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, J.E.; Frankel, S.S.; Sharp, T.R.; Hornbeck, C.L.; Callipari, F.B.

    1985-04-01

    The authors have studied 21 patients infused for 72 hours with 5- Fluorouracil (5-FU) at progressive doses combined with hyperfractionated radiation. The schedule was chosen as being one capable of inducing 5-FU radiosensitization (RS). All patients were started at a daily 5-FU dose of 40 mg/kg/24 hours; doses were then escalated with each subsequent treatment cycle to limiting toxicity or until taken off study. Patients received between one and six infusion cycles. Every treatment cycle included coincident hyperfractionated radiation to various body areas including the abdomen, chest, and head and neck region. Radiation fractionation was invariant; 1,000 rad were delivered in four equal fractions. Two fractions of 250 rad each were given on days 1 and 2 of each three day 5-FU cycle, i.e. at approximately 0, 8, 24, and 32 hours into the drug infusion. Patients were followed for toxicity; serum 5-FU concentrations were determined using a high pressure liquid chromatographic assay. 5-FU clearances were calculated from the mean serum drug levels and the infused drug dose. The toxicity spectrum was not found to be significantly different from infused drug alone in this dose range except when the head and neck region received coincident irradiation. In that region the two anticipated toxicities combined in what appears to be a synergistic fashion to enhance mucositis. Most toxicities including gastrointestinal and bone marrow appeared dependent on the mean serum 5-FU level as did mucositis itself. 5-FU clearance was found to be non-linear in this dose region but did not appear influenced by radiation to any part of the body.

  13. Phase I and pharmacologic study of 72-hour infused 5-fluorouracil and hyperfractionated cyclical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byfield, J.E.; Frankel, S.S.; Sharp, T.R.; Hornbeck, C.L.; Callipari, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied 21 patients infused for 72 hours with 5- Fluorouracil (5-FU) at progressive doses combined with hyperfractionated radiation. The schedule was chosen as being one capable of inducing 5-FU radiosensitization (RS). All patients were started at a daily 5-FU dose of 40 mg/kg/24 hours; doses were then escalated with each subsequent treatment cycle to limiting toxicity or until taken off study. Patients received between one and six infusion cycles. Every treatment cycle included coincident hyperfractionated radiation to various body areas including the abdomen, chest, and head and neck region. Radiation fractionation was invariant; 1,000 rad were delivered in four equal fractions. Two fractions of 250 rad each were given on days 1 and 2 of each three day 5-FU cycle, i.e. at approximately 0, 8, 24, and 32 hours into the drug infusion. Patients were followed for toxicity; serum 5-FU concentrations were determined using a high pressure liquid chromatographic assay. 5-FU clearances were calculated from the mean serum drug levels and the infused drug dose. The toxicity spectrum was not found to be significantly different from infused drug alone in this dose range except when the head and neck region received coincident irradiation. In that region the two anticipated toxicities combined in what appears to be a synergistic fashion to enhance mucositis. Most toxicities including gastrointestinal and bone marrow appeared dependent on the mean serum 5-FU level as did mucositis itself. 5-FU clearance was found to be non-linear in this dose region but did not appear influenced by radiation to any part of the body

  14. The development of radiotherapy in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhelj, Janez; Ravnihar, Bozena

    1996-01-01

    The historical data on the development of radiotherapy in Slovenia are presented from its first use in this county in 1902 until the present. The Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana was established in 1938 with the intention of providing a sound development of radium and roentgen cancer treatment. After World War II, the development of radiotherapy was dynamic, which is evident from the data on new radiation sources in external beam therapy (accelerators, telecobalt units), in brachytherapy (various sealed radioisotopes) as well as in the introduction of therapy with unsealed radioisotopes. In 1947, a Chair of Oncology and Radiotherapy was instituted at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana (with the seat at the Institute of Oncology). In 1955, radiotherapy and oncology were officially recognized as separate branches of medicine requiring special obligatory postgraduate residency training. Within the Medical Society of Slovenia, the Section for Radiotherapy was established in 1987. The following year, the Section for Radiotherapy of Slovenia became a member of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Considering the size of population of Slovenia (nearly 2 million), it was reasonable that by this time radiotherapy became almost completely concentrated in one central institution, the Institute of Oncology, whose core and cohesive activity were represented in the multidisciplinary cancer treatment approach

  15. Radiotherapy equipment for conformal radiotherapy and IMRT in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horakova, I.; Irena Pavlikova, I.; Novotny, J. ml.

    2005-01-01

    The development of the equipment of radiotherapy departments in the Czech Republic is presented here. The data from the special questionnaire from 14 workplaces with linear accelerators with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are included. They show not only the equipment specification but also the application methods, the quality control, plans for future etc. In the Czech Republic, a great extension of modem irradiation techniques and accessories occurs at present. Together with it, it is necessary to develop quality assurance of the whole process of dose delivery to the patient. It is also necessary to assure further education and training of hospital staff. Modern radiotherapy techniques demand sufficient amount of all sources including personal sources. (authors)

  16. Treatment of 29 patients with bulky squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix with simultaneous cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and split-course hyperfractionated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, D.; Yordan, E.; Reddy, S.; Bonomi, P.; Lee, M.S.; Lincoln, S.; Graham, J.; Dolan, T.; Miller, A.; Phillips, A. (Rush Presbyterian-St. Lukes Hospital, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Attempting to improve local disease control in bulky primary or recurrent pelvic tumors, 29 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated with concomitant chemotherapy and split-course hyperfractionated radiation therapy between April 1983 and August 1988. Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) have been shown to be radiation enhancers; furthermore, CDDP, radiation therapy, and continuous-infusion 5-FU have elicited high local response rates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. A pilot study of cyclical week on/week off CDDP, continuous-infusion 5-FU, and hyperfractionated radiation therapy was developed. Radiation was administered at 116 cGy twice daily, Days 1-5, every other week for a median dose of 4600 cGy to a pelvic field, with paraaortic extension if indicated. Concomitant chemotherapy included CDDP 60 mg/m2 IV Day 1 and 5-FU 600 mg/m2 IV continuous infusion for 96 hr following CDDP infusion. Patients received a median of four cycles of combined treatment, and intracavitary or interstitial brachytherapy followed in 21 patients. Local pelvic response was achieved in 29 of 29 (100%): complete response (CR) in 19 of 29 (66%), partial response (PR) in 10 of 29 (34%). Among CR patients 10 of 19 (53%) were without evidence of disease at a mean follow-up of 29 (range 12-76) months. Five-year actuarial disease-free survival among complete responders was 65%. Of the 10 CR patients 2 failed in the pelvis, for a local control rate of 17/19 (89%). Chemotherapy-related and acute radiation morbidity was minimal but 2 patients required surgical correction of radiation injury. Aggressive combination of split-course hyperfractionated radiation therapy with radiation enhancers resulted in promising local control of bulky pelvic tumor, with an acceptable complication rate, in this otherwise very poor prognostic group of patients.

  17. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica M.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; DiNardo, L.; Manning, Matthew A.; Silverman, L.; Clay, L.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Amir, Cyrus

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy of accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for advanced head-and-neck carcinomas. This study represents a single-institution experience, performed to identify the factors influencing tumor control, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1999, 133 patients with primary squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma underwent accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy using a concomitant boost. The concomitant boost in this regimen was delivered using reduced fields delivered 3 times weekly in a twice-daily schedule during the final phase. The total radiation dose ranged from 64.8 Gy to 76.5 Gy (mean 71.1). Patients were evaluated in follow-up for local control and late toxicity. Multivariate analysis of treatment and patient parameters was performed to evaluate their influence on toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results: With a mean follow-up of 37 months, the actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group at 5 years was 24% and the local control rate was 57%. The tumor volume was the most significant predictor of local control, such that each 1-cm 3 increase in volume was associated with a 1% decrease in local control. For patients with tumor volumes ≤30 cm 3 vs. >30 cm 3 , the 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 52% and 27% (p = 0.004) and locoregional control rate was 76% and 26% (p<0.001), respectively. Seventy-six patients with a minimum of 12 months and median of 39 months toxicity follow-up were studied for late effects. None of these patients experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The actuarial rate of significant toxicity (Grade III or greater) was 32% at 5 years. Of the toxicities observed, xerostomia (19%) was the most common. Multivariate analysis revealed N stage and dose as independent predictors of Grade 3 effects. Conclusion: The locoregional control and survival for patients in this institutional experience compare favorably to

  18. An analysis of two separate quality audits in UK radiotherapy centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aird, E G A

    1995-01-01

    The CHART quality assurance programme has been used to audit 2 groups of radiotherapy centres for the delivery of radiotherapy: 1. those involved in the CHART Clinical Trial (1991-1995) 2. all London radiotherapy centres (1994-1996) Machinery Tests This paper will seek to illustrate improvements in meeting the criteria set by the QA programme as older linear accelerators are replaced. Phantom Tests The residual errors between measured and calculated doses in anatomical phantoms will be analysed to demonstrate where there are still weaknesses in treatment planning and delivery of radiotherapy

  19. Hyperfractionated radiation in combination with local hyperthermia in the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase I-II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amichetti, Maurizio; Romano, Mario; Busana, Lucia; Bolner, Andrea; Fellin, Gianni; Pani, Giuseppe; Tomio, Luigi; Valdagni, Riccardo

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with cervical metastases from squamous cell head and neck tumours were treated with hyperfractionated XRT (total dose 69.60-76.80 Gy, 1.2 Gy b.i.d. five times a week) combined with a total of two to six sessions of superficial external HT. Acute local toxicity was mild; as major acute side effects, only one ulceration was recorded. No severe late side effects were observed. Late toxicity was similar to that observed in our previous studies with the combination of heat and radiation. Nodal complete response was observed in 77% of patients, partial response was observed in 15% of patients and no change was observed in 8% of patients. Five-year actuarial nodal control was 64.5 ± 19% and 5-year actuarial survival was 24 ± 10%. The treatment of nodal metastases from head and neck tumours with the combination of HT and hyperfractionated XRT is feasible with an acceptable acute and late toxicity profile

  20. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  1. High energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrillon, P.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to 'light ions' (carbon, oxygen, neon), has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. These high energy medical accelerators are presented in this paper. (author) 15 refs.; 14 figs.; 8 tabs

  2. Laser-driven particle acceleration for radiobiology and radiotherapy: where we are and where we are going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Radiation therapy of tumors progresses continuously and so do devices, sharing a global market of about $ 4 billions, growing at an annual rate exceeding 5%. Most of the progress involves tumor targeting, multi-beam irradiation, reduction of damage on healthy tissues and critical organs, dose fractioning. This fast-evolving scenario is the moving benchmark for the progress of the laser-based accelerators towards clinical uses. As for electrons, both energy and dose requested by radiotherapy are available with plasma accelerators driven by lasers in the power range of tens of TW but several issues have still to be faced before getting a prototype device for clinical tests. They include capability of varying electron energy, stability of the process, reliability for medical users. On the other side hadron therapy, presently applied to a small fraction of cases but within an exponential growth, is a primary option for the future. With such a strong motivation, research on laser-based proton/ion acceleration has been supported in the last decade in order to get performances suitable to clinical standards. None of these performances has been achieved so far with laser techniques. In the meantime a rich crop of data have been obtained in radiobiological experiments performed with beams of particles produced with laser techniques. It is quite significant however that most of the experiments have been performed moving bio samples to laser labs, rather moving laser equipment to bio labs or clinical contexts. This give us the measure that laser community cannot so far provide practical devices usable by non-laser people.

  3. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: a clinical study of 33 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei ZHENG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To retrospectively review the clinical characteristics of medulloblastoma,discuss the optimized treatment regimen,and analyze the prognostic influential factors.Methods Thirty-three children with pathologically certified medulloblastoma(aged 3-14 years with average of 6.5 years,admitted from Aug.2004 to Dec.2007,received radiotherapy within 3 weeks post surgery.Ratiotherapy consisted of 28~36Gy whole craniospinal radiation and a supplementary radiation aimed at tumors by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3D-CRT for a total dose of 50~54Gy(conventional fraction dose of 1.8-2.0Gy.A part of patients received hyperfractionation radiotherapy(1.0Gy/f,2f/d for alleviating the tardive adverse events.Meanwhile,a synchronized chemotherapy,consisting of lomustine + vincristine + cisplatin,or isophosphamide + carboplatin + etoposide,was administered after the completion of whole craniospinal radiation,and 3-5 courses of sequential chemotherapy were given after the overall radiotherapy was finished.According to the metastasis,and the residual tumor and its size,the 33 patients were divided into 2 groups as follows: low-risk group(n=24: no metastases,total or sub-total excision of tumors(residual tumors ≤1.5cm3;high-risk group(n=9: either metastases or residual tumor > 1.5cm3.The 3-year survival rates of two groups were then compared.Results The combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective to 10 of the 11 patients(90.9% with residual tumors.Out of the 33 patients,31 obtained complete remission(93.9%,and 2 patients showed partial remission or stable status(3.0%,respectively.The median survival time of 33 patients was 51 months,3-year disease free survival(DFS was 75.8%,and 3-year overall survival(OS was 78.8%,including 33.3% in high-risk group and 95.8% in low-risk group(P < 0.01.The major side effects occurred in haematological system and digestive system,such as an incidence of 21.2%(7/33 with grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ bone marrow suppression

  4. Debate about breast cancer: 'Cons: Intraoperative radiotherapy'; Debats autour du cancer du sein: 'contre' la radiotherapie peroperatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Heymann, S.; Verstraet, R.; Biron, B.; Marsiglia, H. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Early breast cancer incidence increases owing to mammography screening. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy is more and more proposed in women with low local relapse risk breast cancer, especially accelerated partial breast irradiation. Various irradiation modalities have been reported: brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation, 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation. We describe limitations of intraoperative irradiation and the advantages of alternative techniques. (authors)

  5. Study on the possibility of using a 60 Co therapeutical unity in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Samuel Cesar

    2009-06-01

    With the increasing advances in complex treatment techniques, there is a tendency to obtain more sophisticated equipment to deliver the dose. The use of 3D conformal radiotherapy is now routine in many radiotherapy facilities as well as the utilization of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Both are usually implemented using linear accelerators equipped with multi leaves collimators, which create the conformity and the fluence distributions required. However, the complexity of increasingly sophisticated equipment, such as linear accelerators, requires a frequent quality control of their operation, as well as a detailed and constant maintenance. Even carrying out these procedures, the accelerators may present technical problems interrupting for a long time a treatment using the IMRT technique. Despite the clear practical and technological advantages that linear accelerators have on 60 Co irradiators, these devices occupy an important place in radiotherapy, mainly due to the low cost of equipment installation and maintenance when compared to those required by accelerators. Many radiotherapy facilities that work with IMRT have tele therapeutic isocentric 60 Co units. In principle, such equipment would be able to be used for treatment with IMRT using compensating blocks to modulate the beam. This study investigates this possibility and shows that it is feasible. The comparison of treatment plans of a head-and-neck cancer and other of a cancer of the central nervous system, based on a 60 Co irradiator and a Linac 2300 C/D, presented advantages for the 60 Co irradiator. Furthermore; the delivery of dose obtained with the two systems showed themselves equivalent when compared to their respective plans. (author)

  6. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  7. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  8. Department and patient management in radiotherapy. The Freiburg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, Felix; Frommhold, Hermann; Roehner, Fred; Bruggmoser, Gregor; Schmucker, Marianne; Henne, Karl; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The activities in radiotherapy are mainly affected by numerous partly very complex operational procedures which have to be completed while high safety requirements have to be fulfilled. This fact and steadily increasing economic pressure are forcing us to develop new strategies which help us to optimize our operational procedures and assure their reliability. As there are not so many radiotherapeutic institutions and the main focus, up to now, was mainly stressed on the acceleration systems (radiation planning, acceleration control), only few industrial systems are available which could also support the economic, organizational and administrative needs of radiotherapy. Methods: During the building operations for the 'new clinic for radiotherapy' at the University Hospital Freiburg, Germany, the staff of the clinical and administrative information and the medical physicists developed, in close cooperation with the physicians, a comprehensive concept to control and organize a radiotherapeutic institution. This concept was examined during the construction phase of the new clinic and the adjoined HBFG ('Hochschulbaufoerderungsgesetz') process by the 'Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft' and financed totally by federal funds. Results and Conclusion: The precondition for the goal to operate a homogeneous and comprehensive management of a clinic for radiotherapy was the direct connection of the acceleration area with the organizational/administrative surrounding. The thus developed common basic dates and consistence created transparency and allowed us for the first time to control all operational procedures by EDV-technical means. After 2 years full-time operation and implementation of numerous particular projects we are now ready for film- and paperless digital work. (orig.)

  9. Hyperfractionated total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation. Results in seventy leukemia patients with allogeneic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, B.; Chu, F.C.H.; Dinsmore, R.

    1983-01-01

    From May, 1979 to March, 1981, 76 leukemia patients were prepared for bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with a new hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) regimen (1320 cGy in 11 fractions, 3x/day), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg, for two days. Partial lung shielding was done on each treatment, with supplemental electron beam treatments of the chest wall to compensate, and of the testes, a sanctuary site. This regimen was initiated to potentially reduce fatal interstitial pneumonitis as well as decrease leukemic relapse. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients is 63%, while relapse-free survival at 1 year is 53%. On the other hand, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients, there is no significant difference between relapse or remission patients with regard to overall survival or relapse-free survival, when relapse is defined as > 5% blasts in the marrow at the time of cytoreduction. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for ALL is 61% and relapse-free survival is 45% at 1 year. Fatal interstitial pneumonitis has dropped to 18% compared with 50% in our previous single-dose TBI regimen (1000 cGy), in which the same doses of cyclophosphamide were given prior to TBI. In conclusion, not only has fatal interstitial pneumonitis been reduced by hyperfractionation and partial lung blocking, but there may be a survival advantage in ALL patients in relapse, who have a survival equal to that of remission patients. This may indicate a greater cell kill with the higher dose (1320 cGy) attained with this regimen, in these patients with a higher leukemic cell burden

  10. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Mang, Kristina; Holtmann, Henrik; Spitzer, Wolfgang J; Rübe, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. The occurrence of IORN is an important long

  11. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewald, Marcus; Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Kirrberger Str. 1, D-66421 Homburg (Germany); Mang, Kristina [Dental Practice, Duisburg (Germany); Holtmann, Henrik; Spitzer, Wolfgang J [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Saarland University Medical Center, Kirrberger Str. 1, D-66421 Homburg (Germany); Rübe, Christian [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Kirrberger Str. 1, D-66421 Homburg (Germany)

    2013-10-02

    Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. The occurrence of IORN is an important long

  12. A beam-matching concept for medical linear accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, David; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Ottosson, Wiviann

    2009-01-01

    The flexibility in radiotherapy can be improved if a patient can be moved between any one of the department's medical linear accelerators without the need to change anything in the patient's treatment plan. For this to be possible, the dosimetric characteristics of the various accelerators must...

  13. A phase I trial of etanidazole and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with diffuse brain stem glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, S.C.; Pomeroy, S.L.; Billett, A.L.; Barnes, P.; Kuhlman, C.; Riese, N.E.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Coleman, C.N.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Prospective phase I study to evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole administered concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HRT) for children with brain stem glioma. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients with brain stem glioma were treated with etanidazole and HRT from 1990-1996. Eligibility required MRI confirmation of diffuse glioma of medulla, pons or mesencephalon, and signs/symptoms of cranial nerve deficit, ataxia or long tract signs of ≤ 6 months duration. Cervico-medullary tumors were excluded. Patients (median age 8.5 years; 11 males, 7 females) received HRT to the tumor volume plus a 2 cm margin with parallel opposed 6-15 MV photons. The total dose was 66 Gy for the first 3 patients, followed by 63 Gy over 4.2 weeks (1.5 Gy BID with 6 hours between fractions) for the subsequent 15 patients. Etanidazole was administered as a rapid IV infusion 30 minutes prior to the morning fraction of HRT at doses of 1.8 gm/m2 x 17 doses (30.6 gm/m2) at step 1 to a maximum of 2.4 gm/m2 x 21 doses (50.4 gm/m2) at step 8. Dose escalation was planned with 3 patients at each of the 8 levels. Results: Three patients were treated at each dose level except level 2, on which only one patient was treated. The highest dose level achieved was step 7 which delivered a total etanidazole dose of 46.2 gm/m2. Two patients were treated at this level, and both patients experienced grade 3 toxicity in the form of a diffuse cutaneous rash. Three patients received a lower dose of 42 gm/m2 without significant toxicity, and this represents the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). There were 24 cases of grade 1 toxicity (10 vomiting, 5 peripheral neuropathy, 2 rash, 2 constipation, 1 skin erythema, 1 weight loss, 3 other), eleven cases of grade 2 toxicity (4 vomiting, 2 skin erythema, 2 constipation, 1 arthalgia, 1 urinary retention, 1 hematologic), and four grade b 3 toxicities (2 rash, 1 vomiting, 1 skin desquamation). Grade 2 or 3 peripheral

  14. Pulse-resolved radiotherapy dosimetry using fiber-coupled organic scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg

    scintillators and can be perceived as a well characterized, independent alternative to the methods that are in clinical use today. The dosimeter itself does not require a voltage supply, and is composed of water equivalent materials. The dosimeter can be fabricated with a sensitive volume smaller than a cubic...... millimeter, which is small enough to resolve the small radiation fields encountered in modern radiotherapy. The fast readout of the dosimeter enables measurements on the same time scale as the pulsed radiation delivery from the medical linear accelerators used for treatment. The dosimetry system, comprising...... for both standard and small fields. This thesis concludes that the new pulse-resolved dosimetry system holds great potential for modern radiotherapy applications, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy....

  15. Dosimetry at the location of secondary tumors after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baas, H W; Davelaar, J J; Broerse, J J; Noordijk, E M [University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    1995-12-01

    After a latency period of many years the incidence of a secondary tumor is considered a serious late effect of radiotherapy. Analysis of about 200 patients, treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin`s disease in our hospital, shows an actuarial risk for the incidence of a secondary tumor of about 7% after 10 years. The chance of tumor induction depends on the dose at the location of the tumor and therefore a good dose estimation is mandatory. Radiotherapy was given with Co-60 in the early years and with linear accelerators thereafter, exposing the target areas to 36 - 40 Gy. For dose estimations at the penumbra and outside the beam, where tumor incidence is expected to be high, we used a.o. Monte Carlo calculations. We developed an EGS4 computer simulation for a treatment beam from a linear accelerator irradiating a mathematical phantom representing the patient geometry (GSF ADAM phantom). The isodose curves at certain energies were obtained for a water phantom and fitted quite well with measurements. In addition to Monte Carlo calculations we also used existing treatment planning systems. The dose estimations of a number of patients and the derived risk per unit of dose, which is important for both radiotherapy as well as radiation protection in general, is discussed.

  16. Cost of quality assurance in radiotherapy: human and material requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, V.; Garcia, R.; Chauvet, B.; Bourhis, J.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, three new important laws were passed concerning radiotherapy services. The first two concerns the internal and external quality control of linear accelerators and the last concerns the role of the medical physicist, whose presence was made mandatory during the whole length of the treatments. These laws, which aim to improve the quality and the security of treatments, represent an increase in price that we have calculated, and which prevents them being implemented, as a joint study realised by the SFRO and the SFPM has shown. The cost of quality in radiotherapy requires investment in material and manpower and improvement in availability of the accelerators which entails a complete reorganization of the services. Cost analysis is included. The difficulties in implementing these laws have also been evaluated and this evaluation already enables us to propose certain elements enabling us to go forward to globally improve the quality and security in radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandare, Niranjan, E-mail: bhandn@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Song, William Y. [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bhatti, M. Tariq [Department of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Division of Neurology), Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  18. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Song, William Y.; Morris, Christopher G.; Bhatti, M. Tariq; Mendenhall, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35–39.99 Gy to 50% at 45–49.99 Gy and 90% at 60–64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p ≤ .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45–59.9 Gy, and 3% doses ≥60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  19. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy; Progetto di acceleratore compatto per terapia oncologica con protoni (TOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardi, L; Ronsivalle, C; Vignati, A [ENEA, Cntro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione

    1995-04-01

    The status of the sub-project `Compact Accelerator` in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated `Compact Accelerator` and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources.

  20. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker; Radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein et stimulateur cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M. [Oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M. [Departement d' anesthesie-reanimation-douleur, institut Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker

  2. Review on heavy ion radiotherapy facilities and related ion sources (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ion radiotherapy awakens worldwide interest recently. The clinical results obtained by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan have clearly demonstrated the advantages of carbon ion radiotherapy. Presently, there are four facilities for heavy ion radiotherapy in operation, and several new facilities are under construction or being planned. The most common requests for ion sources are a long lifetime and good stability and reproducibility. Sufficient intensity has been achieved by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the present facilities.

  3. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...... and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...

  4. Commissioning and quality assurance of the x-ray volume imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K.R.; Narayana Murthy, P.; Kumar, Rajneesh

    2008-01-01

    An Image-Guided Radiotherapy-capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI) system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT). The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer's specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy. (author)

  5. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An Image-Guided Radiotherapy-capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer′s specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality. These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy.

  6. Normal tissue complication models for clinically relevant acute esophagitis (≥ grade 2) in patients treated with dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Söhn, Matthias; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Wurstbauer, Karl; Tröller, Almut; Deutschmann, Heinz; Fastner, Gerd; Fussl, Christoph; Steininger, Philipp; Kranzinger, Manfred; Belka, Claus; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary dose-limiting toxicities during thoracic irradiation is acute esophagitis (AE). The aim of this study is to investigate dosimetric and clinical predictors for AE grade ≥ 2 in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 66 NSCLC patients were included in the present analysis: 4 stage II, 44 stage IIIA and 18 stage IIIB. All patients received induction chemotherapy followed by dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid). Depending on size (mean of three perpendicular diameters) tumors were binned in four dose groups: <2.5 cm 73.8 Gy, 2.5–4.5 cm 79.2 Gy, 4.5–6 cm 84.6 Gy, >6 cm 90 Gy. Patients were treated in 3D target splitting technique. In order to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), two Lyman models and the cutoff-logistic regression model were fitted to the data with AE ≥ grade 2 as statistical endpoint. Inter-model comparison was performed with the corrected Akaike information criterion (AIC c ), which calculates the model’s quality of fit (likelihood value) in relation to its complexity (i.e. number of variables in the model) corrected by the number of patients in the dataset. Toxicity was documented prospectively according to RTOG. The median follow up was 686 days (range 84–2921 days), 23/66 patients (35 %) experienced AE ≥ grade 2. The actuarial local control rates were 72.6 % and 59.4 % at 2 and 3 years, regional control was 91 % at both time points. The Lyman-MED model (D50 = 32.8 Gy, m = 0.48) and the cutoff dose model (D c = 38 Gy) provide the most efficient fit to the current dataset. On multivariate analysis V38 (volume of the esophagus that receives 38 Gy or above, 95 %-CI 28.2–57.3) was the most significant predictor of AE ≥ grade 2 (HR = 1.05, CI 1.01–1.09, p = 0.007). Following high-dose accelerated radiotherapy the rate of AE ≥ grade 2 is slightly lower than reported for concomitant radio-chemotherapy with the

  7. Radiobiological characterization of different energy-photon beams used in radiotherapy from linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elata, A.; Hassan, A. M. E.; Ali, E.; Calzolari, P.; Bettega, D.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a radiobiological characterization of different energy photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, and comparison of different treatment modalities, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Using two end points, cell survival and micronucleus induction, in the biological system (Chines hamster V79 cell line). Chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beams and immediately after irradiation were counted and re seeded in different numbered for each dose. For evaluation of surviving fraction samples were incubated at 37o C for 6 days, five samples were counted for each dose. At the same time three samples were seeded for the micronuclei frequency and incubated at 37o C after 24 hours cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis. The survival curve showed similar curves for the two beams and decreased with dose. The micronuclei frequency was positively correlated with dose and the energy of the photon. This indicates the presence of low dose of photoneutrons produced by using high energy photon beams. (Author)

  8. Medical uses of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of particle accelerators have either potential or already demonstrated uses in connection with medically-related research, diagnosis, and treatment. For cancer radiotherapy, nuclear particles including protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and negative pi mesons have advantages compared to conventional radiations in terms of dose localization and/or biological effectiveness. Clinical evaluations of these particles are underway at a number of institutions. Accelerator-produced radionuclides are in widespread use for research and routine diagnostic purposes. Elemental analysis techniques with charged particles and neutrons are being applied to bone, blood, and other tissues. Finally, low-dose medical imaging can be accomplished with accelerated protons and heavy ions. The status and future of these programs are discussed

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of Radiotherapy units wit 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B. Salinas de; Tovar M, V.; Becerril V, A.

    2000-01-01

    The SSDL network of the IAEA performs, every year, quality audit tests for radiotherapy services ( 60 Co units and linear accelerators), and for national SSDL as well. Because of the SSDL-Mexico results in these tests and due to our enthusiasm and confidence in our work, a parallel test has been done , which is described in this talk as well as the results. Nowadays, a second parallel test goes up, which could confirm our optimism and open the possibility to our country to start a national dosimetric audit of 60 Co radiotherapy units. (Author)

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rütten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Rooijakkers, Antoinette F.; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  11. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  12. Characteristics of a dedicated linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery-radiotherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Downes, M. Beverly; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Andrews, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) system on a dedicated Varian Clinac-600SR linear accelerator with Brown-Roberts-Wells and Gill-Thomas-Cosman relocatable frames along with the Radionics (RSA) planning system is evaluated. The Clinac-600SR has a single 6-MV beam with the same beam characteristics as that of the mother unit, the Clinac-600C. The primary collimator is a fixed cone projecting to a 10-cm diameter at isocenter. The secondary collimator is a heavily shielded cylindrical collimator attached to the face plate of the primary collimator. The tertiary collimation consists of the actual treatment cones. The cone sizes vary from 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. The variations in isocenter position with table, gantry, and collimator rotation were found to be <0.5 mm with a compounded accuracy of ≤ 1.0 mm. The radiation leakage under the cones was < 1% measured at a depth of 5 cm in a phantom. The beam profiles of all cones in the x and y directions were within ±0.5 mm and match with the physical size of the cone. The dosimetric data such as tissue maximum ratio, off-axis ratio, and cone factor were taken using film, diamond detector, and ion chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics including dose linearity of this unit are presented and found to be suitable for SRS/SRT. The difficulty in absolute dose measurement for small cone is discussed

  13. Radiotherapy and oncology for technical assistants in the medical professions. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Essential subjects presented in this textbook are: conventional X-ray irradiation, Gamma-ray teletherapy, particle accelerators, therapy using sealed radionuclides, irradiation planning, performance of radiotherapy, physical fundamentals of radiotherapy, biological fundamentals of radiotherapy, specific radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant tumors, irradiation of non-malignant disorders. The new edition covers also information on radiation oncology aspects in the context of epidemiological studies, specific knowledge regarding tumor diagnostics and radiological protection, as well as diagnostic signs and interpretation together with indicated therapies and their efficacy. (orig.) [de

  14. High energy particle accelerators as radiation Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, M E [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Vontrol, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Small accelerators in the energy range of few million electron volts are usually used as radiation sources for various applications, like radiotherapy, food irradiation, radiation sterilization and in other industrial applications. High energy accelerators with energies reaching billions of electron volts also find wide field of applications as radiation sources. Synchrotrons with high energy range have unique features as radiation sources. This review presents a synopsis of cyclic accelerators with description of phase stability principle of high energy accelerators with emphasis on synchrotrons. Properties of synchrotron radiation are given together with their applications in basic and applied research. 13 figs.,1 tab.

  15. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M.; Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before

  16. Histopathological changes in the irradiated normal organs of guinea pigs with conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Taisuke; Itoh, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Nobuaki

    1998-01-01

    Guinea pigs were divided into groups according to four irradiation schedules : 2 Gy/3 Gy x 1/day, five fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (A/C group) and 1.0 Gy/1.5 Gy x 2/day, ten fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (B/D group). The A group and the C group pathologically caused severe damage in the kidney six and three months after irradiation, respectively. In the B group pathological analysis suggested that only slight-to-moderate changes were occurred in the Bowman's capsule. The D group caused slight damage in the kidney six months after irradiation. Hyperfractionation (B/D group) used in this protocol can clearly reduce radiation damage in the kidney of guinea pigs as compared with conventional fractionation (A/C group). (author)

  17. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Jordan [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, Thomas [Huddersfield U.; Green, Stuart [Birmingham U.; Johnstone, Carol [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.

  18. Experience with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) in the curative management of neuroblastoma (NB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Habrand, J.L.; Helfre, S.; Hartmann, O.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of HFRT (BID) in children treated for Nb with curative intent. Material and method: Retrospective analysis of a series of 29 children treated from July 1989 through March 1995 at the Institut Gustave Roussy. Results: Mean age was 38.4 months (range 3-103) with only 1 patient under 12 months, and M/F sex ratio 1. Initial primary was abdominal in 28 and pelvic in 1. Ten children had limited disease at presentation (stage II = 1, stage III = 9) while 19 had disseminated disease (stage IVs = 1, stage IV = 18). Nmyc expression was assessed in 17 of the latest patients and was found amplified in 13. Initial therapy consisted in induction chemotherapy (CAdO = CPM, ADM, VCR ; VP16 + CDDP or carboplatine) 4-8 cycles, followed by resection of the primary and regional lymphatic drainage. The patient with stage II had primary total tumor resection and no chemotherapy. One patient was inoperable for medical reason. Intensive chemotherapy with autologous or allogenous BMT was conducted in children with metastatic disease. HFRT was administered for gross residual disease in most patients (= 22) or microscopic disease with Nmyc amplification (= 7). Three patients were in local progression before initiation of radiotherapy. Target volume varied throughout the time (postoperative or preoperative tumor volume). Total dose was adapted to the children's age and extension of the disease and 30-35 Gy were generally delivered (range 20-40). Two daily fractions of 1 Gy (range 0.8, 1) with at least a 6 hours interval were delivered 5 days a week using 4.5 MV X-rays (28), 18 MV X-rays (= 1). Gastrointestinal toxicity was very limited and few children experienced mild thombopenia, all of whom had receive intensive chemotherapy before. With a median follow-up of 37 months (range 23-74), 15 children are alive of whom 13 in CR, and 2 with distant metastases. Eight patients (27,5%) failed loco-regionally : 4 (13,7%) in field, 3 marginally and 1 outside

  19. Recommendations: Introducing the quality system into the use of significant ionizing radiation sources in radiotherapy. TLD audit by mail within the quality system in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekendahl, D.; Valenta, J.; Horakova, I.

    2005-01-01

    The publication consists of the following sections: TLD measurement methodology (Description of the TLD system; Dose determination); TLD audit in radiotherapy: methodologies and evaluation of results (Checking the dose calculated by the planning system and beam quality control; Checking the calculated dose distribution using a versatile phantom; Checking the calculated doses for linear accelerators with multilammelar collimators; Evaluation and analysis of results; Organizing a performing audits by mail); and Annexes: Detailed guidelines and protocols for radiotherapy departments. (P.A.)

  20. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  1. Results of different modes conformal radiotherapy in treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovs'ka, L.M.; Yivankova, V.S.; Khrulenko, T.V.; Skomorokhova, T.V.; Gorelyina, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Development of techniques for cytotoxic treatment applying different modes of conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy and high-energy (high dose rate - HDR) is one of the promising areas of optimization and efficiency of conservative treatment of patients with regional forms of cervical cancer. At Radiation Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, 89 patients with stage 2b-3b cervical cancer, aged 29 to 70, underwent examination and combined radiotherapy course. The patients were divided into 2 main groups (56 patients) depending on the mode of developed conformal radiation therapy, and a control group made up by 33 patients (classic, default conformal radiotherapy). Results. Along with external beam radiotherapy, the patients of Group 2 were provided with conformal radiotherapy carried out by means of the linear accelerator of electrons in the mode of enhanced multi fractionation of irradiation dose applied to the small pelvis area (tumor and lymph efflux channels) with the single tumor dose 1.3 Gy twice per day once 4-6 hours up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy applied to the small pelvis lymph nodes. The patients of Group 1 and the ones of the control group underwent conformal radiotherapy in the mode of standard fractionation applied to the small pelvis area with the single tumor dose of 1.8 Gy up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy. Conformal radiotherapy was carried out for the patients of Group 1 associated with chemoradiomodifiers (tegafur, cisplatin). At the stage 2 of combined radiotherapy course, all patients underwent HDR brachytherapy via Co60 source in the mode of the single tumor dose of 5 Gy at point A up to the total radiation dose of 35-40 Gy. Therefore, employing accelerated mode of multifractiation in conformal radiotherapy of patients with regional cervical cancer makes it possible to enhance canrcinocidal irradiation doses applied to a tumor, and an interval between radiotherapy fractions provides conditions for initiation of

  2. What is the Radiotherapy Quality Program of the Instituto Nacional do Cancer - INCa?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Castelo Branco Viegas, C.; Salomon de Souza, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Quality Program (PQRT) of Cancer National Institute (INCA) has been functioning since 1999 as a pilot program with only 33 participant institutions. Due to the optimal obtained results the program becomes a part of the INCA National Programs and his activities were extended to all radiotherapy services which attend the Health Unique Systems (SUS), approximately 130 institutions corresponding to 90 percent of the radiotherapy services available in Brazil. The PQRT main objective is to make the radiotherapy to be evaluated as planned, in accordance with quality assurance international standards. The principal activities of the PQRT are: local evaluation, TLD postal evaluation under reference and non-reference conditions, and training and development of research projects. The Local Evaluation System has already evaluated 85 teletherapy equipment (38 Co-60 and 47 linear accelerators), executing dosimetric, electric, mechanic and safety tests. The TLD postal system used for the 33 participants until 2002 was the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for reference conditions. Five evaluations has already been performed with this simply system. Since 2003, the postal evaluation of the PQRT is using his own system, developed for reference and non-reference conditions, applied to 58 beams (18 Co-60 and 40 linear accelerators). The PQRT ras already performed 400 evaluations under reference conditions (190 Co-60 and 210 linear accelerators). 18 courses have been provided for the participants, covering his main practical problems. In addition, some studies and research has been performed

  3. A decade of investment in radiotherapy in New South Wales: why does the gap between optimal and actual persist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Michael B.; Delaney, Geoff P.

    2011-01-01

    There is a gap between optimal and actual radiotherapy utilization (RTU) rates in New South Wales (NSW). It is uncertain if this is because these investments have been insufficient to meet demand, or demand has been over-estimated. In this study we assess trends in infrastructure, staffing and productivity in NSW over the last 10 years. The NSW Radiotherapy Management Information System reports annually on activity including new patients, new courses, retreatments, attendances, radiotherapy fields and Area Health Service (AHS) of residence. Data are obtained from interstate radiotherapy departments that treat NSW residents. A census of equipment and staffing is reported. RTU was defined as the number of new cases in a year treated by radiotherapy divided by the number of new cases of cancer in that year. From 1999 to 2008, 115 941 NSW residents received at least one course of radiotherapy. During this time period there were 325 965 new diagnoses of cancer reported by the Central Cancer Registry. RTU was 38% in 1999 and in 2008. The number of linear accelerators increased from 34 to 42 between 1999 and 2008 but the number of accelerators per 1000 new cases of cancer remained static at 1.2. For AHSs, there was a significant relationship between more linear accelerators per 1000 patients and higher RTU (P = 0.0023). Radiotherapy utilization in NSW has remained at 38% for the period 1999 to 2008 because investment in new facilities only just kept pace with the increase in the number of new cases of cancer with an indication for radiotherapy. Some regional AHS have shown significant increases in RTU with new facilities.

  4. Towards real-time plan adaptation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontaxis, Charis

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid MRI and linear accelerator (MRI-linac) machines enables the online volumetric imaging during radiation delivery with the superior soft tissue contrast of the diagnostic quality MRI. In this context, conventional radiotherapy workflow will gradually transfer from an offline

  5. Kimura's Disease of the Orbit Successfully Treated with Radiotherapy Alone: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Monzen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We performed radiotherapy in a 28-year-old patient with Kimura's disease of the orbit. Irradiation with 21.6 Gy was administered to the tumor bed with a single dose of 1.8 Gy in 5 weekly fractions delivered via a high-energy linear accelerator (6-MV X-ray. Complete remission of the tumor and improvements in the neurological findings were achieved. Neither tumor regrowth nor late complications were detected up to 84 months after radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for Kimura's disease of the orbit.

  6. Development of a multivariable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for tube feeding dependence after curative radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wopken, Kim; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Laan, Hans Paul van der; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; René Leemans, C.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Curative radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) may result in severe acute and late side effects, including tube feeding dependence. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to develop a multivariable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for tube feeding dependence 6 months (TUBE M6 ) after definitive radiotherapy, radiotherapy plus cetuximab or concurrent chemoradiation based on pre-treatment and treatment characteristics. Materials and methods: The study included 355 patients with HNC. TUBE M6 was scored prospectively in a standard follow-up program. To design the prediction model, the penalized learning method LASSO was used, with TUBE M6 as the endpoint. Results: The prevalence of TUBE M6 was 10.7%. The multivariable model with the best performance consisted of the variables: advanced T-stage, moderate to severe weight loss at baseline, accelerated radiotherapy, chemoradiation, radiotherapy plus cetuximab, the mean dose to the superior and inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle, to the contralateral parotid gland and to the cricopharyngeal muscle. Conclusions: We developed a multivariable NTCP model for TUBE M6 to identify patients at risk for tube feeding dependence. The dosimetric variables can be used to optimize radiotherapy treatment planning aiming at prevention of tube feeding dependence and to estimate the benefit of new radiation technologies

  7. Stabilisation Evaluation of Medical Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    1996-01-01

    Medical linear accelerator are widely used for cancer treatment in radiotherapy. Radiation beam stability of accelerators, Megatron 20 and 12 were evaluated for a month with RMI daily constancy tool. Un stability less than 3 % for 7,10,12,15,18 MeV of electron beam and photon beam 15MV of Megatron 20 and photon beam 12MV of Megatron 12. Electron beam of 5 MeV of Megatron 20 should be set to get better salability, especially its radiofrequency

  8. Applications of Particle Accelerators in Medical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cuttone, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are often associated to high energy or nuclear physics. As well pointed out in literature [1] if we kindly analyse the number of installation worldwide we can easily note that about 50% is mainly devoted to medical applications (radiotherapy, medical radioisotopes production, biomedical research). Particle accelerators are also playing an important indirect role considering the improvement of the technical features of medical diagnostic. In fact the use of radionuclide f...

  9. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Intercomparison of quality control procedures in radiotherapy in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleffens, H.J. van; Meijer, G.J.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    A grant was received from the Dutch government to accomplish the development and implementation of guidelines for quality control (QC) of radiotherapy equipment in The Netherlands. QC of electron accelerators, simulators, CT scanners, mould room equipment, dosimetry equipment and treatment planning systems will be considered in this project. The project started in September 1994 with an investigation of QC of medical electron accelerators as performed in all 21 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands. An extensive questionnaire on QC procedures of electron accelerators was sent to all centres with items related to safety systems, mechanical aspects, radiation leakage, beam data and dosimetry equipment (in total about 60 questions). From the answers the following conclusions can be drawn: There is a large variation in time spent on QC; This QC time strongly depends on the complexity of the linear accelerator; There is a large variation in frequency and tolerance levels of the various tests; The way QC of an item is performed differs considerably (extensive-comprehensive). From these data recommendations specific for the situation in The Netherlands are being prepared and compared with other existing national and international reports. Similar procedures are underway for CT scanners and simulators while for the other equipment minimum guidelines still have to be developed. (author)

  11. Hadrons accelerators in the cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.; Silari, M.

    1998-01-01

    The use of hadrons accelerators ( protons and light ions) in the cancer therapy is tackled. After shorts introductory words about the medical reasons in favour of using charged heavy particles radiotherapy, an overall idea is given on the accelerators technology and on the guiding and focusing systems. The Italian project of hadron-therapy (the most important project of this kind in Europe) is introduced, with in reference the National Oncological Center of Hadron-therapy and the plans of two kinds of compact protons accelerators in order to introduce the therapy with protons in a great number of hospitals. Finally, the needs in radiation protection are discussed. (N.C.)

  12. Acute toxicity and cost analysis of a phase III randomized trial of accelerated and conventional radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the head and neck: a trans- tasman radiation oncology group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, M.; Williamson, S.; Tripcony, L.; Spry, N.; Peters, L.; Penniment, M.; Lamb, D.; Krawitz, H.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present analysis was to assess the feasibility and acute toxicity of a pure accelerated fractionation regimen in a cooperative group setting. This analysis included the first 320 patients entered on to the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) randomized controlled trial which compared accelerated radiotherapy (ART) with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in stage lIl and IV squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. Patients were randomized to either 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions over 24 days (ART) or to 70 Gy 35 fractions over 49 days (CRT) after being stratified for site and stage. Accrual began in 1991 and the trial was closed on 3 April 1998 with the targeted 350 patients. The 3-year survival for the whole group was 54%, and the 3-year disease-free survival was 41%. Toxicity data were available on 303 patients (148 ART; 155 CRT). Mucosal toxicity was worse in the accelerated grup, and it peaked ∼ 3 weeks earlier than the conventional grup. Skin toxicity was equivalent but occurred ∼ 7 days earlier in the accelerated grup. Acute effects in both grups healed completely. Hospitalization was more common in the ART grup (71 vs 52 patients; P=0.01) but the total bed days in hospital was not greatly different (1707 bed days for ART and 1607 bed days for CRT). Patients were more likely to require nasogastric (NG) feeding in the ART grup (49 vs 33 patients; P = 0.02). There were 1157 NG feeding days for ART and 1154 NG feeding days for CRT. The average cost of radiation treatment per patient including hospitalisation, NG feeding and accommodation was $11 750 in the ART grup and $11 587 in the CRT grup. The accelerated grup has been shown to be a tolerable, practical and cost-equivalent regimen. The assessment of the therapeutic ratio of this accelerated protocol (ART) will be determined when the analysis of late effects and loco-regional control is made when the data are more mature. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Cardiac dose sparing and avoidance techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Badiyan, Shahed; Berry, Sameer; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad; Schulte, Kevin; Nanavati, Anish; Lynch, Melanie; Vicini, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy represents an essential component in the overall management of both early stage and locally advanced breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors has increased, chronic sequelae of breast cancer radiotherapy become more important. While recently published data suggest a potential for an increase in cardiac events with radiotherapy, these studies do not consider the impact of newer radiotherapy techniques commonly utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate cardiac dose sparing techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy. Current options for cardiac protection/avoidance include (1) maneuvers that displace the heart from the field such as coordinating the breathing cycle or through prone patient positioning, (2) technological advances such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam therapy (PBT), and (3) techniques that treat a smaller volume around the lumpectomy cavity such as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). While these techniques have shown promise dosimetrically, limited data on late cardiac events exist due to the difficulties of long-term follow up. Future studies are required to validate the efficacy of cardiac dose sparing techniques and may use surrogates for cardiac events such as biomarkers or perfusion imaging

  14. Charged particle accelerators for practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of some accelerators operating in the world are given, capabilities of accelerator technique are demonstrated. Examples of wide application of accelerators in radiation-chemical technology as well as for defectoscopy of massive metal products and impurity ion implantation when producing semiconductor elements are presented. Works on nuclear filter production are characterized by high efficiency. Wide application of synchrotron radiation is described. Various accelerators can be applied during element analysis in geology, metallurgy, ecology. Application of accelerators ''in particular, cyclotrons for radioisotope production as well as in radiotherapy in medicine appears to be important. An isochronous cyclotron with controlled ion energy, at which applied works concerning a number of considered trends in the field of radiation physics and radiation physical metallurgy, element analysis, radiation resistance of electronic circuits and components are conducted, is in operation at the IYaPh of the Kazakh Academy of Sciences. Production of tallium-201 for cardiologic invstigations deserves a special attention. An electrostatic heavy ion accelerator which allows one to produce the beams of accelerated ions of elements from hydrogen to uranium is under commissioning

  15. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractionated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using a hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. Materials and Methods: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and sixth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was carried out 4-6 weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was given for an additional 4 monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. Results: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 27 months (range 8-68). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Grade III acute toxicity from chemoradiation included proctitis (5 patients), dermatitis (9), diarrhea (five), leukopenia (1), cardiac (1). Grade IV toxicities included one patient with diarrhea (on dose Level I) and one patient (on dose Level III) with cardiac toxicity (unrelated to radiation). Surgical resection consisted of abdominal perineal resection in 16 and low anterior resection

  16. Pregnancy and radiotherapy : management options for minimising risk, case series and comprehensive literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, S. A.; Christie, D. R. H.; Peres, M. H.; Kaminski, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This article reviews the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy in patients with cancer who are pregnant. Our review provided extended follow-up results in nine cases, presents a technical discussion on measures taken to minimise foetal radiation exposure and provides a comprehensive summary of the literature. Nine patients who received radiotherapy while pregnant are described. The clinical presentation and outcomes of these and 100 additional cases identified on a systematic literature review are presented. Comparisons of scattered radiation doses from three linear accelerators are presented. The average maternal follow-up in our series was 8.9 years with one patient having a recurrence of their astrocytoma. In terms of foetal outcome, there were one death in utero, one elective termination of pregnancy and one on which no data were available. Six children, on whom long-term follow-up (average 10.3 years) was obtainable, were in good health. Overall, there had been 109 cases of radiotherapy in pregnancy that met our search criteria with 13 adverse outcomes and a median follow-up of 37 months. Comparisons of three linear accelerators demonstrated significant differences in the amount of scattered radiation to the abdominal surface. In summary radiotherapy during pregnancy can be associated with a significant number of adverse outcomes. While it may be difficult for a patient not to attribute these effects to radiotherapy, it is also difficult to define the mechanisms by which radiotherapy would have caused them, if that were the case.

  17. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [' Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  18. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≤3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  19. Establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (photons): acceptance tests, dosimetry and quality control; Implantacao de um servico de radioterapia com acelerador linear (fotons): testes de aceitacao, dosimetria e controle de qualidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdaky, Mafalda Feliciano

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the operational part of the final process of the establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (6 MeV photon beams), including the acceptance tests, commissioning tests and the implementation of a quality control program through routine mechanical and radiation tests. All acceptance tests were satisfactory, showing results below the allowed limits of the manufacturer, the commissioning tests presented results within those of the international recommendations. The quality control program was performed during 34 months and showed an excellent stability of this accelerator. (author)

  20. Hyperfractionated radiation in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck: a comparison of two fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S; Morrison, William H; Ang, K Kian; Peters, Lester J

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: In 1984 we began treating patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx with hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Patients received 76.8 Gy in 1.2 Gy fractions twice daily, with a 4 h interfraction interval. In 1988, this schedule was modified in patients treated with shrinking field techniques. The dose per fraction was slightly reduced (while not changing the total dose), and the interfraction interval was increased to 6 h. The goal was to decrease toxicity while maintaining satisfactory local-regional control. This retrospective study analyzes the results of this schedule modification. Methods and Materials: Two hundred thirty-six patients were included in the analysis. Distribution of patients by primary site and T stage was as follows: supraglottic larynx, 120 patients; hypopharynx, 70; true vocal cord, 24; and oropharynx, 22; T1, 5 patients; T2, 118; T3, 93; T4, 19; and Tx, 1. Ninety-nine patients presented with cervical nodal disease. Seventy-eight patients (group A), including 16 treated with induction chemotherapy, were treated throughout with 1.2 Gy fractions twice daily and a 4-h interfraction interval. Subsequently, 158 patients (group B), 57 of whom received chemotherapy, received 1.1 Gy fractions to 55 Gy, and then 1.2 Gy fractions to their boost volumes to 76.6 Gy. The interfraction interval was 6 h. Median follow-up was 91 and 35 months for group A and B, respectively. Results: Two-year actuarial survival, local control, and ultimate local rates were 70%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Differences between survival rates for group A and group B were not statistically significant, with 2-year rates of 66% and 72%, respectively. Overall local control rates at 2 years were 77% and 74%, respectively, for groups A and B (p = 0.22). However, there was a trend toward inferior results in group B patients with T3 disease (67% at 2 years compared to 76% in group A, p = 0.13). Confluent mucositis and persistent mucositis developed in 52

  1. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy plus cetuximab plus cisplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Final 5-year results of a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Department of Imaging and Radiation Medicine, Clinic of Radiooncology, Leipzig (Germany); Schreiber, Andreas [Private Praxis for Radio Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Pirnasch, Anett [University of Rostock, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Hautmann, Matthias G. [University of Regensburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Hass, Peter [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Magdeburg (Germany); Sieker, Frank P. [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiotherapy, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Marburg (Germany); Richter, Michael [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials Halle, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Juergen [University of Kiel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Cetuximab (CET) is a potent inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor and has been shown to have activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We conducted a single-arm phase II trial of a combination therapy comprising cisplatin (CIS), CET and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART). Patients with UICC stage III or IVA/B, M0 SCCHN were enrolled and treated with an initial dose of CET (400 mg/m{sup 2}) and then with a weekly dosage of 250 mg/m{sup 2} during HART. HART was started with a prescribed dosage of 2.0 Gy per day for 3 weeks, followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 70.6 Gy to the gross tumour volume. CIS (40 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered weekly (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36). The primary objective of the phase II study was to determine the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). Between November 2007 and November 2010, a total of 74 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 65 were evaluable (83% were men). Median age was 56 years (range 37-69 years). An Oropharyngeal primary tumour was diagnosed in 49%, T4a,b in 65% and N2/3 in 96% of the patients. Of these patients, 85% were smokers or ex-smokers. Complete remission (CR) was observed in 23 patients (35%). The most common toxicity grade was ≥3, including mucositis (58%) and dysphagia (52%). The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 64 and 41%, the 2- and 5-year PFS rates were 45 and 32%, and the 2- and 5-year locoregional control rates were 47 and 33%, respectively. The combination of weekly CIS with HART plus CET is a feasible regimen for these unfavourable smoking-induced cancers. However, the parallel US study (RTOG 0522) showed no advantage of the enhanced triple therapy compared to chemoradiotherapy alone. (orig.) [German] Cetuximab (CET) ist ein potenter Inhibitor des epidermalen Wachstumsfaktor-Rezeptors, der schon bei Plattenepithelkarzinomen des Kopf-Hals-Bereichs (SCCHN) Wirkung gezeigt hat. Wir fuehrten eine prospektive, einarmige Phase

  2. Saliva in relation to dental erosion before and after radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensdottir, Thorbjorg; von Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Low saliva flow and abnormal saliva composition are common conditions after radiotherapy for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer. Both conditions increase the susceptibility to dental caries and erosion, which may be further accelerated by changes in food preferences. The aim...... of this study was to determine changes in saliva flow and susceptibility to erosive challenges in pharyngeal cancer patients before and after radiotherapy to the head and neck. Materials and methods: The erosive potential of sucking acidic candies with and without calcium was determined in nine patients (50...

  3. Basis of medical accelerator. Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu

    2014-01-01

    On the synchrotron as a medical accelerator, this paper introduces the basic principle, basic techniques and the like. The accelerator, when synchrotron is adopted as an ion beam radiotherapy system, is the composite accelerator composed of ion sources, injector, and synchrotron. This paper introduces the overall structure of synchrotron, and conceptually explains the basic behavior of high-frequency waves and magnetic field of synchrotron, as well as the deflection electromagnet of medical synchrotron and the operation pattern of high-frequency acceleration system. The types of synchrotron can be classified to the function combination type and function separation type, and this paper introduces the features of each type and various types of synchrotrons. It also explains beam dynamics important for ensuring the stability of beams, with a focus on the coordinate system, vertical movement, and lateral movement. In addition, it explains the incidence and outgoing of beams that are important for properly operating the accelerator, with a focus on their techniques. (A.O.)

  4. P53 function influences the effect of fractionated radiotherapy on glioblastoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Kogan, Scott S.; Yount, Garret; Hsu, Jennie; Haas, Martin; Deen, Dennis F.; Israel, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme brain tumors (GM) are treated with a spectrum of fractionation regimens based on the clinical and anatomical characteristics of the tumor but rarely based on the molecular characteristics of the individual neoplasm. This study tests the hypothesis that the response of cell lines derived from GM to fractionated radiotherapy depends on the function of wild-type p53 (wt p53), a tumor suppressor gene frequently mutated in GM tumors. Methods and Materials: Isogenic derivatives of glioblastoma cells differing only in p53 function were prepared using a retroviral vector expressing a dominant negative mutant of p53 (mt p53). Radiation survival in vitro was quantitated using linear quadratic and repair-saturation mathematical models. Apoptosis was assayed by a terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-labeling technique and chromatin morphology. Results: We have previously reported the generation of isogenic GM cell lines differing only in p53 function. U87-175.4, lacking wt p53 function, had a significantly lower α/β value than U87-LUX.8, expressing functional wt p53, leading us to hypothesize that fractionated irradiation would preferentially spare GM cells harboring mt p53 compared with those expressing functional, wt p53. Survival curves following either 2.0 Gy or 3.5 Gy/fraction demonstrated that lack of functional wt p53 was associated with resistance to fractionated irradiation. Radiation-induced apoptosis could not account for the observed differences in clonogenic survival. Rather, our data suggested that a deficit in the G1-checkpoint contributed to increased resistance to fractionated irradiation of cells expressing mutant p53. Conclusions: The effect of fractionated radiotherapy in GM may depend on the function of the tumor suppressor gene p53. A potential clinical consequence of these findings is that hyperfractionation regimens may provide a therapeutic advantage specifically for tumors expressing wt p53 whereas a radiotherapy

  5. Influence of low-dose daily cisplatin on the distant metastasis-free survival of patients with locally advanced nonmetastatic head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Milicic, Biljana

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the impact of low dose daily cisplatin on distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 70 fractions in 35 treatment days). In locally controlled tumors cisplatin led to better DMFS (p = 0.0272); Cisplatin may have acted independently of micrometastasis in locally advanced H and N cancer

  6. Quality assurance procedures in radiotherapy - IEC specifications for equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassow, J; Klieber, E

    1986-08-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) worked out international standards for requirements and tests of electrical, mechanical and radiation safety as well as for definition and tests of functional performance characteristics of radiotherapy equipments (medical electron accelerators, gamma beam teletherapy and afterloading equipments, simulators and accessories) and for clinical dosimeters and terminology for medical radiology. A survey is given on the actual state of standardization projects. The problems of such standards are shown for the standard for functional performance characteristics of medical electron accelerators as example.

  7. Quality assurance procedures in radiotherapy - IEC specifications for equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.; Klieber, E.

    1986-01-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) worked out international standards for requirements and tests of electrical, mechanical and radiation safety as well as for definition and tests of functional performance characteristics of radiotherapy equipments (medical electron accelerators, gamma beam teletherapy and afterloading equipments, simulators and accessories) and for clinical dosimeters and terminology for medical radiology. A survey is given on the actual state of standardization projects. The problems of such standards are shown for the standard for functional performance characteristics of medical electron accelerators as example. (orig.) [de

  8. Development of electron linear accelerators in SAMEER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2015-01-01

    LINear Accelerator (LINAC) based Radiotherapy machine is a key tool for Cancer Treatment. The number of such linac machines available is far less than the actual requirement projected, to suffice the needs of the vast number of Cancer Patients in the country. Development of indigenous state-of-art cancer therapy machine was therefore a crucial achievement under the Jai Vigyan Project of Govt. of India. With the support of Department of Electronics and Information Technology (DeitY), Govt of India, SAMEER has successfully developed 6 MV Radiation Oncology machine at par international standards and is being used to treat cancer patients in the country. SAMEER is also currently developing the dual photon energy and multiple electron energy medical linac machine for radiotherapy and also critical accessories to make a complete oncology system required for advanced state of art treatment. In this paper the work in SAMEER on electron linear accelerators for the medical applications and the related technology and facilities available will be presented. (author)

  9. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Viegas, C.C.B.; Viamonte, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  10. Inclusion of molecular biotherapies with radical radiotherapy: modeling of combined modality treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bleddyn; Dale, Roger G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The use of molecular biology based therapies concurrently with radical radiotherapy is likely to offer potential benefits, but there is relatively little use of classical radiobiology in the rationale for such applications. The biological mechanisms that govern the outcomes of radiotherapy need to be completely understood before rational application and optimization of such adjuvant biotherapies with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Existing biomathematical models of radiotherapy can be used to explore the possible impact of biotherapies that modify tumor proliferation rates and/or radiosensitivity parameters during radiotherapy. Equations that show how to incorporate biotherapies with the linear-quadratic model of radiation cell kill are presented. Also considered are changes in tumor physiology, such as improved blood flow with enhanced delivery of biotherapy to the tumor cells and accelerated clonogen repopulation during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo random sampling methods are used to simulate these effects in heterogenous tumor populations with variation in radiosensitivities, clonogen numbers, and doubling times, as well as variations in repopulation onset rates and in vascular perfusion rates with time. Results: The time onset and duration of exposure of each type of biotherapy during radical radiotherapy can influence the predicted tumor cure probabilities in subtle ways. In general, the efficacy of biotherapies that radiosensitize will depend upon the number of radiotherapy fractions that are sensitized and the change in blood flow with time during radiotherapy. Biotherapies that control repopulation will depend not only on the duration of exposure but also, where accelerated repopulation occurs, on the time at which biotherapy is initiated during radiotherapy. From the ranges of radiobiological parameters and biotherapy efficacies assumed for exploratory examples, large changes of tumor control probability (TCP) are encountered in individual

  11. Properties of the proton therapy. A high precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The proton therapy is a radiotherapy using protons beams. The protons present interesting characteristics but they need heavy technologies to be used, such particles accelerators, radiation protection wall and sophisticated technologies to reach the high precision allowed by their ballistic qualities (planning of treatment, beam conformation and patient positioning). (N.C.)

  12. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2012-02-01

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 1010 pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV/u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 108 or 109 pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of accelerators are under

  13. Quantitative analysis of results for quality assurance in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passaro, Bruno Martins

    2011-01-01

    The linear accelerators represent the most important, practical and versatile source of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. These functional characteristics influence the geometric and dosimetric accuracy of therapeutic doses applied to patients. The performance of this equipment may vary due to electronic defects, component failures or mechanical breakdowns, or may vary due to the deterioration and aging of components. Maintaining the quality of care depends on the stability of the accelerators and quality control of the institutions to monitor deviations in the parameters of the beam. The aim of this study is to assess and analyze the stability of the calibration factor of linear accelerators, as well as the other dosimetric parameters normally included in a program of quality control in radiotherapy. The average calibration factors of the accelerators for the period of approximately four years for the Clinac 600C and Clinac 6EX were (0,998 ± 0,012) and (0,996 ± 0,014), respectively. For the Clinac 2100CD 6 MV and 15 MV was (1,008 ± 0,009) and (1,006 ± 0,010), respectively, in a period of approximately four years. Statistical analysis of the three linear accelerators was found that the coefficient of variation of calibration factors had values below 2% which shows a consistency in the data. By calculating the normal distribution of calibration factors, we found that for the Clinac 600C and Clinac 2100CD, is an expected probability that more than 90% of cases the values are within acceptable limits according to the TG-142, while for the Clinac 6EX is expected around 85% since this had several exchanges of accelerator components. The values of TPR 20,10 of three accelerators are practically constant and within acceptable limits according to the TG-142. It can be concluded that a detailed study of data from the calibration factor of the accelerators and TPR20,10 from a quantitative point of view, is extremely useful in a quality assurance program. (author)

  14. Conformation radiotherapy with eccentric multi-leaves, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Yasunori; Sakuma, Sadayuki.

    1986-01-01

    In order to extend the application of the conformation radiotherapy, the eccentric multi-leaves are equipped with the linear accelerator. The information of the position of the collimators and the dose distribution of the eccentric conformation radiotherapy are calculated by the improved algorism of the treatment planning system. In simple cases, the dose distributions for the distant region from the rotational center are measured and compared with the calculated values. Both distributions are well coincided with the error of about 5 % in the high dose region and 10 % in the low dose region. In eccentric conformation radiotherapy, it is difficult to deliver the planned dose to the lesion. The dose increases with the distance of the target area from the rotational center. And the measured value and the calculated value are well coincided with 1 % error. So after getting the dose ratio of the rotational center to the target area, the calculated dose can be delivered to the rotational center. The advantages of the eccentric conformation radiotherapy are a good coincidence of target area and treated area, a partial shielding and a hollow out technique without absorber. The limitation of the movement of the collimator from center is 5 cm at 1 m SCD. (author)

  15. The physics of radiotherapy X-rays and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, Peter; Hoban, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays and Electrons is an updated successor to The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays from Linear Accelerators published in 1997. This new volume includes a significant amount of new material, including new chapters on electrons in radiotherapy and IMRT, IGRT, and tomotherapy, which have become key developments in radiation therapy. Also updated from the earlier edition are the physics beam modeling chapters, including Monte Carlo methods, adding those mysterious electrons, as well as discourse on radiobiological modeling including TCP, NTCP, and EUD and the impact of these concepts on plan analysis and inverse planning. This book is intended as a standard reference text for postgraduate radiation oncology medical physics students. It will also be of interest to radiation oncology registrars and residents, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists. The new text contains review questions at the end of each chapter and full bibliographic entries. Fully indexed. Selected questions and ans...

  16. Potentials of radiotherapy in inoperable tumours of the central nervous system in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocsis, Bela; Horvath, Akos; Varjas, Geza; Bajcsay, Andras; Kaldau, Ferenc; Pap, Lilla

    1990-01-01

    16 patients under 16 years were irradiated because of inoperable tumours in the central nervous system. Irradiations were performed by cobalt-60 facility and by a Neptun 10-p linear accelerator, and the results were evaluated. In these cases radiotherapy has an important role as it is the only definitive therapeutical intervention. Radiotherapy should be attempted even if the histological verification is impossible and only the clinical course referres to malignant process. Radiotherapy must be carried out on the basis of CT scan controlled irradiation plan. The 3-year survival rate was 14 per cent in the authors' material. (author) 16 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  18. A randomised trial of accelerated and conventional radiotherapy for stage III and IV squamous carcinoma of the head and neck: a Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael G.; Denham, James W.; Peters, Lester J.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Hindley, Andrew; Krawitz, Hedley; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Walker, Quenten

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this randomized controlled trial were to determine whether there were differences in the disease-free survival (DFS) and toxicity between conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and a continuous 3 week accelerated radiotherapy regimen (ART) in stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. Patients and methods: Patients from 14 centres throughout Australia and New Zealand were randomly assigned to either CRT, using a single 2 Gy/day to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 49 days or to ART, using 1.8 Gy twice a day to a dose of 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions in 24 days. Treatment allocation was stratified for site and stage. The accrual began in 1991 and the trial was closed in 1998 when the target of 350 patients was reached. Results: The median potential follow-up time was 53 months (range, 14-101). The DFS at 5 years was 41% (95% CI, 33-50%) for ART and 35% (95% CI, 27-43%) for CRT (P=0.323) and the hazard ratio was 0.87 in favour of ART (95% CI, 0.66-1.15). The 5-year disease-specific survival rates were 40% for CRT and 46% for ART (P=0.398) and the loco-regional control was 47% for CRT vs. 52% for ART (P=0.300). The respective hazard ratios were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.65-1.2) and 0.85 (0.62-1.16), favouring the accelerated arm. In the ART arm, confluent mucositis was more severe (94 vs. 71%; P<0.001) and peaked about 3 weeks earlier than in the CRT arm, but healing appeared complete in all cases. There were statistically significant reductions in the probability of grade 2 or greater late soft tissue effects over time in the ART arm (P<0.05), except for the mucous membrane where late effects were similar in both arms. Conclusions: Differences in DFS, disease-specific survival and loco-regional control have not been demonstrated. ART resulted in more acute mucosal toxicity, but this did not result in greater prolongation of the treatment time compared with the CRT arm. There were less late effects in the ART arm

  19. Recent advances in radiotherapy: Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwinska, A.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) after conservative surgery has increased over the past decade as a result of many factors, including clinical and pathological data questioning the efficacy of whole breast irradiation in highly selected patients, as well as factors related to patient's convenience. High dose rate and low dose rate brachytherapy, brachytherapy MammoSite, Electron Intraoperative Therapy - ELIOT and Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy - TARGIT are the subject of investigation. The tolerability and efficacy of the treatment are of special interest. In this review article, methods of accelerated PBI, eligibility criteria, techniques of radiotherapy, early results and side effects are reviewed. (author)

  20. New algorithm for risk analysis in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Antonio; Montes de Oca, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Risk analyses applied to radiotherapy treatments have become an undeniable necessity, considering the dangers generated by the combination of using powerful radiation fields on patients and the occurrence of human errors and equipment failures during these treatments. The technique par excellence to execute these analyses has been the risk matrix. This paper presents the development of a new algorithm to execute the task with wide graphic and analytic potentialities, thus transforming it into a very useful option for risk monitoring and the optimization of quality assurance. The system SECURE- MR, which is the basic software of this algorithm, has been successfully used in risk analysis regarding different kinds of radiotherapies. Compared to previous methods, It offers new possibilities of analysis considering risk controlling factors as the robustness of reducers of initiators frequency and its consequences. Their analytic capacities and graphs allow novel developments to classify risk contributing factors, to represent information processes as well as accidental sequences. The paper shows the application of the proposed system to a generic process of radiotherapy treatment using a lineal accelerator. (author)

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous modulated accelerated boost technique and chemotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareed, Muhammad M; AlAmro, Abdullah S; Bayoumi, Yasser; Tunio, Mutahir A; Ismail, Abdul S; Akasha, Rashad; Mubasher, Mohamed; Al Asiri, Mushabbab

    2013-01-01

    To present our experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty eight patients of NPC were treated between April 2006 and December 2011 including 45 males and 23 females with mean age of 46 (range 15–78). Stage distribution was; stage I 3, stage II 7, stage III 26 and stage IV 32. Among 45 (66.2%) evaluated patients for presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 40 (88.8%) were positive for EBV. Median radiation doses delivered to gross tumor volume (GTV) and positive neck nodes were 66–70 Gy, 63 Gy to clinical target volume (CTV) and 50.4 Gy to clinically negative neck. In addition 56 (82.4%) patients with bulky tumors (T4/N2+) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy 2–3 cycles (Cisplatin/Docetaxel or Cisplatin/Epirubicin or Cisplatin/5 Flourouracil). Concurrent chemotherapy with radiation was weekly Cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 (40 patients) or Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (28 patients). With a median follow up of 20 months (range 3–43), one patient developed local recurrence, two experienced regional recurrences and distant failure was seen in 3 patients. Estimated 3 year disease free survival (DFS) was 94%. Three year DFS for patients with EBV was 100% as compared to 60% without EBV (p = 0.0009). Three year DFS for patients with undifferentiated histology was 98% as compared to 82% with other histologies (p = 0.02). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen as 21 (30.9%) having G-III mucositis and 6 (8.8%) with G-III skin reactions. Late toxicity was minimal and loss of taste was seen in 3 patients (7.5%) at time of analysis. IMRT with SMART in combination with chemotherapy is feasible and effective in terms of both the clinical response and safety profile. EBV, histopathology and nodal involvement were found important prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence

  2. Improvement of Radiation Safety in Radiotherapy Facilities: Catering for Neutrons Outside Short Mazes in 10MV Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that neutron leakage cannot be neglected at 10MV when direct access doors are used or when short mazes, typically less than 7 metres in length, are employed. The majority of radiotherapy facilities in Africa have Co-60 machines installed that are now being replaced by linear accelerators. The in-coming linear accelerators are being installed in the same bunkers that were designed for Co-60 energy ranges albeit with some shielding modifications. The modifications do not alter the length of the maze and where the maze length is less than 7 metres, neutron leakage will occur in 10MV linear accelerators. There is lack of capacity within the regulatory bodies in Africa to handle this changeover from a technical and equipment perspective. The justification of medical exposures ensures that the benefits to the patients substantially outweigh any risks that the patient may incur. As such, the justification process needs to be implemented through the effective use of evidence-based referral guidelines and clinical audits. In the case of most African countries, medical diagnostic exposures of patients are not underpinned by an effective justification system. This, coupled with the scenario where physicians own outpatient diagnostic centres to which they refer patients (self-referral) increases the conflict of physicians due to dual roles as professionals and businessmen, further compromising on patient protection. Nuclear security is the responsibility of the Member State and requires that a number of key stakeholders work closely together. In the case of research reactors and nuclear power plants, this cooperation is evident and functional. However, this does not extend to the use of high-activity radioactive sources in medicine (category 1&2) where in most cases the regulators seem to be the only authority having oversight on the security of these sources without the benefit of direct input and collaboration of other key security stakeholders. This

  3. Effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and borderline prognostic factors without distant metastasis: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Linh N.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; Schea, Randi A.; Milas, Luka

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and good prognostic factors (e.g., weight loss [WL] ≤5% and Karnofsky performance status [KPS] ≥70) is induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy to the primary site at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a total dose of 60-63 Gy to the target volume. Patients with poor prognostic factors usually receive radiotherapy alone, but the fractionation schedule and total dose have not been standardized. To attempt to optimize irradiation doses and schedule, we compared the effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy (ACRT) alone to 45 Gy at 3 Gy per fraction with standard radiation therapy (STRT) of 60-66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in regard to tumor response, local control, distant metastasis, toxicity, and survival. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients treated with radiation for NSCLC at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1994 were identified. All 55 patients had node-positive, and no distant metastasis (N+, M0) of NSCLC. Two cohorts were identified. One cohort (26 patients) had borderline poor prognostic factors (KPS less than 70 but higher than 50, and/or WL of more than 5%) and was treated with radiotherapy alone to 45 Gy over 3 weeks at 3 Gy/fraction (ACRT). The second cohort (29 patients) had significantly better prognostic factors (KPS ≥70 and WL ≤5%) and was treated to 60-66 Gy over 6 to 6((1)/(2)) weeks at 2 Gy per fraction (STRT) during the same period. Results: In the first cohort treated by ACRT, the distribution of patients by AJCC stage was IIB 8%, IIIA 19%, and IIIB 73%. Sixty-two percent had KPS 5%. The maximum response rate as determined by chest X-ray was 60% among 45 of 55 patients who were evaluable for response: combined complete responses (20%) and partial responses (40%). Overall survival in these patients was 13% at 2 and 5 years, with a locoregional control rate of 42% and a

  4. Result of Radiotherapy for Esophagus Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Taesig; Moon, Changwoo; Yum, Hayong; Yang, Chilyong

    1988-01-01

    Among 165 patients of esophagus cancer treated by either radiation alone or postoperative radiation, median survival period was 6.6 months, 16% 3 years and 8% 5 years crude survival in biphasic plotting of survival curve semilogarithmically all nonresponder died within one year regardless of treatments and in responder each 1, 2, 3 years survival rate was 80%, 70%, 60% in the group of postoperative radiation among 20 patients (54% of 37 patients) respectively and 62%, 38%, 23% each in the group of radiation alone among 61 patients (48% of 128 patients) respectively, better survival rate of postoperative radiation vs radiation alone in 3 year (P<0.01). The most common cause of death was dysphagia 55%, and majority of patients died by failure to control the disease locally 62%, 88% of stricture were associated with persistenece of cancer in esophagus. 50% of patients was found to have locoregional metastatic nodes. Preoperative diagnostic failure rate was for metastatic locoregional nodes was 54%, for grossly metastatic nodes 29.7%, for blood borne organ metastasis 13.5%, and for local extent of the disease 14%. The residual cancer at surgical margin on positive node was not effectively killed by either 5000 to 5500 cGy conventional radiation or 5290 to 5750 cGy with 115 cGy fraction in 2 times daily; hyperfractionated radiation. However hyperfractionation schedule decreased the both acute and late complications in this study

  5. Success Stories in Radiotherapy Development Projects: Radiotherapy Service in Mauritania. Chapter 28.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, E.; Zubizarreta, E.; Djeutie, A.; Meghzifene, A.; Mohamedou, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Mauritania, a country of 3.4 million people, did not have any radiotherapy facility until 2009. As is usually the case in countries without radiotherapy services, cancer patients with a need for this treatment travelled to neighbouring countries (Morocco or Tunisia) or to Europe to receive it, or switched to alternative forms of care. Cancer is a rising cause of death in Mauritania. According to WHO estimates, about 2200 people died of cancer in 2011, of whom 1400 were aged below 70 years of age. The number of patients sent abroad for treatment by the National Health Insurance Fund rose to 500 patients in 2007, causing a significant drain on the State budget. Cancer was the main cause of health related travel abroad. The average cost of such travel was two million ouguiya per patient (US $8000). Through a technical cooperation project initiated in 2009 between the Mauritanian Government and the IAEA, the latter assisted the country with the establishment and operation of its first radiotherapy facility. The National Oncology Centre, including a radiotherapy department, was built in Nouakchott in 2010 and began operation in early 2011 with a limited staff, all hired from abroad. Its equipment includes a modern medical linac with a multileaf collimator and portal imaging, a CT simulator, a 3-D CRT TPS and a remote afterloading HDR brachytherapy system. The centre was planned with an additional bunker, where a second accelerator can be installed in the future. Except for the training of the Department Head, the entire professional team has been trained through the IAEA’s technical cooperation fellowship programme. The centre treated a total of 250 patients in 2012 and treated 176 in the first half of 2013. Most patients undergo simulation and computerized radiotherapy treatment planning. The centre ensures the sustainability of the equipment through full maintenance contracts for the major radiation equipment and source replacements for the HDR brachytherapy unit.

  6. Poster — Thur Eve — 28: Enabling trajectory-based radiotherapy on a TrueBeam accelerator with the Eclipse treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, J; Asiev, K; DeBlois, F; Morcos, M; Seuntjens, J; Syme, A

    2014-01-01

    The TrueBeam linear accelerator platform has a developer's mode which permits the user dynamic control over many of the machine's mechanical and radiation systems. Using this research tool, synchronous couch and gantry motion can be programmed to simulate isocentric treatment with a shortened SAD, with benefits such as smaller projected MLC leaf widths and an increased dose rate. In this work, water tank measurements were used to commission a virtual linear accelerator with an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, from which several arc-based radiotherapy treatments were generated, including an inverse optimized VMAT delivery. For each plan, the pertinent treatment delivery information was extracted from control points specified in the Eclipse-exported DICOM files using the pydicom package in Python, allowing construction of an XML control file. The dimensions of the jaws and MLC positions, defined for an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, were scaled for delivery on a conventional SAD linear accelerator, and translational couch motion was added as a function of gantry angle to simulate delivery at 85 cm SAD. Ionization chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were used to compare the radiation delivery to dose calculations in Eclipse. With the exception of the VMAT delivery, ionization chamber measurements agreed within 3.3% of the Eclipse calculations. For the VMAT delivery, the ionization chamber was located in an inhomogeneous region, but gamma evaluation of the Gafchromic film plane resulted in a 94.5% passing rate using criteria of 3 mm/3%. The results indicate that Eclipse calculation infrastructure can be used

  7. Applications of Particle Accelerators in Medical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cuttone, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are often associated to high energy or nuclear physics. As well pointed out in literature [1] if we kindly analyse the number of installation worldwide we can easily note that about 50% is mainly devoted to medical applications (radiotherapy, medical radioisotopes production, biomedical research). Particle accelerators are also playing an important indirect role considering the improvement of the technical features of medical diagnostic. In fact the use of radionuclide for advanced medical imaging is strongly increasing either in conventional radiography (CT and MRI) and also in nuclear medicine for Spect an PET imaging. In this paper role of particle accelerators for medical applications will be presented together with the main solutions applied.

  8. Average accelerator simulation Truebeam using phase space in IAEA format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Emico Ferreira; Milian, Felix Mas; Paixao, Paulo Oliveira; Costa, Raranna Alves da; Velasco, Fermin Garcia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper is used a computational code of radiation transport simulation based on Monte Carlo technique, in order to model a linear accelerator of treatment by Radiotherapy. This work is the initial step of future proposals which aim to study several treatment of patient by Radiotherapy, employing computational modeling in cooperation with the institutions UESC, IPEN, UFRJ e COI. The Chosen simulation code is GATE/Geant4. The average accelerator is TrueBeam of Varian Company. The geometric modeling was based in technical manuals, and radiation sources on the phase space for photons, provided by manufacturer in the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) format. The simulations were carried out in equal conditions to experimental measurements. Were studied photons beams of 6MV, with 10 per 10 cm of field, focusing on a water phantom. For validation were compared dose curves in depth, lateral profiles in different depths of the simulated results and experimental data. The final modeling of this accelerator will be used in future works involving treatments and real patients. (author)

  9. An assessment of effective dose to staff in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, D.J.; Nicholson, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation safety in external beam radiotherapy is governed by national legislation. Annual doses recorded by radiographers and others associated with external beam radiotherapy are typically much lower than the relevant dose limit. However, it is possible that larger doses might be received as a result of an accidental irradiation. In the event of a significant exposure resulting in a dose at or near a relevant dose limit, an accurate conversion has to be made from the dose meter reading to the limiting quantity. A method was devised to demonstrate ratios of effective dose to personal dose equivalent which might be anticipated in the even of an individual other than the patient being irradiated within a radiotherapy treatment room consisting of a linear accelerator. The variation of ratios obtained under different conditions is discussed. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  11. Comparative evaluation of multiple fractions per day radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrabi, W.H.; Akhtar, S.; Kharadi, M.Y.; Mushtaq, G.; Zargar, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Dose fractionated is important in radiotherapy in order to achieve the desired results. There are regimes which are accepted and followed worldwide. Five fractions per week for a full course of treatment is regarded as standard fractionation regimen. Interest has lately been developed to alter this and try regimes like hyper and accelerated fractionations. In the former, smaller doses per fraction than usual are given in several fractions on each treating day, with no change in overall time. In the latter, conventionally sized fractions are given as two or three per day with a shortening of overall time. As the dose fraction in our case is high, we spilt the full course of treatment introducing a gap of one week between the treatment schedules. The results obtained are fairly good in comparison with conventional radiotherapy regimes. (author)

  12. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, O.; Fenoglietto, P.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique allowing dose escalation and normal tissue sparing for various cancer types. For breast cancer, the main goals when using IMRT were to improve dose homogeneity within the breast and to enhance coverage of complex target volumes. Nonetheless, better heart and lung protections are achievable with IMRT as compared to standard irradiation for difficult cases. Three prospective randomized controlled trials of IMRT versus standard treatment showed that a better breast homogeneity can translate into better overall cosmetic results. Dosimetric and clinical studies seem to indicate a benefit of IMRT for lymph nodes irradiation, bilateral treatment, left breast and chest wall radiotherapy, or accelerated partial breast irradiation. The multiple technical IMRT solutions available tend to indicate a widespread use for breast irradiation. Nevertheless, indications for breast IMRT should be personalized and selected according to the expected benefit for each individual. (authors)

  13. Determination of the neutron spectra in the treatment room of a linear accelerator for radiotherapy; Determinacion de los espectros de neutrones en la sala de tratamiento de un acelerador lineal para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cuerpo Academico de Radiobiologia, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid (Spain); Mendez, R.; Iniguez, M.P. [Depto. de Fisica Teorica, Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    By means of a series of measures and Monte Carlo calculations the dosimetric characteristics of the photoneutrons have been determined that take place in volume to a linear accelerator of radiotherapy of 18 MV, LINAC, mark Siemens Mevatron model. The measures were carried out with thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD 600 and TLD 700 that were naked exposed and confined with cover of Cd and Sn, inside a sphere of paraffin and inside spheres Bonner. (Author)

  14. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-01-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3 He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in 'nested'-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3 He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment

  15. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M. N.; Hamm, R. W.; Adler, R. J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-12-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery — with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use and innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data is also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in "nested"-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  16. Analysis of quality control protocol implementation of equipment in radiotherapy services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcina, Carmen S. Guzman; Lima, Luciana P. de; Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Ferraz, Eduardo; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2000-01-01

    Considering the importance of the Quality Assurance in the radiotherapy services, there was an interest to make tests' evaluation for a Quality Control for the cobalt equipment, linear accelerator and simulator as a classification and comparison. The work proposed is a suggestion that can serve as tool for medical physicists that are starting to work in the radiotherapy area and for the most experts. The discussions were made by the gathering of local tests and official protocols, resulting in a minimum protocol as a suggestion for a routine work, emphasizing the periodicity and level of tolerance of each one of the tests. (author)

  17. Workshop on the accelerator for particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, M.; Ujeno, Y.

    1991-02-01

    A two-day workshop on the accelerator for particle therapy was held on August 22-23, 1990, with the aim of mutual understanding of medical accelerators among investigators. The state-of-the-art facilities in Japan and medical proton accelerators in Japan and other countries were introduced. This is a compilation of papers presented at the workshop: (1) particle radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS); (2) proton therapy; (3) treatment planning, especially for photon and electron therapies; (4) heavy ion synchrotron project at the NIRS; (5) medical proton accelerator project of Tsukuba University and recent status of Loma Linda University Medical Center Proton Beam Facility; (6) inspection report on the Loma Linda University Medical Center Proton Beam Facility; (7) accelerator project of Kyoto University; (8) actual conditions of the 7 MeV proton linear accelerator; (9) design study of superconducting compact cyclotron prototype model; (10) medical superconducting prototype cyclotron; (11) RCNP cyclotron cascade project; (12) beam extraction from synchrotron; (13) radiation safety design in high energy particle accelerator facilities. (N.K.)

  18. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O'Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-05-02

    Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct radiotherapy costs for long- (assumed at 45-50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over a 5 week period) and short-courses (assumed at 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions over a one week period). Following interviews and on-site visits to radiotherapy departments in two designated cancer centers, a radiotherapy care pathway for a typical rectal cancer patient was developed. Total direct costs were derived by applying fixed and variable unit costs to resource use within each care phase. Costs included labor, capital, consumables and overheads. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Radiotherapy treatment was estimated to cost between €2,080 (5-fraction course) and €3,609 (25-fraction course) for an average patient in 2012. Costs were highest in the treatment planning phase for the short-course (€1,217; 58% of total costs), but highest in the radiation treatment phase for the long-course (€1,974: 60% of total costs). By simultaneously varying treatment time, capacity utilization rates and linear accelerator staff numbers, the base cost fell by 20% for 5-fractions: (€1,660) and 35% for 25-fractions: (€2,354). Traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer is relatively inexpensive. Moreover, significant savings may be achievable through service organization and provision changes. These results suggest that a strong economic argument can be made for expanding the use of radiotherapy in rectal cancer treatment.

  19. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m 2 /week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  20. Lessons learned from radiological accidents at medical exposures in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagundes, J.S.; Ferreira, A.F.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    An exposure is considered accidental in radiotherapy when there is a substantial deviation in the prescription of treatment. In this work, an analysis of published radiological accidents, both in Brazil and internationally, was performed during medical exposures in radiotherapy treatments, removing the main lessons learned. Of the research carried out, we highlight Brazil with four radiological accidents and one death in the period between 2011 and 2014; the United States of America with 169 accidents with two deaths from 2000 to 2010 and France from 2001 to 2014 had 569 deaths without patients. Lessons learned have been described, for example, that maintenance personnel training should specify limitations or restrictions on the handling or adjustment of critical parts on the accelerator. It is recommended to apply the 10 main lessons learned due to radiological accidents during medical exposures in radiotherapy treatments to avoid future events

  1. Combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Takao; Takeuchi, Midori; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with carcinoma of the lung treated with radiotherapy alone or combination of chemotherapy were reviewed. Radiation was given with a 10MV photon beam by a linear accelerator. A fraction dose of 2Gy (200 rad) was given routinely 5 times a week. Combined durgs consist of 5FU or FT-207 in monochemotherapy and METT, MFC, or METVFC in combination chemotherapy. 5 year survival rate of all patients was 3.8%. As for the stage classification, 5 year survival rate is 30% in Stage I and II cancer, but there was no 3 year survivor in Stage III cancer and 2 year survivor in Stage IV cancer. As for the cell types, cases of adenocarcinoma had worse prognosis than them of squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The prognosis of patients treated with combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was similar to that of patients treated with radiotherapy alone. These results suggest that combined chemotherapy did not influence tumor control. Some discussion on the treatment modality of chemotherapy are made, emphasizing untoward effect of chemotherapy on immunopotency. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research.

  3. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  4. Probabilistic safety analysis of radiation treatments with linear accelerator (Spanish Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    This publication addresses the issue of accidental exposures of radiotherapy patients and how to avoid them. More proactive approaches are required to anticipate and thus avoid situations that could lead to accidental exposures. In this context, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Ibero American Forum of Radiation and Nuclear and Safety Regulatory Agencies (the FORO) have applied proactive methods, such as probabilistic safety assessment to radiotherapy treatments with accelerators. The methodology and results of this exercise are described in this publication.

  5. Neutron fluence produced in medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.C.; Silva, A.X. da; Crispim, V.R.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy with photon and electron beams still represents the most diffused technique to control and treat tumour diseases. To increase the treatment efficiency, accelerators of higher energy are used, the increase of electron and photon energy is joined with generation of undesired fast neutron that contaminated the therapeutic beam and give a non-negligible contribution to the patient dose. In this work we have simulated with the MCNP4B code the produced neutron spectra in the interaction between the beam and the head to the accelerator and estimating the equivalent dose for neutrons by x-ray dose for aims far from the targets. (author)

  6. Atypical fractionation in advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrowsky, W.; Naude, J.; Toth, M.; Millesi, W.; Grasl, M.; Koehler, W.; Kautzky, M.; Pavelka, R.; Dobrowsky, E.

    1992-01-01

    From May 1990 to May 1991, 23 patients with advanced, inoperable squamous cell cancers, clinically staged as III or IV, were treated by unconventional fractionation radiotherapy. Treatment consisted of a continuous hyper-fractionated accelerated radiotherapy, delivering a total dose of 55.3 Gy within 17 consecutive days. In ten patients radiation therapy was combined with chemotherapy: 20 mg mitomycin C/m 2 , administered by intravenous bolus injection on day 5 of treatment. Apart from a confluent mucositis, treatment tolerance was good. Haematological toxicity from mitomycin C was minor and did not require any specific therapy. The mucosal reaction lasted six weeks (median duration) and was not thought to be increased by additional chemotherapy. In twelve of 23 patients a complete remission of the primary tumour was seen, in patients with lymph node metastases there was a complete response in 14 out of 20 patients. After a median follow-up of 18 months, ten of 23 patients have survived (8/23 without evidence of disease). Eleven patients have died due to local tumour progression and one patient died with distant metastases, being without evidence of local tumour. The advantage of this unconventional fractionation, which takes the described short potential tumour doubling time for heat and neck cancers into account, is discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Perspex in the verification routines for accelerator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Genis S, R.

    1998-01-01

    It is analyzed the use of a perspex solid phantom, adequately referred to a water phantom, as an auxiliary alternative for the daily stability verification routines or constance of radiation beam, as an option in the case of radiotherapy installations with high charge of accelerator working and with basic dosimetry equipment. (Author)

  8. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases: surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunati, M.K.S.

    2001-04-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Control-group: 71 patients have been operated from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 1997, before the LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. Results: There are shown the mean survival times. Therapy options (0,05): LINAC-group: 377 days. Surgery-group: 195 days. Control-group: 285 days. Primary cancer (0,05): unknown primary: 203 days. Cancer of the colon tract: 218 days. Breast cancer: 314 days. Melanoma: 162 days. Kidney: 466 days. Lung 261 days. Others: 439 days. Metastases in one/in both hemispheres (0,05): in one hemisphere 310 days, in both 184 days. All the other parameters (age, sex, Karnofsky-Index, period between diagnose of the primary and the brain metastases, primary cancer therapy, extra cerebral metastases, number of metastases, localization of metastases supra- or infratentoriell, dose/effect relationship in the LINAC-group, whole brain radiotherapy) showed interesting differences, but the results were not statistically

  9. Environmental dose level survey of radiotherapy center in large cancer hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Bin; Zhong Hailuo; Wu Dake; Li Jian; Wang Pei; Qi Guohai; Huang Renbing; Lang Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the radiation dosage around the working environment in radiotherapy centre affiliated to Sichuan cancer hospital in the western China. Methods: In 60 days, we have continuously monitored the accumulated dose that absorbed by doctors, nurses, technicians, physicists and engineers, and investigated the working environment ( 60 Co unit, accelerator, after loading unit, X-ray simulator, CT simulator, gamma knife, MRI and doctor's office) and external environment by using TLD, and compared our results to those released by relevant departments. Results: The average dosage in the working environment is 1.96 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 , 1.61 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 in external environment. Conclusion: In the past 25 years, the radiotherapy center constructed strictly by the criterions of environment and protection departments required, so the radiation dosage in or outside the radiotherapy center has reached the national standard, which is safe for the staff and patients. Its instatement that the radiotherapy sites constructed by the related laws well accorded with the safety standards regulated. (authors)

  10. Cyberknife : how has it changed the radiotherapy practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hukku, S.

    2016-01-01

    The CyberKnife is a frameless robotic radiosurgery system used for treating benign tumors, malignant tumors and other medical conditions. The system was invented by John R. Adler, a Stanford University professor of neurosurgery and radiation oncology, and Peter and Russell Schonberg of Schonberg Research Corporation. It is the most accurate and flexible tool available for aggressive therapeutic irradiation. It is a method of delivering radiotherapy, with the intention of targeting treatment more accurately than standard radiotherapy. The two main elements of the CyberKnife are: 1. The radiation produced from a small linear particle accelerator (linac) 2. A robotic arm which allows the energy to be directed at any part of the body from any direction. Several generations of the CyberKnife system have been developed since its initial inception in 1990

  11. Phase-space database for external beam radiotherapy. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote, R.; Jeraj, R.; Ma, C.M.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Sempau, J.; Seuntjens, J.; Siebers, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting assembled to discuss and recommend actions and activities to prepare a Phase-space Database for External Beam Radiotherapy. The new database should serve to disseminate phase-space data of those accelerators and 60 Co units used in radiotherapy through the compilation of existing data that have been properly validated. Both the technical discussions and the resulting work plan are described, along with the detailed recommendations for implementation. The meeting was jointly organized by NAPC-Nuclear Data Section and NAHU-Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section. (author)

  12. Advanced Accelerator Applications in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjiaem, Sakhorn

    2015-01-01

    besides the original purpose on development of particle acceleratora as research tools in nuclear and high-energy physics, there are large variety of accelerators used in various fileds from fundamental research to industrial usesand applications chemistry, biology and medicine. Pratical accelators used in various field of medical applications since serveral decades. Even through, a large fraction of applications is emphasized on cancer therappy, the number of accelerators used in midicine for other diagnostics and treatments has increased steady over the years. Several types of accelerated particles are used including electron, proton, neutron and ions. Presently, relativistic electron beams and radiation from linear accelerators (linas) are widely used. A combination of positron emission tomography (PRT) and radiotherapy is an example of excellent invention early detection and treat of cancer tumors. The most developments for proton and heavy ion therapy as well as a modern boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are also great incoming effective systems. This talk will focus on developments of the accelrator systems as well as overview on biophysical properties and medical aspects of the diacnostics and treatments.

  13. Magneto-optics for linear electron accelerator with beam recirculation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaenko, M.G.; Severgin, Yu.P.; Fedorov, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Magneto-optical devices of the 40 MeV LUEhR-40M accelrator designed for radiotherapy, are described. A magnetic mirrow and bending-shaping device are reffered to magnetooptical systems. The both devices do not contain quadrupole lenses and have only dipole magnets with radial-homogeneous field. Axial focusing of particles is carried out by magnetic field boundary skew. The both devices have internal mirror symmetry. Results of optimization of devices parameters with the help of BETRAMF program are presented

  14. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P.; Anders, A.

    1995-01-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam's eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam's eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment

  15. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  16. Implementation of a linear mini accelerator for radiotherapy intraoperative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias-Verde, D.; Yanez-Lopez, D.; Marti-Asenjo, J.; Sanchez-Carrascal, M.; Torres-Pozas, S.; Godoy-Cazorla, J. I.; Madan-Rodriguez, C.; Martin-Oliva, R.

    2013-01-01

    Has been defined the status initial reference of the lineal mini-accelerator Intrabeam PRS 500. The alternative worksheet in times of treatment provides an additional verification. The system is validated for clinical use. (Author)

  17. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R., E-mail: hogstrom@lsu.edu; Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rice University, 6100 Main MS-61, Houston, Texas 77005-1827 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  18. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  19. Configuration control based on risk matrix for radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes de Oca Quinnones, Joe; Torres Valle, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of the science and technique breakthroughs in the application of the radiotherapy represents a challenge so that, the appearance of equipment failure or human mistakes that triggers unfavorable consequences for patients, public, or the occupationally exposed workers; it is also diversified forcing to incorporate besides, as part of the efforts, new techniques for the evaluation of risk and the detection of the weak points that can lead to these consequences. In order to evaluate the risks of the radiotherapy practices there is the SEVRRA code, based on the method of Risk Matrix. The system SEVRRA is the most frequently used code in the applications of risk studies in radiotherapy treatment. On the other hand, starting from the development of tools to control the dangerous configurations in nuclear power plants, it has been developed the SECURE code, which in its application variant of Risk Matrix, has gain a comfortable interface man-machine to make risk analyses to the radiotherapy treatment, molding in this way a lot of combinations of scenarios. These capacities outstandingly facilitate the studies and risk optimization applications in these practices. In the system SECURE-Risk Matrix are incorporated graphic and analytical capacities, which make more flexible the analyses and the subsequent documentation of all the results. The paper shows the the application of the proposed system to an integral risk study for the process of radiotherapy treatment with linear accelerator. (Author)

  20. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research. PMID:22972972

  1. Imaging response is highly predictive of survival of malignant glioma patients treated with standard or hyperfractionated RT and carmustine in RTOG 9006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, Walter J.; Scott, Charles B.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Scarantino, Charles; Urtasun, Raul; Movsas, Benjamin; Jones, Christopher; Simpson, Joseph; Fischbach, A. Jennifer; Petito, Carol; Nelson, James

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Limited information is available correlating response to initial therapy and survival outcome among malignant glioma patients. This analysis was conducted to determine the response rate of malignant glioma patients to either standard (STN) or hyperfractionated (HFX) RT and carmustine and to correlate the tumor response status with survival. Patients and Methods: From (11(90)) to (3(94)), 712 newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients were registered on RTOG 9006 and randomized between hyperfractionated RT of 72.0 Gy in 1.2 Gy twice-daily fractions and 60.0 Gy in 2.0 Gy daily fractions. All patients received 80 mg/m-2 of carmustine D 1-3 q 8 wks. As reported in the 1996 Proceedings of the Amer Soc Clin Oncol (Abstr no. 280), there was no survival benefit observed for the HFX regimen. 529 of the 686 eligible patients had pre-operative, post-operative, and post-RT contrast-enhanced MR and/or CT scans available for central review of tumor and peritumoral edema measurements. Response status was judged by applying standard response criteria to a comparison of tumor measurements on follow-up and post-operative films. Results: Of the 529 patients evaluated for imaging response, the complete and partial response rates were 14% and 20%, respectively. A significant correlation between response and survival was observed (P<0.0001). Variables which predicted for a better tumor response were anaplastic astrocytoma vs glioblastoma multiforme histology, better performance status, more extensive resection, and a more favorable Recursive Partitioning and Amalgamation class assignment (JNCI 85:704-710, 1993). Conclusion: The objective response rate for malignant glioma patients to RTOG 9006 therapy was 34%, and survival outcome is strongly correlated with tumor response status. These observations justify the testing of aggressive salvage strategies for patients without imaging evidence of response following initial therapy

  2. Randomized phase II chemotherapy and radiotherapy trial for patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: long-term follow-up of RTOG 92-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, R.; Seiferheld, W.; Ettinger, D.; Lee, J.S.; Movsas, B.; Sause, W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer and good prognostic factors has become combined chemotherapy (ChT) and radiotherapy (RT). However, the sequencing of the two modalities, as well as fractionation of RT, has been controversial. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Study 92-04 was a randomized Phase II study designed to evaluate further the toxicity and efficacy of 2 different strategies of chemoradiation evaluated in 2 prior RTOG Phase II studies. Methods: Patients with Stage II or III medically inoperable or unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer, good performance status, and minimal weight loss were enrolled into a prospective randomized Phase II RTOG study. Arm 1 consisted of induction ChT (vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. bolus weekly for the first 5 weeks, and cisplatin, 100 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 1 and 29) followed by concurrent ChT/RT (cisplatin 75 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 50, 71, and 92) during thoracic radiotherapy (63 Gy in 34 fractions during 7 weeks starting on Day 50). Arm 2 was concurrent ChT and hyperfractionated RT starting on Day 1 with a total dose of 69.6 Gy in 58 fractions during 6 weeks, 1.2 Gy/fraction b.i.d. ChT consisted of cisplatin, 50 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 1 and 8, and oral VP-16, 50 mg b.i.d. for 10 days only on the days of thoracic radiotherapy repeated on Day 29. Results: A total of 168 patients were entered between 1992 and 1994, and 163 patients were eligible for analysis. Eighty-one patients were treated in Arm 1 and 82 patients in Arm 2. Pretreatment characteristics, including age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic features, and stage, were similar. The incidence of acute esophagitis was significantly higher among patients treated in Arm 2 than among those treated in Arm 1 (p<0.0001). The incidence of acute hematologic toxicity was significantly higher among patients treated in Arm 1 (p=0.01 for anemia and p=0.03 for other hematologic toxicities) than among

  3. The First Two Electron Linear Accelerators in South Africa | Minnaar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electron linear accelerator is considered by many leading radiotherapy centres throughout the world as the most suitable equipment for the treatment of cancer. There are good reasons for this opinion, and some physical aspects are summarised here. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1004 (1974) ...

  4. Definitive Radiotherapy for Ewing Tumors of Extremities and Pelvis: Long-Term Disease Control, Limb Function, and Treatment Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Shi Wenyin; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: More than 70% of Ewing tumors occur in the extremities and pelvis. This study identified factors influencing local control and functional outcomes after management with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: A total of 75 patients with a localized Ewing tumor of the extremity or pelvis were treated with definitive RT at the University of Florida between 1970 and 2006 (lower extremity tumors in 30, pelvic tumors in 26, and upper extremity tumors in 19). RT was performed on a once-daily (40%) or twice-daily (60%) basis. The median dose was 55.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions or 55.0 Gy in 1.2-Gy twice-daily fractions. The median observed follow-up was 4.7 years. Functional outcome was assessed using the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score. Results: The 10-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, freedom from relapse, and local control rate was 48%, 48%, 42%, and 71%, respectively. Of the 72 patients, 3 required salvage amputation. Inferior cause-specific survival was associated with larger tumors (81% for tumors 3 . Conclusions: Limb preservation was effectively achieved through definitive RT. Treating limited field sizes with hyperfractionated high-energy RT could minimize long-term complications and provides superior functional outcomes

  5. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  6. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors; Radiotherapie conformationnelle par modulation d'intensite des tumeurs pediatriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseur, J.; Le Prise, E. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Carrie, C. [Centre Leon Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Bernier, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France); Beneyton, V. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Mahe, M.A.; Supiot, S. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  7. The Nano-X Linear Accelerator: A Compact and Economical Cancer Radiotherapy System Incorporating Patient Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Enid M; Keall, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Rapid technological improvements in radiotherapy delivery results in improved outcomes to patients, yet current commercial systems with these technologies on board are costly. The aim of this study was to develop a state-of-the-art cancer radiotherapy system that is economical and space efficient fitting with current world demands. The Nano-X system is a compact design that is light weight combining a patient rotation system with a vertical 6 MV fixed beam. In this paper, we present the Nano-X system design configuration, an estimate of the system dimensions and its potential impact on shielding cost reductions. We provide an assessment of implementing such a radiotherapy system clinically, its advantages and disadvantages compared to a compact conventional gantry rotating linac. The Nano-X system has several differentiating features from current radiotherapy systems, it is [1] compact and therefore can fit into small vaults, [2] light weight, and [3] engineering efficient, i.e., it rotates a relatively light component and the main treatment delivery components are not under rotation (e.g., DMLCs). All these features can have an impact on reducing the costs of the system. In terms of shielding requirements, leakage radiation was found to be the dominant contributor to the Nano-X vault and as such no primary shielding was necessary. For a low leakage design, the Nano-X vault footprint and concrete volume required is 17 m2 and 35 m3 respectively, compared to 54 m2 and 102 m3 for a conventional compact linac vault, resulting in decreased costs in shielding. Key issues to be investigated in future work are the possible patient comfort concerns associated with the patient rotation system, as well as the magnitude of deformation and subsequent adaptation requirements. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. QA programme in external radiotherapy in Romania - status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Milu, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Recognizing the importance of quality assurance in radiotherapy and the need to make access to radiation standards traceable to the international measurement system for every radiotherapy center, the Romanian national secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) has started in 1999 - together with IAEA - a national quality audit programme in all the centers for external radiotherapy from Romania. At present, there are 17 radiotherapy centers in Romania, and a total of 19 teletherapy units and 4 LINCs. The programme has 3 phases: the first phase was to organize a survey in all radiotherapy centers, to collect general information on their radio therapists, medical physicists, type of equipment, dosimeters, etc. Following the survey, a quality assurance network was set up, and on-site dosimetry reviews were arranged according to a suitable timetable. The second phase consisted in performing the reference dosimetry and the calibration of the equipment. Then, a quality audit system based on mailed TLDs has been applied to all radiation beams produced by cobalt-60 therapy units and medical accelerators, in order to identify discrepancies in dosimetry larger than ± 3%. At the same time, the beam calibration performed by the SSDLs was verified. The results of the first survey were analyzed, and corrective actions were taken. A second survey was then organized, based on the mailed TLDs. This paper presents in detail the entire QA programme, its results, and the actions that are to be taken in order to improve the accuracy and consistency of the dosimetry in clinical radiotherapy in Romania. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  10. Medical applications of accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Sandro

    1998-01-01

    At Present, about five thousands accelerators are devoted to biomedical applications. They are mainly used in radiotherapy, research and medical radioisotopes production. In this framework oncological hadron-therapy deserves particular attention since it represents a field in rapid evolution thanks to the joint efforts of laboratories with long experiences in particle physics. It is the case of CERN where the design of an optimised synchrotron for medical applications has been pursued. These lectures present these activities with particular attention to the new developments which are scientifically interesting and/or economically promising.

  11. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2–4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2–4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2–4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2–4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  12. Investigation of linear accelerator pulse delivery using fast organic scintillator measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Andersen, Claus Erik; Lindvold, Lars René

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-coupled organic plastic scintillators present an attractive method for time-resolved dose measurements during radiotherapy. Most organic scintillators exhibit a fast response, making it possible to use them to measure individual high-energy X-ray pulses from a medical linear accelerator...... performed on Varian medical linear accelerators, delivering 6 MV X-ray beams. The dose delivery per radiation pulse was found to agree with expectations within roughly 1%, although minor discrepancies and transients were evident in the measurements....

  13. Role of levamisole immunotherapy as an adjuvant to radiotherapy in oral cancer. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaram, P.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Vasudevan, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy and adjuvant levamisole immunotherapy on the lymphocyte subpopulations was investigated. Comparisons were made between groups receiving levamisole, those receiving placebo, and normal healthy controls. The results of a thirty-month follow-up are reported. Radiotherapy caused leukopenia and lymphopenia affecting all the subsets (T, B, T G and T M ); T lymphocytes were affected to a greater extent. This study demonstrates that levamisole does accelerate the restoration of T lymphocytes, with the T M lymphocytes showing a faster repopulation in comparison with the T G lymphocytes. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 39 refs

  14. Norwegian program of quality assurance in radiotherapy (KVIST) - Organisation, benefits and experience feedback;Programme norvegien d'assurance qualite dans la radiotherapie (KVIST) - Organisation, benefices et retour d'experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merete Olerud, H. [Oslo Univ., Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Institut de Physique et Biophysique (Norway); Levernes, S. [Oslo Univ., Centre Hospitalier, Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras - DNR, Montebello (Norway); Hellebust, T.P. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Centre Hospitalier, DNR, Montebello (Norway); Heikkela, I.E. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras D.C., Johannessen, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire - Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Bjerke, H. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Rekstad BL, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire - Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Sundqvist, E. [Programme Radiographie, Faculte de la Sante, Oslo, College Universitaire, Oslo (Norway); Frykholm, G. [Oslo Univ., Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, St.Olav, Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-12-15

    In 2000, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (N.R.P.A.) initiated work to develop a national quality assurance programme in radiotherapy. The program was named K.V.I.S.T.: i.e. Norwegian abbreviation of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy (KValitetSikring STraleterapi). The programme is performed by the multidisciplinary K.V.I.S.T. Group and aims to stimulate collaboration by focussing on clinical, technical and administrative problems that can be addressed and solved on a national level. An important objective is to establish a positive attitude towards quality assurance and better communication between centres and the various professions and professionals involved in radiotherapy, i.e. the oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapy technologists. Information is also provided to other stake holders such as health authorities, hospital administrators and patients. In 2007 radiotherapy in Norway represent 10 departments and forty accelerators. Since radiotherapy is given high priority in cancer care good quality assurance is required. The member of the K.V.I.S.T.-group are part time at N.R.P.A. and part time in different radiotherapy departments. Professionals with competencies within radiotherapy (R.T.) have permanent positions in a national public entity. The K.V.I.S.T.-group is multidisciplinary. The K.V.I.S.T.-group acts as a coordinating group for all type of national Q.A. projects. The recommendations/guidelines are developed by national consensus. The work is performed by the radiotherapy community it self, thus creating an atmosphere of ownership. (N.C.)

  15. The place of conformal radiotherapy in the routine work: national investigation of SFRO members'opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, J.L.; Lipinski, F.

    2001-01-01

    National French investigation of the using of conformal radiotherapy in routine work, has been made in 2001, in 180 radiotherapeutic centers. Eighty responses have been obtained and analyzed. Conformal radiotherapy is used in 88% and virtual simulation in 60% of these centers. There is a heterogeneity in the equipment of these institutions, most of them have one or two machines. The accelerator equipment differs, and the availability of multi-leaf collimators and electronic portal imaging is limited. Actually only eleven centers have IMRT, eight have projects to install. Only six centers have CT-scans, used mainly for simulation. In 75% of centers conformal radiotherapy have been used in the treatment of CNS-tumors, head and neck cancers, prostate, and non-small cell lung carcinoma. If there are more equipment and human facilities to use conformal radiotherapy, this treatment can be proposed to patients with breast cancer, rectal and gynecological tumors. According 90% of responses, all prostatic cancers need conformal radiotherapy. The analysis of routine use of conformal radiotherapy in France shows an important heterogeneity but it seems that there is an agreement with objectives of this treatment. (authors)

  16. The use of high-density concretes in radiotherapy treatment room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facure, A.; Silva, A.X.

    2007-01-01

    With the modernization of radiotherapic centers, medical linear accelerators are largely replacing 60 Co teletherapy units. In many cases, the same vault housing the 60 Co teletherapy unit is reused for the linear accelerator and, when space is at a premium, high-density concrete (3.0-5.0 g/cm 3 ) is employed to provide shielding against the primary, scatter and leakage radiation. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of transmission of some clinical photon spectra (of 4-10 MV accelerators) through some types of high-density concretes, normally used in the construction of radiotherapy bunkers. From the simulations, the initial and subsequent tenth-value layers (TVL) for these materials, taking into account realistic clinical photon spectra, are presented, for primary radiation

  17. A versatile program for the calculation of linear accelerator room shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zeinab El-Taher; Farag, Nehad M; Elshemey, Wael M

    2018-03-22

    This work aims at designing a computer program to calculate the necessary amount of shielding for a given or proposed linear accelerator room design in radiotherapy. The program (Shield Calculation in Radiotherapy, SCR) has been developed using Microsoft Visual Basic. It applies the treatment room shielding calculations of NCRP report no. 151 to calculate proper shielding thicknesses for a given linear accelerator treatment room design. The program is composed of six main user-friendly interfaces. The first enables the user to upload their choice of treatment room design and to measure the distances required for shielding calculations. The second interface enables the user to calculate the primary barrier thickness in case of three-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and total body irradiation (TBI). The third interface calculates the required secondary barrier thickness due to both scattered and leakage radiation. The fourth and fifth interfaces provide a means to calculate the photon dose equivalent for low and high energy radiation, respectively, in door and maze areas. The sixth interface enables the user to calculate the skyshine radiation for photons and neutrons. The SCR program has been successfully validated, precisely reproducing all of the calculated examples presented in NCRP report no. 151 in a simple and fast manner. Moreover, it easily performed the same calculations for a test design that was also calculated manually, and produced the same results. The program includes a new and important feature that is the ability to calculate required treatment room thickness in case of IMRT and TBI. It is characterised by simplicity, precision, data saving, printing and retrieval, in addition to providing a means for uploading and testing any proposed treatment room shielding design. The SCR program provides comprehensive, simple, fast and accurate room shielding calculations in radiotherapy.

  18. Prospective randomized trail on chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy and conventional chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Feng; Ouyang Jinling; Dong Hongmin; Wu Weili; Chen Haixia; He Zhihui