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Sample records for academic literacy practices

  1. Academic literacy and student diversity the case for inclusive practice

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    Wingate, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of approaches to academic literacy instruction and their underpinning theories and a synthesis of the debate on academic literacy. It aims to raise awareness of innovative literacy pedagogies and argues for the transformation of academic literacy instruction in all universities with diverse student populations.

  2. Scientific literacy and academic identity: Creating a community of practice

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    Reveles, John Michael

    2005-07-01

    This one-year ethnographic study of a third grade classroom examined the construction of elementary school science. The research focused on the co-development of scientific literacy and academic identity. Unlike much research in science education that views literacy as merely supportive of science; this dissertation research considers how students learned both disciplinary knowledge in science as well as about themselves as learners through language use. The study documented and analyzed how students came to engage with scientific knowledge and the impact this engagement had upon their academic identities over time. Ethnographic and discourse analytic methods were employed to investigate three research questions: (a) How were the students in a third grade classroom afforded opportunities to acquire scientific literate practices through the spoken/written discourse and science activities? (b) In what ways did students develop and maintain academic identities taken-up over time as they discursively appropriated scientific literate practices via classroom discourse? and (c) How did students collectively and individually inscribe their academic identities and scientific knowledge into classroom artifacts across the school year? Through multiple forms of analyses, I identified how students' communication and participation in science investigations provided opportunities for them to learn specific scientific literate practices. The findings of this empirical research indicate that students' communication and participation in science influenced the ways they perceived themselves as active participants within the classroom community. More specifically, students were observed to appropriate particular discourse practices introduced by the teacher to frame scientific disciplinary knowledge and investigations. Thus, emerging academic identities and developing literate practices were documented via analysis of discursive (spoken, written, and enacted) classroom interactions. A

  3. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negot......This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  4. Survey of Information Literacy Instructional Practices in U.S. Academic Libraries

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    Julien, Heidi; Gross, Melissa; Latham, Don

    2018-01-01

    An online survey sent to the community of professional librarians in the United States who provide information literacy instruction in academic libraries provided insights into their practices and the challenges they face. Data include current pedagogical methods, client groups of focus, assessment and evaluation, marketing, instructional…

  5. Mainstreaming academic literacy teaching: Implications for how ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article draws on research into the role of academic literacies within a range of disciplines and its implications for academic literacy teaching in Higher Education. The study explored ways of transforming current academic literacy teaching practices with a view to developing better synergy between the academic ...

  6. From digital to Academic Literacy: Interactional Dynamic and Writing Practices on Facebook

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    Eunice Braga Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the results obtained in an educational project carried out in a Portuguese undergraduate course at Universidade Federal do Pará. We analyzed the interactional dynamic experienced by students in Facebook when it is used as a teaching platform, as well as the use of writing in these interactions. We understand that the use of digital literacy tools can greatly contribute to the training of future Portuguese language teachers, considering that such tools have directly influenced language practices. Integral formation of our students is one of our main objectives, so we intent not just preparing them for academic practice, but also for future teaching practice in a context which technology and digital tools will be increasingly present. Thus, we aim at contributing to the expansion of digital and academic literacy of our students. Blended Learning, a mix of face-to-face and on line teaching was the methodology used in the project. That way, we believe that learning could become a more continuous process. Our research is theoretically founded on the Studies about Literacy, as Martin (2008, Street (2014 and Lankshear and Knobel (2008 and by Levy (2010 Cyberculture. This ethnographic research analyses the, literacy in context, understood as social practice.

  7. Culturally Diverse Students in Higher Education: Challenges and Possibilities within Academic Literacy Practices

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    Elena Tkachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With growing diversity in the population, higher education faces a new situation with increasing student diversity. In our paper, we will explore questions concerning the consequences student diversity has for higher-education institutions. Based on our experience from three different R&D projects, the differences in culture and academic literacy practices give culturally diverse students challenges that have often been ignored in academia. Some other studies also document that this group of students has a much higher risk of dropping out and underachieving than majority students (Andersen & Skaarer- Kreutz, 2007; Støren, 2009. In our paper, we are going to discuss the students’ challenges and discourse of remediation that is often associated with their challenges and suggest how higher-education institutions can adjust their practices to be more oriented to intercultural communication. Intercultural communication as a dialogic approach may create dynamics in academic tutoring and lead to mutual change/transformation instead of a one-way adaptation of existing academic literacy norms. We argue that all teachers should be aware of cultural differences in literacy practices in the education systems and strive to adjust their teaching practices to the diversity in the classroom. This approach, we believe, can contribute to a better learning environment for all students, independently of their backgrounds. 

  8. The importance of academic literacy for undergraduate nursing students and its relationship to future professional clinical practice: A systematic review.

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    Jefferies, Diana; McNally, Stephen; Roberts, Katriona; Wallace, Anna; Stunden, Annette; D'Souza, Suzanne; Glew, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review was designed to assess the importance of academic literacy for undergraduate nursing students and its relationship to future professional clinical practice. It aimed to explore the link between academic literacy and writing in an undergraduate nursing degree and the development of critical thinking skills for their future professional clinical practice. A systematic review of qualitative studies and expert opinion publications. A systematic literature search was undertaken of the following databases: ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE and Scopus. All papers reviewed were from 2000 to 2016 and were written in English. We identified 981 studies and expert opinion papers from the selected databases. After reviewing key words and abstracts for the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 papers were selected for review. These were read and reread, with 22 papers, including one thesis, selected for quality appraisal. One paper was discarded due to the exclusion criteria. Three major themes were evident from this study. First, students need assistance to develop tertiary level academic literacy skills when they commence their undergraduate nursing degree. Second, that teaching practices need to be consistent in both designing assessments and in giving feedback to students, in order to assist improvement of academic literacy skills. And finally, academic literacy can facilitate critical thinking when students are assessed using discipline specific genres that relate to their future professional nursing practice. This review highlights the importance of critical thinking in clinical nursing practice and its strong relationship with academic writing skills. It has shown critical thinking is discipline specific and nursing students need to be taught discipline specific literacy genres in undergraduate nursing degrees. Nursing has a diverse educational and cultural mix of students, and educators should not assume academic literacy skills upon commencement of an

  9. Adolescent Literacy in the Academic Disciplines: General Principles and Practical Strategies

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    Jetton, Tamara L., Ed.; Shanahan, Cynthia, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    From leading authorities in both adolescent literacy and content-area teaching, this book addresses the particular challenges of literacy learning in each of the major academic disciplines. Chapters focus on how to help students successfully engage with texts and ideas in English/literature, science, math, history, and arts classrooms. The book…

  10. 'Academic literacies approaches to genre'?

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    Brian Street

    Full Text Available I provide an overview of approaches to writing referred to as 'academic literacies' building on broader traditions, such as New Literacy Studies, and I draw out the relevance of such traditions for the ways in which lecturers provide support to their students with regard to the writing requirements of the University. I offer three case studies of the application of academic literacies approaches to programmes concerned with supporting student writing, in the UK and the USA. I briefly conclude by asking how far these accounts and this work can be seen to bring together many of the themes raised at SIGET conferences - including academic literacies and its relation to genre theories - and express the hope that it opens up trajectories for future research and collaboration of the kind they were founded to develop.

  11. Academic Literacies: The Word Is Not Enough

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    Richards, Kendall; Pilcher, Nick

    2018-01-01

    For Academic Literacies, the world is textually mediated; written texts and what informs them reveal elements such as subject-discipline practices. Furthermore, multi-modalities, for example, visual representation, inform written text, and multiple methods of inquiry, including interviews, shed light on written text production. In this article we…

  12. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  13. Visual Literacy Practices in Higher Education

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    Schellenberg, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Joint Master Degree in Digital Library Learning (DILL) In our media-driven age visuals are increasingly frequent and prominently present in society and their importance and influence across academic disciplines is growing. This makes it essential to enable learners to become visually literate and justifies the need for teaching visual literacy competencies. Yet, there has been little research on visual literacy practices undertaken across academic subjects and institutions in h...

  14. The Value of Literacy Practices

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    Esposito, Lucio; Kebede, Bereket; Maddox, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of literacy events and practices have received considerable attention in educational research and policy. In comparison, the question of value, that is, "which literacy practices do people most value?" has been neglected. With the current trend of cross-cultural adult literacy assessment, it is increasingly important to…

  15. Gaming as a Literacy Practice

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    Hall, Amy Conlin

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study was designed to be a detailed, informative study of a group of adult males who have been gamers since adolescence. The purposes of the study are to provide information regarding gaming as a literacy practice and to explore other vernacular technological literacy practices. The study sheds light on the merits of gaming and other new literacies by examining the literacy development of a select group of adult males. This research was centered on vernacular technological...

  16. Academic Literacies: Providing a Space for the Socio-Political Dynamics of EAP

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    Turner, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the potential of academic literacies as a theoretical framework for EAP, encompassing not only work on texts, but the wider, socio-political, geopolitical, and institutional contexts and practices in and with which EAP operates. An academic literacies approach foregrounds social practices, and one particular practice, that…

  17. The design of a postgraduate test of academic literacy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a consideration in the design of a test of academic literacy, the face validity of such a test is determined by its perceived suitability and usefulness in addressing the literacy requirements of specific academic contexts. This article focuses on one such a literacy context: that of postgraduate academic literacy at a South ...

  18. A Date With Academic Literacies: Using Brief Conversation to Facilitate Student Engagement With Academic Literacies

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    Dunham, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The argument that de-contextualized deficit approaches to academic literacies were ineffective (Lea, 2004; Northedge, 2003), has led to expectations that New Zealand Higher Education institutions embed academic literacies within programmes and courses (Tertiary Education Commission, 2010). This paper reports on the use of a teaching and learning…

  19. Wingate, Ursula (2015). Academic Literacy and Student Diversity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wingate, Ursula (2015). Academic Literacy and Student Diversity: The Case of Inclusive Practice. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Reviewed by Thengani H. Ngwenya*. Book review. * Prof. Thengani H. Ngwenya is Director of the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching of the. Durban University of Technology, Durban, ...

  20. Literacy testing practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Literacy testing has been researched as a social practice from different perspectives (McNamara & Roewer, 2006; Shohamy, 2001). Drawing on a Faucault inspired concept og governmentality in which literacy testing practices are seen as social technologies (Dean, 1999) and as a phenomenon closely...... related to supra- and transnational agencies this paper investigates the relation between state, pedagogy and conceptualizations of literacy. Drawing on data and findings from three ethnographic oriented studies of institutional testing practices of literacy in preschool, primary school and adult second...... language teaching in Denmark (Holm, 2004; 2007; 2009) this paper reveals the construction of values, ideologies and practices around institutional testing of litaracy in education. The analyses of testing instruments and assessment practices indicate among other things that testing of literacy have become...

  1. Academic literacy and the decontextualised learner | Boughey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The literacy practices that are valued in the university emerge from specific disciplinary histories yet students are often expected to master these as if they were common sense and natural. This article argues that the autonomous model of literacy, which sees language use as the application of a set of neutral skills, continues ...

  2. Contending with contest in academic literacy. | Murray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29 (1996) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Contending with contest in academic literacy. H Murray ...

  3. Mobility and Academic Literacies: An Epistolary Conversation

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    Blommaert, Jan; Horner, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the implications of a mobilities perspective for the conceptualization, teaching, and study of academic literacies. Mobility has come to serve as a catalyst for rethinking scholarly work in a variety of fields--most provocatively, the assumed stability as well as uniformity of what is studied and the location and products of…

  4. Using Picturebooks to Promote Academic Literacy

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    Ranck-Buhr, Wendy, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The development of academic literacy requires students to think critically about multiple text types. Picturebooks can be rich and varied resources on which to base well-designed instruction that will facilitate thinking, discussions, connections, and problem solving in multiple content areas. From the Holocaust to ecology to grammar, picturebooks…

  5. Writing Purposefully in Art and Design: Responding to Converging and Diverging New Academic Literacies

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    Melles, Gavin; Lockheart, Julia

    2012-01-01

    In disciplines with long histories in higher education, academic literacies, including writing practices, are less contested than in newer academic fields such as art and design. The relatively recent incorporation of such fields and schools into the university sector has required these fields to create academic writing practices consistent with…

  6. Morphing Literacy: Boys Reshaping Their School-Based Literacy Practices

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    Blair, Heather A.; Stanford, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Details about a two-year ethnographic case study research in middle school boys to understand school literacy are presented. The study revealed that boys resist many school-based practices by transforming the assigned literacy work.

  7. Information literacy of the academic library users

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    Sanda Hasenay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy should be a foundation of any educational system, which would enable students and library users a more efficient way to perform academically and in everyday life. The research goal was to determine the level of information literacy among the students, users of the Library of Faculty of Food and Technology Osijek (PTFOS. A special survey – quiz was used to determine students’ knowledge of library collection and services. The sample of 115 students was surveyed between 16th and 27th of February 2015. The library users are aware of the conditions of using the library collections as well as library services, but they don't read messages on the library's bulletin board, desks and web site. The research results will be used as guidelines for improving information literacy and future research.

  8. The Practice and Promise of Critical Information Literacy: Academic Librarians' Involvement in Critical Library Instruction

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    Tewell, Eamon C.

    2018-01-01

    Critical information literacy is a way of thinking and teaching that examines the social construction and political dimensions of libraries and information, problematizing information's production and use so that library users may think critically about such forces. Being an educational approach that acknowledges and emboldens learners' agency,…

  9. Researching literacy practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Researching literacy practices in transition Postmodern societies are characterized by constant, fast and unpredictable mobility of people, goods, ideas and values. These mobilities are often visualized as a movement from one place to another, as a temporary interference of the stability of fixed...... places. An alternative take on mobilty sees movement as the default and change as the normal way of being rather than the exception (Barton, 2012). This understanding of change is central to the framing concept of this symposium: transition. Transitional processes around literacy are significant because...... literacy is something that is taught and learned, that is adopted, transformed and appropriated and that is used to categorize and classify people (Holm & Pitkänen-Huhta, 2012). Based on detailed empirical studies in the Nordic countries, the aim of this symposium is to discuss how to explore and research...

  10. Tracing Academic Literacies across Contemporary Literacy Sponsorscapes: Mobilities, Ideologies, Identities, and Technologies

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    Wargo, Jon M.; De Costa, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    Locating itself broadly within the "sociolinguistics of mobility" (Blommaert, 2014) and taking heed of Stornaiuolo and Hall's (2014) call to "trace resonance" in writing and literacies research, this article works to trace academic literacies across the emerging "literacy sponsorscapes" (Wargo, 2016a) of contemporary…

  11. Promoting Student Engagement with Academic Literacy Feedback: An Institute Wide Initiative

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    Cleary, Ann; Delahunt, Brid; Fox, Claire; Maguire, Moira; O'Connor, Lorna; Ward, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    The transition to Higher Education, while often exciting, is demanding for many students. Successful transition necessitates learning the conventions of scholarly conversation, including how to read and create work in an academic context. Knowledge of academic literacy practices is an important part of this process but these discourses and…

  12. Investigating the relationship between information literacy and academic performance among students.

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    Soleymani, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, no student can ever pursue the ends of his studies unless he makes use of his information literacy skills. To become lifelong learners, they do need these skills. Information literacy is a set of information needed for searching, retrieval, evaluating, and making best use of information. This study uncovers the relationship between information literacy and academic performance among students at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. This is a practical study using a survey method. All MA students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences make the statistical population for this study, according to the sample size determined by using Cochran formula 265 samples that were selected by stratified random sampling. Data collection was through information literacy questionnaires designed by Davarpanah and Siamak, verified by Library and Information Sciences experts; and finally, gave a Cronbach's alpha of 0.83. To determine academic performance, the average scores of the students in previous semesters were considered. The information literacy of all other students was significantly higher than medium except for students at Nursing and Nutrition faculties. The students of Management and Information Sciences faculty had the highest level of information literacy and students of nutrition faculty were attributed with the least level. There was no significant difference between male and female students' information literacy. We also found out that there was a significant positive relationship between information literacy and students' academic performance in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Information literacy is one of the most important factors that leads to educational success. As there is a significant positive relationship between information literacy and students' academic performance, we should necessarily provide them with relative skills dealing with information literacy to improve their academic performance.

  13. Academic literacy diagnostic assessment in the first semester of first year at university

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    Lorinda Palmer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One vital aspect of the first semester of the first year at university is how academic literacy expectations are made explicit though teaching and assessment practices at the disciplinary level. This paper describes how an academic literacy diagnostic process, and the MASUS tool, was used to ascertain the academic literacy profile of a cohort of undergraduate nursing students [N=569] at the beginning and end of their first semester. Key findings of this quantitative descriptive case study were that only just over half of commencing students possessed appropriate academic literacy skills in all four aspects of the diagnostic and nearly 20% scored in the lowest band—suggesting difficulty with multiple aspects of academic literacy. By the end of semester, 77% of the students who had scored in the lowest band of the MASUS at the beginning of the semester had improved their scores to the middle or highest band, and 73% of them eventually attained a pass or higher grade for the course. The findings of this study suggest that large-scale academic literacy diagnostic assessment, when embedded and contextualized within a course of study, is an effective means of providing the early feedback and targeted support that many commencing university students need.

  14. Digital Literacies in Higher Education: Exploring Textual and Technological Practice

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    Lea, Mary R.; Jones, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Concerns are frequently raised about undergraduates being so immersed in web-based technologies in their broader lives that they have difficulties engaging in more conventional study practices, such as academic reading and writing essays. The research reported on here examines this issue through a literacies lens. The project findings illustrate…

  15. An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year University Biology Course. ... Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning ... These changes in his report writing as well as in his attitude and motivation for writing the report were ...

  16. Adult literacy, learning identities and pedagogic practice

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther, Jim; Maclachlan, Kathy; Tett, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between persistence in adult literacy and numeracy\\ud programs, changes in the participants’ attitudes to engaging in learning and pedagogic practices\\ud using data from eight Scottish literacy education organizations. It argues that literacy learning can act as a resource that enables vulnerable adults to change their dispositions to learning, achieve their goals and make a transition towards their imagined futures. Pedagogic practices that operate fro...

  17. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

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    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  18. Computer Literacy among University Academic Staff: The Case of IIUM

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    Shaheen Majid

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of computing skills of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM faculty members. A questionnaire was used to elicit information regarding computer literacy from a sample of 114 faculty members. The study shows that the level of computer literacy among IIUM faculty members is quite low: most of them have been using computers for word processing only. Other computer applications are being used by a limited number of academic staff. Irrespective of the existing level of computer literacy, almost all academic staff showed interest in attending computer courses.

  19. Productive knowledge of collocations may predict academic literacy

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    Van Dyk, Tobie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the relationship between productive knowledge of collocations and academic literacy among first year students at North-West University. Participants were administered a collocation test, the items of which were selected from Nation’s (2006 word frequency bands, i.e. the 2000-word, 3000-word, 5000-word bands; and the Academic Word List (Coxhead, 2000. The scores from the collocation test were compared to those from the Test of Academic Literacy Levels (version administered in 2012. The results of this study indicate that, overall, knowledge of collocations is significantly correlated with academic literacy, which is also observed at each of the frequency bands from which the items were selected. These results support Nizonkiza’s (2014 findings that a significant correlation between mastery of collocations of words from the Academic Word List and academic literacy exists; which is extended here to words from other frequency bands. They also confirm previous findings that productive knowledge of collocations increases alongside overall proficiency (cf. Gitsaki, 1999; Bonk, 2001; Eyckmans et al., 2004; Boers et al., 2006; Nizonkiza, 2011; among others. This study therefore concludes that growth in productive knowledge of collocations may entail growth in academic literacy; suggesting that productive use of collocations is linked to academic literacy to a considerable extent. In light of these findings, teaching strategies aimed to assist first year students meet academic demands posed by higher education and avenues to explore for further research are discussed. Especially, we suggest adopting a productive oriented approach to teaching collocations, which we believe may prove useful.

  20. Reading and Writing with a Public Purpose: Fostering Middle School Students' Academic and Critical Community Literacies through Debate

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    Mirra, Nicole; Honoroff, Benjamin; Elgendy, Suzanne; Pietrzak, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Middle school is a crucial transition period for adolescents; in addition to beginning to grapple with the academic literacy demands of college and career readiness, they are working to find their place in public life and developing opinions about civic issues. This article presents debate as a literacy practice that is uniquely suited to helping…

  1. Teachers' professional development: Awareness of literacy practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    professional development and deepen teachers' understanding of literacy practices and teaching. Interviews and ... these disadvantages, linked to both material and human resources, have continued, and in fact become .... given access to literacy usage and variation, but ... English as their LoLT, though it may be their.

  2. Literacy as a Translocal Practice: Digital Multimodal Literacy Practices among Girls Resettled as Refugees

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    Omerbašic, Delila

    2015-01-01

    Situated in critical sociocultural theory of literacy with a particular focus on literacy in relation to space and displacement, this qualitative study considers how nine teenage girls who were resettled as refugees from Thailand engage in productions of translocality through multimodal literacy practices in digital spaces. The girls are…

  3. Some Visual Literacy Initiatives in Academic Institutions: A Literature Review from 1999 to the Present

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    Blummer, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitousness of images in the digital era highlights the importance of individuals' visual communication skills in the 21st Century. We conducted a literature review of visual literacy initiatives in academic institutions to illustrate best practices for imparting these skills in students. The literature review identified five categories of…

  4. Developing academic literacy through self-regulated online learning

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    Emmaline Lear

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the self-regulated learning (SRL experiences of international students in developing English language academic literacy essential for successful transition to university. The participants in this study were a small, diverse group of first year undergraduate students who sought academic support from the Academic Skills Centre at an Australian university. They were given the opportunity to independently access an online program, Study Skills Success, over the duration of one semester to develop their academic literacy in English. Data for this study were collected from a pre- and post-program questionnaire, interviews, a focus group discussion, and reflective online learning logs. These sources gathered information regarding the participants’ motivation and attitudes, their online learning experiences and strategy use, and the perceived benefits of SRL online. The findings from this study have implications for supporting the transition of first year students to university by developing essential academic skills through independent online learning.

  5. Academic literacies: looking back in order to look forward

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    Mary R Lea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that we need to reclaim the institutional perspective that was inherent in some of the early work in the field of academic literacies. It offers a brief overview of the emergence of the field and examines some key developments, including an examination of areas of tension with regard to the use of the term academic literacies. It also points to the ways in which the field is drawing in valuable and complementary theoretical and methodological frames, latterly with respect to significant developments in the digital landscape in higher education. The author concludes that academic literacies researchers have ongoing work to do with regard to the changing contexts of higher education and the need to push against the relentless redefinition of the university for its commercial and transfer value as opposed to its intellectual or critical value.

  6. Measuring Practicing Clinicians’ Information Literacy

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    Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn J.; Sherman, Scott E.; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. Objectives This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans’ Affairs (VA) medical center. Methods Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach’s a=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson’s correlations. Results Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians’ information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs. PMID:28197620

  7. Techno-Literacy Practices of Emergent Readers

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    Razeale G. Fernandez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available – This research explored the techno-literacy practices of emergent readers. The study found that young children experienced a multi-literate practices in their homes that comprised not only print and paper-based literacies but also techno-literacies. That television, games on tablets and phones are the sources of textual pleasure of young children.Families reported that children watched television and play games on tablets/phones regularly. This is due to the limited options of leisure activities available to younger children. Emergent readers are highly focused to televisual text as they demonstrate meaningmaking practices when they constantly ask questions and talk about what they are watching,hence they are active meaning-makers. The learning opportunities which include hand eye coordination, parallel processing, and problem solving skills young children acquired through playing computer games and games on tablet/iPad . Aside from these, they also developed a number of literacy skills as well as how to behave as players.It can be concluded thatexposure to imagery in electronic technologies contributed to the children’s literacy development. The literate identities of emergent readers can be further enhanced as they begin formal schooling. Data indicated that young children are developing techno-literacy practices and this concurs to the findings of Marsh (2010. Therefore, technology serves as a tool for the literacy development of young children. That techno-literacy practices of young children should be valued in school. Future research should also consider attitude, behavior and practices of parents towards the use of technology by children.

  8. 407 CONTENDING WITH CONTEST IN ACADEMIC LITERACY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But, learning how to behave appropriately toward texts in an academic ..... the discipline to access or activate the relevant schemas of background knowledge they have ..... [English] are turning to communicating in written academic English.

  9. Reinventing the Possibilities: Academic Literacy and New Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan 'rylish' Moeller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This webtext demonstrates the possibilities of using new media to teach students critical literacy skills applicable to the 21st century. It is a manifesto for what the authors think writing scholars should be teaching in general-education "writing" classes like first-year composition. In order to answer the question of what we should teach, we have to ask what kinds of academic literacy, if any, we value. The authors argue here that rhetorical theory is a productive way to theorize how meaning is made among new media texts, their designers, and their readers. They use the Ancient Greek concepts of topoi and commonplace to explain how designers and readers enter into a space of negotiated meaning-making when converging upon new media texts. That negotiated space offers a new-media space for learning critical literacies by means other than research papers. As examples, they discuss two student texts and the literacies they demonstrate.

  10. Supporting Academic Literacies: University Teachers in Collaboration for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lotta

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with an action research project, where a group of university teachers from different disciplines reflected on and gradually extended their knowledge about how to support students' academic literacy development. The project was conducted within a "research circle" [Bergman, L. 2014. "The Research Circle as a…

  11. Diagnosing academic language ability : An analysis of the Test of Academic Literacy for Postgraduate Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, Anna; Weideman, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Following the observation that a large number of postgraduate students may not possess an adequate level of academic language ability to complete their studies successfully, this study investigates postgraduate students' strengths and weaknesses in academic literacy, with a specific focus on

  12. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  13. Improving academic literacy by teaching collocations | Nizonkiza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics ... Abstract. This study explores the effect of teaching collocations on building academic vocabulary and hence improving academic writing abilities. ... They were presented with a completion task and an essay-writing task before and after being exposed to a collocation-based syllabus.

  14. Reconceptualising Science Education Practices from New Literacies Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of profound socio-economic and technological changes, the research from New Literacies has raised fundamental questions on the nature of literacy in the way we read, write, and communicate. Yet, in science education, research in literacy has been largely restricted to the domain of print-oriented academic language. This paper aims to set…

  15. Understanding and Practice of Information Literacy in Australian Government Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Jennifer; Barham, Lyn; Brady, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Most research on information literacy has emerged from the academic sector and there is a lack of research undertaken in the workplace. To further expand on this area of study, a survey was undertaken to investigate librarians' understanding of information literacy and the application of information literacy in government libraries in Australia.…

  16. THE USE OF STATISTIC KNOWLEDGE IN ACADEMIC DISCOURSES OF LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Sperrhake

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes how discourses of literacy, illiteracy and alphabetic literacy have used statistical knowledge. We carried out a search into digital files of journals specialized in Education and Statistics, as well as into CAPES Thesis Database. From the selected corpus, it is possible to perceive the following kinds of uses: 1 statistics used as empirical material; 2 statistics used as methodological procedure; 3 reference to statistical knowledge. Besides evidencing how the statistical knowledge has been used, the analysis of academic productions has enabled us to perceive other two points: the appearance of levels of alphabetic literacy, and the change in the understanding of the relationship of the subject with reading and writing.

  17. Online Book Clubs: Bridges between Old and New Literacies Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharber, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    In this Digital Literacies column, online book clubs are offered as one example of how to effectively bridge old and new literacy practices. These Internet-based book clubs capitalize on children's interest in new literacy practices while complementing, and hopefully encouraging, traditional reading practices. Examples from online book clubs…

  18. New Literacies Practices of Teenage "Twitter" Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This study is an empirical study into the new literacy practices of five teenage "Twitter" users on Twitter. Qualitative methods were used to describe the most prominent ways of participating on "Twitter." Results indicate that teenagers used "Twitter" for self-expression, communication, friendship maintenance, and…

  19. Promotion of scientific literacy: Bangladeshi teachers' perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mahbub; Corrigan, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    Background: In Bangladesh, a common science curriculum caters for all students at the junior secondary level. Since this curriculum is for all students, its aims are both to build a strong foundation in science while still providing students with the opportunities to use science in everyday life - an aim consistent with the notion of scientific literacy. Purpose: This paper reports Bangladeshi science teachers' perspectives and practices in regard to the promotion of scientific literacy. Sample: Six science teachers representing a range of geographical locations, school types with different class sizes, lengths of teaching experience and educational qualifications. Design and method: This study employed a case study approach. The six teachers and their associated science classes (including students) were considered as six cases. Data were gathered through observing the teachers' science lessons, interviewing them twice - once before and once after the lesson observation, and interviewing their students in focus groups. Results: This study reveals that participating teachers held a range of perspectives on scientific literacy, including some naïve perspectives. In addition, their perspectives were often not seen to be realised in the classroom as for teachers the emphasis of learning science was more traditional in nature. Many of their teaching practices promoted a culture of academic science that resulted in students' difficulty in finding connections between the science they study in school and their everyday lives. This research also identified the tension which teachers encountered between their religious values and science values while they were teaching science in a culture with a religious tradition. Conclusions: The professional development practice for science teachers in Bangladesh with its emphasis on developing science content knowledge may limit the scope for promoting the concepts of scientific literacy. Opportunities for developing pedagogic

  20. Information Literacy among Educational Academic Members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batul Keykha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of information literacy is considered a required factor for instructors of higher education system due to its impact on educational and research activities, and performance of educational academic members is a main factor that affects the output of system. The aim of this study was to report and compare the information literacy among the academic members of departments of clinical and basic biomedical sciences in 2011. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed using a valid and reliable questionnaire distributed among 48 full-time equivalent academic members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences in both clinical (19 members and basic biomedical departments (29 members. Data were analyzed using Fisher, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square statistics in SPSS 17. Results: Information literacy of the members was at an average level at both knowledge and attitude levels but it was low at the practice. There was a significant difference between two groups in terms of awareness about information resources; however, the difference was not significant for the utilization of information resources. Conclusion: Members of department of basic biomedical sciences were more aware than those of clinical department about the information resources but such awareness has not resulted in more use of resources in the educational and research activities. Despite positive attitude of all members towards the application of electronic information resources in both educational and research activities, their awareness of information literacy skills and practicing were not satisfying in educational and research sections. As a final point, Information literacy is hence suggested as a part of continuing medical education courses.

  1. Recontextualising work into academic practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Globalisation and the related changes in social and economic practices have impacted strongly on teaching .... One aspect of work/academic curriculum interactions is that there is .... lecturers who were responsible for designing and teaching on the work ... were assessed on their ability to mimic the layout of a given news-.

  2. Resources, mediators, and identities: Home literacy practices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Everyday home literacy practices of bilingual students who are learning English as an Additional Language (EAL) is an under-explored topic in South Africa. In this qualitative case study, home literacy practices of these students are viewed as a resource that can enhance their literacy development, while affirming their lived ...

  3. Children's Literacy Interest and Its Relation to Parents' Literacy-Promoting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Laura E.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; McQueen, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how children's literacy interests related to parent literacy-promoting practices across time. Using a sample of 909 preschool-age children and the newly developed Child Activities Preference Checklist, literacy interest appeared to be a complex construct, not easily captured by a single measure. In a subsample of 230 children…

  4. Literacy Practices and Linguistic Choices: A Sociocultural Study of a Multilingual Adult Literacy Student Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stephen R.; Thorp, Kay

    The report describes a study of a multilingual group of six adult literacy students, five women and one man, enrolled in an English literacy class at an Australian college. Subjects' countries of origin include Afghanistan, Indonesia/China, Lebanon, Iran, and China. The study examined factors affecting subjects' daily literacy practices and…

  5. Academic Practice, APA Referencing Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system.Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen...... indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system....

  6. Literacy teacher education principles and effective practices

    CERN Document Server

    Litt, Deborah G; Place, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Few resources exist to give literacy teacher educators a comprehensive view of effective, innovative practices in their field, making this uniquely practical volume an important addition to the literature. Each chapter describes research findings and pedagogical methods, with an emphasis on what teachers really need to know to succeed. Woven into the text are more than 30 detailed activities and assignments to support teacher development, written by outstanding teacher educators. Links to professional teaching standards and the Common Core State Standards are highlighted throughout. Suppleme

  7. Relocalising Academic Literacy: Diversity, Writing and Collective Learning in an International Master's Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students' educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among…

  8. International Graduate Students' Academic Writing Practices in Malaysia: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges faced by non-native English speaking international graduate students in their academic writing practices while they studied at a university in Malaysia as well as the solutions they employed when faced with the challenges. Academic Literacies Questionnaire was used to collect data. Based on 131 participants,…

  9. Reading and Writing as Academic Literacy in EAP Program of Indonesian Leaners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imroatus Solikhah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates academic literacy imposed in reading and writing for academic purposes in the EAP program. This study uses descriptive design elaborating data from curriculum documents and interviews.  Involving 45 participants from IAIN Surakarta and Veteran University, data were analyzed using constant-comparison and inductive analysis tecniques. The study diseovers that academic literacy is prominent to serve and recently it has been the growing learning outcomes universities should provide besides discipline and experise. Academic literacy in EAP program is embedded into academic vocabulary, grammar, reading and writing for academic purposes.  Consequently, academic literacy should be incurred in the curriculum, syllabus, aims and objectives, and teaching materials.

  10. Gender Disparities in Academic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waljee, Jennifer F; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Kim, H Myra; Gyetko, Margaret R; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Woolliscroft, James O; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    In academia, women remain underrepresented. The authors' sought to examine differences in faculty position and professional satisfaction among academic physicians by gender. From 2008 to 2012, academic faculty members at a single institution were surveyed (2008, n = 737; 2010, n = 1151; and 2012, n = 971) regarding current position, choice of position, professional satisfaction, and desire for leaving. Logistic regression was performed to compare aspects of professional satisfaction by gender. Men more often held tenure track positions compared with women (2008, 45 percent versus 20 percent; 2010, 47 percent versus 20 percent; and 2012, 49 percent versus 20 percent; p Women were more likely to engage in only clinical activities compared with men (2008, 31 percent versus 18 percent; 2010, 28 percent versus 14 percent; and 2012, 33 percent versus 13 percent; p Women chose tracks to accommodate work-life balance [2008, OR, 1.9 (95 percent CI, 1.29 to 2.76); 2010, OR, 2.0 (95 percent CI, 1.38 to 2.76); and 2012, OR, 2.1 (95 percent CI, 1.40 to 3.00)], rather than the opportunity of tenure [2008, OR, 0.4 (95 percent CI, 0.23 to 0.75); 2010, OR, 0.5 (95 percent CI, 0.35 to 0.85); and 2012, OR, 0.5 (95 percent CI, 0.29 to 0.76) compared with men. Men reported higher professional satisfaction compared with women (2008, 5.7 versus 5.4, p women. Women report lower levels of professional satisfaction in academic practice compared with men. Given the increasing pressures of academic practice, efforts to align work-life balance and professional goals could potentially improve faculty satisfaction and retention.

  11. Information Literacy Practices and Student Protests: Mapping Community Information Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiranec, Sonja; Kos, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper provides a contribution to understandings of information literacy regarding context and transferability of information practices. Specifically, the paper analyses the subset of information practices in situations of student protests and addresses issues of transfer of information literacy practice from a highly formal…

  12. Writing Information Literacy Assessment Plans: A Guide to Best Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Oakleaf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic librarians throughout higher education add value to the teaching and learning missions of their institutions though information literacy instruction. To demonstrate the full impact of librarians on students in higher education, librarians need comprehensive information literacy assessment plans, composed of instructional program-level and outcome-level components, that summarize the purpose of information literacy assessment, emphasize the theoretical basis of their assessment efforts, articulate specific information literacy goals and outcomes, describe the major assessment methods and tools used to capture evidence of student learning, report assessment results, and highlight improvements made as a consequence of learning assessment.

  13. Emirati, Omani and Saudi students’ Academic Literacy Socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadah Al Murshidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the academic literacy socialization of students at U.S. universities from the Gulf Region—Oman, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates (UAE. International students were contacted and asked if they would participate in the project. Fifty three students responded to the survey and interview, 77% of the respondents were  male and 23% were female. The results of the study found that the Gulf Coast students studying in the U.S. shared similar experiences in how they socialized academically, however, noticeable differences appeared between linguistic abilities and grammar challenges. When the students were asked if their linguistic abilities prevented them from participating in classroom discussion, the Saudi participants were the only group that said ‘Never’. Likewise, when the researchers inquired about grammar challenges, an interesting dissimilarity revealed itself. The Saudi sample indicated it was very easy while the UAE participants specified that it was somewhat difficult and each group had the same percentage of respondents. Although differences between the students were observed, similarities were also revealed. For instance, all the students did not mind working academically with the opposite sex. The results of this study help in the understanding on how to help students from the Gulf Coast academically assimilate into the American educational system.

  14. Reading and writing academic practices in the phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mirely Chois-Lenis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some results of an investigation aimed to characterize the academic literacy practices that are developed in the Phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca. In this descriptive study, a sample of 24 students was taken from those in the last semester of the first academic period of 2009, who answered a survey of 26 multiple choice questions. The results indicate that the academic moment for which the students write and read the most is for the courses, who develop these practices primarily to be assessed and predominantly read and write their own lecture notes and the materials prepared by their faculty, to the detriment of scientific articles or papers for publication. It is expected, from these results, to generate reflexion processes and actions that qualify the practices of academic literacy within the program for the benefit of academic and professional performance of their students and graduates.

  15. Practice of New Style Information Literacy Education Attached Internet Enviroment

    OpenAIRE

    堀内, 泰輔

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays, to say nothing of importance of Information education. And Internet technology is developed more and more. Accordingly, at elemental information processing education, it is important to teach not only information literacy but also network literacy. In this paper, we describe about practice of new style information literacy education for freshman of our technical college, and we mention about the results and problems of this education.

  16. Rural Media Literacy: Youth Documentary Videomaking as a Rural Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, Damiana Gibbons

    2016-01-01

    Through an analysis of a corpus of youth-produced documentary video data collected at a youth media arts organization in rural Appalachia, I explore how these rural youth engaged in media literacy practices through creating documentary videos about themselves and their community. Using a theoretical foundation in literacies research, especially…

  17. Academic Difficulties and Early Literacy Deprivation: The Case of Ethiopians in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkon, Elisheva; Avinor, Eleanor

    1995-01-01

    Investigates a possible link between academic difficulties and early literacy deprivation among the immigrant Ethiopian population in Israel. Findings suggest that such deprivation can affect the person after he becomes literate and multilingual and that literacy exposure in early childhood and first-language maintenance is important. (11…

  18. Profiles of Emergent Literacy Skills among Preschool Children Who Are at Risk for Academic Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Justice, Laura M.; Konold, Timothy R.; McGinty, Anita S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore patterns of within-group variability in the emergent literacy skills of preschoolers who are at risk for academic difficulties. We used the person-centered approach of cluster analysis to identify profiles of emergent literacy skills, taking into account both oral language and code-related skills.…

  19. The Relationship between Bible Literacy and Academic Achievement and School Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between Bible literacy among secondary school students and their academic achievement and school behavior. One hundred and forty students in the 7th to 12th grade were randomly selected from a Christian school. Four measures of Bible knowledge were combined to obtain an overall measure of Bible literacy. They…

  20. Information Literacy Education in the UK: Reflections on Perspectives and Practical Approaches of Curricular Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Andretta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper has two main aims, to present the current position of information literacy education in UK-based academic institutions and to propose a strategy that ensures the integration of this phenomenon in learning and teaching institutional practices. The first part of the paper offers an insight into the perceptions of information literacy by exploring four distinct perspectives, including the institutional angle and the views associated with faculty staff, library staff and students. What transpires from the findings is that information literacy from an institutional perspective is dominated by the need to measure information skills within the context of information as a discipline in its own right. Another issue that is raised by the data points to a great deal of misinformation regarding information literacy, and that, as a result, a clear marketing strategy must be adopted by information professionals to address the misconceptions held by faculty staff and students alike. We aim to address these points by drawing on recent scholarship and research in the field which demonstrates the validity of information literacy as a process for fostering independent learning. The second part of the paper explains how a Fellowship project has placed information literacy on the pedagogical agenda of the University of Staffordshire in the UK by promoting information literacy education as an integrated element of the curriculum.

  1. Linguistic diversity and literacy practices in multilingual classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia

    & Leung, 2001). In search of a critical postmodern perspective on classroom studies, as advocated by Lin & Luk (2002), the study 'Signs of language‘ (2008-2014) aims to investigate the possibilities of restructuring the literacy practices in multilingual classrooms by giving attention to the children‘ s......In the context of an increasing multilingualism, literacy teaching has become a central and contested issue in public and political debate. International comparisons of levels of literacy have been interpreted as an indication of a prevailing literacy crisis that demands political actions to avoid...

  2. Cultural Shifts: Putting Critical Information Literacy into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the example of foreign languages to explore the integration of critical information literacy into the curriculum of various disciplines. By closely examining the practices and values inherent in the foreign language information environment, the paper suggests that a critical vision of information literacy provides the most…

  3. Literacy Coaching: Middle School Academic Achievement and Teacher Perceptions Regarding Content Area Literacy Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anjell H.; Neill, Patricia; Faust, Phyllis B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined differences in perceptions of content area teachers receiving literacy coaching and teachers receiving no literacy coaching regarding implementation of literacy instruction. It also examined student achievement on standardized tests relative to literacy coaching. A survey measured teachers' perceptions regarding their…

  4. Actions of the Academic Literacy Laboratory of the University of São Paulo: promoting academic writing in the undergraduate and graduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Mendes Ferreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing internationalization of Brazilian universities requires its academic community not only to read, but also to communicate effectively in academic discourse in at least two languages - the mother tongue and a foreign language (mainly English. However, material conditions for meeting these demands are practically nonexistent in Brazilian higher education institutions (FERREIRA, 2015. The purpose of this article is to describe an action that aims to meet one of these demands imposed by internationalization – the socialization of academic production in English, French and Portuguese not only for reading purposes and assimilation of content, but above all for the publication in these languages. This action is undertaken by the Academic Literacy Laboratory at the University of São Paulo.

  5. Actions of the Academic Literacy Laboratory of the University of São Paulo: promoting academic writing in the undergraduate and graduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Mendes Ferreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p125 The increasing internationalization of Brazilian universities requires its academic community not only to read, but also to communicate effectively in academic discourse in at least two languages - the mother tongue and a foreign language (mainly English. However, material conditions for meeting these demands are practically nonexistent in Brazilian higher education institutions (FERREIRA, 2015. The purpose of this article is to describe an action that aims to meet one of these demands imposed by internationalization – the socialization of academic production in English, French and Portuguese not only for reading purposes and assimilation of content, but above all for the publication in these languages. This action is undertaken by the Academic Literacy Laboratory at the University of São Paulo.

  6. Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum: Constructive Alignment from Theory into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Dahlqvist

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Librarian-teacher cooperation is essential for the integration of information literacy into course syllabi. Therefore, a common theoretical and methodological platform is needed. As librarians at Kristianstad University we have had the opportunity to develop such a platform when teaching information literacy in a basic course for teachers in higher education pedagogy. Information literacy is taught in context with academic writing, distance learning and teaching, and development of course syllabi. Constructive Alignment in Theory: We used constructive alignment in designing our part of the course. John Biggs’ ideas tell us that assessment tasks (ATs should be aligned to what is intended to be learned. Intended learning outcomes (ILOs specify teaching/learning activities (TLAs based on the content of learning. TLAs should be designed in ways that enable students to construct knowledge from their own experience. The ILOs for the course are to have arguments for the role of information literacy in higher education and ideas of implementing them in TLAs. The content of learning is for example the concept of information literacy, theoretical perspectives and constructive alignment for integration in course syllabi. TLAs are written pre-lecture reflections on the concept of information literacy, used as a starting point for the three-hour seminar. Learning reflections are written afterwards. The AT is to revise a syllabus (preferably using constructive alignment for a course the teacher is responsible for, where information literacy must be integrated with the other parts and topics of the course. Constructive Alignment in Practice: Using constructive alignment has taught us that this model serves well as the foundation of the theoretical and methodological platform for librarian-teacher cooperation when integrating information literacy in course syllabi. It contains all important aspects of the integration of information literacy in course

  7. Multicultural Issues in Literacy Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Arlette Ingram, Ed.; Garcia, Georgia Earnest, Ed.; Barrera, Rosalinda B., Ed.; Harris, Violet J., Ed.

    This book addresses the lack of research and scholarly discussion on multicultural literacies. A common theme across chapters is the ways in which elements of difference--race, ethnicity, gender, class, and language--create tensions that influence students' literacy experiences and achievements. Sections explore the relationships among culture,…

  8. Reading and Writing as Academic Literacy in EAP Program of Indonesian Leaners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solikhah, Imroatus

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates academic literacy imposed in reading and writing for academic purposes in the EAP program. This study uses descriptive design elaborating data from curriculum documents and interviews. Involving 45 participants from IAIN Surakarta and Veteran University, data were analyzed using constant-comparison and inductive analysis…

  9. Pre-TOEFL guide academic English practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Preparing for TOEFL Do you plan to take TOEFL or IELTS but are not ready for the challenge? Do you need more practice? If you do, then this book is for you. It is also for those who just want to practice their academic English. Whatever your purpose, this book will give you the foundation in academic English you need for TOEFL and IELTS success.

  10. An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year University Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin Kelly-Laubscher

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa there are many students, especially those from previously underrepresented groups at university, who successfully gain access to university but do not succeed in completing their degree either within the prescribed time or at all.  One of the barriers to student success at university is the difficulty these students have in accessing the literacy practices of the disciplines.  Therefore, within a first year biology course at a South African University, an intervention that focused on the academic literacy practices in biology was introduced. The intervention was designed around the assignment of writing a lab report. This paper describes this intervention and how it impacted on one student’s journey from learning science at school to learning science at university.  A literacy history interview and ‘talk around text’ interviews were used to assess the student’s experience of the intervention. Comparison of the student’s first and final drafts of the report revealed changes in the style and format of his writing. These changes in his report writing as well as in his attitude and motivation for writing the report were facilitated by a better understanding of the expectations of writing in university biology. This understanding was mediated largely through the modelling and deconstruction of the expected genre. This highlights not only the importance of providing first year students with examples of the genres they are  expected to be writing but also the facilitation of their engagement with these new genres. Without these kinds of intervention many students are unlikely to gain access to disciplinary ways of learning and writing, which ultimately may lead to their exclusion from university.

  11. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  12. Observing Literacy Practices in Neighbor Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte

    ’procedures on language and literacy. Based on this material, we developed an observation scheme and a guide for preschool teachers to follow, inspired by an action learning concept.During fall 2015, a pilot project is carried out. Preschool teachers from one institution visit a neighbor institution one by one during...... work hours, in order to observe and register how language and literacy events look like there. Afterwards, they share their registrations at a team meeting, and discuss and decide which procedures to test in their own institution. Thus, they form a professional learning network. In the pilot project......The Danish National Centre for Reading and a municipality in southern Denmark cooperate to develop a program to improve preschool children’s early literacy skills. The project aims to support preschool teachers’ ability to create a rich literacy environment for children age 3‒6. Recent research...

  13. Language and Literacy in Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybin, Janet, Ed.

    Readings on language and literacy within their social context include: "The Problem of Meaning in Primitive Languages" (Bronislaw Malinowski); "Toward Ethnographies of Communication" (Dell Hymes); "Language as Social Semiotic" (M. A. K. Halliday); "Language and Ideology" (V. N. Volosinov); "Family…

  14. An Investigation of Literacy Practices in High School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Jade; Mitchell, Marisa A.; Clancy, Erin E.; Silverman, Rebecca D.

    2017-01-01

    This study reports findings from an exploration of the literacy practices of 10 high school science teachers. Based on observations of teachers' instruction, we report teachers' use of text, evidence-based vocabulary and comprehension practices, and grouping practices. Based on interviews with teachers, we also report teachers' perceptions…

  15. Adapting Practices of Science Journalism to Foster Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Newman, Alan; Saul, Ellen Wendy; Farrar, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how the practices of expert science journalists enable them to act as "competent outsiders" to science. We assert that selected science journalism practices can be used to design reform-based science instruction; these practices not only foster science literacy that is useful in daily life, but also…

  16. Quantitative Literacy Interventions at University of Cape Town: Effects of Separation from Academic Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Frith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the Numeracy Centre at the University of Cape Town is to develop students’ quantitative literacy (QL in a manner consistent with their programmes of study and intended roles in the community. Our theoretical perspective on the nature of QL is in line with that of the New Literacies Studies and sees academic QL as practices in different academic disciplinary contexts. This means that for us the ideal curriculum structure for developing QL would fully integrate it into the teaching of the disciplines. This is in practice not achievable in most cases, especially since many students do not have the necessary foundations of mathematical and statistical knowledge and skills. The unavoidable deviation from the ideal curriculum structure presents challenges to the design of QL interventions. Two illustrative examples which display different degrees of separation from the disciplinary teaching are described and discussed. This discussion is based on lecturers’ reflections on the teaching experience and on student evaluations. The ‘stand-alone’ QL course for Humanities and Law students, which uses a context-based approach, is the least integrated with the disciplinary curriculum, and presents challenges in terms of tensions in the classroom between the contexts and the mathematical and statistical content, as well as challenges in terms of student motivation. The QL intervention for medical students is more closely integrated into the medical curriculum and presents fewer challenges. Both interventions are intended to provide ‘foundations’ in terms of QL and suffer from difficulties in providing students with authentic motivation.

  17. Texting literacies as social practices among older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyers, Charlyn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many studies on mobile messaging have tended to focus on the communicative practices of the urban young, this paper considers the role of mobile messaging (also called texting both as a social practice as well as a form of literacy enhancement among a group of older working class women between the ages of 50 and 80 in a Cape Town township. The paper examines how these women, with little or no formal education, acquire this form of literacy, as well as the purposes for which they use texting. It also explores how this form of late-modern communication is adding to four of their existing or developing literacies – text, numeracy, visual and personal. The paper therefore adopts a multiliteracies approach within the context of portable literacies.

  18. Academic Librarians' Perceptions on Information Literacy: The Israeli Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Noa; Bronstein, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Information literacy (IL) is a necessary skill crucial for effective functioning in today's knowledge society. This study seeks to explore Israeli librarians' perspectives toward major components of information literacy. Do librarians find there is a need to redefine the concept? Who do they think should teach it? How do they think Web 2.0…

  19. Heritage-Language Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Three Japanese American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kumi; Lee, Jin Sook

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the heritage-language (HL) literacy practices of three Japanese American families residing in a predominantly Anglo and Latino community. Through interviews and observations, this study investigates Japanese children's HL-literacy practices, parental attitudes toward HL literacy, and challenges in HL-literacy development in…

  20. The Case of Three Karen Refugee Women and Their Children: Literacy Practices in a Family Literacy Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Sabrina; Sarroub, Loukia K.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of research about the Karen, one of 135 ethnic groups from Myanmar limits literacy educators charged with educating this refugee population in public schools. In this case study the authors explore the literacy practices of Karen families when at school and in their homes and within an ESL family literacy program. The case of these…

  1. Marketing the academic medical center group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, J A; Divis, K L

    1992-01-01

    From a marketing perspective, there are many differences between private and academic medical center (AMC) group practices. Given the growing competition between the two, write John Eudes and Kathy Divis, it is important for the AMC group practice to understand and use these differences to develop a competitive market advantage.

  2. Letramento acadêmico: uma perspectiva etramento portuguesa = Academic literacy: a Portuguese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Fischer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Os modos de constituição letrada de alunos universitários, no meio acadêmico, é foco deste trabalho, realizado em Portugal, no ano de 2006. Os dados que integram as análises advêm de entrevistas orais semiestruturadas realizadas com alunos do curso de Letras da Universidade do Minho. São selecionadas as falas de quatro alunas, a fim de se proceder a discussões específicas e coerentes ao objetivo proposto: analisar como alunos constituem-se sujeitos letrados no meio acadêmico. A teoria do letramento como prática social direciona as discussões e análises dos resultados advindos das falas vivas das alunas. Em acréscimo, abordagens relativas ao letramento acadêmico são decisivas para a compreensão das práticas letradas nesse contexto social. Na perspectiva das quatro alunas/sujeitos da pesquisa, experiências anteriores ao ingresso no curso de Letras e,principalmente, as diversas formas de interação no meio acadêmico interferem no uso, no domínio da linguagem e na formação como professoras. Das falas das alunas emerge uma tensão constante entre ser aluno e ser professor, o que indica uma constituição letrada emconflito, no que tange ao ensino de língua em Letras.Current analysis deals with modes of literate constituency of undergraduate students in an academic environment. Study hasbeen undertaken in Portugal in 2006. Data for analysis hailed from half-structured interviews with students in a Language and Literature graduation course at the University of Minho, Portugal. Samples of responses by four students were selected for specific discussions and with the proposed objective of this study, or rather, to analyze the way students constitute themselves as literate subjects in the academic environment. Literacy theory as social practice guided thediscussions and analyses of results from the interviews. Approaches related to academic literacy are crucial for the understanding of the literate practices in this social

  3. ‘I was not to forget that my reader comes from another world’: An Academic Literacies perspective on shuttling between the workplace and the academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibusiso Clifford Ndlangamandla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In response to pressure to participate in the ‘knowledge economy’, universities are offering a wide range of different masters programmes oriented to the professions. Universities are opening their doors without fully understanding what these programmes entail with little attention to the literacy challenges that students face together with supervisors and academic literacy teachers. This article contributes to our understanding of the mixed forms of academic discourse produced by postgraduates in professional masters programmes by focusing on students registered for the MTech in Policing at a large ODL (Open Distance Learning university at the point where they are writing research proposals. I trace how students use recontextualization strategies, such as mimicry and transformation, to signal how postgraduate students engage with research literacies, as they shuttle between the workplace and academic contexts. Implications for supervisors and literacy instructors about the nature of social practices in an ODL context acknowledge and embrace hybridity as an emerging feature of the research literacy practices, rather than as a problem to be erased, based on a proposed hybrid PWU model.

  4. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  5. Preschool Teachers' Language and Literacy Practices with Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Cycyk, Lauren M.; López, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Sandilos, Lia; Komaroff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the degree to which teachers used linguistically responsive practices to support the language and literacy development of Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLL) and (b) to investigate the associations between these practices and select teacher-level factors. The sample consisted of 72 preschool…

  6. Activist Literacies: An Analysis of the Literacy Practices of a School-Based Human Rights Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine the literacy practices of a high school-based human rights club. I investigate how the group engages in certain kinds of textual production to sponsor and arrange advisory sessions (school-wide meetings between teachers and small groups of students). More specifically, I consider how the club adapts school genres to…

  7. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included Within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Stacie M; Kirk, Erik P

    2016-03-01

    The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA intervention and a second site participating as the control site. The PA program was designed to promote 300 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous PA academic lessons. Academic achievement related to early literacy and phonological awareness in the areas of rhyming and alliteration were assessed at baseline, 4 and 8 months. Over 8 months, rhyming significantly (p literacy. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  8. Task Persistence Mediates the Effect of Children's Literacy Skills on Mothers' Academic Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikas, Eve; Silinskas, Gintautas

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at examining the relationship between children's task persistence, mothers' academic help, and the development of children's literacy skills (reading and spelling) at the beginning of primary school. The participants were 870 children, 682 mothers, and 53 class teachers. Data were collected three times--at the…

  9. Problem-based learning through field investigation: Boosting questioning skill, biological literacy, and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwono, Hadi; Wibowo, Agung

    2018-01-01

    Biology learning emphasizes problem-based learning as a learning strategy to develop students ability in identifying and solving problems in the surrounding environment. Problem identification skills are closely correlated with questioning skills. By holding this skill, students tend to deliver a procedural question instead of the descriptive one. Problem-based learning through field investigation is an instruction model which directly exposes the students to problems or phenomena that occur in the environment, and then the students design the field investigation activities to solve these problems. The purpose of this research was to describe the improvement of undergraduate biology students on questioning skills, biological literacy, and academic achievement through problem-based learning through field investigation (PBFI) compared with the lecture-based instruction (LBI). This research was a time series quasi-experimental design. The research was conducted on August - December 2015 and involved 26 undergraduate biology students at the State University of Malang on the Freshwater Ecology course. The data were collected during the learning with LBI and PBFI, in which questioning skills, biological literacy, and academic achievement were collected 3 times in each learning model. The data showed that the procedural correlative and causal types of questions are produced by the students to guide them in conducting investigations and problem-solving in PBFI. The biological literacy and academic achievement of the students at PBFI are significantly higher than those at LBI. The results show that PBFI increases the questioning skill, biological literacy, and the academic achievement of undergraduate biology students.

  10. Computer Literacy in Learning Academic English: Iranian EAP Students' and Instructors' Attitudes and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Borzabadi, Davood; Dashtestani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze perceptions of Iranian English for Academic Purposes (EAP) students on their computer literacy levels. A total of 641 undergraduate students of civil engineering and 34 EAP instructors participated in the study. Data collection instruments included questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Findings confirmed that…

  11. Predicting Academic Success and Technological Literacy in Secondary Education: A Learning Styles Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Szewczyk-Zakrzewska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the predictive validity of learning styles on academic achievement and technological literacy (TL). For this purpose, secondary school students were recruited (n = 150). An empirical research design was followed where the TL test was used with a learning style inventory measuring learning orientation, processing…

  12. The Future of Information Literacy in Academic Libraries: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Information literacy is a central tenet of academic librarianship. However, technological advancements coupled with drastic changes in users' information needs and expectations are having a great impact on this service, leading practitioners to wonder how programs may evolve. Based on a Delphi study, this article surveyed 13 information literacy…

  13. The Readability of Information Literacy Content on Academic Library Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Adriene

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study addressing the readability of content on academic libraries' Web sites, specifically content intended to improve users' information literacy skills. Results call for recognition of readability as an evaluative component of text in order to better meet the needs of diverse user populations. (Contains 8 tables.)

  14. Situated Literacy Practices Amongst Artisans in the South West of Nigeria: Developmental and Pedagogical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade-Ojo, Gordon O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an aspect of a larger study on literacy practices, needs and perceptions of artisans in a part of the South West region of Nigeria. Using an ethnographic approach to research, it identified a variety of literacy practices, events and mediums, thus confirming the notion of literacy as social practice. The study employed a…

  15. 1 Academic literacy and the decontextualised learner Chrissie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-17

    Dec 17, 2016 ... This article argues that the autonomous model of literacy, which sees ... Throughout 2015 and 2016, South African universities have been rocked ... move away from previous apartheid explanations of cognitive ..... engage with the theory, a wealth of which has been developed .... Stellenbosch: Sun Media.

  16. Inclusive education for Deaf students: Literacy practices and South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inclusive education for Deaf students: Literacy practices and South African Sign Language. ... Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies ... of inclusive education for Deaf students in a mainstream Further Education and Training (FET) classroom through the use of a South African Sign Language interpreter.

  17. Let's Play: Exploring Literacy Practices in an Emerging Videogame Paratext

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Catherine; Miller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the literacy practices associated with Let's Play videos (or LPs) on YouTube. A hybrid of digital gaming and video, LPs feature gameplay footage accompanied by simultaneous commentary recorded by the player. Players may set out to promote, review, critique or satirize a game. In recent years, LPs have become hugely popular…

  18. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the grass-roots…

  19. Preschool Teachers' Language and Literacy Practices with Dual Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Cycyk, Lauren M; López, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Sandilos, Lia; Komaroff, Eugene

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the degree to which teachers used linguistically responsive practices to support the language and literacy development of Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLL) and (b) to investigate the associations between these practices and select teacher-level factors. The sample consisted of 72 preschool teachers. Observational data were collected on practices. Teachers self-reported on language and culture beliefs, Spanish speaking ability, and classroom composition. Results indicated that teachers, including those who spoke Spanish, used few linguistically responsive practices to support preschool DLLs. Only Spanish-speaking ability was related to practices. Implications for targeted professional development are discussed.

  20. Exploring Practical Responses of M3LC for Learning Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah; Baharman

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to explore the responses of participants toward Mathematics-Language Literacy Learning Courseware (M3LC) for learning literacy. There are five practical aspects concerned by involving 30 participants in the focus group discussion. In the beginning, participants were given some response sheet and introduced to M3LC by watching learning video of M3LC. At the end, they were asked to concern about response sheet and give comments related what they saw during the introduction session. The results show that the responses of users’ agree and strongly agree are still higher than those of users’ disagree or strongly disagree, with below 30% of responses are in the fair category. It means that the participants tend to give a positive opinion that M3LC is a useful courseware since it is qualified to satisfy 5 practical aspects, including knowledge use, knowledge construction, evaluation practice, social programming, and valuing to support literacy learning. In future, the implementation of using this courseware can be enhanced to further recognition of literacy level so that students can be well-prepared before starting learning activities in the classroom.

  1. First grade classroom-level adversity: Associations with teaching practices, academic skills, and executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Granger, Kristen L; Bryce, Crystal I; Taylor, Michelle; Swanson, Jodi; Bradley, Robert H

    2018-05-24

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development and a model-building approach, the authors examined direct and indirect associations between first-grade (G1) classroom-level adversity (CLA), G1 teaching practices, and student (N = 1,073; M = 6.64 years; 49% girls; 82% White) academic skills and executive functioning in G1 and third grades (G3). Teachers reported the prevalence of adversity among their students (e.g., poor home/family life, poor academic/social readiness). Observers rated G1 teaching practices: teachers' classroom management, controlling instruction, and amount of academic instruction (classroom observation system). Children completed literacy and math assessments at 54 months, G1, and G3 (Woodcock Johnson Letter-Word Identification and Applied Problems), and executive functioning at G1 and G3 (Tower of Hanoi). Direct associations emerged between CLA and controlling instruction (positive), classroom management, and academic instruction (both negative). In addition, CLA was related to G1 literacy (but not math) directly and indirectly via classroom management (negatively) and controlling instruction (positively). The addition of G3 outcomes revealed a negative direct longitudinal association between CLA and G3 executive functioning, and indirect associations with G3 literacy and math through G1 teaching practices and literacy. Results support the notion that collective student characteristics influence student outcomes in part through teaching practices and suggest that teachers and students may benefit from the diffusion of high-adversity classroom compositions when possible. Moreover, in high-adversity classrooms teachers and students may benefit from supports targeting classroom management and foundational student competencies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. An exploration of workplace literacy as a catalyst to support employees in dealing with changing workplace literacy practices

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Hester

    2009-01-01

    The changing workplace requires employees to engage with new ways of working that rely increasingly on a variety of literacy skills. This study used action research to answer the research question whether a workplace literacy initiative could act as a catalyst to support employees to manage these new literacy practices in the workplace with confidence. A multi-national high-tech manufacturing plant in Ireland which is in a process of continuous change was selected as research site. A 45 ho...

  3. Aligning Literacy Practices in Secondary History Classes with Research on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a basic element of the discipline of history and of traditional secondary history instruction. However neither the growing body of research on learning with texts nor modern learning theories support the traditional literacy practices that are taking place in many secondary history classrooms. Nor are classroom literacy practices a…

  4. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  5. No Selling the Genie Lamp: A Game Literacy Practice in "The Sims"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Elisabeth R.; Gee, James Paul

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the New Literacy Studies, the authors argue that game literacy takes multiple forms and is embedded in different practices associated with particular games and gaming communities. They examine one specific game literacy practice that involves players of "The Sims" creating challenges for other players, and they identify how playing and…

  6. Making health information meaningful: Children's health literacy practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Fairbrother

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Children's health and wellbeing is high on the research and policy agenda of many nations. There is a wealth of epidemiological research linking childhood circumstances and health practices with adult health. However, echoing a broader picture within child health research where children have typically been viewed as objects rather than subjects of enquiry, we know very little of how, in their everyday lives, children make sense of health-relevant information.This paper reports key findings from a qualitative study exploring how children understand food in everyday life and their ideas about the relationship between food and health. 53 children aged 9-10, attending two socio-economically contrasting schools in Northern England, participated during 2010 and 2011. Data were generated in schools through interviews and debates in small friendship groups and in the home through individual interviews. Data were analysed thematically using cross-sectional, categorical indexing.Moving beyond a focus on what children know the paper mobilises the concept of health literacy (Nutbeam, 2000, explored very little in relation to children, to conceptualise how children actively construct meaning from health information through their own embodied experiences. It draws on insights from the Social Studies of Childhood (James and Prout, 2015, which emphasise children's active participation in their everyday lives as well as New Literacy Studies (Pahl and Rowsell, 2012, which focus on literacy as a social practice. Recognising children as active health literacy practitioners has important implications for policy and practice geared towards improving child health. Keywords: Children, Health literacy, Qualitative, UK

  7. Understanding Translanguaging Practices through a Biliteracy Continua Framework: Adult Biliterates Reading Academic Texts in Their Two Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Schallert, Diane L.

    2016-01-01

    Ten adult readers, advanced in their control of two languages, Korean and English, were recruited for a study of academic literacy practices to examine the various linguistic repertoires on which they drew. Analysis of their language use revealed many instances of "translanguaging," that is, a flexible reliance on two languages to serve…

  8. Hymns, Prayers and Bible Stories: The Role of Religious Literacy Practices in Children's Literacy Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papen, Uta

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the role of religious literacy practices such as hymns, prayers and Bible stories in the context of literacy teaching in primary schools in England. Drawing on data collected through a classroom ethnography of a year 1 class (five and six-year-olds) conducted in a Catholic primary school in 2013 and 2014, I suggest that…

  9. Endangered Literacies? Affordances of Paper-Based Literacy in Medical Practice and Its Persistence in the Transition to Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterponi, Laura; Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Alby, Francesca; Fatigante, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Under the rapid advances of digital technology, traditional paper-based forms of reading and writing are steadily giving way to digital-based literacies, in theory as well as in application. Drawing on a study of literacy in a medical workplace context, this article examines critically the shift toward computer-mediated textual practices. While a…

  10. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  11. Academic dishonesty today, unethical practices tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Rebekah D

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the most current published literature on the topics of academic dishonesty, unethical professional practices, and research that studied the correlation between these 2 areas of interest. Literature was retrieved by utilizing key words such as academic dishonesty, cheating, workplace dishonesty, and unethical behavior. Multiple research databases were used and a reference librarian in locating relevant research studies resulting in 16 research articles reviewed and 7 articles referenced within the literature review. Upon completion, it became apparent that nursing educators should be concerned that nursing students found to be academically dishonest today may have a higher incidence of displaying unethical practices as a registered nurse tomorrow. It also became clear that the nursing profession needs to conduct its own research in this field to verify findings discovered by other professions such as engineering, business, and psychology. Finally, recommendations were given on how nursing educators should handle the topic of ethics in nursing programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The design and use of 'alternate' assessments of academic literacy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Put simply, the challenge is to identify academically talented students from educationally diverse backgrounds, especially in cases where the educational backgrounds of these applicants may have militated against them, fully demonstrating their talent in conventional (e.g. school-leaving) examinations. This article ...

  13. Literacy in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, B.

    This paper reviews some of the issues in the new literacy studies and the questions, from an anthropological perspective, of self, person, and identity that affect literacy practices. It is suggested that in discussing literacy, it is better to start from a cultural viewpoint rather than an educational one. The traditional autonomous model of…

  14. Adolescent Literacy Practices and Positive Youth Development through Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Greathouse, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was not to disprove the effects of the current, common remedial literacy course design and the literacy practices within that help adolescent RLLs pass statewide assessment tests, but to describe the potential long-term impact of an innovative comprehensive approach to literacy (CAL) framed through an integrated course…

  15. Improving coding accuracy in an academic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dana; O'Mara, Heather; Powell, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Practice management has become an increasingly important component of graduate medical education. This applies to every practice environment; private, academic, and military. One of the most critical aspects of practice management is documentation and coding for physician services, as they directly affect the financial success of any practice. Our quality improvement project aimed to implement a new and innovative method for teaching billing and coding in a longitudinal fashion in a family medicine residency. We hypothesized that implementation of a new teaching strategy would increase coding accuracy rates among residents and faculty. Design: single group, pretest-posttest. military family medicine residency clinic. Study populations: 7 faculty physicians and 18 resident physicians participated as learners in the project. Educational intervention: monthly structured coding learning sessions in the academic curriculum that involved learner-presented cases, small group case review, and large group discussion. overall coding accuracy (compliance) percentage and coding accuracy per year group for the subjects that were able to participate longitudinally. Statistical tests used: average coding accuracy for population; paired t test to assess improvement between 2 intervention periods, both aggregate and by year group. Overall coding accuracy rates remained stable over the course of time regardless of the modality of the educational intervention. A paired t test was conducted to compare coding accuracy rates at baseline (mean (M)=26.4%, SD=10%) to accuracy rates after all educational interventions were complete (M=26.8%, SD=12%); t24=-0.127, P=.90. Didactic teaching and small group discussion sessions did not improve overall coding accuracy in a residency practice. Future interventions could focus on educating providers at the individual level.

  16. Academic literacy of South African higher education level students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Specifically, measuring vocabulary size, i.e. how many words a student knows ... The focus of this module is on basic research skills, critical thinking, finding and ..... (x) Make meaning (e.g. of an academic text) beyond the level of the sentence. ..... 25. 30. Total 275 28.05. 2.72 .16. 9. 30. 2000- word. 2. 38. 28.50. 1.62 .26. 24.

  17. Transnational Chinese Students' Literacy and Networking Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Situated in the context of a first-year writing course at a Midwestern public university in the United States, this study examines Chinese international students' networking practices through the mediation of WeChat, a popular social networking application for smartphones. Based on interviews with 36 students and detailed accounts of one focal…

  18. Literacy, learning and health - a social practices view of health literacu

    OpenAIRE

    Papen, Uta

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I use a social practices view of literacy to challenge dominant conceptions of health literacy. Health literacy is frequently defined as an abstract skill that can be measured through individual performance tests. The concept of health literacy as a skill neglects the contextual nature of reading and writing in health care settings. It risks ignoring the many ways in which patients access and comprehend health information, make sense of their experience and the resources they d...

  19. "Blogfolios" and Their Role in the Development of Research Projects in an Advanced Academic Literacy Class for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on "blogfolios", online interactive blog-based portfolios, developed by students for class projects in Electronic Literacy. Blogfolios may contain interactive images, podcasts, and web-log discussions on a variety of researched academic topics. The impact of academic blogfolios on the second language learner's…

  20. Divine Interventions: Needs Analysis for Post-Graduate Academic Literacy and Curriculum Development, in a South African School of Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a critical exploration of work in progress to develop a genre based academic support that promotes post-graduate academic literacies among new EIL and EAL Hons and Masters students in the School of Theology, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg. It traces the path of an action research project, using an eclectic needs analysis…

  1. Multilingual Language and Literacy Practices and Social Identities in Sunni Madrassahs in Mauritius: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owodally, Ambarin Mooznah Auleear

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the connections among multilingual language practices, multilingual literacy practices, and social identities in two Sunni madrassahs in Mauritius. The study is framed by sociolinguistic and poststructuralist perspectives on language and identity, and social practice views of literacy. Data collection and analysis involved…

  2. The Relationships among Early Childhood Educators' Beliefs, Knowledge Bases, and Practices Related to Early Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Chhanda

    A study was conducted to determine and compare the literacy beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices of early childhood educators who espouse emergent literacy and reading readiness philosophies; to explore the relationship among beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices; and to examine the degree to which beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices were…

  3. Adolescent Worlds and Literacy Practices on the United States-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article presents partial results of an ethnographic study about literacy practices among adolescents living near the United States-Mexico border. The students became involved in literacy practices with their friends and family at home. These practices were related to the adolescents' interests in popular culture such as reading magazines or…

  4. Students' experiences of embedded academic literacy support in a graduate entry nursing program: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Maneze, Della; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Trajkovski, Suza; Lynch, Joan; Salamonson, Yenna

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry nursing (GEN) programs were designed to address the predicted nursing shortfall. In Australia, although these programs attract students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, the workload is compounded by cultural differences and a new academic learning environment which presents additional challenges. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of GEN students enrolled in the introductory unit of their nursing program with embedded academic literacy support in Sydney, Australia. Twenty-four commencing GEN students were interviewed in January 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three main themes emerged which illustrated that GEN students were 'diamonds in the rough'. They possessed a raw natural beauty that required some shaping and polishing to ensure academic needs were met. To ensure retention is high, institutions need to evaluate how best to support and harness the potential of these unique students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  6. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nichols Hess

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ high-impact practices and e-learning best practices were integrated as scaffolds for course content. The authors' experience with this systematic process and the concepts of instructional design suggest that the ADDIE model can be used to achieve several different ends in information literacy instruction. First, it can provide a structure around which librarians can develop a variety of instructional interactions. Second, it can help librarians consider student engagement, learning, and assessment more intentionally. And third, it can help to marry information literacy-specific standards and other learning guidelines, such as high-impact practices and e-learning best practices. From the authors' experience, other academic librarians may find applications for instructional design constructs into their own teaching practices, both in online and face-to-face learning environments.

  7. Bilingual Intertextuality: The Joint Construction of Bi-Literacy Practices between Parent and Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Based on sociocultural theory, this article examines two activities constituted by a parent and child as jointly constructed bi-literacy practices. Bi-literacy practices enable the parent and child to co-construct conceptual meanings and sense across two languages. Concept development in young children "begins" with meaning in one language and…

  8. Literacy Practices in the Homes of African American Families and the Perceived Affects on the Language and Literacy Development of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Delilah A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the tenacities, practices, and discourse of family-based literacy practices and their connection in African American families. It scrutinized the influence of the practices of African American families on the multiple contexts of literacy practices in their passageway across the school-community periphery.…

  9. Digital Literacies Go to School: A Cross-Case Analysis of the Literacy Practices Used in a Classroom-Based Social Network Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Denise L.; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2016-01-01

    The authors, working from a "new literacies studies" perspective, suggest that educators can better teach their students if they develop their own knowledge of the purposes, types, and language conventions students use in their informal out-of-school literacy practices. The purpose of this study was to identify the literacy practices…

  10. Teacher change in beliefs and practices in science and literacy instruction with English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    2004-01-01

    This study examined patterns of change in beliefs and practices as elementary teachers learned to establish instructional congruence, a process of mediating academic disciplines with linguistic and cultural experiences of diverse student groups. The study focused on six bilingual Hispanic teachers working with fourth-grade, mostly Hispanic students. The results indicated that teacher learning and change occurred in different ways in the areas of science instruction, students' language and culture, English language and literacy instruction, and integration of these areas in establishing instructional congruence. The results also indicated that establishing instructional congruence was a gradual and demanding process requiring teacher reflection and insight, formal training, and extensive support and sharing. Implications for further research in promoting achievement for all students are discussed.

  11. The Morphing of Academic Practice: Unbundling and the Rise of the Para-Academic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Teaching, research and service are the three conventional elements of academic practice, recognised on an international basis. However, evidence suggests that academic practice is rapidly disaggregating, or "unbundling", as a result of a variety of forces including the massification of national systems, the application of technology in teaching…

  12. Adult Literacy: Monitoring and Evaluation for Practice and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of the UN Literacy Decade launched in 2003, there is increased emphasis on monitoring and evaluation of adult literacy around the globe. The present paper presents an overview of the main approaches that have been taken to measure adult literacy within and across countries. A particular focus of the present review is to compare and…

  13. The Challenges of OER to Academic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Tom; Holding, Richard; Howell, Anna; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which Open Educational Resources (OER) reflect the values of its institutional provider depends on questions of economics and the level of support amongst its academics. For project managers establishing OER repositories, the latter question--how to cultivate, nurture and maintain academic engagement--is critical. Whilst…

  14. The effects of academic literacy instruction on engagement and conceptual understanding of biology of ninth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Susan C.

    Academic language, discourse, vocabulary, motivation, and comprehension of complex texts and concepts are keys to learning subject-area content. The need for a disciplinary literacy approach in high school classrooms accelerates as students become increasing disengaged in school and as content complexity increases. In the present quasi-experimental mixed-method study, a ninth-grade biology unit was designed with an emphasis on promoting academic literacy skills, discourse, meaningful constructivist learning, interest development, and positive learning experiences in order to learn science content. Quantitative and qualitative analyses on a variety of measures completed by 222 students in two high schools revealed that those who received academic literacy instruction in science class performed at significantly higher levels of conceptual understanding of biology content, academic language and vocabulary use, reasoned thought, engagement, and quality of learning experience than control-group students receiving traditionally-organized instruction. Academic literacy was embedded into biology instruction to engage students in meaning-making discourses of science to promote learning. Academic literacy activities were organized according the phases of interest development to trigger and sustain interest and goal-oriented engagement throughout the unit. Specific methods included the Generative Vocabulary Matrix (GVM), scenario-based writing, and involvement in a variety of strategically-placed discourse activities to sustain or "boost" engagement for learning. Traditional instruction for the control group included teacher lecture, whole-group discussion, a conceptual organizer, and textbook reading. Theoretical foundations include flow theory, sociocultural learning theory, and interest theory. Qualitative data were obtained from field notes and participants' journals. Quantitative survey data were collected and analyzed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to

  15. Understanding game-based literacy practices in a school context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper; Brok, Lene Storgaard

    methodology, and the interventions will be carried out at 20 schools in Denmark and will consist of 4 specially designed game-based units in each of the subjects Danish (as L1), mathematics, and science in both 5th and 7th grade. Games include digital as well as analogue games, and we understand game...... in the 21st Century (GBL21), a five years large-scale intervention project launched in December 2017. The overall aim is to explore how and to what degree students develop 21st century skills through a game-based pedagogy in different school subjects. The GBL21 project is based on a mixed methods......-based learning as relating to the process of designing games, exploring game worlds, and reflecting on game activities in an educational context. The purpose of the qualitative strand is to explore how the game-based learning activities influence the literacy practices in the different classrooms. This includes...

  16. The representation of truth by the scientific discourse: views to a rupture of the academic literacy paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gerson Rodrigues Stefanello

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses, from a theoretical perspective, the question of writing in the academic sphere. The particularities of the ways to read and write in this sphere constitute a world of literacies characterized by a formality that distinguishes it, purposely, from other use situations of these abilities. The appropriation and maintenance of the scientific discourse, however, require students’ competences commonly not well developed during the years in basic education and which highlight the difficulties faced by both the student and the teacher in the transition to higher education. For the current discussion, I rely on literacy studies (STREET, 1984, 2003; KLEIMAN, 1995; HAMILTON, 2002 to deal, specifically, with academic literacy and the truth regime (FOUCAULT, 2004 through which the scientific discourse is legitimated in society.

  17. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction…

  18. Social Science Boot Camp: Development and Assessment of a Foundational Course on Academic Literacy in the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Judy; Long, Jennifer; Morris, David

    2018-01-01

    We developed a course, as part of our institution's core program, which provides students with a foundation in academic literacy in the social sciences: how to find, read, critically assess, and communicate about social science research. It is not a research methods course; rather, it is intended to introduce students to the social sciences and be…

  19. Accelerating Literacy for Diverse Learners: Classroom Strategies That Integrate Social/Emotional Engagement and Academic Achievement, K-8. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Socorro G.; Kavimandan, Shabina K.; Perez, Della R.; Wessels, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates that the culturally responsive teaching strategies outlined in this book accelerate literacy, language development, and academic growth for students in grades K-8, particularly for English language learners. Completely revised and updated, this bestselling resource speaks to the social-emotional needs of learners and helps…

  20. Conceptions of Scientific Knowledge Influence Learning of Academic Skills: Epistemic Beliefs and the Efficacy of Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Peter, Johannes; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2018-01-01

    The present article investigates the effects of epistemic beliefs (i.e. beliefs about the nature of knowledge and knowing) on the effectiveness of information literacy instruction (i.e. instruction on how to search for scholarly information in academic settings). We expected psychology students with less sophisticated beliefs (especially…

  1. Frame Works: Using Metaphor in Theory and Practice in Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education generated a large amount of discourse during its development and adoption. All of this discourse is rich in metaphoric language that can be used as a tool for critical reflection on teaching and learning, information literacy, and the nature and role of theory in the practice of…

  2. Young Children's Initiation into Family Literacy Practices in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie; Hannon, Peter; Lewis, Margaret; Ritchie, Louise

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study that explored young children's digital literacy in the home. The aim of the study was to identify the range of digital literacy practices in which children are engaged in the home and to explore how these are embedded into family life and involve family members. Four children, two girls and two boys aged between 2 and…

  3. Production-on-the-Go Practice: Storyboarding as a Retrospective and Redundant School Literacy Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lynde

    2013-01-01

    Storyboarding is one common strategy used in teaching young people digital media. This paper argues that in adolescents' literacy practices, they engage in production on the go. The metaphor is described in this paper to put forward the argument that storyboarding can be a retrospective and redundant literacy activity in adolescents' school…

  4. Remix as Professional Learning: Educators’ Iterative Literacy Practice in CLMOOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Connected Learning Massive Open Online Collaboration (CLMOOC is an online professional development experience designed as an openly networked, production-centered, participatory learning collaboration for educators. Addressing the paucity of research that investigates learning processes in MOOC experiences, this paper examines the situated literacy practices that emerged as educators in CLMOOC composed, collaborated, and distributed multimediated artifacts. Using a collaborative, interactive visual mapping tool as participant-researchers, we analyzed relationships between publically available artifacts and posts generated in one week through a transliteracies framework. Culled data included posts on Twitter (n = 678, a Google+ Community (n = 105, a Facebook Group (n = 19, a blog feed (n = 5, and a “make” repository (n = 21. Remix was found to be a primary form of interaction and mediator of learning. Participants not only iterated on each others’ artifacts, but on social processes and shared practices as well. Our analysis illuminated four distinct remix mobilities and relational tendencies—bursting, drifting, leveraging, and turning. Bursting and drifting characterize the paces and proximities of remixing while leveraging and turning are activities more obviously disruptive of social processes and power hierarchies. These mobilities and tendencies revealed remix as an emergent, iterative, collaborative, critical practice with transformative possibilities for openly networked web-mediated professional learning.

  5. Social Media Use in Academics: Undergraduate Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Mark; Thrasher, Evelyn H.; Revels, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to elicit student perceptions and practices regarding the use of social media in the academic setting. More specifically, the objectives of this study were to (1) assess student perceptions of technology use in an academic setting and to rank their preferences; (2) determine which resources and communication options…

  6. Understanding Academic Work as Practical Activity--and Preparing (Business-School) Academics for Praxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanen, Keijo

    2009-01-01

    This text suggests a way of framing academic work and outlines a design for a preparatory event based on this understanding. It conceives academic work as "practical activity" and potential "praxis" in emergence by focusing on four issues: how can I do this work (tactical stance), what can I accomplish and achieve in it…

  7. Academic English Socialization through Individual Networks of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa-Hollman, Sandra; Duff, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of individual network of practice (INoP) as a viable construct for analyzing academic (discourse) socialization in second language (L2) contexts. The authors provide an overview of social practice theories that have informed the development of INoP--community of practice (CoP; Lave & Wenger, 1991; Wenger,…

  8. Girls, identities and agency in adolescents' digital literacy practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Adampa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the ways girls use digital environments, like Word, PowerPoint and chatting programmes, for writing and communication purposes. By combining quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis and by adopting a critical discourse framework, we will explore the relationship between girls and new media, especially the ones related to digital writing, in terms of three interconnected variables. The first one is related to the role of the two most important socialisation institutions, home and school, at the present historical juncture, characterised by intense mobility and an expansion of traditional forms of literacy. The strategic choices of the girls' families and their schools' teaching practices contributed significantly to the formulation of their digital writing practices. The second variable is gender. Our data clearly show that a substantial number of girls were more inclined than their male peers to use word-processing and presentation software, performing, thus, the school discourses of 'diligent students'. The third key variable concerns the personality of the girls who filtered in their own unique ways their social experiences, overcame limitations, took initiatives and appropriated technologically-mediated writing media for personally meaningful ends that enhanced their school and/or entertainment Discourses.

  9. What is the Best Way to Develop Information Literacy and Academic Skills of First Year Health Science Students? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Munn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – This systematic review sought to identify evidence for best practice to support the development of information literacy and academic skills of first year undergraduate health science students. Methods – A range of electronic databases were searched and hand searches conducted. Initial results were screened using explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria to identify 53 relevant articles. Data on study design, student cohort, support strategy, and learning outcomes were extracted from each article. Quality of individual studies was considered and described narratively. Articles were classified and findings synthesized according to the mode of delivery of the intervention (Embedded, Integrated, or Adjunct and classification of the study’s learning evaluation outcome (Organizational change, Behaviour, Learning, or Reaction. Results – Studies included in this review provide information on academic skills and information literacy support strategies offered to over 12,000 first year health science students. Courses targeted were varied but most commonly involved nursing, followed by psychology. Embedded strategies were adopted in 21 studies with Integrated and Adjunct strategies covered in 14 and 16 studies respectively. Across all modes of delivery, intervention formats included face-to-face, peer mentoring, online, and print based approaches, either solely or in combination. Most studies provided some outcomes at a level higher than student reaction to the intervention. Overall, irrespective of mode of delivery, positive learning outcomes were generally reported. Typically, findings of individual studies were confounded by the absence of suitable control groups, students self-selecting support and analysis of outcomes not accounting for these issues. As a result, there is very little unbiased, evaluative evidence for the best approach to supporting students. Nonetheless, our findings did identify poor student uptake of

  10. Reconnecting Proficiency, Literacy, and Culture: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Mark K.; White, William L.

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to capably communicate across languages? This article introduces two theoretical models and a lesson plan format designed to facilitate the integration of proficiency, literacy, and culture teaching in foreign language teaching. The Second Symbolic Competencies Model configures proficiency and literacy as subordinate clusters of…

  11. Developing Psychological Literacy: Is There a Role for Reflective Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Debra; Homewood, Judi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological literacy is an umbrella term that is widely used to describe the attributes or capabilities of psychology graduate (Cranney & Dunn 2011). This article explores some of the complexities inherent in the learning and teaching of psychological literacy by exploring challenges to the development of self-awareness and cultural…

  12. Language, Literacy and Learning in Educational Practice. A Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierer, Barry, Ed.; Maybin, Janet, Ed.

    Articles presented include: "Introducing the New Literacy" (John Willinsky); "The Emergence of Literacy" (Nigel Hall); "Media Education: The Limits of a Discourse" (David Buckingham); "Extracts from 'Thought and Language' and 'Mind in Society'" (L. S. Vygotsky); "From Communicating to Talking" (Jerome Bruner); "What Does It Mean To Be Bilingual?"…

  13. The Messiness of Meaning Making: Examining the Affordances of the Digital Space as a Mentoring and Tutoring Space for the Acquisition of Academic Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Moeain; Hunma, Aditi; Hutchings, Catherine; Nomdo, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    Having incorporated a digital aspect to our academic literacy course, and having monitored this over the last three years, we have come to believe that online mentoring can serve as an essential form of tutoring and mentoring. Our study is located in the field of New Literacy Studies and examines the affordances of a digital space in a first year…

  14. A phenomenographic investigation into Information Literacy in nursing practice - preliminary findings and methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Information Literacy is essential to 'evidence-based practice'; without the ability to locate evidence, evidence-based practice is rendered extremely difficult if not impossible. There is currently little evidence to show how Information Literacy is experienced by nurses or what its parameters are within evidence-based practice and therefore whether Information Literacy educational interventions are actually promoting the correct knowledge and skills. Using phenomenographic interviews the author will attempt to discover how nurses experience Information Literacy. Insights from the findings will be used to map out its parameters and to put forward a theoretical model for a course or module to develop it effectively. This article presents preliminary findings, including 7 draft categories of description of how Information Literacy is experienced in nursing. This pilot study indicates that the complete findings may be of significant potential value in the promotion and development of Information Literacy education in nursing. It is argued that such insights into how nurses actually experience the phenomenon of Information Literacy can be used to develop potentially more effective, research-based, educational interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  16. Mexican parents' and teachers' literacy perspectives and practices: construction of cultural capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie; Arauz, Rebeca Mejía; Bazán, Antonio Ray

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among the literacy practices engaged in by first-grade children and parents at home and the ways in which these practices are communicated, shaped, and fostered by teachers and administrators in two different sociocultural environments in urban Mexico. The differences observed between the home literacy experiences of children in a working class and a middle class community included transgenerational communication of assumptions regarding literacy and schooling, as well as attitudes associated with the parents' own school experiences. Class-based expectations on the part of teachers not only shaped interactions with parents, but were also reflected in the way the national curriculum was delivered, with a greater emphasis on rote skills and traditional reading instruction in the working class community. The authors argue that the school plays a role in the co-production of cultural capital in the home through its shaping of some of the literacy practices that children and families undertake.

  17. Academic Program Approval and Review Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don G. Creamer

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines general and specific processes for both program approval and program review practices found in 50 states and eight foreign countries and regions.  Models that depict these procedures are defined and the strengths and weakness of each are discussed.  Alternatives to current practice by state agencies in the U.S. are described that might provide for greater decentralization of these practices while maintaining institutional accountability.

  18. Competitive marketing strategies. A challenge for academic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinioris, M E

    1985-01-01

    A special challenge has been presented to academic medical practices by the new healthcare environment. While increased competition for patients and resources affects all medical groups, it is the academic practices who are responsible for training the physicians of tomorrow. Not only must they sharpen their students' awareness of the new environment and teach them to incorporate effective management strategies into their practices, but they must set an example in effective management as well. The basic concepts of competitive marketing strategy, along with helpful exhibits, are presented here, and strategies for effectively maximizing position are discussed from the viewpoints of product mix, process market, and financing.

  19. Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper

    I løbet at de seneste 10 år har literacy-begrebet for alvor vundet indpas som et etableret begreb i den nordiske forsknings- og uddannelsesverden, ikke mindst inden for læse-/skriveområdet. Der er dog langt fra konsensus om den præcise betydning af begrebet, og af samme grund hersker der en udbredt...... forvirring om hvorledes det skal forstås. Man kan på den baggrund stille spørgsmålet om hvorvidt literacy overhovedet er et brugbart og produktivt begreb i en nordisk kontekst. Når man i PISA-undersøgelserne giver læseområdet den pleonastiske betegnelse reading literacy, kunne det give anledning til...... at tvivle på at det er tilfældet. Med afsæt i forskellige begrebs- og forskningsmæssige perspektiver diskuteres i oplægget literacy-begrebets berettigelse, og i forlængelse heraf præsenteres et bud på en trifokal optik som teoretisk blik på literacy i undervisningskontekster. Eksempler fra forskellige...

  20. Analytical implications of using practice theory in workplace information literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, Camilla Elisabeth; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers practice theory and the analytical implications of using this theoretical approach in information literacy research. More precisely the aim of the paper is to discuss the translation of practice theoretical assumptions into strategies that frame the analytical...... focus and interest when researching workplace information literacy. Two practice theoretical perspectives are selected, one by Theodore Schatzki and one by Etienne Wenger, and their general commonalities and differences are analysed and discussed. Analysis: The two practice theories and their main ideas...... of what constitute practices, how practices frame social life and the central concepts used to explain this, are presented. Then the application of the theories within workplace information literacy research is briefly explored. Results and Conclusion: The two theoretical perspectives share some...

  1. Family Digital Literacy Practices and Children's Mobile Phone Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M; Ramsay, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Smart phones are ubiquitous in everyday life and are having a major impact on work, education, social relationships and modes of communication. Children are the fastest growing population of smart phone users, with use often focusing around internet access, e.g., 1 in 3 internet users in the UK are under 18 years of age. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the factors that underpin children's use. The home is a significant ecological context of development and recent research has highlighted the importance of the home environment in promoting and supporting the development of both safe and unsafe online behavior. Yet the importance of these influences currently remains relatively unrecognized. Therefore, in this paper we present a narrative review of evidence examining parental practices concerning digital communication technologies and applications, with a particular focus on smartphones, and how they relate to the use of technology by their children. Emerging evidence to date indicates that two important factors are at play. Firstly, parental technology use is closely related to that of their child. Secondly, that despite parents frequently voiced concerns about the nature and extent of their child's mobile phone use, parents themselves often engage in a number of unsafe internet behaviors and excessive phone use in the home environment. Our review identifies two crucial lines of enquiry that have yet to be comprehensively pursued by researchers in the field: firstly, the adoption of a psychological perspective on children's emergent behaviors with mobile devices and secondly, the influential role of context. Given parental concerns about the possible negative impact of technologies, parental awareness should be raised about the influence of their behavior in the context of internet safety along with the adoption of good digital literacy practices. It is anticipated that a comprehensive characterization of the associated contextual

  2. Teaching for Scientific Literacy? An Examination of Instructional Practices in Secondary Schools in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer-Bradshaw, Ramona E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which the instructional practices of science teachers in Barbados are congruent with best practices for teaching for scientific literacy. Additionally, through observation of practice, it sought to determine the teachers' demonstrated role in the classroom, their demonstration of learning through discourse,…

  3. Plating up Information Literacy as a Social Practice: A Slice of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafeita, Jenny; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2012-01-01

    Few studies in the Library and Information Studies field investigate how vocational workers use information in their learning and workplace practice. This paper introduces doctoral research that explores how apprentice chefs develop information literacy practices that enable them to learn their trade and engage with the professional practices of…

  4. Information Literacy Instruction Assessment and Improvement through Evidence Based Practice: A Mixed Method Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Wakimoto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective — This study explored first-year students’ learning and satisfaction in a required information literacy course. The study asked how students understand connections between themselves and information literacy in terms of power, society, and personal relevance to assess if students’ understanding of information literacy increased after taking the course. Student satisfaction with the course also was measured.Methods — The study used pre- and post tests and focus group session transcripts which were coded and analyzed to determine student learning and satisfaction during the regular 2008-2009 academic year at California State University, East Bay.Results — Many students entered the course without any concept of information literacy; however, after taking the course they found information literacy to be personally relevant and were able to articulate connections among information, power, and society. The majority of students were satisfied with the course. The results from analyzing the pre- and post-tests were supported by the findings from the focus group sessions.Conclusion — The results of this study are supported by other studies that show the importance of personal relevancy to student learning. In order to fully assess information literacy instruction and student learning, librarians should consider incorporating ways of assessing student learning beyond testing content knowledge and levels of competency.

  5. Can Academic Standards Boost Literacy and Close the Achievement Gap? Policy Brief, Fall 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Ron; Murnane, Richard; Sawhill, Isabel; Snow, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Good jobs in the nation's twenty-first-century economy require advanced literacy skills such as categorizing, evaluating, and drawing conclusions from written texts. The adoption of the Common Core State Standards by nearly all the states, combined with tough literacy assessments that are now in the offing, will soon reveal that literacy skills of…

  6. Teachers’ discourses of literacy as social practice in advantaged and disadvantaged early childhood contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn D. Martin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two teachers’ discourses of literacy as social practice in advantaged and disadvantaged early childhood centres for three- to four-year-olds. The intention is to make sense of the dominant discourse of literacy, its constitutive nature and its effects on children, teaching and learning. Foucault’s theory of discourse is used to make salient the influence of interpretive frames of references on the understanding and practice of literacy. The data for the study was produced through a qualitative approach using in-depth semi-structured interviews. The findings show that teachers in both the advantaged and disadvantaged contexts are located in the dominant discourse of early literacy as a technical, autonomous skill. This discourse foregrounds children as adults-in-the-making (the becoming child and a maturationist-environmentalist view of readiness for early literacy development. This narrow view of literacy discounts young children’s positioning as social actors, issues of diversity and contextually situated practice.

  7. Academic Practice:Guidelines for Staff and Students - English

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system. Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt...

  8. Political Literacy as Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Cory Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This paper contends that political literacy and information literacy are compatible concepts that are inextricably linked and should therefore be taught and stressed simultaneously to students in the classroom. Improving the information literacy and political literacy skills of students will allow them to not only perform better academically, but also empower them to become better citizens who form opinions and make decisions based on appropriate and quality information.

  9. Position paper: Web tutorials and Information Literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2011-01-01

    Position paper on future research challenges regarding web tutorials with the aim of supporting and facilitating Information Literacy in an academic context. Presented and discussed at the workshop: Social media & Information Practices, track on Information literacy practices, University of Borås...

  10. Gender, academic achievement, and ownership of ATM as predictors of accounting students’ financial literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti; Hardini, H. T.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between GPA, gender, and ownership of ATM on accounting students’ financial literacy (n = 184). Financial literacy was assessed using a paper-and-pencil objective (multiple choice) test measuring general knowledge of finance, income, money management savings, loans, and investment. Gender and GPA data were obtained from the university records. Regression analysis found that GPA and ownership of ATM were associated with financial literacy, but gender was not. Female students with an ownership of ATM and those with a high GPA were found to be superior to males. The implication of this research is that students are expected to increase their GPA and utilize financial facilities in the form of ownership ATM and other financial instruments so as to increase financial literacy. In addition, the need for financial literacy training from related parties to improve financial literacy for students who have low financial literacy.

  11. The accessibility of the Test of Academic Literacy for Postgraduate Students (TALPS: Student perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambiritch, Avasha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the results of a questionnaire administered to students who wrote the Test of Academic Literacy for Postgraduate Students (TALPS between 2008 and 2010. The purpose of the questionnaire was to elicit information and reactions from test takers about the test. The paper begins by contextualising the problem of student success in higher education, outlining, as well, how a test such as TALPS can contribute positively to student success, before focusing specifically on the voices of the test takers in order to determine how accessible TALPS is to them. This contribution from the test takers is an important one, especially because responsible test developers cannot work in isolation, removed from those affected by the use of test scores. Applied linguists should strive to ensure that the tests they design and use are fair, socially acceptable, and have positive effects. This paper will illustrate that these concerns become important when one works within a framework that challenges test developers to consider questions related to every aspect of the test. In employing a framework that incorporates a concern for the empirical analyses of a test, as well as a concern for the social dimensions of language testing, one is compelled to give a voice to those often ignored, but most affected by the use of the test scores: the test takers. The data gathered will give test developers valuable insight into the feelings and opinions of test-takers.

  12. Are we teaching critical literacy? Reading practices in a township classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glynis Lloyd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in educational provision in South Africa since 1994, the opportunities for learners from historically under-resourced schools to gain access to powerful English resources remain limited and unequal (Prinsloo 2012. In this article I will provide a detailed description of literacy practices in a township high school in Cape Town, specifically of the orientations to text that are made available to learners. I will draw on feminist poststructuralist theory, in which the subject is theorised as constructed and contested in language to construct difference. The analysis of classroom discourse and text-based tasks shows that the orientations to reading that were offered were characterised by a focus on the surface meaning of the texts and by an absence of critical engagement, despite the latter being required in the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement. The analysis reveals how the power dynamics of our racialised past and dominant ideologies about gender, class and race continue to define teaching in our classrooms in ways that limit access to the English resources that learners in under-resourced schools need for academic success.

  13. Current status of information literacy instruction practices in medical libraries of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal

    2014-10-01

    The research explored the current practices of information literacy (IL) instruction in medical libraries of Pakistan. A semi-structured questionnaire was mailed to the head librarians of all 114 academic medical libraries in Pakistan. It investigated the types of IL instruction provided, topics covered, methods of delivery and assessment, level of integration in the curriculum, and level of collaboration with teaching staff. The study revealed that 74% of the respondents had offered some types of IL instruction in their institutions during the previous year, ranging from library orientation to research-level skills. IL instruction is typically only offered to new students or first-time library users or on demand. A majority of the respondents developed IL instruction programs without faculty involvement. Librarians were primarily responsible for offering IL instruction in medical institutions. Face-to-face instruction in computer labs or lecture halls and individual instruction at reference desks were identified as the most common IL instruction delivery methods. The data indicated that oral feedback, written feedback, and searching in a computer lab were the most popular assessment methods that medical librarians used. IL instruction activities in medical libraries of Pakistan are in their infancy. Medical librarians also lack systematic approaches to IL instruction. Medical librarians need to develop educational partnerships with faculty for integrating IL instruction into the mainstream curriculum.

  14. Exploring Literacy and Numeracy Teaching in Tanzanian Classrooms: Insights from Teachers' Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmasa, Mussa; Anney, Vicent Naano

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the literacy teaching practices in Tanzanian classrooms in the provision of Primary education. It comprehensively assessed why primary school leavers are graduating without skills of reading, writing and numeracy competencies. Three objectives guided this study, first, was to explore teachers classroom practices in the…

  15. Good Practice Guide: Bringing a Social Capital Approach into the Teaching of Adult Literacy and Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This good practice guide is based on research that looked at how to teach adult literacy and numeracy using a social capital approach. The guide suggests ways vocational education and training (VET) practitioners can adopt a social capital approach to their teaching practice. A social capital approach refers to the process in which networks are…

  16. Digital Storytelling Revisited: An Educator's Use of an Innovative Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby-Caffey, Crystal; Úbéda, Edwin; Jenkins, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Digital storytelling has emerged as an innovative practice that allows students deeper engagement with content while encouraging the use of critical thinking and technological skills needed to navigate the ever changing digital terrain of the 21st century. The integration of traditional and new literacy practices is evident throughout the process…

  17. "La Historia de Mi Nombre": A Culturally Sustaining Early Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kindel; Panther, Leah; Arce-Boardman, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    This article features a culturally sustaining practice that many early literacy teachers can adapt and use: "la historia de mi nombre"/the story of my name. The practice is described in the context of a second-grade bi/multilingual class as the Latinx students are learning about their names through culturally authentic literature,…

  18. Analytical Implications of Using Practice Theory in Workplace Information Literacy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Camilla; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers practice theory and the analytical implications of using this theoretical approach in information literacy research. More precisely the aim of the paper is to discuss the translation of practice theoretical assumptions into strategies that frame the analytical focus and interest when researching workplace…

  19. Making Use of Theories about Literacy and Justice: Teachers Re-Searching Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara

    This paper explores the way teachers make use of and work on theory to disrupt and ultimately improve everyday educational practice. The paper argues that teachers working on and with theory can and do generate new forms of educative practices in the field of literacy education, which are based on explicit standpoints towards social justice in…

  20. Teaching Climate Social Science and Its Practices: A Two-Pronged Approach to Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwom, R.; Isenhour, C.; McCright, A.; Robinson, J.; Jordan, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Essential Principles of Climate Science Literacy states that a climate-literate individual can: "understand the essential principles of Earth's climate system, assess scientifically credible information about climate change, communicate about climate and climate change in a meaningful way, and make informed and responsible decisions with regard to actions that may affect climate." We argue that further integration of the social science dimensions of climate change will advance the climate literacy goals of communication and responsible actions. The underlying rationale for this argues: 1) teaching the habits of mind and scientific practices that have synergies across the social and natural sciences can strengthen students ability to understand and assess science in general and that 2) understanding the empirical research on the social, political, and economic processes (including climate science itself) that are part of the climate system is an important step for enabling effective action and communication. For example, while climate literacy has often identified the public's faulty mental models of climate processes as a partial explanation of complacency, emerging research suggests that the public's mental models of the social world are equally or more important in leading to informed and responsible climate decisions. Building student's ability to think across the social and natural sciences by understanding "how we know what we know" through the sciences and a scientific understanding of the social world allows us to achieve climate literacy goals more systematically and completely. To enable this integration we first identify the robust social science insights for the climate science literacy principles that involve social systems. We then briefly identify significant social science contributions to climate science literacy that do not clearly fit within the seven climate literacy principles but arguably could advance climate literacy goals. We conclude

  1. Discovering Jewish Studies Collections in Academic Libraries: A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Izabella

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. colleges and universities offering non-sectarian educational programs in Jewish Studies rely on the support of their academic libraries for research materials and library services. For college libraries which use Library of Congress Classification scheme, it is a common practice to integrate "studies" resources into their…

  2. Blogging as Community of Practice: Lessons for Academic Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Cally; Carter, Susan; Aitchison, Claire

    2015-01-01

    As practices and expectations around doctoral writing continue to change, so too do the demands on academic developers and learning advisors. Social media is increasingly playing a role in doctoral education, just as it is in higher education more generally. This paper explores a blog initiated in 2012 to inform and support doctoral writing; since…

  3. Researching contexts, practices and pedagogies in English for academic purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Blaj-Ward, L

    2014-01-01

    This book is a point of reference for EAP professionals planning to conduct or commission research into learning, teaching, professional development or quality assurance in EAP. It draws on academic and professional debates to inspire further research and practical initiatives to enhance EAP provision.

  4. Leadership in academic libraries today connecting theory to practice

    CERN Document Server

    Eden, Bradford Lee

    2014-01-01

    This book connects leadership theories to academic libraries through case studies, analysis of survey results, and action research. By providing library examples of concepts such as transformational leadership, leadership frames, and other theories, the book breaks new ground in helping the profession develop a vision for its future leadership based on existing theory and current practice.

  5. "Academicus Interculturalis"? Negotiating Interculturality in Academic Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Structure and agency of cultural diversity in (international) higher education have to be addressed with a critical perspective on international mobility and practices of international academic teaching. In order to overcome naive assumptions about intercultural developments on the individual and the organizational level, sociological analysis…

  6. A Problem-Solving Model for Literacy Coaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Cathy A.

    2017-01-01

    Literacy coaches are more effective when they have a clear plan for their collaborations with teachers. This article provides details of such a plan, which involves identifying a problem, understanding the problem, deciding what to do differently, and trying something different. For each phase of the problem-solving model, there are key tasks for…

  7. The Written Literacy Forum: Combining Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher M.; Florio, Susan

    1983-01-01

    Writing teachers and researchers collaborate in the Written Literacy Forum at Michigan State University to: (1) heighten teachers' awareness of the complexity of writing; (2) stimulate discussion across grade levels; and (3) focus research on areas concerning teachers. Discussion formats and inservice activities are described, and materials…

  8. Learning through Play: Portraits, Photoshop, and Visual Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyford, Michelle A.; Boyd, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Play has a significant role in language and literacy learning. However, even when valued in schools, opportunities for play are limited beyond early childhood education. This study of an after-school program for adolescents looks closely at several forms of play that students engaged in to produce self-portraits. The study suggests that play and…

  9. The Literacy Practices of "Transfronterizos" in a Multilingual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Guerra, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    This introduction provides the background for this special issue by first describing the US-Mexico border, a fascinating context in which to research issues related to Spanish-English biliteracy and multilingualism. We present main points in the prevailing discussion within the field of literacy studies about issues of multilingualism and…

  10. The Role of Community Book Club in Changing Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Alanna Rochelle; McGee, Lea M.; Edwards, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Community Book Club began as an experimental approach intended to combine professional development for teachers and family literacy for the parents of the preschoolers involved in an Early Reading First project. We collected data on 11 book club meetings over a 2-year time period. Meetings were held at local churches and at each meeting,…

  11. Best Practices in Academic Mentoring: A Model for Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M. Nick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is important for the recruitment and retention of qualified nurse faculty, their ongoing career development, and leadership development. However, what are current best practices of mentoring? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of a model for excellence in establishing a formal mentoring program for academic nurse educators. Six themes for establishing a formal mentoring program are presented, highlighting best practices in mentoring as culled from experience and the literature. Themes reflect aims to achieve appropriately matched dyads, establish clear mentorship purpose and goals, solidify the dyad relationship, advocate for and guide the protégé, integrate the protégé into the academic culture, and mobilize institutional resources for mentoring support. Attending to the six themes will help mentors achieve important protégé outcomes, such as orientation to the educator role, integration into the academic community, development of teaching, scholarship, and service skills, as well as leadership development. The model is intended to be generalizable for faculty teaching in a variety of academic nursing institution types and sizes. Mentoring that integrates the six themes assists faculty members to better navigate the academic environment and more easily transition to new roles and responsibilities.

  12. Multimodal Literacy Practices in the Indigenous Sámi Classroom: Children Navigating in a Complex Multilingual Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietikäinen, Sari; Pitkänen-Huhta, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article explores multimodal literacy practices in a transforming multilingual context of an indigenous and endangered Sámi language classroom. Looking at literacy practices as embedded in a complex and shifting terrain of language ideologies, language norms, and individual experiences and attitudes, we examined how multilingual Sámi children…

  13. Maternity leave policies in academic and private radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirt, B.A.; Rauth, V.; Price, A.P.F.; Pagani, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987, the American Association of Women Radiologists surveyed both academic and private radiology departments regarding pregnancy and maternity leave policies. One hundred academic institutions (70% response), 30 radiotherapy departments (38% response), and 31 private practices responded. Details were obtained regarding maternity leave policy for residents and attending physicians; availability of paternity leave; policies regarding on-call time, fluoroscopy time and intracavitary/interstitial applications during pregnancy; and problems that occurred during resident or attending physician pregnancies. There was a wide range of responses regarding paid leave time, availability of additional time, and the use of vacation time during maternity leave

  14. Writing an academic essay: a practical guide for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Y

    Writing academic essays can be a major hurdle and source of anxiety for many students. Fears and misconceptions relating to this kind of writing can be dispelled if the task is approached in a logical and systematic manner. This article outlines the key steps involved in successfully completing an essay and provides some practical tips to facilitate critical and analytical writing. These steps are: analysing the task; exploring the subject; planning the essay; writing the account; and revising the drafts. Although this process is challenging, academic writing is a means of developing both personally and professionally.

  15. Perspectives on academic misconduct: implications for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klainberg, Marilyn B; McCrink, Andrea; Eckardt, Patricia; Schecter, Rose; Bongiorno, Anne; Sedhom, Laila

    2014-01-01

    From Harvard to high school, concern related to academic misconduct, specifically cheating and its impact on societal issues, has become a great concern for educational communities. While a significant number of studies on ethical behaviors in practice in other professions such as business have been published, little research exists on registered nurses in practice. Even fewer studies have, for registered nurses, addressed if there is an association between perceived academic misconduct as students and perceived unethical behaviors in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of registered professional nurses' (RNs) current workplace behaviors and the RNs' retrospective perceptions of their academic misconduct as students. A convenience sample of 1 66 RNs enrolled in master's degree programs at four university schools of nursing completed questionnaires regarding their beliefs and behaviors. The outcome of this study was significant. Results revealed a strong relationship between unethical behaviors of the RN in practice and their prior academic misconduct when they were students.

  16. Thinking strategically: academic-practice relationships: one health system's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmser, Teri; Bliss-Holtz, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Strategic planning and joint leverage of the strengths inherent in the academic and practice arenas of nursing are imperative to confront the challenges facing the profession of nursing and its place within the healthcare team of the future. This article presents a description and discussion of the implementation of several academic-practice partnership initiatives by Meridian Health, a health system located in central New Jersey. Included in the strategies discussed are creation of a support program for nonprofessional employees to become registered nurses; active partnership in the development of an accelerated BSN program; construction of support systems and academic partnerships for staff participation in RN-to-BSN programs; construction of on-site clinical simulation laboratories to foster interprofessional learning; and the implementation of a new BSN program, the first and only generic BSN program in two counties of the state. Outcomes of these academic-practice partnerships also are presented, including number of participants; graduation and NCLEX-RN pass rates; MH nurse vacancy rates; and nurse retention rates after first employment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Professor in Residence: An Innovative Academic-Practice Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinic, Katherine; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Silverstein, Wendy

    2017-12-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership between an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet ® -designated hospital and an academic nurse educator that has increased the hospital's capacity for research, evidence-based practice, and support for nurses continuing their education. Through close collaboration with the full-time nurse researcher and members of the nursing education department, the professor in residence consults with clinical staff to support completion of research and evidence-based practice projects. The collaboration also has resulted in the development of a formal year-long mentoring program for clinical nurses in the area of evidence-based practice. Individual support and academic consults are offered to nurses enrolled in school to promote advancement of nurses' educational level. This collaboration has been beneficial for both the hospital and the university, increasing the capacity for scholarly activities for nurses in the hospital and serving as a forum for ongoing faculty practice and scholarship. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):552-556. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Laying a Firm Foundation: Embedding Evidence-Based Emergent Literacy Practices Into Early Intervention and Preschool Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Pamela; Watson, Maggie

    2018-04-05

    As part of this clinical forum on curriculum-based intervention, the goal of this tutorial is to share research about the importance of language and literacy foundations in natural environments during emergent literacy skill development, from infancy through preschool. Following an overview of intervention models in schools by Powell (2018), best practices at home, in child care, and in preschool settings are discussed. Speech-language pathologists in these settings will be provided a toolbox of best emergent literacy practices. A review of published literature in speech-language pathology, early intervention, early childhood education, and literacy was completed. Subsequently, an overview of the impact of early home and preschool literacy experiences are described. Research-based implementation of best practice is supported with examples of shared book reading and child-led literacy embedded in play within the coaching model of early intervention. Finally, various aspects of emergent literacy skill development in the preschool years are discussed. These include phonemic awareness, print/alphabet awareness, oral language skills, and embedded/explicit literacy. Research indicates that rich home literacy environments and exposure to rich oral language provide an important foundation for the more structured literacy environments of school. Furthermore, there is a wealth of evidence to support a variety of direct and indirect intervention practices in the home, child care, and preschool contexts to support and enhance all aspects of oral and written literacy. Application of this "toolbox" of strategies should enable speech-language pathologists to address the prevention and intervention of literacy deficits within multiple environments during book and play activities. Additionally, clinicians will have techniques to share with parents, child care providers, and preschool teachers for evidence-based literacy instruction within all settings during typical daily

  19. Libraries and Librarians: Key Partners for Progress in Health Literacy Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Wanda; Keselman, Alla; Humphreys, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    The field of librarianship has a history of involvement in patient education, general literacy and information literacy efforts. This history and prominent placement in communities make libraries and librarians an excellent resource in advancing health literacy practice and research. This chapter provides an overview of health literacy and health information literacy efforts in US libraries over the past two decades. The chapter begins with the description of the role of the US National Library of Medicine in developing resources, programs, and partnerships serving health information needs of the public. It then overviews special training programs for increasing librarians' expertise with health information and health literacy support. The narrative also presents different models of health information outreach programs in diverse communities, focusing on serving special populations that may suffer from health disparities. The second half of the chapter describes libraries' and librarians' health information response to continuously evolving contexts, mediums, and requirements. One subsection describes librarians' outreach effort with cutting-edge technologies, such as virtual worlds and gaming. Another focuses on supporting patients' information needs in clinical settings. Two more describe how libraries meet patrons' health information needs in the context of disaster preparedness and health insurance market place sign-up. While presenting the information, to the extent possible, the chapter draws upon research and evaluation of the effectiveness of different types of programs. It also discusses enablers of successes, limitations of the existing data, and directions for future research.

  20. Global Health Systems and Policy Development: Implications for Health Literacy Research, Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Gillian; Dodson, Sarity; Leung, Angela; Levin-Zamir, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Accessible and responsive health systems are critical to population health and human development. While progress has been made toward global health and development targets, significant inequities remain within and between countries. Expanding health inequities suggest a widespread and systemic neglect of vulnerable citizens, and a failure to enshrine within policies a responsibility to tailor care to the variable capabilities of citizens. Implementation of health and social policies that drive the design of accessible health systems, services, products and infrastructure represents the next frontier for health reform. Within this chapter we argue the need to consider health and health literacy across policy domains, to operationalize the intent to address inequities in health in meaningful and pragmatic ways, and to actively monitor progress and impact within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We contend that viewing and developing policies and systems within a health literacy framework will assist in placing citizens and equity considerations at the center of development efforts. In this chapter, we explore the relationship between health literacy and equitable access to health care, and the role of health system and policy reform. We first explore international policies, health literacy, and the SDGs. We then explore national policies and the role that national and local services and systems play in building health literacy, and responding to the health literacy challenges of citizens. We discuss the World Health Organization's (WHO) Framework for Integrated People-Centered Health Services and the way in which health services are being encouraged to understand and respond to citizen health literacy needs. Each section of the chapter ends with a summary and a review of health literacy research and practice. Throughout, we illustrate our points through 'vignettes' from around the world.

  1. Academic Librarians in Data Information Literacy Instruction: A Case Study in Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Emily P.; Pharo, Nils

    2016-01-01

    E-science has reshaped meteorology due to the rate data is generated, collected, analyzed, and stored and brought data skills to a new prominence. Data information literacy--the skills needed to understand, use, manage, share, work with, and produce data--reflects the confluence of data skills with information literacy competencies. This research…

  2. An Academic-Practice Partnership Model to Grow and Sustain Advanced Practice Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracy E; Howard, Patricia B

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this article were to describe the implementation of an academic-practice partnership for healthcare system workforce development and provide preliminary outcomes of the associated pilot study. The demand for cross-continuum healthcare delivery models necessitates creation of workforce development structures for advanced practice nursing. An academic-practice partnership specified enrollment of 5 cohorts of BSN staff nurses in a 3-year DNP program. Qualitative methods were used to explore pilot data at midpoint of cohort 1 student progression to determine learning outcomes and DNP projects with potential for impact on organization goals. Partnership implementation experiences indicate that contractual agreements and an established evaluation plan are keys to academic-practice partnership success. Pilot study findings suggest that curriculum core courses provide a foundation for designing DNP projects congruent with acute and primary care health system goals. Implementing an academic-practice partnership is a strategy for workforce development to increase retention of advanced practice nurses. Academic-practice partnerships can serve as a catalyst for a paradigm shift for changing models of care, thus enhancing workforce development succession planning for sustainable growth in healthcare systems.

  3. Academic Practice. Guidelines for Staff and Students - English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive...... kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system....

  4. Honoring and Building on the Rich Literacy Practices of Young Bilingual and Multilingual Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author invites teachers of children who are bilingual, multilingual, and at promise for bi-/multilingualism to honor and build on their rich literacy practices. To do so, she challenges ideas and labels that continuously disempower bilingual and multilingual learners. Souto-Manning establishes the understanding that education…

  5. Expanding Opportunities to Learn to Support Inclusive Education through Drama-Enhanced Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Sultan; Farrand, Kathleen; Chapman, Kathryn; Kelley, Michael; Millinger, Jenny; Adams, Korbi

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how the Early Years Educators at Play (EYEPlay) professional development (PD) programme supported inclusive learning settings for all children, including English language learners and students with disabilities. The EYEPlay PD model is a year-long programme that integrates drama strategies into literacy practices within…

  6. Exploring the Classroom Practices That May Enable a Compassionate Approach to Financial Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-01-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The…

  7. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  8. Inquiring into Pre-Service Content Area Teachers' Development of Literacy Practices and Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton Kukner, Jennifer; Murray Orr, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative multi-year case study is on preservice teachers' experiences related to the development of their literacy practices in teaching high school science, math, social studies and other content area courses during their final field placement in a teacher education program. Results indicate tangible indicators of overall…

  9. Documenting Instructional Practices in a Literacy-infused Arts Program: Respecting Pedagogues from the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Smith, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the instructional practices around literacy that characterized the work of a community based arts program designed for urban adolescents. Two primary sources of data were collected: field notes on approximately 35 hours of instruction spread across seven months and interviews with the program's staff and students. Four…

  10. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  11. Religious and Self-Generated Quechua Literacy Practices in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Quechua speakers' religious literacy practices in the native language in a rural community located in the department of Cuzco (Peru). I argue that in a situation where the school did not play the role of developing or maintaining the written vernacular, a group of community members found specific situations where they felt…

  12. Modern Scientific Literacy: A Case Study of Multiliteracies and Scientific Practices in a Fifth Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Elizabeth; Goldston, M. Jenice

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the convergence of multiliteracies and scientific practices in a fifth grade classroom. As students' lives become increasingly multimodal, diverse, and globalized, the traditional notions of literacy must be revisited (New London Group 1996). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States 2013a) in many states, either in their entirety or in adapted forms, it becomes useful to explore the interconnectedness multiliteracies and scientific practices and the resulting implications for scientific literacy. The case study included a fifth grade classroom, including the students and teacher. In order to create a rich description of the cases involved, data were collected and triangulated through teacher interviews, student interviews and focus groups, and classroom observations. Findings reveal that as science activities were enriched with multiliteracies and scientific practices, students were engaged in developing skills and knowledge central to being scientifically literate. Furthermore, this study establishes that characteristics of scientific literacy, by its intent and purpose, are a form of multiliteracies in elementary classrooms. Therefore, the teaching and learning of science and its practices for scientific literacy are in turn reinforcing the development of broader multiliteracies.

  13. Thinking in Hashtags: Exploring Teenagers' New Literacies Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    This research investigates how three high school students in the USA developed new literacies practices through their participation in teenage Twitter. Data was collected from two sources, including archival data from participants' Twitter over a two-year span, and semi-structured interviews. Results found that teenagers developed a number of…

  14. Family Child Care Learning Environments: Caregiver Knowledge and Practices Related to Early Literacy and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Beth M.; Morse, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a stratified-random survey of family child care providers' backgrounds, caregiving environments, practices, attitudes, and knowledge related to language, literacy, and mathematics development for preschool children. Descriptive results are consistent with prior studies suggesting that home-based providers are…

  15. Cultivating the Spatial Politics of Community-Based Literacy Practices in Hip-Hop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Darius D.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the social imagination of community-based sites of urban resistance enable out-of-school literacy practices in Black popular culture to foreground the contemporary context in which youth empowerment is nurtured in out-of-school learning settings. Second, the author chronicles how youth advocates in hip-hop--based community…

  16. Literacy as Self-Expression: Interpreting the Subject Areas through the Arts. Research into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen D.; Finke, Janet; Douville, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines self-expression in art, drama, and gesture, offering practical strategies that can be used across subject areas to enhance students' literacy performance. Discusses the way creative projects can motivate student language use and participation in history and science projects. (JPB)

  17. Academic-Practice Partnerships: The Interdependence Between Leadership and Followership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Linda Q

    2016-04-01

    In this article, there is a discussion focused on three contemporary nursing topics: leadership, followership, and academic-practice partnerships. These comments are framed within the context of the current healthcare system transformation. There is a focus on why each of these topics is relevant to the nursing profession in leading change and advancing health. Finally, there is a description about the interdependence of leadership and followership and the significance these hold for the interdependence between nursing education and nursing practice. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Co-Constructed Identities and Literacy Practices: How Identities of One Teacher and Her First Grade Students Are Enacted and Co-Constructed through Literacy Practices and a Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlal, Sasha R.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation explored how identities of students and a teacher in a first grade classroom were co-constructed through various literacy practices and within a third space. Drawing on research that documented the strong connection between literacy and identity and its socio-cultural connections, this qualitative study incorporates ethnographic…

  19. Reading-Writing Relationships in First and Second Language Academic Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, William; Zhang, Cui

    2016-01-01

    Reading and writing relations, as this concept applies to academic learning contexts, whether as a major way to learn language or academic content, is a pervasive issue in English for academic purposes (EAP) contexts. In many cases, this major link between reading/writing and academic learning is true even though explicit discussions of this…

  20. Effective Literacy Instruction for Students with Moderate or Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Susan R.; Keefe, Elizabeth B.

    2007-01-01

    For students with moderate or severe disabilities, developing literacy skills is a critical component of successful communication, employment, and community participation. Finally, educators have a practical, concise guidebook for helping these students meet NCLB's academic standards for literacy. Appropriate for use in all settings, including…

  1. Autoria e deontologia: mediação de princípios éticos e práticas de letramento na escrita acadêmica em um fórum virtual Authorship and deontology: mediation of ethical principles and literacy practices in academic writing using a virtual forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Araújo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a utilização de um fórum virtual como alternativa de interação entre professores, estudantes e bolsistas nas disciplinas Leitura e Produção de Textos Acadêmicos (LPTA e Metodologia Científica, dos cursos de Letras e Pedagogia, respectivamente, da Universidade Federal do Ceará - UFC. A questão investigada é: Como a interação no fórum virtual pode alavancar a aprendizagem da escrita de textos acadêmicos e promover a construção de uma consciência deontológica inerente a essa atividade? Os resultados mostraram que, no ambiente virtual, os alunos discutiram suas dificuldades relativas à escrita acadêmica e se descobriram autores de artigos científicos e projetos de pesquisa, evitando a apropriação indevida de ideias alheias e estabelecendo relações cooperativas e respeitosas para com as dificuldades de escrita do outro. Assim, o fórum se mostrou bastante útil à exploração dos conteúdos de ambas as disciplinas, enriquecendo a interação respeitosa, os letramentos e a autoconfiança dos alunos.This article analyzes the use of a virtual forum as an option for the interaction between professors, students and fellows in two undergraduate programs at the Federal University of Ceará - Brazil: a Literature and Languages and b Pedagogy, respectively. The question investigated is: How can the interaction on the virtual forum improve the learning of academic text production and promote the construction of a deontological conscience inherent to this activity? The results showed that, in the virtual environment, the students discussed their difficulties related to academic writing and discovered themselves as authors of scientific articles and research projects, avoiding the undue appropriation of ideas of other people, and establishing cooperative and respectful relationships concerning the difficulties of writing of the other students. Thus, the forum has represented an additional possibility in the

  2. Autoria e deontologia: mediação de princípios éticos e práticas de letramento na escrita acadêmica em um fórum virtual Authorship and deontology: mediation of ethical principles and literacy practices in academic writing using a virtual forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a utilização de um fórum virtual como alternativa de interação entre professores, estudantes e bolsistas nas disciplinas Leitura e Produção de Textos Acadêmicos (LPTA e Metodologia Científica, dos cursos de Letras e Pedagogia, respectivamente, da Universidade Federal do Ceará - UFC. A questão investigada é: Como a interação no fórum virtual pode alavancar a aprendizagem da escrita de textos acadêmicos e promover a construção de uma consciência deontológica inerente a essa atividade? Os resultados mostraram que, no ambiente virtual, os alunos discutiram suas dificuldades relativas à escrita acadêmica e se descobriram autores de artigos científicos e projetos de pesquisa, evitando a apropriação indevida de ideias alheias e estabelecendo relações cooperativas e respeitosas para com as dificuldades de escrita do outro. Assim, o fórum se mostrou bastante útil à exploração dos conteúdos de ambas as disciplinas, enriquecendo a interação respeitosa, os letramentos e a autoconfiança dos alunos.This article analyzes the use of a virtual forum as an option for the interaction between professors, students and fellows in two undergraduate programs at the Federal University of Ceará - Brazil: a Literature and Languages and b Pedagogy, respectively. The question investigated is: How can the interaction on the virtual forum improve the learning of academic text production and promote the construction of a deontological conscience inherent to this activity? The results showed that, in the virtual environment, the students discussed their difficulties related to academic writing and discovered themselves as authors of scientific articles and research projects, avoiding the undue appropriation of ideas of other people, and establishing cooperative and respectful relationships concerning the difficulties of writing of the other students. Thus, the forum has represented an additional possibility in the

  3. Bilingual proposal in deaf education: educational practices in literacy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina Florêncio Fernandes Moret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching and use of the LIBRAS, in the deaf people education are indispensable for their development, building of their identity, autonomy, beside the communication with the world. The acquisition of the Portuguese Language is part of the regular school curriculum, and its command provides a relationship between language and society, which is mostly formed by hearing and users of this language. There is a concern related to the deaf people education, especially in literacy phase, which consequently extends through all the regular schooling, where the most part of the deaf students are finishing the high school without knowing how to read and/or produce in Portuguese Language. This problem affects the social development of these subjects, since the Portuguese Language is still required as if it were the deaf mother tongue, not respecting his/her culture, that has LIBRAS as their first language. The object of this research it to verify the methods and techniques in the deaf people literacy process and seek for other models, based on bilingual theory, ensuring the acquisition of LIBRAS, as a natural language and the teaching of Portuguese Language in a second language methodology, so that, in fact, the acquisition of reading and writing skills to materialize.

  4. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-06-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  5. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2017-08-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  6. The Practical Integration of Action Research into Building Climate Literacy and Partnership with Key Influentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate Education Partners (CEP) has been using an action research approach to build climate literacy and partnership with key influential (KI) leaders in the San Diego community. After identifying 6 key sectors that either (a) could reduce green house gas emissions and adapt to impacts, or (b) would be highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, we conducted 89 interviews with KIs from the San Diego region -- including elected officials, academics, laborers, and representatives from local businesses, non-profits, ethnic and cultural communities, faith-based groups, and special interest groups -- to assess their science knowledge and opinions about climate change and the impacts of climate change. Other questions asked were about KIs' personal efficacy, identity, values and engagement in pro-environmental behaviors related to climate change. The results of the interviews contributed to CEP's action research approach in two ways: 1) it provided critical data regarding which leaders wanted further engagement with CEP and what that engagement should entail (e.g., being a connector to other leaders, a spokesperson, or a participant in future educational activities), and 2) it provided key information about the extent to which "knowledge deficit" is related to use of climate change knowledge to inform engagement in mitigation and adaptive behaviors. Practically, the results were used to create a database that is being used to inform the contact and education of KIs. We were able to show, consistent with previous research and identity theory, that liberal leaders were more likely than conservatives to believe in, feel concern for, and be knowledgeable about climate change. However, engagement in mitigation behaviors- specifically making decisions that would reduce electricity, gas, or water use- were similar for both groups. These results are being used to create resources and direct climate education activities going forward.

  7. An Academic-Practice Partnership to Advance DNP Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Patricia B; Williams, Tracy E

    During the past decade, the growth of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in the United States has been phenomenal, with most focusing on the preparation of advanced practice registered nurses. Simultaneously, academic-practice partnerships have been a frequent subject of discussion for nursing's leading academic, administrative, and practice organizations. Numerous reports about academic-practice partnerships concerning aspects of baccalaureate nursing education exist, but partnership accounts for DNP programs are essentially nonexistent. The purpose of this article is to describe the initial phase of an academic-practice partnership between a multisystem health care organization and a college of nursing in a public land-grant university in the southeastern United States. The 7-year partnership agreement between Norton Healthcare and the University of Kentucky College of Nursing was designed to prepare 5 cohorts of 20 to 30 baccalaureate-prepared staff nurses as DNP graduates for advanced practice registered nurse eligibility. The description of partnering institution characteristics frames an emphasis on elements of the partnership proposal, contractual agreement, and partner responsibilities along with the logic model evaluation plan. Lessons learned include the importance of proposals and contracts to sustain the partnership, frequent communication to build trust, and strategic analysis for rapid response to challenging situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Literacies Crossing Borders: Transfronterizo Literacy Practices of Students in a Dual Language Program on the USA-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Araujo, Blanca E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on transnational literacies has generally focused on youth who live in one country and communicate using digital literacies across national boundaries. Our work contributes to this literature by providing a view of transnational literacies that are unique to the USA-Mexico border region. The students in this ethnographic study navigate…

  9. Altmetrics a practical guide for librarians, researchers and academics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an overview of altmetrics, their tools and how to implement them successfully to boost your research output. New methods of scholarly communication and dissemination of information are having a huge impact on how academics and researchers build profiles and share research. This groundbreaking and highly practical guide looks at the role that library and information professionals can play in facilitating these new ways of working and demonstrating impact and influence. The book explains the theory behind the growing altmetrics – alternative metrics for measuring scholarly impact, from social networks such as Twitter and blogs to online platforms such as Mendeley, ResearchGate and Altmetrics.org – movement, how it came about, why it can help improve academics and their research profiles and where it sits amongst current measurements of impact. Drawing on the expertise of leading altmetric innovators and the LIS professionals using their tools, the book explains the connections between r...

  10. Best Practices in Academic Management. Study Programs Classification Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Ema Aleca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes and tests a set of performance indicators for the assessment of Bachelor and Master studies, from two perspectives: the study programs and the disciplines. The academic performance at the level of a study program shall be calculated based on success and efficiency rates, and at discipline level, on the basis of rates of efficiency, success and absenteeism. This research proposes a model of classification of the study programs within a Bachelor and Master cycle based on the education performance and efficiency. What recommends this model as a best practice model in academic management is the possibility of grouping a study program or a discipline in a particular category of efficiency

  11. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    OpenAIRE

    William Badke

    2011-01-01

    Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that infor...

  12. Radiation protection code of practice in academic and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A. A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a code of practice on radiation protection for safe control of radiation sources used in academic and research institutes, another aim of this study was to assess the current situation of radiation protection in some of the academic and research institutes.To achieve the aims of this study, a draft of a code of practice has been developed which is based on international and local relevant recommendation. The developed code includes the following main issues: regulatory responsibilities, radiation protection program and design of radiation installations. The second aim had been accomplished by conducting inspection visits to five (A, B, C, D and E) academic and to four (F, G, H and I ) research institutes. Eight of such institutes are located in Khartoum State and the ninth one is in Madani city (Aljazeera State). The inspection activities have been carried out using a standard inspection check list developed by the regulatory authority of the Sudan. The inspection missions to the above mentioned institutes involved also evaluation of radiation levels around the premises and storage areas of radiation sources. The dose rate measurement around radiation sources locations were found to be quite low. This mainly is due to the fact that the activities of most radionuclides that are used in these institutes are quite low ( in the range of micro curies). Also ,most the x-ray machines that were found in use for scientific academic and research purposes work at low k Vp of maximum 60 k Vp. None of the radiation workers in the inspected institutes has a personal radiation monitoring device, therefor staff dose levels have not been assessed. However it was noted that in most of the academic/ research studies radiation workers are only exposed to very low levels of radiation and for a very short time that dose not exceed 1 minute, therefore the expected occupational exposure of the staff is very low. Radiation measurement in public

  13. Tools for evidence-based vascular nursing practice: Achieving information literacy for lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Jodi; Walsh, M Eileen

    2017-12-01

    Information literacy is essential in facilitating evidence-based practice (EBP) activities. In vascular nursing, the implementation of EBP is of utmost importance. Best practice grounded in research evidence can contribute to improved patient care outcomes for individuals with vascular disease. The following paper discusses information literacy competencies for nurses to develop in the context of EBP, with an emphasis on formulating a clinical question and searching for evidence. Relevant health science information resources are described, including their value and purpose in the 6S model of evidence. Also discussed are practical and supportive solutions with proven effectiveness in ensuring nurses' success with EBP. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Empowering Students in Information Literacy Practices Using a Collaborative Digital Library for School Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrizah Abdullah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the affordances that a collaborative digital library (CDL can bring to bear on supporting information literacy practices in the digital information environment. It suggests that the digital library can contribute to student empowerment in information literacy practices while searching, using and collaboratively building the digital library resources. To illustrate this, the authors have been experimenting with the implementation of an integrated information literacy model based on Eisenberg and Berkowitz’ Big 6 Model and describes the CDL features in association with the information literacy dimensions in this model. The CDL focuses on the project-based learning approach to conduct students’ project, which supports specific information behaviors that underpin research and learning such as information seeking, browsing, encountering, foraging, sharing, gathering, filtering, and using. Findings regarding teachers’ reception of the digital library are encouraging as they feel the relevance of the digital library to the current requirement of the students’ project and its potential to entrench information and resource study skills through project-based learning.

  15. The home literacy and numeracy environment in preschool: Cross-domain relations of parent-child practices and child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Amy R; Purpura, David J

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that home literacy and numeracy environments are predictive of children's literacy and numeracy skills within their respective domains. However, there is limited research on the relations between the home literacy environment and numeracy outcomes and between the home numeracy environment and literacy outcomes. Specifically, there is limited information on relations between the home numeracy environment and specific literacy outcomes (e.g., vocabulary). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relations of the home literacy and numeracy environments to children's literacy and numeracy outcomes both within and across domains. Participants were 114 preschool children and their parents. Children ranged in age from 3.01 to 5.17 years (M = 4.09 years) and were 54% female and 72% Caucasian. Parents reported the frequency of parent-child literacy (code-related practices and storybook reading) and numeracy practices. Children were assessed in the fall and spring of their preschool year on their literacy (definitional vocabulary, phonological awareness, and print knowledge) and numeracy skills. Four mixed-effects regression analyses were conducted to predict each of the child outcomes. Results indicate that although code-related literacy practices and storybook reading were not broadly predictive of children's literacy and numeracy outcomes, the home numeracy environment was predictive of numeracy and definitional vocabulary outcomes. These findings demonstrate a relation between the home numeracy environment and children's language development and contribute to the growing body of research indicating the important relations between early numeracy and language development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. "So we would all help pitch in:" The family literacy practices of low-income African American mothers of preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Robin L; Hamilton, Megan-Brette; Coba-Rodriguez, Sarai

    2015-01-01

    The development of emergent literacy skills are important for the development of later literacy competencies and affect school readiness. Quantitative researchers document race- and social class-based disparities in emergent literacy competence between low-income African American and middle-income White children. Some researchers suggest that deficits in parenting practices account for limited literacy skills among low-income African American children. A small body of qualitative research on low-income African American families finds that despite economic challenges, some African American families were actively engaged in promoting child literacy development. Using qualitative interviews that emphasize family strengths, we add to this small body of research to highlight positive family practices obscured in many quantitative analyses that concentrate on family shortcomings. Specifically, we examine in-home literacy practices and child literacy development with a sample of low-income African American mothers (families) of preschoolers. Key findings include identification of various literacy activities promoting child literacy development and inclusion of multiple family members assisting in literacy activities. These findings add to substantive discussions of emergent literacy and resilience. Insights from the qualitative interviews also provide culturally-sensitive recommendations to childhood educators and speech-language pathologists (SLP) who work with low-income African American families and children. Reader should recognize that (1) there is not a 'right' phenotype and therefore not a right form of environmental input and (2) that context matters (at both the level of the cell and the individual organism). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New Practices in Doing Academic Development: Twitter as an Informal Learning Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Megan; Budge, Kylie; Lemon, Narelle

    2015-01-01

    Using social media platforms to build informal learning processes and social networks is significant in academic development practices within higher education. We present three vignettes illustrating academic practices occurring on Twitter to show that using social media is beneficial for building networks of academics, locally and globally,…

  18. Association of eHealth literacy with colorectal cancer knowledge and screening practice among internet users in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Seigo; Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Oka, Koichiro

    2012-11-13

    In rapidly developing Internet-user societies, eHealth literacy has become important in promoting wellness. Although previous studies have observed that poor health literacy is associated with less knowledge and screening practice of colorectal cancer (CRC), little is known about whether eHealth literacy is associated with these variables. The present study examined associations between eHealth literacy, knowledge of CRC, and CRC screening practices. Data were analyzed for 2970 Japanese adults (men, 49.9%; mean age±SD, 39.7±10.9 years) who responded to an Internet-based cross-sectional survey. Knowledge of the definition of CRC, its risk factors and screening practice, previous experience of CRC screening, score on the Japanese version of the eHEALS (J-eHEALS), sociodemographic attributes (sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, and household income level), and frequency of Internet usage were obtained. Sociodemographic attributes and frequency of Internet usage were used as control variables in the multiple regression and logistic regression models. eHealth literacy was positively associated with CRC knowledge (β=.116, increase of 1 point in the eHEALS score signified that participants were 1.03 times (95% CI=1.01-1.05) more likely to undergo CRC screening. Internet users with high eHealth literacy are more likely to have knowledge and previous screening practice related to CRC compared to those with low eHealth literacy.

  19. A Trend Analysis of Computer Literacy Skills of Preservice Teachers During Six Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Caryl J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes trends in computer-literacy skills of preservice teachers during the period 1991/92 to 1996/97. A significant linear pattern of increasing means was found in word processing, spreadsheet, hardware, operating system software, and the mouse. Analysis provides a perspective on how increasing access to computers in high school translates into…

  20. Emergent Literacy Development Through Storybook Reading: One Head Start Teacher's Explanations and Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Jawhar, Salwa Baker

    2000-01-01

    My goal in undertaking this research was to contribute to strengthening kindergarten educational practices in Kuwait with particular focus on literacy development. I was interested in the instructional techniques, tools, methods, language activities that would make sense to Arabic kindergartners and help them learn the formal, written register (i.e., formal literary Arabic) required in Kuwait. To this end, I used part of my graduate studies in education visiting and observing several kinderga...

  1. Information literacy skills and training of licensed practical nurses in Alberta, Canada: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadson, Kelley; Phillips, Leah Adeline

    2018-06-01

    Although information literacy skills are recognized as important to the curriculum and professional outcomes of two-year nursing programs, there is a lack of research on the information literacy skills and support needed by graduates. To identify the information literacy skills and consequent training and support required of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) in Alberta, Canada. An online survey using a random sample of new graduates (graduated within 5 years) from the registration database of the College of Practical Nurses of Alberta (CLPNA). There was a 43% response rate. Approximately 25-38% of LPNs felt they were only moderately or to a small extent prepared to use evidence effectively in their professional practice. LPNs use the internet and websites most frequently, in contrast to library resources that are used least frequently. Developing lifelong learning skills, using information collaboratively, and locating and retrieving information are areas where LPNs desire more effective or increased training. The results suggest there are significant gaps in the preparedness and ability of LPNs to access and apply research evidence effectively in the workplace. There are several areas in which the training provided by Librarians appears either misaligned or ineffective. © 2018 Health Libraries Group.

  2. Academic or community practice? What is driving decision-making and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudreau, Bernadette J; Hassinger, Taryn E; Hedrick, Traci L; Slingluff, Craig L; Schroen, Anneke T; Dengel, Lynn T

    2018-06-18

    Identifying factors that impact progression of surgery trainees into academic versus non-academic practices may permit tailoring residency experiences to promote academic careers in institutions charged with the training of future surgeon scientists. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with progression of surgery trainees into academic versus non-academic practice. A survey was distributed to 135 surgeons graduating from the University of Virginia residency program from 1964-2016, a single academic institution. Questions addressed practice type, research productivity, work/life balance, mentorship, and overall sentiment toward research and academic surgery. A 5-point Likert scale measured career satisfaction and influence of factors in practice setting choice. Of the 135 surveys that were electronically distributed, 69 participants responded (response rate: 51%). Of the 54 with known current practice types, 34 (63%) were academic and 20 (37%) non-academic. Academic surgeons reported more publications by the conclusion of surgery training (56% vs 25% with >10 publications, P = .02). More academic surgeons reported >$100,000 in student debt at graduation (44% vs 25%, P productive research experiences, current surgical trainees may be more enthusiastic about a career in academic practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Master teachers' responses to twenty literacy and science/mathematics practices in deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, Susan R; Stephenson, Brenda; Mertens, Donna

    2006-01-01

    Under a grant to improve outcomes for students who are deaf or hard of hearing awarded to the Association of College Educators--Deaf/Hard of Hearing, a team identified content that all teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing must understand and be able to teach. Also identified were 20 practices associated with content standards (10 each, literacy and science/mathematics). Thirty-seven master teachers identified by grant agents rated the practices on a Likert-type scale indicating the maximum benefit of each practice and maximum likelihood that they would use the practice, yielding a likelihood-impact analysis. The teachers showed strong agreement on the benefits and likelihood of use of the rated practices. Concerns about implementation of many of the practices related to time constraints and mixed-ability classrooms were themes of the reviews. Actions for teacher preparation programs were recommended.

  4. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that information literacy is acquired only by experience, there is a false assumption that technological ability is the same as information literacy, faculty culture makes information literacy less significant than other educational pursuits, faculty have a limited perception of the ability of librarians. and accrediting bodies have not yet advanced information literacy to a viable position in higher education. The new information age demands that these barriers be overcome and information literacy take a prominent place within the academic experience.

  5. Remix as a literacy for future anthropology practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markham, Annette

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses how remix functions as a generative metaphor for thinking about ethnographic research methods. By dismantling and reconfiguring past (mostly taken for granted) terminology for ‘what counts’ as appropriate data, research practices, and research products, scholars can explore...

  6. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections between Oral and Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working- and middle-class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between…

  7. Academic Librarians’ Conception and Use of Evidence Sources in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The objective of this study was to explore and understand how academic librarians use evidence in their professional decision making. Theresearcher aimed to gain insights on the relevance of the current EBLIP model topractice, and to understand the possible connections between scientific researchand tacit knowledge within the practice of LIS.Methods – A grounded theory methodology was used, following the approach ofCharmaz (2006. Participants were 19 academic librarians in Canada. Data wasgathered via online diaries and semi-structured interviews over a six-month periodin 2011.Results – Two broad types of evidence were identified (hard and soft, and aregenerally used in conjunction with one another. Librarians examine all evidencesources with a critical eye, and try to determine a complete picture before reachinga conclusion. As well, librarians use a variety of proactive and passive approachesto find evidence.Conclusions – These results provide a strong message that no single evidencesource is perfect. Consequently, librarians bring different types of evidencetogether in order to be as informed as possible before making a decision. Using acombination of evidence sources, depending upon the problem, is the wayacademic librarians approach decision making.

  8. VIOLENCE GENERATING PRACTICES IN A POSTGRADUATED ACADEMIC SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Méndez-Cadena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reflects the results from a study on institutional behavior and interaction between teachers and pupils that influence the overall academic performance of postgraduate students from an agronomic institution in Mexico, Postgraduated College (CP. The goal was to identify multiple practices, forms and behaviors where gender is perceived in such way that harassment or mistreat occurs in the form of inequalities expressed in postgraduate programs that have been, traditionally, of a higher masculine presence. The method of investigation used quantitative and qualitative tools; a poll was made through electronic devices aimed at both men and women students from 4 of the 7 campuses. These campuses are spread through several states of Mexico and form part of the Postgraduate College. The students identified behavior that is deemed sexist and/or discriminatory such as psychological abuse at school, use of sexist and non-inclusive language, undermining the academic work of female peers, exclusion, and subordination. All of the stated activities have strong repercussions on school performance, the perception of achievement, emotional stability and self- esteem of the alumni. What we see here is an urgent need to change the way the student body and the professors behave on the institution grounds. It is of essence to analyze gender inequality, from chain of command to the social and symbolic aspects of the postgraduate community. This means restructuring institutional culture, by proposing strategies that veer in favor of equity.

  9. Unveiling social awareness through literacy practices in an EFL class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzmel Alexánder Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study addresses issues of verbal and physical aggression among tenth grade students in a public school. Through a pedagogical intervention the participants worked collaboratively to reflect on social issues in their English language classes. Inquiry was a fundamental element in this study as it allowed students to explore, read, compare, and then reflect on issues that come from their own context and experiences (Giroux, 1988. Students’ reflections were collected through questionnaires, artifacts, and audio recorded interviews in order to gather information to reveal students’ social awareness of physical and verbal aggression in their school context.  The findings revealed that students see violence as a need to avoid their partners´ abuse. Students´ reflections showed that students considered that parents and teachers paid more attention to academic concerns, rather than personal growth. The study demonstrated that inquiry along with writing about social issues in English allowed students to develop rationality and sensitivity towards violent acts, furthermore, inquiry about their social problems encouraged students to work collaboratively, to reflect about their social conditions and to apply the use of the English language in contextualized situations.

  10. Effectiveness of the Use of Spiritual Intelligence in Women Academic Leadership Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandaran, Sharmila Devi; Krauss, Steven Eric; Hamzah, Azimi; Idris, Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence into women academic leadership practices. The study designed to provide a clear understanding of the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence practices within women academic leadership practices. In addition, the study will be an ideal…

  11. Improving access to important recovery information for heart patients with low health literacy: reflections on practice-based initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Biuso, Catuscia; Jennings, Amanda; Patsamanis, Harry

    2018-05-29

    Evidence exists for the association between health literacy and heart health outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation is critical for recovery from heart attack and reducing hospital readmissions. Despite this, literacy. This brief case study reflects and documents practice-based initiatives by Heart Foundation Victoria to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. Three key initiatives, namely the Six Steps To Cardiac Recovery resource, the Love Your Heart book and the nurse ambassador program, were implemented informed by mixed methods that assessed need and capacity at the individual, organisational and systems levels. Key outcomes included increased access to recovery information for patients with low health literacy, nurse knowledge and confidence to engage with patients on recovery information, improved education of patients and improved availability and accessibility of information for patients in diverse formats. Given the challenges involved in addressing heart health literacy, multifaceted practice-based approaches are essential to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. What is known about the topic? Significant challenges exist for patients with lower health literacy receiving recovery information after a heart attack in hospitals. What does this paper add? This case study provides insights into a practice-based initiative by Heart Foundation Victoria to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. What are the implications for practitioners? Strategies to improve recovery through increased heart health literacy must address the needs of patients, nursing staff and the health system within hospitals. Such strategies need to be multifaceted and designed to build the capacity of nurses, heart patients and their carers, as well as support from hospital management.

  12. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce.

  13. Exploring the Complex Interplay of National Learning and Teaching Policy and Academic Development Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Academic developers are important interpreters of policy, yet little research has focussed on the interplay of policy and academic development practice. Using methods from critical discourse analysis, this article analyses a national learning and teaching policy, charts its development, and explores its interpretation by the academic development…

  14. Latina/o Academics' Resilient Qualities in Their Linguistically Diverse Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis placed on academic writing in English may create challenges for multilingual academics as they negotiate diverse languages. Based on personal interviews with bilingual Latina/o academics in rhetoric and composition, this study reveals that their language practices reflect diverse resilient qualities at various stages in their academic…

  15. Challenges posed by diversity in Academic institutions as they implement Information Literacy: the experiences of Makerere University Library in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Beatrice Akiteng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, academic libraries have been conducting information literacy (IL programmes for their users. This paper shares Makerere University Library's experience in implementing IL programmes at Makerere University and other academic institutions of learning in Uganda. The findings of this paper are based on the IL sessions' evaluation forms, together with the authors' experiences as instructors. A sample of one thousand (1000 participants' evaluation feedback forms was used in assessing the IL sessions conducted by Makerere University Library in two years (2008-2009. The evaluation focused on the duration and relevancy of training, nature of content, its organization; the instructors, new skills participants gained and how they hoped to pass them to others. Initial findings indicate that IL sessions are highly regarded with repeated recommendations for increased duration and frequency of information literacy sessions in different universities. The various challenges posed by diversity are explained as follows: Difference in age groups arise because admissions to the various universities cater for direct entrants from high school and mature age entrants'. Students also come from different social backgrounds that dictate the standard of schools they attend i.e.; urban schools where education standards are high and skills such as using computers are imparted visa-a-vis the rural schools where such skills are not imparted. To the IL instructor, this implies conducting the training with patience and extending the time allocated for each session in order to impart the basic ICT skills prior to imparting the IL skills. Internationalization on the other hand is not a very big challenge because the proportion of foreign students is small and their ICT skills are moderate. Gender aspects and the diverse disciplines of research in the Ugandan universities also pose challenges when conducting IL sessions in that the groups handled at a time are

  16. Factors in the development of higher levels of reading literacy: Argumentation skills in educational practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The highest levels of reading literacy, as defined within PISA study, include the ability to use various cognitive skills, with argumentative skills being one of the most important among them. In the present study our goal was to reveal some of the factors that influence the development of argumentative skills in Serbian schools. We investigated the extent to which argumentative skills are required in PISA reading literacy tasks, as well as the specific difficulties our students have faced on these tasks, through an analysis of student performance. We also conducted an analysis of the educational practice - by doing in-depth interviews with teachers and content analysis of students' textbooks. The results revealed that: 1 Argumentations skills are an important requirement within PISA tasks; 2 Serbian students are mostly successful at basic tasks of recognizing arguments or providing arguments for the given position; they face difficulties answering the tasks which require precise formulation of relevant arguments as well as those demanding meta-cognitive skills (e.g. recognizing persuasive strategies in the given text. Their performance is particularly poor on tasks requiring the combination of information from different sources or information presented in different formats (text, tables, or graphs; 3 There is a significant gap between the requirements for argumentation skills our students usually encounter and PISA reading literacy tasks. In this paper we discuss some of the difficulties and obstacles to encouraging the development of argumentative thinking.

  17. Scholarly information discovery in the networked academic learning environment

    CERN Document Server

    Li, LiLi

    2014-01-01

    In the dynamic and interactive academic learning environment, students are required to have qualified information literacy competencies while critically reviewing print and electronic information. However, many undergraduates encounter difficulties in searching peer-reviewed information resources. Scholarly Information Discovery in the Networked Academic Learning Environment is a practical guide for students determined to improve their academic performance and career development in the digital age. Also written with academic instructors and librarians in mind who need to show their students how to access and search academic information resources and services, the book serves as a reference to promote information literacy instructions. This title consists of four parts, with chapters on the search for online and printed information via current academic information resources and services: part one examines understanding information and information literacy; part two looks at academic information delivery in the...

  18. Exploring the Literacy Beliefs of Refugee Mothers: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize an exploratory and descriptive lens to examine the literacy beliefs of refugee mothers of preschool aged children, who were enrolled in a refugee family literacy program (n = 19). Through use of a survey, mothers' literacy beliefs as related to the home literacy environment and schooling were examined. Results…

  19. Information Literacy in Mathematics Undergraduate Education: Where Does It Stand Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Bond, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The published literature on information literacy in mathematics is relatively sparse. This article explores the current state of information literacy initiatives in undergraduate mathematics. The authors survey academic librarians (n = 118) who liaise with mathematics departments in order to gain an understanding of their practices and attitudes…

  20. Toward an Understanding of the Use of Academic Theories in Public Relations Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Joep P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a focal issue in the public relations field: the way that practitioners use academic theories. Offers an exploration of the possible modes of use of academic or scientific theory in public relations practice. Notes that the premise of this model is that scientific knowledge is seldom used in an unaltered form in practice. Closes by…

  1. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols Hess, Amanda Kathryn; Greer, Katie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities' high-impact practices and e-learning best practices…

  2. Educational laptops in public schools: digital literacy and possibilities of transforming pedagogical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Beatris Valentini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of educational laptops in the routine of students and teachers might contribute for the construction of innovative alternatives for the teaching practice. With that in mind, this paper starts with the idea that the insertion of educational laptops in 1:1 model might be a disturbing element, triggering a process of reflection and awareness of the teaching practice on teachers themselves. That could lead to redimensioning the pedagogical practice in a movement towards including the laptop significantly in the school routine. We present a case study from an exploratory perspective about the insertion of laptops in a public school (from elementary to junior high, analyzing the process of digital literacy taking place in that school community. In that sense, digital literacy implies on the interaction in social networks that allow exploration and research, teaching and criticizing in a construction process of learning and knowing mediated by digital technologies. To do so, from the non-linearity that accompanies the communication flows emerging from these technologies, students and teachers are instigated to find new meanings, where reading and writing consist in sharing knowledge and opinions and not only an assignment to hand in.

  3. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes.

  4. Re-mastering the Master's Tools: Recognizing and affirming the life experiences and cultural practices of urban youth in critical computational literacy through a video game project

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a video game project that focuses on students' lived experiences and cultural practices teach critical literacies and computational thinking. Specifically, this research looked at how the pedagogy, processes, and student products demonstrated culturally relevant pedagogy practices, critical literacy, and computational thinking. This design-based research study utilizes critical literacy, sociocultural learning theory, and culturally relevant pedagogy in the framing, st...

  5. The Messiness of Meaning Making: Examining the Affordances of the Digital Space as a Mentoring and Tutoring Space for the Acquisition of Academic Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Moeain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Having incorporated a digital aspect to our academic literacy course, and having monitored this over the last three years, we have come to believe that online mentoring can serve as an essential form of tutoring and mentoring. Our study is located in the field of New Literacy Studies and examines the affordances of a digital space in a first year academic literacy course in the Humanities. We focus on students’ acquisition of academic literacy, as well as critical thinking and reflexivity around a core social science concept; identity. Here, we refer to the ability to think critically and reflexively, as the ‘analytical mode’, a key driver in shaping the pedagogy of the course. In this paper, we explore the online participation of two students and how they engage with the theme of identity, not only as an academic concept but also as one intrinsically linked with how they see themselves in a diverse post-apartheid South African context. We argue that the digital space promotes a particular form of the ‘analytical mode’ as students grapple with texts and concepts on the academic literacy course. Using a qualitative case study methodology, our analysis of students’ online interaction revealed that the digital space allowed students to express themselves with a level of depth and sophistication, and to share dissident views that could not be expressed in the traditional classroom space. Furthermore, we argue that the digital space can suspend students’ urgency to agree or disagree with the arguments of authors they read. By holding students between the two positions of agreement and disagreement, we propose that the digital space becomes a space of reflexive1 discomfort which captures various moments in students’ drafting processes as they operate within the analytical mode. Therefore, we argue that the digital space, if harnessed with a particular type of mentoring philosophy and pedagogy that activates the analytical mode, can

  6. Nursing Education Transformation: Promising Practices in Academic Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mary Sue; Farmer, Patricia D; Sroczynski, Maureen; Close, Liz; Wortock, Jean M

    2015-09-01

    Health care has changed over the past decade; yet, nursing education has not kept pace with social and scientific advances. The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, called for a more highly educated nursing work-force and an improved nursing education system. Since the release of that report, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP, and the AARP Foundation, has worked with nursing education leaders to better understand existing and evolving nursing education structures. Through a consensus-building process, four overarching promising practice models, with an emphasis on seamless academic progression, emerged to advance the goals of education transformation. Key nurse educators and other stakeholders refined those models through a series of meetings, collaborative partnerships, and focused projects that were held across the United States. This article summarizes that process and provides a description of the models, challenges, common themes, recommendations, and progress to date. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. "So Many Books They Don't Even All Fit on the Bookshelf": An Examination of Low-Income Mothers' Home Literacy Practices, Beliefs and Influencing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Cycyk, Lauren M.; Sandilos, Lia E.; Hammer, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    Given the need to enhance the academic language and early literacy skills of young children from low-income homes and the importance of the home literacy environment in supporting children's development, the purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the home literacy environment of low-income African-American and Latino mothers of…

  8. The role of advanced practice providers in pediatric otolaryngology academic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Brian K; Brandon, Gretchen; Shah, Rahul; Preciado, Diego; Zalzal, George

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the roles of Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) in pediatric academic otolaryngology programs to provide a better understanding of their scope of practice, levels of autonomy, clinical duties, teaching opportunities and research participation. An anonymous web-based electronic survey tool was sent to all pediatric otolaryngology fellowship program directors in the United States. Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants are utilized in approximately 3 out of every 4 pediatric otolaryngology practices. The top three job activities of both the PA and NP were: (1) seeing patients independently, (2) working alongside doctors in clinic, and (3) answering phone lines/parental calls. A higher percentage of PAs (83%), worked alongside doctors in clinic, as compared to NPs, where only 55% work alongside MDs. Over half of PAs round with the in-patient team and see consults as compared to just over one third of NPs who participate in such activities. Twenty-five percent of practices reported that PAs cover call and assist in the OR. Most PAs/NPs saw between 11 and 15 patients per clinic which provides a clear productivity advantage when looking to screen patients, provide medical care, generate surgical cases, and maximize billings. NPs and PAs have complimentary skill sets ideal for the pediatric otolaryngology workplace, although job activities and "best fit" are hospital and practice dependent. Our study suggests that the use of PAs and NPs will continue to grow to meet increased demand for services in the field of pediatric otolaryngology. Employing advanced practice providers enables academic centers to improve access, provide additional financial remuneration, reduce wait times for new patients, and allow attending physicians to meet increased practice demands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Publication practices of academics in medical psychology and in psychosomatics and psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, O; Brähler, E

    2001-07-01

    When qualifying for higher academic positions junior academics face increasing demands for submitting papers for publication. The criteria for assessing these publications are presently under discussion. Contributions to international English language journals are more highly regarded, and it has become indispensable to have papers published in journals listed in SCI and SSCI. The question remains whether these criteria are valid to judge academic qualifications. Whereas one criterion for validity may be the publication practice of the present academic representatives, it appears that to some extent the chairs themselves would not fulfill the requirements for academic qualification today. Results regarding this are presented and discussed.

  10. The Relevance of Academic Research in OSCM Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffield, Wiliam D.; Vang, David O.; Lundsten, Lorman L.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the relevance of academic research for operations and supply chain management (OSCM) professionals. Members of a major metropolitan APICS chapter were surveyed. Consistent with prior research, findings indicate that OSCM practitioners prefer trade journal articles to academic research. Nonetheless, respondents indicate interest…

  11. The Relationship between Academic Dishonesty and Unethical Business Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Randi L.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the relationship between the range and severity of academic dishonesty during undergraduate studies and that of dishonesty engaged in during employment revealed that subjects (n=60) who admitted to a wide range of academic dishonesty also admitted a wide range of work-related dishonesty. (Author/JOW)

  12. Academic Talent Development Programs: A Best Practices Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Françoys

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe how schools should structure the development of academic talent at all levels of the K-12 educational system. Adopting as its theoretical framework the "Differentiating Model of Giftedness and Talent," the author proposes (a) a formal definition of academic talent development (ATD) inspired by the principles…

  13. Practice and Evaluation of Ability Grouping Lecture on Information Literacy Using a Chat Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Kiyohisa

    A teaching methodology on information literacy that skilled and inexperienced students learn through different specific contents in a class is proposed. Skilled students collaboratively work using an e-Learning environment while a conventional projector-based lecture on how to use a computer is given for inexperienced students. The methodology had been put into practice for two years. Skilled students were divided into a few groups and members in a group collaboratively made a PowerPoint slide show using a chat tool as the communication media. The slide shows were evaluated by means of questionnaire to the inexperienced students. The results were nearly the same as those of teachers. The practice of the methodology resulted in that the concentration of the skilled students was promoted and the learning attitude of the inexperienced students was improved, compared with the case that the both skilled and inexperienced students learned through the same contents.

  14. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Nichols Hess; Katie Greer

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ high-impact practices and e-learning best practices were integrated as scaffolds for course content. The authors' experience with this systematic process and the concepts of instructional design suggest...

  15. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  16. Literacy practices in multi-graded classrooms in the context of the National Pact for Literacy at the Right Age (PNAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Figueiredo de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study aimed to analyze the literacy practices in a multi-graded rural classroom of a PNAIC participating teacher. As methodological procedures, we conducted classroom observations and semi-structured interviews, analysed through Bardin’s (2002 content analysis. We carried out a diagnostic class evaluation through written words, which were analyzed based on the theory of Psychogenesis of written language, and document analysis of PNAIC education notebooks - Rural Education (2013 edition. We noticed some “marks” of PNAIC during the observations, particularly concerning to the pedagogical perspective (CHARTIER, 2002 in working with literature books, literacy games and the appropriation of methodological appropriation of projects and didactic sequences.

  17. The Politics and Practice of Literacy Pedagogy: Ideology and Outcomes in Two Racially Diverse Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, Margaret; Eastman, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Discussing ideologically opposing views of beginning reading, the authors trace the politics of reading curriculum in two racially diverse New Jersey school districts working to raise the literacy achievement of traditionally underserved students through socially just literacy education.

  18. Developing educational material on chronic kidney disease using best practices in health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luanda Thaís Mendonça; Bastos, Marcus Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Based in the precepts of Health Literacy (HL), an educational booklet "Do you know the Chronic Kidney Disease?" was written. It was used as a basic text for development of a Brazilian instrument for Assessment of Health Literacy (Teste de Avaliação de Letramento em Saúde or TALES). The guideline used to create the TALES obeyed four steps: systematization of content; creation and drawing of images by an expert designer; submission to a Committee of Experts on nephrology and linguistics; and editing and printing of the content. The content covering six aspects of chronic kidney disease (definition, diagnosis, signs and symptoms, prevention, risk factors and treatment) was developed utilizing multimodality techniques such as: creation of personages; verbal and visual metaphors; metonymy; personifications; direct dialogue; and plain language avoided of technicalities. During the development of TALES, the booklet proved to be useful in translating complicated scientific concepts on kidney disease into meaningfuly health messages. In conclusion, besides of being used as basic text for the development of TALES, the booklet "Do you know chronic kidney disease?", based in best practices in HL, can assist health professionals in communicating to patients using consumer-friendly educational materials that might impact positive health-related behaviors and results.

  19. Developing educational material on chronic kidney disease using best practices in health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanda Thaís Mendonça Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Based in the precepts of Health Literacy (HL, an educational booklet "Do you know the Chronic Kidney Disease?" was written. It was used as a basic text for development of a Brazilian instrument for Assessment of Health Literacy (Teste de Avaliação de Letramento em Saúde or TALES. The guideline used to create the TALES obeyed four steps: systematization of content; creation and drawing of images by an expert designer; submission to a Committee of Experts on nephrology and linguistics; and editing and printing of the content. The content covering six aspects of chronic kidney disease (definition, diagnosis, signs and symptoms, prevention, risk factors and treatment was developed utilizing multimodality techniques such as: creation of personages; verbal and visual metaphors; metonymy; personifications; direct dialogue; and plain language avoided of technicalities. During the development of TALES, the booklet proved to be useful in translating complicated scientific concepts on kidney disease into meaningfuly health messages. In conclusion, besides of being used as basic text for the development of TALES, the booklet "Do you know chronic kidney disease?", based in best practices in HL, can assist health professionals in communicating to patients using consumer-friendly educational materials that might impact positive health-related behaviors and results.

  20. Exploring Cumulative Risk and Family Literacy Practices in Low-Income Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcella, Jennifer; Howes, Carollee; Fuligni, Allison Sidle

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The home literacy environment and other early learning settings such as preschool play a role in children's language and literacy outcomes, yet research suggests that Latino, Spanish-speaking families are less likely than other families to participate in family literacy activities. This study explored the relations among…

  1. Merging Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Practice in an Undergraduate Health Sciences Curriculum Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Susan; Bannon, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The ACRL's "Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education" offers the opportunity to rethink information literacy teaching and curriculum. However, the ACRL's rescinded "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" correlate with the preferred research and decision-making model of the health…

  2. Readability of Patient Education Materials in Hand Surgery and Health Literacy Best Practices for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie; Prince, Latrina Y; Schnaekel, Asa; Couch, Cory G; Stephenson, John M; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to update a portion of a 2008 study of patient education materials from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site with new readability results, to compare the results to health literacy best practices, and to make recommendations to the field for improvement. A sample of 77 patient education documents were downloaded from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site, handcare.org, and assessed for readability using 4 readability tools. Mean readability grade-level scores were derived. Best practices for plain language for written health materials were compiled from 3 government agency sources. The mean readability of the 77 patient education documents in the study was 9.3 grade level. This reading level is reduced from the previous study in 2008 in which the overall mean was 10.6; however, the current sample grade level still exceeds recommended readability according to best practices. Despite a small body of literature on the readability of patient education materials related to hand surgery and other orthopedic issues over the last 7 years, readability was not dramatically improved in our current sample. Using health literacy as a framework, improvements in hand surgery patient education may result in better understanding and better outcomes for patients seeing hand surgeons. Improved understanding of patient education materials related to hand surgery may improve preventable negative outcomes that are clinically significant as well as contribute to improved quality of life for patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostate Brachytherapy Case Volumes by Academic and Nonacademic Practices: Implications for Future Residency Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cail, Daniel W.; Chen, Yu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prostate brachytherapy has continued to decline in the United States. We examined the national practice patterns of both academic and nonacademic practices performing prostate brachytherapy by case volume per year to further characterize the decline and postulate the effect this trend might have on training the next generation of residents. Methods and Materials: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone radiation therapy in 2004 to 2012 were identified. The annual brachytherapy case volume at each facility was determined and further categorized into ≤12 cases per year (ie, an average of ≤1 cases per month), 13 to 52 cases per year, and ≥53 cases per year (ie, an average of ≥1 cases per week) in academic practices versus nonacademic practices. Results: In 2004 to 2012, academic practices performing an average of ≤1 brachytherapy cases per month increased from 56.4% to 73.7%. In nonacademic practices, this percentage increased from 60.2% to 77.4% (P<.0001 for both). Practices performing an average of ≥1 cases per week decreased among both academic practices (from 6.7% to 1.5%) and nonacademic practices (from 4.5% to 2.7%). Conclusions: Both academic and nonacademic radiation oncology practices have demonstrated a significant reduction in the use of prostate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2012. With the case volume continuing to decline, it is unclear whether we are prepared to train the next generation of residents in this critical modality.

  4. Collective student characteristics alter the effects of teaching practices on academic outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikas, Eve; Peets, Kätlin; Hodges, Ernest V E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of collective student characteristics (academic skills and task persistence at the beginning of first grade) and different teaching practices (child-centered, teacher-directed, and child-dominated) on the development of academic skills and task

  5. Relations of Perceived Maternal Parenting Style, Practices, and Learning Motivation to Academic Competence in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia S.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A measure of academic parenting practices was developed through parent and teacher interviews and subsequently administered to 91 Hong Kong Chinese fifth graders, who also rated their mothers' restrictiveness and concern, school motivation, and self-perceived academic competence. Children's actual school grades were obtained from school records.…

  6. Reviewing History and IR Journals : Academic Publication Practices and Dominance in World Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendak, Maarten; de Wilde, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    1 Reviewing History and IR Journals: Academic Publication Practices and dominance in World Society Maarten Duijvendak & Jaap de Wilde Groningen, 2016 This article reflects on analyses of academic History journals and International Relations (IR) journals conducted by students in our Research

  7. "A Rainforest in Front of a Bulldozer": The Literacy Practices of Teacher Candidates Committed to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Janet D.

    2012-01-01

    This critical ethnographic study explores how two teacher candidates in English education used specific and varied literacy practices to enact their social justice priorities at a troubled high school in a high-need district. Data include interviews before and after the student teaching experience; observations of teaching, blogs, journals, and…

  8. Listening to Graduates of a K-12 Bilingual Program: Language Ideologies and Literacy Practices of Former Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworin, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the language and literacy practices of five graduates of a Spanish-English K-12 dual language immersion program through semistructured interviews to understand the residual impact of thirteen years in a Spanish-English bilingual school program. Drawing from sociocultural theory, the interviews also sought to provide an…

  9. Community-Based Financial Literacy Education in a Cultural Context: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Forte, Karin Sprow

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings related to teaching beliefs and pedagogical practices of a study that examined how financial literacy educators educate adults from underserved population groups in community-based settings. The study is theoretically framed in the teaching beliefs and culturally responsive education literature. Findings reveal a…

  10. Enhancing Literacy Practices in Science Classrooms through a Professional Development Program for Canadian Minority-Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Léonard P.; Gueye, Ndeye R.

    2016-01-01

    'Literacy in the Science Classroom Project" was a three-year professional development (PD) program supporting minority-language secondary teachers' use of effective language-based instructional strategies for teaching science. Our primary objective was to determine how teacher beliefs and practices changed over time and how these were enacted…

  11. Differential Influences of Parental Home Literacy Practices and Anxiety in English as a Foreign Language on Chinese Children's English Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; Chui, Barbie Hiu-Tung; Lai, Michael Wei-Chun; Kwok, Sylvia Y. C. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the differential influences of maternal and paternal factors on Chinese children's English as a foreign language development. It took into account both behavioral (i.e. parental home literacy practices, HLP; and children's vocabulary knowledge) and emotional (i.e. parental and children's foreign language reading anxiety,…

  12. The Importance of SES, Home and School Language and Literacy Practices, and Oral Vocabulary in Bilingual Children's English Reading Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth R.; Páez, Mariela M.; August, Diane L.; Barr, Christopher D.; Kenyon, Dorry; Malabonga, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the role that socioeconomic status (SES), home and school language and literacy practices, and oral vocabulary play in the development of English reading skills in Latino English language learners (ELLs) and how these factors contribute differentially to English reading outcomes for children of different ages and in different…

  13. Fostering and Sustaining Diverse Literacy Practices in the Early Childhood Classroom: Reviewing the Literature in Three Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I synthesize extant research that documents how teachers foster and sustain children's diverse literacy practices within the early childhood classroom. Framing this review with Bakhtin's heteroglossia, I draw on theoretical and empirical scholarship in the fields of biliteracy, translanguaging, and culturally sustaining pedagogy.…

  14. The Impact of Professional Development on Poverty, Schooling, and Literacy Practices: Teacher Narratives and Reformation of Mindset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the impact of professional development on the topic of poverty in one high poverty school community located in a small city in southern Ontario, Canada. It considers narrative-based experiences of teachers' collaborative inquiry on literacy practices after a significant amount of professional development was provided to…

  15. Teaching to Exceed the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach for 6-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Thein, Amanda Haertling; Webb, Allen

    2012-01-01

    As the new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards take hold across the United States, the need grows for pre-service and in-service teachers to be ready to develop curriculum and instruction that addresses their requirements. This timely, thoughtful, and comprehensive text directly meets this need. It delineates a literacy practices and…

  16. "Critical Literacy Helps Wipe Away the Dirt on Our Glasses": Towards an Understanding of Reading as Ideological Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative teacher inquiry conducted in a tertiary, English-as-a-foreign-language classroom in Taiwan. The purpose of the study was, first, to implement a poststructuralist view of critical literacy that focuses not only on texts but also on the practice of reading as constructed and contested, and second, to examine the…

  17. Television, Language, and Literacy Practices in Sudanese Refugee Families: "I Learned How to Spell English on Channel 18"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kristen H.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explored the ways in which media, particularly television, connected with English language and literacy practices among Sudanese refugees in Michigan. Three families with young children participated in this study. Data collection included participant observation, interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months, with…

  18. "Seeing the Everyday through New Lenses": Pedagogies and Practices of Literacy Teacher Educators with a Critical Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamshi, Pooja

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the practices and pedagogies of six literacy teacher educators with a critical stance. In this qualitative research study, three semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant over a three-year period. They were able to negotiate a critical stance into their teacher education courses in several ways: using an…

  19. The Web and Information Literacy: Scaffolding the use of Web Sources in a Project-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marion; Archer, Arlene

    2004-01-01

    In this article we describe and discuss a three-year case study of a course in web literacy, part of the academic literacy curriculum for first-year engineering students at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Because they are seen as practical knowledge, not theoretical, information skills tend to be devalued at university and rendered invisible to…

  20. Comparison of Rate of Utilization of Medicare Services in Private Versus Academic Cardiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanesyan, Arsen; Rubio, Eduardo; Novak, Eric; Budoff, Matthew; Rich, Michael W

    2017-11-15

    Cardiovascular services are the third largest source of Medicare spending. We examined the rate of cardiovascular service utilization in the community of Glendale, CA, compared with the nearest academic medical center, the University of Southern California. Publicly available utilization data released by Medicare for the years 2012 and 2013 were used to identify all inpatient and outpatient cardiology services provided in each practice setting. The analysis included 19 private and 17 academic cardiologists. In unadjusted analysis, academic physicians performed half as many services per Medicare beneficiary per year as those in private practice: 2.3 versus 4.8, p cardiology practice settings in southern California, medical service utilization per Medicare beneficiary was nearly 2-fold higher in private practice than in the academic setting, suggesting that there may be opportunity for substantially reducing costs of cardiology care in the community setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. E-Book Purchasing Best Practices for Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    This article alerts academic libraries to some of the methods for purchasing electronic books (e-books) and notes that, while they are similar to the models used for journal-evaluation purposes, there are a number of factors important to consider that are different for e-books. Simon notes that, while theoretically there should be some advantages…

  2. Information literacy as the foundation for evidence-based practice in graduate nursing education: a curriculum-integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan; Rosenfeld, Peri; Haber, Judith

    2003-01-01

    As part of a system-wide initiative to advance evidence-based practice among clinicians, graduate students, and educators, the New York University Division of Nursing embarked on a curricular initiative to integrate components of information literacy in all core courses of the master's program. Increasing competency in information literacy is the foundation for evidence-based practice and provides nursing professionals with the skills to be literate consumers of information in an electronic environment. Competency in information literacy includes an understanding of the architecture of information and the scholarly process; the ability to navigate among a variety of print and electronic tools to effectively access, search, and critically evaluate appropriate resources; synthesize accumulated information into an existing body of knowledge; communicate research results clearly and effectively; and appreciate the social issues and ethical concerns related to the provision, dissemination, and sharing of information. In collaboration with the New York University Division of Libraries' Health Sciences Librarian, instructional modules in information literacy relevant to each of the 5 core nursing master's courses were developed, complemented by a Web-based tutorial: http://library.nyu.edu/research/health/tutorial. The Web site is multifaceted, with fundamentals for the beginner, as well as more complex content for the advanced user. Course assignments were designed to promote specific competencies in information literacy and strategies for evaluating the strength of the evidence found. A survey of information literacy competencies, which assessed students' knowledge, misconceptions, and use of electronic information resources, was administered when students entered the program and at 1-year intervals thereafter.

  3. Making the Invisible of Learning Visible: Pre-Service Teachers Identify Connections between the Use of Literacy Strategies and Their Content Area Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton-Kukner, Jennifer; Orr, Anne Murray

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe four ways secondary pre-service teachers appeared to be developing assessment practices during field experience, after taking a content area literacy course. This paper arises from a multi-year study exploring pre-service and beginning content area teachers' use of literacy strategies in teaching mathematics, science, and…

  4. "El Alfabetismo Y Las Familias Latinas": A Critical Perspective on the Literacy Values and Practices of Latino Families with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Elsa S.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated literacy values and practices among Latino families with preschool-age children. Results are part of a larger study that looked at the efficacy of a pediatric-based early literacy promotion program called Reach Out and Read (ROR). Participants included families participating in a ROR program in which…

  5. A Young Child's Intergenerational Practices through the Use of Visual Screen-Based Multimodal Communication to Acquire Qur'anic Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Parven

    2016-01-01

    This paper is derived from a wider small-scale study of digital literacy practice that explores the ways in which a multilingual seven-year-old child, Bablu, interacts with his grandmother during Internet activities connected to Qur'anic literacy. The study aims to reveal how intergenerational learning support was given to Bablu by his…

  6. Integration of literacy into speech-language therapy: a descriptive analysis of treatment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Schwarz, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was: (a) to examine the extent to which speech-language therapy provided to children with language disorders in the schools targets code-based literacy skills (e.g., alphabet knowledge and phonological awareness) during business-as-usual treatment sessions, and (b) to determine whether literacy-focused therapy time was associated with factors specific to children and/or speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Participants were 151 kindergarten and first-grade children and 40 SLPs. Video-recorded therapy sessions were coded to determine the amount of time that addressed literacy. Assessments of children's literacy skills were administered as well as questionnaires regarding characteristics of SLPs (e.g., service delivery, professional development). Results showed that time spent addressing code-related literacy across therapy sessions was variable. Significant predictors included SLP years of experience, therapy location, and therapy session duration, such that children receiving services from SLPs with more years of experience, and/or who utilized the classroom for therapy, received more literacy-focused time. Additionally, children in longer therapy sessions received more therapy time on literacy skills. There is considerable variability in the extent to which children received literacy-focused time in therapy; however, SLP-level factors predict time spent in literacy more than child-level factors. Further research is needed to understand the nature of literacy-focused therapy in the public schools. Readers will be able to: (a) define code-based literacy skills, (b) discuss the role that speech-language pathologists have in fostering children's literacy development, and (c) identify key factors that may currently influence the inclusion of literacy targets in school-based speech-language therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the psychology of seeking support to increase Health Science student engagement in academic support services. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Francis Hoyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing student engagement within higher education academic support services is a constant challenge. Whilst engagement with support is positively associated with successful retention, and non-engagement connected to attrition, the most vulnerable students are often the least likely to engage. Our data has shown that Health Science students are reluctant to engage with academic support services despite being made aware of their academic deficiencies. The “psychology of seeking support” was used as a lens to identify some of the multifaceted issues around student engagement. The School of Health Sciences made attendance at support courses compulsory for those students who were below the benchmark score in a post entrance literacy test. Since the policy change was implemented, there has been a 50% reduction in the fail rate of “at risk” students in a core literacy unit. These findings are encouraging and will help reduce student attrition in the long term.

  8. ICT Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The entanglement of ethics and technology makes it necessary for us to understand and reflect upon our own practices and to question technological hypes. The information and communication technology (ICT) literacy required to navigate the twenty-first century has to do with recognizing our own...... human limitations, developing critical measures and acknowledging feelings of estrangement, puzzlement as well as sheer wonder of technology. ICT literacy is indeed all about visions of the good life and the art of living in the twenty-first century. The main focus of this paper is to explore...... sensitivity with regard to ICT in the ‘classic’ literacy context of the educational system....

  9. Digital literacies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockly, Nicky; Pegrum, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic shifts in our communication landscape have made it crucial for language teaching to go beyond print literacy and encompass the digital literacies which are increasingly central to learners' personal, social, educational and professional lives. By situating these digital literacies within a clear theoretical framework, this book provides educators and students alike with not just the background for a deeper understanding of these key 21st-century skills, but also the rationale for integrating these skills into classroom practice. This is the first methodology book to address not jus

  10. E-Book Purchasing Best Practices for Academic Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    The article provides a guideline for purchasing of electronic books (e-books) in relevance to academic libraries. Topics include advantages and disadvantages of different acquisition routes such as aggregators, access models and ownership of e-books, and access management systems such as catalogs and electronic resource management systems (ERMs). File formats of e-books, and licensing and copyright issues are discussed along with information on open-access digital resources.

  11. Community Resilience Education: Lessons Learned from an Emerging Community of Practice - NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; McDougall, C.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports community resilience to extreme weather events, climate change and other environmental hazards by preparing communities through Weather Ready Nation and through programs addressing coastal community needs. These programs primarily target adult decisions makers in a professional capacity (emergency managers, city planners, et al.), leaving non-professional audiences without opportunities to understand and develop the skills to prepare for the threats and vulnerabilities that their communities face. As a result, resilience became the focus of NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grants in 2015. The goal of these investments is to strengthen the public's and/or K-12 students' environmental literacy to enable informed decision-making necessary for community resilience to extreme weather events and other environmental hazards. Funded projects build an understanding of Earth systems and the threats and vulnerabilities that are associated with a community's location, are aligned with existing adaptation/resilience plans, and connect audiences to relevant tools and resources to prepare for and respond to these hazards. These first few years of investment will create new models for how education can improve community resilience. Although these projects incorporate a variety of approaches, a few common themes stand out: empowering youth and adults to increase their understanding of locally relevant natural hazards and stresses; giving youth a voice in resilience planning; and student-led vulnerability assessments of their schools and communities. In this session we will report on the first convening of the principal investigators of our 13 funded projects, which represents the beginning of a new community of practice focused on resilience education. We will specifically share lessons learned about: engaging youth and adults about climate change and resiliency; working with local resilience/adaptation planners; and case studies on the use of NOAA's Digital Coast and

  12. Considering children's advertising literacy from a methodological point of view : past practices and future recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Zarouali, Brahim; Pauw, De, Pieter; Ponnet, Koen; Walrave, Michel; Poels, Karolien; Cauberghe, Veroline; Hudders, Liselot

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Childrens advertising literacy is a well-documented research area. Yet, the literature on how to measure advertising literacy is not straightforward due to conceptual and operational differences in the existing studies. This has led to inconsistent results with regard to the development, possession and application of advertising literacy. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the different measurement methodologies used in past research efforts to assess childrens advert...

  13. Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Basili, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy is a concept which is well established in theory while in practice it is only slowly breaking ground in accordance with the understanding of its significance and the possibilities of its realisation. Based on fundamental works, the characteristics of information literacy, its cognitive foundations and significance for individuals as well as for society, are argumented in the article. The analyzed content of this concept is connected with the content of a librarian’s knowl...

  14. The spiritual and religious identities, beliefs, and practices of academic pediatricians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Elizabeth Ann; Cadge, Wendy; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Gage, Elizabeth A; Zollfrank, Angelika Annette

    2008-12-01

    Physicians' spiritual and religious identities, beliefs, and practices are beginning to be explored. The objective of this study was to gather descriptive information about personal religion and spirituality from a random sample of academic American pediatricians and to compare this information with similar data from the public. In 2005, a Web-based survey of a random sample of 208 pediatrician faculty from 13 academic centers ranked by the US News & World Report as "honor roll" hospitals was conducted. Surveys elicited information about personal beliefs and practices as well as their influence on decisions about patient care and clinical practice. Multiple questions were replicated from the General Social Survey to enable comparisons with the public. Descriptive statistics were generated, and logistic regression analyses were conducted on relevant variables. Nearly 88% of respondents were raised in a religious tradition, but just 67.2% claimed current religious identification. More than half (52.6%) reported praying privately; additional spiritual practices reported included relaxation techniques (38.8%), meditation (29.3%), sacred readings (26.7%), and yoga (19%). The majority of academic pediatricians (58.6%) believed that personal spiritual or religious beliefs influenced their interactions with patients/colleagues. These odds increased 5.1-fold when academic pediatricians attended religious services monthly or more (P religious identity. The majority believed spiritual and religious beliefs influenced their practice of pediatrics. Whether secular or faith-based belief systems measurably modify academic pediatric practice is unknown.

  15. Is faculty practice valuable? The experience of Western Australian nursing and midwifery academics undertaking faculty clinical practice - A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amanda C; Baker, Melanie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-09-01

    The faculty clinical practice model provides dedicated time for nursing lecturers and educators in a university school of nursing to work with supervision in the clinical environments for an agreed amount of time each year. Allowing academics to partake in faculty clinical practice this way has been shown to update skills and retain clinical competency. Some nursing and midwifery academics believe it is essential to remain clinically current and up-to-date with professional issues in the clinical environments, whereas other academics believe reading current research maintains clinical competency. This discussion paper will explore the authors' own experiences of faculty clinical practice as an opportunity to enhance their learning. Narrative accounts of time spent in the clinical areas being expressed as invaluable as it allowed the authors to become part of the health professional team, refine clinical skills, gain clinical confidence, and share knowledge. This, in turn, impacted upon the academic's teaching style as well as redefined it by introducing incidents and stories from their experience. It has been concluded by the authors that faculty clinical practice allows academics to increase confidence, encourage leadership skills, and improve their teaching abilities in their clinical area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationships between Parenting Practices, Social Engagement, Academic Competency, and High School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parenting practices, social engagement, academic competency, and high school dropout. The study revealed students whose parents practiced Reactive Communication along with students that exhibited Truancy and Disciplinary Issues were more likely to drop out. Conversely, students…

  17. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  18. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  19. Job satisfaction among obstetrician-gynecologists: a comparison between private practice physicians and academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darrel J; Bringman, Jay; Bush, Andrew; Phillips, Owen P

    2006-11-01

    Physician job satisfaction has been the subject of much research. However, no studies have been conducted comparing academic and private practice physician satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology. This study was undertaken to measure satisfaction levels for academic and private practice obstetrician-gynecologists and compare different aspects of their practice that contributed to their satisfaction. A survey was mailed to randomly selected obstetrician-gynecologists in Memphis, TN; Birmingham, AL; Little Rock, AR; and Jackson, MS. Physicians were asked to respond to questions concerning demographics and career satisfaction. They were also asked to assess the contribution of 13 different aspects of their practice in contributing to their job selection and satisfaction using a Likert scale. A score of 1 meant the physician completely disagreed with a statement regarding a factor's contribution or was completely dissatisfied; a score of 5 meant the physician completely agreed with a factor's contribution or was completely satisfied. Simple descriptive statistics, as well as the 2-sample t test, were used. Likert scale values were assumed to be interval measurements. Of the 297 questionnaires mailed, 129 (43%) physicians responded. Ninety-five (74%) respondents rated their overall satisfaction as 4 or 5. No significant difference was found between academic and private physicians when comparing overall job satisfaction (P = .25). When compared to private practice physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to overall job satisfaction for academic physicians were the ability to teach, conduct research, and practice variety (P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .007, respectively). When compared with academic physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to job satisfaction for private practice physicians were autonomy, physician-patient relationship, and insurance reimbursement (P = .0058, P = .0001, and P = .0098, respectively). When choosing a practice setting

  20. Secular and Koranic Literacies in South Asia: From Colonisation to Contemporary Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the distinction between "secular" and "Koranic" schooling and literacy in South Asia. It begins by tracing an archaeology of the distinction between secular "literacy" and religious "illiteracy". It locates the emergence of the distinction in the colonial census of the 19th century, in…

  1. Teaching Literacy through Braille in Mainstream Settings whilst Promoting Inclusion: Reflections on Our Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Joao; Rogers, Sue; Donaldson, Marion; Gordon, Clare; Meager, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    We would describe teaching literacy through braille as one of the most rewarding and challenging aspects of the role of a Qualified Teacher for the Visually Impaired (QTVI). This article focuses on teaching literacy through braille in mainstream settings whilst promoting inclusion and meeting the social-emotional needs of children who use braille.…

  2. Information Literacy in the Tension between School's Discursive Practice and Students' Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-guided learning has had a major impact on adult education, where information seeking and use are key aspects of learning. With their lack of experience in study contexts, the students are nevertheless assumed to develop information literacy. Method: The paper aims to create an understanding of how information literacy can be…

  3. Cherokee Practice, Missionary Intentions: Literacy Learning among Early Nineteenth-Century Cherokee Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, M. Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how archival documents reveal early nineteenth-century Cherokee purposes for English-language literacy. In spite of Euro-American efforts to depoliticize Cherokee women's roles, Cherokee female students adapted the literacy tools of an outsider patriarchal society to retain public, political power. Their writing served…

  4. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  5. Critical Media Literacy in Action: Uniting Theory, Practice and Politics in Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin, Benjamin Joseph

    2012-01-01

    As media literacy is a growing field, there exist a number of distinct approaches to media education with varied political significance. Approaches such as protectionism, media arts education, and critical media literacy draw upon diverse theoretical traditions. Often overlooked in these traditions is the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School.…

  6. Practicing Critical Media Literacy Education: Developing a Community of Inquiry among Teachers Using Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Koulish, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Media literacy compels us to look anew at the most mundane, that which surrounds us: the media and our popular culture. From there media literacy compels us to accept that the media are constructed and to seek various ways to analyze them, while considering our own beliefs to evaluate for ourselves an ultimate interpretation. This process has the…

  7. Learning to Queer Text: Epiphanies from a Family Critical Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Nicola A.

    2018-01-01

    Critical literacy provides the opportunity to queer picture books and challenge normative depictions of family. In this autoethnography, the author describes her 4-year-old's journey of learning to talk back to texts as she actively constructs a better, more just world. The author argues that a critical literacy tool kit is vital to every child's…

  8. Information Literacy for Social Workers: University at Albany Libraries Prepare MSW Students for Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Brustman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of workshops, University at Albany librarians collaborate with the School of Social Welfare to impart information literacy skills to Master in Social Work students. The rationale, curriculum, and embedded ACRL information literacy standards are discussed. Also presented are assessments and a discussion of the challenges of implementation.

  9. Secondary Science Teachers' Implementation of CCSS and NGSS Literacy Practices: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Sally Valentino; Thomas, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Most middle and high school students struggle with reading and writing in science. This may be because science teachers are reluctant to teach literacy in science class. New standards now require a shift in the way science teachers develop students' literacy in science. This survey study examined the extent to which science teachers report…

  10. Information Literacy Strategy Development: Study Prescribes Strategic Management Framework for Academic Institutions. A Review of: Corrall, Sheila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Protzko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine the development of information literacy (IL strategies in higher education by assessing content and presentation of IL strategy documentation, and to explore the application of corporate strategy concepts and techniques to IL strategy.Design – Comparative, multi-case study. Qualitative analysis.Setting – U.K. universities.Subjects – Twelve information literacy strategy documents from ten institutions.Methods – Google was searched for IL strategy documents (restricted to the ac.uk domain, the LISINFOLITERACY discussion list was queried, and the Web sites of all U.K. universities were searched for a total sample of 12 documents at 10 institutions. Results of the data capture were discussed in the context of the literature on strategic management.Main Results – Corporate strategy tools and techniques are extensive in the literature, trending toward an emphasis on holistic thinking and marketing concepts. Many themes identified in the documents were consistent with the literature. While the format and style varied, all documents emphasized the integration of IL into subject curricula. All stressed the need to build collaborative partnerships between library/information staff and academic staff.Significantly, many strategies aimed to reach the broader institution, although poor articulation undermined this ambitious goal. In three, IL intervention was intended for the whole university community. However, the target audience often was not well-defined. Seven of the IL strategies identified additional partnerships to effect change at the policy level. Another key theme was the adoption of recognized IL standards; seven proposed the SCONUL (1999 model. All strategies recognized the importance of learning outcomes; six stated them explicitly. Prominent was the integration of e-learning resources, namely online tutorials. Many strategies recognized the need for marketing and advocacy activities. Half considered

  11. Promoting Climate And Data Literacy: University Courses Engaging Students In Effective Teaching, Learning, Communication And Outreach Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; McDonnell, J. D.; Apple, J. K.; Weiss, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Two university courses, 1) Promoting Climate Literacy and 2) Climate and Data Literacy, developed by the University of California Berkeley provide faculty across the country with course materials to help their students delve into the science underlying global environmental change. The courses include culturally responsive content, such as indigenous and place-based knowledge, and examine how people learn and consequently, how we should teach and communicate science. Promoting Climate Literacy was developed working with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Washington, and Western Washington University. Climate and Data Literacy was developed with Rutgers University and Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, WA. The Climate and Data Literacy course also focuses on helping students in science majors participating in U-Teach programs and students in pre-service teacher education programs gain skills in using real and near-real time data through engaging in investigations using web-based and locally-relevant data resources. The course helps these students understand and apply the scientific practices, disciplinary concepts and big ideas described in the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This course focuses on students interested in teaching middle school science for three reasons: (1) teachers often have relatively weak understandings of the practices of science, and of complex Earth systems science and climate change; (2) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the NGSS; and (3) middle school is a critical time for promoting student interest in science and for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. This course is now being field tested in a number of U-Teach programs including Florida State University, Louisiana State University, as well as pre-service teacher education programs at California State University East Bay, and Western Washington University

  12. Combining clinical practice and academic work in nursing: A qualitative study about perceived importance, facilitators and barriers regarding clinical academic careers for nurses in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Goedhart, Nicole S; Francke, Anneke L; Vermeulen, Hester

    2017-12-01

    To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurse academics and other stakeholders regarding the importance, facilitators and barriers for nurses combining clinical and academic work in university hospitals. Combining clinical practice and academic work facilitates the use of research findings for high-quality patient care. However, nurse academics move away from the bedside because clinical academic careers for nurses have not yet been established in the Netherlands. This qualitative study was conducted in two Dutch university hospitals and their affiliated medical faculties and universities of applied sciences. Data were collected between May 2015 and August 2016. We used purposive sampling for 24 interviews. We asked 14 participants in two focus groups for their perceptions of importance, facilitators and barriers in nurses' combined clinical and academic work in education and research. We audiotaped, transcribed and thematically analysed the interviews and focus groups. Three themes related to perceived importance, facilitators and barriers: culture, leadership and infrastructure. These themes represent deficiencies in facilitating clinical academic careers for nurses. The current nursing culture emphasises direct patient care, which is perceived as an academic misfit. Leadership is lacking at all levels, resulting in the underuse of nurse academics and the absence of supporting structures for nurses who combine clinical and academic work. The present nursing culture appears to be the root cause of the dearth of academic positions and established clinical academic posts. A culture change would require a show of leadership that would promote and enable combined research, teaching and clinical practice and that would introduce clinical academic career pathways for nurses. Meanwhile, nurse academics should collaborate with established medical academics for whom combined roles are mainstream, and they should take advantage of their established infrastructure

  13. Gender and Academic Leadership Practices at Copenhagen Business School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Villeseche, Florence

    . First, it examines the following aspects in relation to gender: 1) Management practices in recruitment and promotion (with a special focus on scouting and nudging); 2) Management practices in establishing and maintaining good work cultures and attractive research environments; 3) Best practices......This report examines the relationship between gender and the Heads of Department group’s leadership practices at Copenhagen Business School. This research project is one of the initiatives of the action plan developed by the Diversity and Inclusion Council at this university. Its aim is two fold...... and guidelines for the promotion of diversity and equality, including suggestions for avoiding unconscious bias. Second, this initiative aims to stimulate self-reflexivity and open dialogue on the topic of gender and talent development among CBS’s management groups and between these groups and the Diversity...

  14. Literacies in the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, the author invites readers to consider the body and its central place in literacy pedagogy, practice and research. She emphasizes two interrelated paths for teachers and researchers interested in literacies to tend to the body: (1) the ways literacies are engaged and cultivated for making sense of bodies, and (2) the literacies…

  15. Marketing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, more than a decade after the original Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter the Standards) were institutionalized as the goal of academic library instruction, the Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force convened by ACRL recommended…

  16. Creating and sustaining an academic-practice Partnership Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schoon, Patricia M; Brueshoff, Bonnie L

    2017-11-01

    Public health clinical educators and practicing public health nurses (PHNs) are experiencing challenges in creating meaningful clinical learning experiences for nursing students due to an increase in nursing programs and greater workload responsibilities for both nursing faculty and PHNs. The Henry Street Consortium (HSC), a collaborative group of PHNs and nursing faculty, conducted a project to identify best practices for public health nursing student clinical learning experiences. Project leaders surveyed HSC members about preferences for teaching-learning strategies, facilitated development of resources and tools to guide learning, organized faculty/PHN pilot teams to test resources and tools with students, and evaluated the pilot team experiences through two focus groups. The analysis of the outcomes of the partnership engagement project led to the development of the Partnership Engagement Model (PEM), which may be used by nursing faculty and their public health practice partners to guide building relationships and sustainable partnerships for educating nursing students. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Measuring Practicing Clinicians' Information Literacy. An Exploratory Analysis in the Context of Panel Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E; Bennett, Katelyn J; Sherman, Scott E; Schwartz, Mark D

    2017-02-15

    As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans' Affairs (VA) medical center. Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach's α=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson's correlations. Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians' information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs.

  18. Academic Practice, APA Referencing Style:guidelines for staff and students

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangivelse og referencer i henhold til APA referencing system.Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og...

  19. French college students' sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, Greg; Boujut, Emilie; Brisset, Camille

    2012-01-01

    College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students' sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular, or intensive) would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies, and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  20. French college students’ sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg eDécamps

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students’ sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular or intensive would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  1. Combining clinical practice and academic work in nursing: a qualitative study about perceived importance, facilitators and barriers regarding clinical academic careers for nurses in university hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, C.J. van; Goedhart, N.S.; Francke, A.L.; Vermeulen, H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurse aca- demics and other stakeholders regarding the importance, facilitators and barriers for nurses combining clinical and academic work in university hospitals. Background: Combining clinical practice and academic work

  2. Family Digital Literacy Practices and Children’s Mobile Phone Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M.; Ramsay, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Smart phones are ubiquitous in everyday life and are having a major impact on work, education, social relationships and modes of communication. Children are the fastest growing population of smart phone users, with use often focusing around internet access, e.g., 1 in 3 internet users in the UK are under 18 years of age. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the factors that underpin children’s use. The home is a significant ecological context of development and recent research has highlighted the importance of the home environment in promoting and supporting the development of both safe and unsafe online behavior. Yet the importance of these influences currently remains relatively unrecognized. Therefore, in this paper we present a narrative review of evidence examining parental practices concerning digital communication technologies and applications, with a particular focus on smartphones, and how they relate to the use of technology by their children. Emerging evidence to date indicates that two important factors are at play. Firstly, parental technology use is closely related to that of their child. Secondly, that despite parents frequently voiced concerns about the nature and extent of their child’s mobile phone use, parents themselves often engage in a number of unsafe internet behaviors and excessive phone use in the home environment. Our review identifies two crucial lines of enquiry that have yet to be comprehensively pursued by researchers in the field: firstly, the adoption of a psychological perspective on children’s emergent behaviors with mobile devices and secondly, the influential role of context. Given parental concerns about the possible negative impact of technologies, parental awareness should be raised about the influence of their behavior in the context of internet safety along with the adoption of good digital literacy practices. It is anticipated that a comprehensive characterization of the associated

  3. Developing Academic Literacy and Voice: Challenges Faced by a Mature ESL Student and Her Instructors (Desarrollo del discurso académico y la voz: retos de una estudiante de inglés como segunda lengua y sus profesores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on critical, socio-cultural and sociolinguistic theories of writing, text and voice, this ethnographic study examines the challenges that a mature ESL student and her instructors in a university course on Spanish Language Media face as they co-construct a common understanding of academic literacy and voice in an undergraduate General…

  4. Intelligence, Academic Self-Concept, and Information Literacy: The Role of Adequate Perceptions of Academic Ability in the Acquisition of Knowledge about Information Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present paper argues that adequate self-perceptions of academic ability are essential for students' realization of their intellectual potential, thereby fostering learning of complex skills, e.g., information-seeking skills. Thus, academic self-concept should moderate the relationship between intelligence and information…

  5. PUBLICATION ACTIVITY AND ITS ROLE IN ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT OF HEI ACADEMIC STAFF (RUSSIAN PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Ardashkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyze and summarize the Russian best practices of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the professional activity of the academic staff; to identify the role of motivational factors as a method to manage and control the publication activity of the academic staff.Methods. The authors address the methodology of comprehensive research based on the method of document analysis, comparative analysis, and method of secondary use of sociological and psychological data.Results and scientific novelty concludes in presenting Russian and international best practices generalized on using the publication activity to assess the engagement of HEI (Higher Educational Institution academic staff; the most appropriate formats of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the research component of the academic staff engagement are defined. Degree of reliability of this criterion is shown – its strengths and shortcomings. The conclusion is drawn on need of the essential changes in management of publication activity affecting both professional and motivational spheres of scientific and pedagogical staff. The most acceptable options of measurement of staff work efficiency of this category are formulated.Practical significance. The research outcomes can be the corpus for designing the assessment method for the professional engagement of the academic staff.

  6. Social Media Utilization at an Academic Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Nicholas A; Kamer, Aaron P; Dodson, Sean C; Capps, Alisha E; Tomblinson, Courtney M; Brown, Brandon P; Frank, Mark S; Heitkamp, Darel E

    2018-01-01

    We report social media (SoMe) utilization trends at an academic radiology department, highlighting differences between trainees and faculty and between Baby Boomers versus Generation X and Millennials. An anonymous online survey regarding SoMe utilization and SoMe-based educational curriculum was distributed to all radiologists (trainees and faculty) in our department. Regular chi-square, ordered (Mantel-Haenszel) chi-square, and Fischer exact tests were performed. The survey instrument was sent to 172 radiologists with a 65% completion rate (N = 112). Eighty-three percent (n = 92) of the respondents use SoMe, with Facebook (67%, n = 75), YouTube (57%, n = 64), Instagram (26%, n = 29), and Twitter (21%, n = 23) as the most commonly used platforms. Eighty-one percent (n = 91) use SoMe for 30 minutes or less per day. Thirty-five percent (n = 39) reported previously using SoMe for educational purposes, although 66% (n = 73) would be willing to join SoMe for educational activities. The faculty are more likely than trainees to avoid using SoMe (30% vs 9%, P < 0.03). Trainees are more likely than faculty to find an electronic case-based curriculum valuable (95% vs 83%, P < 0.05) and are willing to spend more time on cases (P < 0.01). Baby Boomers are less interested in joining SoMe for educational activities than Generation X and Millennials (24% vs 73%, P = 0.0001). Generation gaps between trainees and faculty, as well as between Generation X and Millennials versus Baby Boomers, exist with regard to the use of SoMe, which may be underutilized in radiology education. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical Spaces for Critical Times: Global Conversations in Literacy Research as an Open Professional Development and Practices Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Albers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects an OER (Open Educational Resources critical literacy project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR, (www.globalconversationsinliteracy.wordpress.com, now in its fourth year. GCLR annually hosts seven web seminars presented by internationally recognized literacy and education scholars. We outline key dimensions of GCLR not only as an OER but as an open educational practice (OEP (Andrade et al., 2011 that through its design, not only provides open access to scholarship, but also understands the critical nexus among resources, practices and theory. Informed by data from a longitudinal study, this paper situates these dimensions within professional development literature, and outlines GCLR as a critical space designed for critical times, and the importance of intentionality when accessing OER. Like scholars before us, we argue that that availability is not the only consideration when using OER (Andrade et al., 2011; OER must be considered in relation to pedagogical considerations and how OER are used as a critical component to online professional development.

  8. Health promotion in pediatric primary care: importance of health literacy and communication practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deborah Winders; Jones, V Faye; Logsdon, M Cynthia; Ryan, Lesa; Wilkerson-McMahon, Mandie

    2013-12-01

    Health literacy has been shown to predict health behaviors and outcomes above the effects of education or socioeconomic status. Much remains unknown about the health literacy of parents and the role it plays in children's health outcomes or in health disparities. The current study explored the health communication needs and health literacy indicators in a diverse sample of parents (n = 75) to identify potential areas for future interventions. The sample consisted of parents of children 18 to 36 months old who were visiting 3 different pediatric medical offices, 2 of which served low-income families and 1 located in an affluent suburb. When comparisons were made between 2 educational attainment groups, there were variations in indicators of health literacy and health communication needs. These data can be used to guide the development of interventions by primary care providers to improve parent education.

  9. Popular Culture and Critical Media Literacy in Adult Education: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter introduces the volume, provides an overview of the theory and literature on popular culture and critical media literacy in education, and discusses ways to use popular culture in adult education.

  10. The Challenges of Promoting Literacy Integration within a Play-Based Learning Kindergarten Program: Teacher Perspectives and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Angela; Poliszczuk, Daniel; Danniels, Erica

    2018-01-01

    Kindergarten teachers face the challenge of balancing traditional developmental programming and contemporary academic standards. In classrooms following a play-based learning framework, academic content such as literacy is to be taught within children's play. However, educators have reported conceptual and practical challenges with integrating…

  11. Conversation as Academic Practice: Tutors' Strategies in Integrating Student Learning in a Professional Training Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Bowden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tutors are generally considered to be an additional resource in teaching and learning, as a means of augmenting that of the lecturer. This article explores tutors as academic staff with responsibilities for developing practice competencies and integrating student learning in a social care professional training degree programme. The research is small-scale, based upon data from a purposive sample of five interviews; and upon insider-participant observation notes and reflections in one single setting. The author deployed a situated ethnographic methodology alongside a frame analytic approach. The research found that in their academic practice, tutors reveal how their student contact is oriented to developing a reflective practitioner and they discuss how programme inputs impact on the student’s professional self. Simultaneously, tutors seek to create cross programme integration through finding overlaps with academic programme strands.

  12. Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture: Language is literacy is language - Positioning speech-language pathology in education policy, practice, paradigms and polemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela C

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the fundamental and intrinsic links between early receptive and expressive oral language competence on the one hand and the transition to literacy in the early school years and achievement of academic (and life) success on the other. Consequently, it also concerns the professional knowledge base of two key disciplines whose work is central to children's early language and literacy success: teachers and speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Oral language competence underpins the transition to literacy, which in turn underpins academic achievement. Academic achievement is significant in its own right, conferring opportunities for further education and training post-secondary school, contributing to psychological health and mitigating some of the mental health risks and adversities that can be associated with adolescence and early adulthood. The central thesis is that the linguistic basis of the transition to literacy makes early reading success core business for SLPs. Further, SLPs need a firm grasp of the political and ideological factors that have exerted historical and continuing influence on reading instruction in western nations such as Australia, the US and the UK. This will facilitate the establishment of meaningful working relationships with teaching colleagues, to achieve optimal education outcomes for all children.

  13. Identification of at-risk students and strategies to improve academic success in first year health programs. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gerard Pearson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to university is a difficult process for many students, having a negative impact on their academic performance, ultimately resulting in failure or withdrawal from one or more courses in their first semester. This practice report describes a profile analysis and readiness assessment designed to identify students at high academic risk. Students so identified were offered additional workshops to address assumed knowledge and academic skills. Attendance at the workshops correlated with improved academic outcomes.

  14. Citizen expectations of 'academic entrepreneurship' in health research: public science, practical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona A; Painter-Main, Michael; Axler, Renata; Lehoux, Pascale; Giacomini, Mita; Slater, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Responsiveness to citizens as users of technological innovation helps motivate translational research and commercial engagement among academics. Yet, retaining citizen trust and support for research encourages caution in pursuit of commercial science. We explore citizen expectations of the specifically academic nature of commercial science [i.e. academic entrepreneurship (AE)] and the influence of conflict of interest concerns, hopes about practical benefits and general beliefs. We conducted a cross-sectional national opinion survey of 1002 Canadians online in 2010. Approval of AE was moderate (mean 3.2/5, SD 0.84), but varied by entrepreneurial activity. Concern about conflict of interests (COI) was moderate (mean 2.9/5, SD 0.86) and varied by type of concern. An ordinary least-squares regression showed that expectations of practical benefits informed support for AE, specifically that academic-industry collaboration can better address real-world problems; conflict of interest concerns were insignificant. These findings suggest that citizens support AE for its potential to produce practical benefits, but enthusiasm varies and is reduced for activities that may prioritize private over public interests. Further, support exists despite concern about COI, perhaps due to trust in the academic research context. For user engagement in research priority setting, these findings suggest the need to attend to the commercial nature of translational science. For research policy, they suggest the need for governance arrangements for responsible innovation, which can sustain public trust in academic research, and realize the practical benefits that inform public support for AE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Grit in the Oyster – does an appreciation of threshold concepts in an adult literacies teaching qualification result in pearls of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wallace

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws from the experiences of a new adult literacies teaching qualification in Scotland that has been designed for experienced but unqualified adult literacies tutors.  Created to respond to an approach to adult literacies as social practices (Scottish Executive 2001, 2005, Tett et al 2006, the course team employs a sociocultural pedagogy that explicitly rejects transmission and seeks to build critical reflection through learning from experience, collaborative activities and the creation of an on-line community (Ackland and Wallace 2006.  Recognising that ‘moments of conflict and disjuncture may form the spaces in which learning occurs’ (Lewis, Enciso and Moje 2007:5 the paper explores whether ideas about liminality and threshold concepts (Cousin 2006:1, Land, Meyer and Smith 2008 illuminate the learning process.  It concludes that engagement with these concepts may assist adult literacies tutors to develop transformed practice (Cope and Kalantzis 2003:35.

  16. Practices of Conformity and Resistance in the Marketisation of the Academy: Bourdieu, Professionalism and Academic Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Fran M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on an empirical study based on qualitative interviews with staff from four Australian universities. These universities are shown to be undergoing significant social change as processes of marketisation impact on the everyday practices of academic workers. The universities are analysed as sites of contestation between the new…

  17. The Role of Communities of Practice in the Professional Education of Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeaua, Edward; Carson, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to better understand the range of learning practices that academic librarians use throughout their careers, and to explore the ways library schools give students the opportunities to engage in learning methods that they are likely to use in their careers as librarians. The study uses semi-structured interviews with…

  18. On the Borders: Adjusting to Academic, Social and Cultural Practices at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John; Ljungdahl, Lesley; Maher, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Adjustment to university is challenging for students as they navigate a path through new academic, social and cultural practices. Some may feel on the borders, marginalised by their background. Issues such as adjustment to university life, independence, performance expectations, establishing friendships, technological competence, cultural capital,…

  19. The Relationship between Disciplinary Practices in Childhood and Academic Dishonesty in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, R. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although academic dishonesty is known to be prevalent in institutions of higher education, little research has examined the role that differences in disciplinary techniques used in childhood play in its occurrence. This study investigated the relationship between specific disciplinary practices, particularly harsh physical discipline, and the…

  20. Parental Beliefs Concerning Development and Education, Family Educational Practices and Children's Intellectual and Academic Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazouti, Youssef; Malarde, Amelie; Michea, Aurelie

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the relationships between parental beliefs relating to development and education, parenting practices, and the intellectual and academic performances of children. Data were collected for 128 families with a child in the second or third year of primary school. Investigations of the factors affecting the children's…

  1. Communities of Practice in Higher Education: Professional Learning in an Academic Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Linet

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the life history of a university academic, and the ways in which he learned in different communities of practice during his career. This account raises questions about the applicability of situated learning theory to a knowledge-based organisation, and argues that both the external context and the individuals within the…

  2. How Implementation of Bibliometric Practice Affects the Role of Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, Fredrik; Hansson, Joacim

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses potential consequences of implementing bibliometrics as an institutionalized practice in academic libraries. Results are reported from a survey among libraries in Sweden with organized bibliometric activities. Incorporating bibliometric activities is one way of redefining and widening the role of the library. Implementation…

  3. Latino Parent Home-Based Practices that Bolster Student Academic Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Jasmine A.

    2011-01-01

    Home-based parental involvement practices (i.e., educational encouragement, monitoring, and support) and their impact on students' academic persistence were investigated with a sample of 137, ninth-grade Latino students in a northeast high school. Structural Equation Modeling results indicate that the relationship between home-based parental…

  4. International survey of academic library data curation practices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This survey looks closely at the data curation practices of a sample of research-oriented universities largely from the USA, the UK, Australia and Scandinavia but also including India, South Africa and other countries. The study looks at how major universities are assisting faculty in developing data curation and management plans for large scale data projects, largely in the sciences and social sciences, often as pre-conditions for major grants. The report looks at which departments of universities are shouldering the data curation burden, the personnel involved in the efforts, the costs involved, types of software used, difficulties in procuring scientific experiment logs and other hard to obtain information, types of training offered to faculty, and other issues in large scale data management.

  5. Advancing organizational health literacy in health care organizations serving high-needs populations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Nancy L; Wray, Ricardo J; Zellin, Stacie; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri

    2012-01-01

    Health care organizations, well positioned to address health literacy, are beginning to shift their systems and policies to support health literacy efforts. Organizations can identify barriers, emphasize and leverage their strengths, and initiate activities that promote health literacy-related practices. The current project employed an open-ended approach to conduct a needs assessment of rural federally qualified health center clinics. Using customized assessment tools, the collaborators were then able to determine priorities for changing organizational structures and policies in order to support continued health literacy efforts. Six domains of organizational health literacy were measured with three methods: environmental assessments, patient interviews, and key informant interviews with staff and providers. Subsequent strategic planning was conducted by collaborators from the academic and clinic teams and resulted in a focused, context-appropriate action plan. The needs assessment revealed several gaps in organizational health literacy practices, such as low awareness of health literacy within the organization and variation in perceived values of protocols, interstaff communication, and patient communication. Facilitators included high employee morale and patient satisfaction. The resulting targeted action plan considered the organization's culture as revealed in the interviews, informing a collaborative process well suited to improving organizational structures and systems to support health literacy best practices. The customized needs assessment contributed to an ongoing collaborative process to implement organizational changes that aided in addressing health literacy needs.

  6. Developing professional identity in nursing academics: the role of communities of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nicola; Ferguson, Dorothy; Wilkie, George; Corcoran, Terry; Simpson, Liz

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the current standing of nursing within the wider United Kingdom (UK) higher education (HE) environment and considers the development of academic identity within the sector, introducing a technology mediated approach to professional learning and development. A community of practice (CoP) is a way of learning based on collaboration among peers. Individuals come together virtually or physically, with a common purpose, defined by knowledge rather than task [Wenger, E., 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, sixth ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge]. In 2008, a small team of academics at Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health created and implemented iCoP, a project undertaken to pilot an international CoP, where novices and expert academics collaborated to debate and discuss the complex transition from clinician to academic. Although not intended as a conventional research project, the developmental journey and emerging online discussion provide an insight into the collective thoughts and opinions of a multi-national group of novice academics. The article also highlights the key challenges, problems and limitations of working in an international online arena with professionals who traditionally work and thrive in a face to face, real time environment.

  7. The Relationship between Bible Literacy and Behavioral and Academic Outcomes in Urban Areas: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis is undertaken, including 11 studies, to determine whether there is a relationship between Bible knowledge on one hand and academic and behavioral outcomes on the other among those living in urban areas. The results indicate that increased Bible knowledge is associated with higher levels of student academic achievement and positive…

  8. Disciplinary literacy redefining deep understanding and leadership for 21st-century demands

    CERN Document Server

    Piercy, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Disciplinary Literacy addresses the practical issues of how teachers can help students engage in creativity, communication, and critical thinking, while remaining true to the rigors of academic disciplines. The authors detail specific literacy actions to increase connections between the disciplines of mathematics, history, science, English language arts, music and student's lives. For teachers and administrators there are immediately transferable instructional models provided for different content areas, including aligned connections with Common Core Standards.

  9. Translating integrity into policy and practice – HEIs leaders as political and academic mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Lise

    As the higher education sectors all over the world are changing, due to both external and internal pressures, new questions arise concerning academic work, and the norms and practices that influence it. The proposed paper aims at exploring how the recent focus on “research integrity” influences t...... the organization and practices of higher education institutions, and how pressures from without and within the organizations are navigated by leaders and managers.......As the higher education sectors all over the world are changing, due to both external and internal pressures, new questions arise concerning academic work, and the norms and practices that influence it. The proposed paper aims at exploring how the recent focus on “research integrity” influences...

  10. Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice (EBP): how nurse academics facilitate EBP use in theory and practice across Australian undergraduate programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-09-01

    This paper is drawn from a grounded theory study that aimed to investigate processes undertaken by academics when integrating evidence-based practice into undergraduate curricula. This paper focuses on how nurse academics facilitated students to apply evidence-based practice in theory and practice. Facilitating undergraduate nursing students to develop skills within an evidence-based practice framework is vital to achieving evidence-based care. Studies on evidence-based practice conducted globally suggests that there is a need to investigate approaches used by nurse academics in facilitating students' understanding and use of evidence-based practice during their nurse education. Employing constructivist grounded theory approach, 23 nurse academics across Australian universities were interviewed and nine observed during their teaching. Some study participants shared their unit guides to enrich analysis. Data analysis was performed by following Charmaz's approach of coding procedures; as a result, four categories were constructed. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice. Findings revealed that most academics-assisted students to use evidence in academic-related activities. Recognising the importance of evidence-based practice in practice, some also expected students to apply evidence-based practice during clinical experiences. However, the level of students' appreciation for evidence-based practice during clinical experiences was unknown to participants and was influenced by practice-related barriers. Acknowledging these challenges, academics were engaged in dialogue with students and suggested the need for academia-practice collaboration in combating the cited barriers. Ensuring academics are supported to emphasise clinical application of evidence-based practice requires strategies at school and practice levels. Faculty development, engagement of clinical nurses with evidence-based practice, supportive

  11. Quality Control Practices for Chemistry and Immunochemistry in a Cohort of 21 Large Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Flood, James G; Melanson, Stacy E F; Baumann, Nikola A; Marzinke, Mark A; Rai, Alex J; Hayden, Joshua; Wu, Alan H B; Ladror, Megan; Lifshitz, Mark S; Scott, Mitchell G; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Bowen, Raffick; Babic, Nikolina; Sobhani, Kimia; Giacherio, Donald; Bocsi, Gregary T; Herman, Daniel S; Wang, Ping; Toffaletti, John; Handel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Kathleen A; Albeiroti, Sami; Wang, Sihe; Zimmer, Melissa; Driver, Brandon; Yi, Xin; Wilburn, Clayton; Lewandrowski, Kent B

    2018-05-29

    In the United States, minimum standards for quality control (QC) are specified in federal law under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment and its revisions. Beyond meeting this required standard, laboratories have flexibility to determine their overall QC program. We surveyed chemistry and immunochemistry QC procedures at 21 clinical laboratories within leading academic medical centers to assess if standardized QC practices exist for chemistry and immunochemistry testing. We observed significant variation and unexpected similarities in practice across laboratories, including QC frequency, cutoffs, number of levels analyzed, and other features. This variation in practice indicates an opportunity exists to establish an evidence-based approach to QC that can be generalized across institutions.

  12. Curriculum scholars: Embedding learning and teaching scholarship in first year academic identities. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This practice report details an institutional innovation designed to enhance academic capacities for curriculum development, with a particular focus on the first year experience (FYE. The authors discuss the appointment of “Curriculum Scholars” in each of the faculties at James Cook University. This innovation can be seen as an example of third generation responses to the challenges of the first year in higher education (FYHE (Kift, Nelson & Clarke, 2010. The report  discusses the question of academic identity and the tension between a discipline-specific identity and identification with the scholarship of teaching and learning. The authors argue that this tension may have significant implications for the success of third generation approaches to the FYE. This tension is the focus of a multi-method research project being developed by the authors. The autoethnographical dimension of this project is described, inviting participants to reflect on their own journeys as academics engaged in learning and teaching.

  13. Poor Documentation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality Measures in Academic, Community, and Private Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Joseph D; Castillo, Natalia E; Siddique, Sana S; Lewandowski, Jeffrey J; Geissler, Kathy; Martinez-Vazquez, Manuel; Thukral, Chandrashekhar; Leffler, Daniel A; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2016-03-01

    Quality measures are used to standardize health care and monitor quality of care. In 2011, the American Gastroenterological Association established quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but there has been limited documentation of compliance from different practice settings. We reviewed charts from 367 consecutive patients with IBD seen at academic practices, 217 patients seen at community practices, and 199 patients seen at private practices for compliance with 8 outpatient measures. Records were assessed for IBD history, medications, comorbidities, and hospitalizations. We also determined the number of patient visits to gastroenterologists in the past year, whether patients had a primary care physician at the same institution, and whether they were seen by a specialist in IBD or in conjunction with a trainee, and reviewed physician demographics. A univariate and multivariate statistical analysis was performed to determine which factors were associated with compliance of all core measures. Screening for tobacco abuse was the most frequently assessed core measure (89.6% of patients; n = 701 of 783), followed by location of IBD (80.3%; n = 629 of 783), and assessment for corticosteroid-sparing therapy (70.8%; n = 275 of 388). The least-frequently evaluated measures were pneumococcal immunization (16.7% of patients; n = 131 of 783), bone loss (25%; n = 126 of 505), and influenza immunization (28.7%; n = 225 of 783). Only 5.8% of patients (46 of 783) had all applicable core measures documented (24 in academic practice, none in clinical practice, and 22 in private practice). In the multivariate model, year of graduation from fellowship (odds ratio [OR], 2.184; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.522-3.134; P measures. We found poor documentation of IBD quality measures in academic, clinical, and private gastroenterology practices. Interventions are necessary to improve reporting of quality measures. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  14. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DelliFraine, Jami L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess academic emergency medicine (EM chairs’ perceptions of quality improvement (QI training programs.Methods: A voluntary anonymous 20 item survey was distributed to a sample of academic chairs of EM through the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. Data was collected to assess the percentage of academic emergency physicians who had received QI training, the type of training they received, their perception of the impact of this training on behavior, practice and outcomes, and any perceived barriers to implementing QI programs in the emergency department.Results: The response rate to the survey was 69% (N = 59. 59.3% of respondents report that their hospital has a formal QI program for physicians. Chairs received training in a variety of QI programs. The type of QI program used by respondents was perceived as having no impact on goals achieved by QI (χ2 = 12.382; p = 0.260, but there was a statistically significant (χ2 = 14.383; p = 0.006 relationship between whether or not goals were achieved and academic EM chairs’ perceptions about return on investment for QI training. Only 22% of chairs responded that they have already made changes as a result of the QI training. 78.8% of EM chairs responded that quality programs could have a significant positive impact on their practice and the healthcare industry. Chairs perceived that QI programs had the most potential value in the areas of understanding and reducing medical errors and improving patient flow and throughput. Other areas of potential value of QI include improving specific clinical indicators and standardizing physician care.Conclusion: Academic EM chairs perceived that QI programs were an effective way to drive needed improvements. The results suggest that there is a high level of interest in QI but a low level of adoption of training and implementation.[West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:479-485.

  15. Development of a Regional Nursing Research Partnership for Academic and Practice Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Tubbs-Cooley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Collaborative nursing research across academic and practice settings is imperative to generate knowledge to improve patient care. Models of academic/practice partnerships for nursing research are lacking. This paper reports data collected before and during a one-day retreat for nurse researchers and administrators from local universities and health care organizations designed to establish a regional nursing research partnership. Methods. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to address the study aims: (1 to assess research involvement and institutional research resources; (2 to assess interest in and concerns regarding cross-institutional collaborations; and (3 to describe perceptions of the purpose of a partnership and resources needed to ensure success. Results. Participants (n=49 had differing perceptions of accessibility to resources; participants in practice settings reported less accessibility to resources, notably grant development, informatics, and research assistant support. Participants were interested in collaboration although concerns about conflict of interest were expressed. Four themes related to partnering were identified: harnessing our nursing voice and identity; developing as researchers; staying connected; and positioning for a collaborative project. Conclusion. Academic-practice research collaborations will become increasingly important with health care system changes. Strategies to develop and sustain productive partnerships should be supported.

  16. Perceived Statistical Knowledge Level and Self-Reported Statistical Practice Among Academic Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Publications arguing against the null hypothesis significance testing (NHST procedure and in favor of good statistical practices have increased. The most frequently mentioned alternatives to NHST are effect size statistics (ES, confidence intervals (CIs, and meta-analyses. A recent survey conducted in Spain found that academic psychologists have poor knowledge about effect size statistics, confidence intervals, and graphic displays for meta-analyses, which might lead to a misinterpretation of the results. In addition, it also found that, although the use of ES is becoming generalized, the same thing is not true for CIs. Finally, academics with greater knowledge about ES statistics presented a profile closer to good statistical practice and research design. Our main purpose was to analyze the extension of these results to a different geographical area through a replication study.Methods: For this purpose, we elaborated an on-line survey that included the same items as the original research, and we asked academic psychologists to indicate their level of knowledge about ES, their CIs, and meta-analyses, and how they use them. The sample consisted of 159 Italian academic psychologists (54.09% women, mean age of 47.65 years. The mean number of years in the position of professor was 12.90 (SD = 10.21.Results: As in the original research, the results showed that, although the use of effect size estimates is becoming generalized, an under-reporting of CIs for ES persists. The most frequent ES statistics mentioned were Cohen's d and R2/η2, which can have outliers or show non-normality or violate statistical assumptions. In addition, academics showed poor knowledge about meta-analytic displays (e.g., forest plot and funnel plot and quality checklists for studies. Finally, academics with higher-level knowledge about ES statistics seem to have a profile closer to good statistical practices.Conclusions: Changing statistical practice is not

  17. Comparison of private versus academic practice for general surgeons: a guide for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Brownstein, Michelle R; Sheldon, George F

    2003-12-01

    Medical students and residents often make specialty and practice choices with limited exposure to aspects of professional and personal life in general surgery. The purpose of this study was to portray practice composition, career choices, professional experiences, job satisfaction, and personal life characteristics specific to practicing general surgeons in the United States. A 131-question survey was mailed to all female members (n = 1,076) and a random 2:1 sample of male members (n = 2,152) of the American College of Surgeons in three mailings between September 1998 and March 1999. Respondents who were not actively practicing general surgery in the United States and both trainees and surgeons who did not fit the definition of private or academic practice were excluded. Detailed questions regarding practice attributes, surgical training, professional choices, harassment, malpractice, career satisfaction, and personal life characteristics were included. Separate five-point Likert scales were designed to measure influences on career choices and satisfaction with professional and personal matters. Univariate analyses were used to analyze responses by surgeon age, gender, and practice type. A response rate of 57% resulted in 1,532 eligible responses. Significant differences between private and academic practice were noted in case composition, practice structure, and income potential; no major differences were seen in malpractice experience. Propensity for marriage and parenthood differed significantly between men and women surgeons. Overall career satisfaction was very high regardless of practice type. Some differences by surgeon gender in perceptions of equal career advancement opportunities and of professional isolation were noted. This study offers a comprehensive view of general surgery to enable more informed decisions among medical students and residents regarding specialty choice or practice opportunities.

  18. Widened Frameworks and Practice: From Bibliotherapy to the Literacy of Testimony and Witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpow, Ray; Askov, Eunice N.

    2001-01-01

    Considers what literacy teachers can do to prevent subsequent school failure and lowered test scores with media attention on school violence and trauma in and out of schools. Suggests bibliotherapy, a familiar tool used in earlier decades by teachers to counsel students with problems, is useful today in dealing with students who suffer from…

  19. Children Working with Text in Science: disparities with 'Literacy Hour' practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Alan; Weedon, Helen

    2002-02-01

    The National Literacy Strategy (NLS) provides a coherent plan of what and how children should be taught about non-fiction text. Nevertheless, the difficulties that children actually experience when using science texts are not fully addressed: in particular, the use and interpretation of the visual elements of science text is given limited attention in the prescriptions for teaching the 'Literacy Hour'. Such disparities identified by prior research and by a content analysis of the NLS Framework Document are considered alongside evidence of the difficulties encountered by a class of Year 5 pupils working with a range of non-fiction texts during science lessons. Pupils' text use is studied through observations and interviews with children, through interviews with their teachers and through a questionnaire about text use strategies. The findings suggest that (1) the pupils experienced considerable difficulty in making sense of the science content of non-fiction text, particularly in terms of interpretation of visual elements and their links to written text and (2) use of retrieval strategies taught during the Literacy Hour was not transferred to learning from text during science lessons. The study proposes closer planning of text use in science and literacy lessons.

  20. Recognizing the "Social" in Literacy as a Social Practice: Building on the Resources of Nonmainstream Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Courtney R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an after-school program in which immigrant and urban low-income middle school students collaborated to create social maps of their school and to produce a multilingual video against gossip. These literacy-based projects combined critical pedagogy and culturally relevant pedagogy to promote meaningful interactions between…

  1. The Practice and Principles of Teaching Critical Literacy at the Educational Video Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The Educational Video Center (EVC) is an independent nonprofit media organization that has worked to build students' skills in documentary production and media literacy while nurturing their intellectual development and civic engagement. As founding director of EVC, the author has spent more than 20 years working with students and teachers in New…

  2. Seeing and Hearing: Examining Production Workers' Literacy and Numeracy Practices in a Context of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony; Yasukawa, Keiko; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A policy consensus has emerged in Australia that there is a workforce literacy and numeracy crisis, similar to many other Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. The study informing this paper examined this framing of crisis by interviewing and observing production workers in three manufacturing companies. Each company was…

  3. Concentrated Language Encounter Approach in Practice for Global Teaching of Literacy: Lighthouse Strategy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the lighthouse literacy strategies model using the concentrated language encounter (CLE) approach that has been successfully replicated in many countries in different languages and cultures. A review of CLE research studies and the project implementation in Thailand showed highly significant results in students' literacy…

  4. Promoting Early Literacy via Practicing Invented Spelling: A Comparison of Different Mediation Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Iris; Aram, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of different mediation routines provided to kindergartners from families of low socioeconomic status on the students' invented spelling attempts and on their gains obtained on spelling and other early literacy skills (letter naming, sounds of letters, word segmentation, and word decoding). The effects of the…

  5. The Role of Digital Literacy Practices on Refugee Resettlement: The Case of Three Karen Brothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooly, Daniel; Lee, Eunbae

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the social and cultural uses of digital literacies by adolescent immigrants to cope with their new lives in the United States. This case study focuses on three adolescent ethnic Karen brothers. Two years of participant observations in their home and Karen community, accompanied by formal and informal interviews, served as the…

  6. A Comparative Study of Family Social Capital and Literacy Practices in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Hu, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    Social capital--the social relations between people--is an important component of the family environment and is crucial for the creation of human capital for the next generation. Drawing on James S. Coleman's theory of family capital, this study focuses on parents' utilization of social capital to support children's literacy acquisition in four…

  7. Rethinking Normative Literacy Practices, Behaviors, and Interactions: Learning from Young Immigrant Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Manning, Mariana; Dernikos, Bessie; Yu, Hae Min

    2016-01-01

    In light of the historical failure of boys of color in US schools, this article sheds light onto the ways in which normative discourses of literacy and learning shape the experiences of immigrant boys and how they are perceived and defined as un/successful students. Findings indicate that although these boys--deemed to be "at-risk" or…

  8. IALS and Essential Skills in Canadian Literacy Policy and Practice: A Descriptive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centre for Literacy, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper gathers descriptions on the use of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and essential skills cross Canada. IALS was developed as a population measure to lay out the distribution of skills and their relationship to other social and economic attributes. The information was taken from federal, provincial, and territorial…

  9. Teaching Writing in Adult Literacy: Practices to Foster Motivation and Persistence and Improve Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Writing is critical to success in education, the workplace, and everyday communication yet receives limited attention in the research, particularly the topic of writing instruction in adult education. Adult literacy practitioners frequently lack training in writing instruction and must rely on a confusing array of information, primarily derived…

  10. The Information Book Genre: Its Role in Integrated Science Literacy Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a call for approaches that connect science learning with literacy, yet the use of, and research on, children's literature information books in science instruction has been quite limited. Because the discipline of science involves distinctive generic linguistic registers, what information books should be integrated in science…

  11. Arts-Integrated Literacy Instruction: Promising Practices for Preservice Teaching Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Coneway, Betty; Hindman, Janet Tipton; Garcia, Beth; Bingham, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers are facing increasing responsibility to integrate the arts during literacy instruction. In order to address the arts effectively, teachers require understandings, confidence, and competence with visual arts, music, dance, and theater. Therefore, educator preparation programs must develop the knowledge and skills of preservice…

  12. Network analysis literacy a practical approach to the analysis of networks

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    Zweig, Katharina A

    2014-01-01

    Network Analysis Literacy focuses on design principles for network analytics projects. The text enables readers to: pose a defined network analytic question; build a network to answer the question; choose or design the right network analytic methods for a particular purpose, and more.

  13. Family Literacy Practices and Parental Involvement of Latin American Immigrant Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lorna; Lavan, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon three years of interviews and participant observation research in the Chelsea Public Schools, to discuss the impact of the Chelsea Family Literacy Program on promoting Latin American immigrant mothers' involvement in their children's education. The authors present the voices of Latin American immigrant mothers who describe…

  14. Approximating Literacy Practices in Tutorials: What Is Learned and What Matters for Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James V.; Wetzel, Melissa Mosley; Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the learning of preservice teachers associated with the features of a literacy tutorial experience. Our qualitative study focused on the close inspection of the experiences of 7 focus cases out of the 19 preservice teachers enrolled in our program across a one-semester tutorial experience. Through our research we…

  15. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  16. Collaborative Metaliteracy: Putting the New Information Literacy Framework into (Digital) Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Beate; Lampner, Wendy; Turner, Dudley

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a course-integrated collaborative project between a subject librarian, a communication professor, and an instructional designer that illustrates how the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) framework, developed by Mishra and Koehler (2006), and the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy (Framework)…

  17. Building on research evidence to change health literacy policy and practice in England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, Gillian; Berry, Jonathan; Protheroe, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is important because of the high proportion of the population with skills below those needed to become and stay healthy, and the resultant negative impact on people’s lives. A recent study in England has shown that, as is true in other industrialized nations, a signifi...

  18. New directions for academic liaison librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Aimed at practitioners and students of librarianship, this book is about interesting and unusual practical projects currently being run by academic liaison librarians. It shows how liaison librarians can extend their roles beyond the established one of information literacy teaching and showcases areas in which they can engage in collaborative ventures with academic and administrative staff. Designed to excite and inspire, New Directions for Academic Liaison Librarians demonstrates the potential of the liaison role and emphasises the need for flexibility, imagination and initiative in those who

  19. Streaming Media in an Uncertain Legal Environment: A Model Policy and Best Practices for Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Adams

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As VCRs and DVD players become obsolete, online course offerings increase, and flipped pedagogy becomes ubiquitous, academic librarians are frequently confronted with requests from instructors for streaming media. The authors of this article describe the reasoning for and process by which a policy and best practices to manage streaming media requests were developed at a large public university. This policy is guided by the principles set forth in U.S. Copyright Act’s fair use doctrine (17 U.S.C. § 107 and ARL’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries (2012. The policy also includes a workflow for delivering streaming, ADA-compliant video content that cannot be licensed via conventional library means. Moreover, the comparative costs of purchasing subscription video collections versus licensing individual streaming videos at George Mason University are provided for the fiscal years 2013 through 2016.

  20. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vosoughi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic. Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  Persian  and  English  languages  gave  rise  to  some  fifty-five  participants randomly  selected  from  different  university  disciplines  (Humanities,  Engineering,  Medicine and Basic Sciences and diverse university settings (Public and Private across the country and classified  via  stratified  sampling.  A  validated  questionnaire  from  a  large-scale  project  called ENEIDA (Moreno, 2011 was used for collecting the required data. Two measures were used to assess  written  literacy  competencies  across  language  uses:  1  participants'  assumed,  self-reported written literacy competencies in using English and Persian languages for General and Academic  purposes  were  denoted  as  'perceived'  measures  and  2  further  supported  by  actual measures:  mostly  received  comments  from  reviewers  in  the  mainstream,  English  journals  by the  target  group  above.  Findings  were  discussed  in  the  light  of  recent  lines  of  enquiries  in Academic Literacy (AL trends بررسی تجربیات دانشجویان در نگارش وچاپ مقاله درمجلات انگلیسی زبان؛ مطالعه موردی بر روی فعالیت های سواد نوشتاری دانشجویان تحصیلات تکمیلی چکیده: هدف از نگارش مقاله حاضر انعکاس مشکلات رایج درخصوص نگارش و

  1. Overseas Chinese Student Agency: Academic norm, Oral Participation and Discursive Practices for Change

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Tianjiao

    2011-01-01

    Participatory practice of overseas Asian students has been much deliberated over these two decades. Recent studies on the international higher education have proposed new perspectives and analytical framework in looking at their classroom participation, which put the essentialising notion of culture and ongoing misunderstandings under attack. Among these alternative approaches, the proposal for a view on ―small culture‖ and ―academic transition‖ are useful in the exploration of student agency...

  2. Analysis of Practical and Academic Application for Knowledge of Lanquage for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Rutkienė

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the methods applied by graduate master’s degree students of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University for the purposes of using knowledge of language for specific purposes in the work and study environment. Their linguistic situation is ambivalent: they act in the academic environment, and therefore the used language has to meet academic requirements; on the other hand, most of them are adapting to the linguistic environment at work. Thus, master’s degree students are able to view the subject of language for specific purposes and the knowledge and skills gained from a practical perspective. With the help of a questionnaire and an interview, the article is aimed at assessing the experience of applying the knowledge gained by the students who completed a course on language for specific purposes 2–5 years ago. The article analyses both academic and practical applications regarding knowledge of language for specific purposes. Extralinguistic factors are taken into account when examining why employed master’s degree students do not always use what they have learnt. The problems of the practical application of knowledge are closely related to the cultural situation; hence, the relevant issues of the postmodern epoch are discussed. The paper explores the interconnection of the practical application of knowledge that covers economic and political factors and globalisation. The study focuses on the academic application of knowledge about the language for specific purposes. Attention is paid to dangers posed for the youth language by the predominance of information technologies in higher education institutions. The article analyses how employed master’s degree students evaluate the course on language for specific purposes and the linguistic revision of MA theses, as well as explores how the knowledge provided meets their needs.

  3. Teachers’ use of a school library in a South African township school: closing the literacy gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoline Wessels

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This post-project study investigates the use of the school library at a primary school by teachers at the end of a literacyproject, without the guidance of the project facilitators at the school. The article gives background information about theAcademic Literacy Research Project Unit (ALRU from the University of South Africa which established a school library atschool P as part of the literacy research project. The aim of the Literacy Project was to improve literacy levels and createa strong reading culture that would later have a positive impact on the academic progress of learners at school P. TheLiteracy Project involved training teachers in literacy and reading matters. In addition to the teacher training, a schoollibrarian was trained to manage the school library. At the onset of the post-project study, self-administered questionnaireswere drawn up to collect data on the teachers’ school library practices after withdrawal of the project team. Thequestionnaires included qualitative and quantitative questions. The findings suggest that the school library is being utilisedand appreciated as an integral part of the learning process; however, the teachers seem to need further exposure andtraining on information literacy. The authors hope that the information and interpretations provided in this article will behelpful in achieving the goal of quality education in South Africa and especially in improving the reading and literacy levelsof all learners.

  4. How do nurse academics value and engage with evidence-based practice across Australia: Findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2016-06-01

    Integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into undergraduate education and preparing future nurses to embrace EBP in clinical practice becomes paramount in today's complex and evolving healthcare environment. The role that EBP plays in the practical lives of nursing students will depend on the degree to which it is promoted by academics, how it is incorporated into courses and its application to clinical setting. Hence, nursing academics play a crucial role in influencing its integration into curricula. Drawn from a larger doctoral study, this paper presents findings discussing how nurse academics value and engage with EBP. Grounded theory was employed to explore processes used by nursing academics while incorporating EBP into teaching and learning practices. Twenty-three academics across Australian universities were interviewed. Nine were also observed while teaching undergraduate students. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. In keeping with the tenets of grounded theory, data collection and analysis continued until theoretical saturation was reached. In total, four categories emerged. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Valuing and Engaging with EBP. How nursing academics valued and engaged with EBP was closely associated with meanings they constructed around understanding it, attitudes and commitment to implementation while teaching and working clinically. Different opinions also existed in regard to what actually constituted EBP. However, they engaged with and valued EBP by keeping themselves up-to-date, being involved in research activities, using evidence in teaching, therefore leading by example. Participants identified a number of barriers influencing their engagement with EBP including heavy workloads, limited time, lack of commitment within their schools, lack of confidence with teaching EBP, and complexity of EBP application. Faculty clinical practice, committed academics, workload

  5. Perceptions of Academic Fieldwork Coordinators Regarding the Value of Fieldwork in Emerging Areas of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria G. Wilburn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the perceptions of academic fieldwork coordinators (AFWCs regarding emerging areas of practice as fieldwork experiences for entry-level occupational therapy (OT students. Further, this study explored several aspects of fieldwork experiences in emerging areas of practice on student personal and professional development, academic curriculum, partnering community agencies, and the profession at large. A survey designed through Qualtrics®, an electronic survey system, was sent to 163 AFWCs of fully accredited master’s and doctoral entry-level OT programs. Forty-four participants (27% completed the 16-question survey. Significance at p < .05 was found in higher levels of Bloom’s taxonomy student performance when compared to traditional areas of practice. Common perceptions found among the AFWCs related to emerging areas of practice fieldwork experiences included: improved student professional and personal skills, increased connections and collaborations across and in health care disciplines, an enhanced ability to define and understand OT. Continued opportunities for fieldwork in emerging areas of practice are essential as the profession contemplates new markets and avenues in a changing health care environment.

  6. Scaffolded Code-switching: A resource for achieving academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to establish whether code-switching is still common practice in rural Limpopo as it was 16 years ago (McCabe, 1996) and if so, to suggest ways to use it as a resource to aid comprehension of English and to explicitly teach cognitive skills and academic literacy. Many rural South African schools have ...

  7. Tanzania Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy : Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, only 17.3 percemt of adults in Tanzania had an account at a formal financial institution and 56 percemt did not have any access to financial services. Most of the population lives in rural areas with very low incomes and poor infrastructure, and women are especially disadvantaged. Such limited access to formal financial services also inhibits financial literacy – awareness of bene...

  8. The Literature Landscape of Blended Learning in Higher Education: The Need for Better Understanding of Academic Blended Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi-Steele, Geraldine; Drew, Steve

    2013-01-01

    If we are to realise the potential of blended learning in higher education, then further research into academic practice and relevant academic development is essential. Our review of literature on blended learning in higher education reveals an interesting scholarship landscape which, when described in detail, pointedly directs attention to the…

  9. Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghjian, Lucretia B.

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of…

  10. The Harvard Medical School Academic Innovations Collaborative: transforming primary care practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Asaf; Ellner, Andrew; Pabo, Erika; Stout, Somava; Sugarman, Jonathan R; Sevin, Cory; Goodell, Kristen; Bassett, Jill S; Phillips, Russell S

    2014-09-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) need new approaches to delivering higher-quality care at lower costs, and engaging trainees in the work of high-functioning primary care practices. In 2012, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care, in partnership with with local AMCs, established an Academic Innovations Collaborative (AIC) with the goal of transforming primary care education and practice. This novel two-year learning collaborative consisted of hospital- and community-based primary care teaching practices, committed to building highly functional teams, managing populations, and engaging patients. The AIC built on models developed by Qualis Health and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, optimized for the local AMC context. Foundational elements included leadership engagement and development, application of rapid-cycle process improvement, and the creation of teams to care for defined patient populations. Nineteen practices across six AMCs participated, with nearly 260,000 patients and 450 resident learners. The collaborative offered three 1.5-day learning sessions each year featuring shared learning, practice coaches, and improvement measures, along with monthly data reporting, webinars, and site visits. Validated self-reports by transformation teams showed that practices made substantial improvement across all areas of change. Important factors for success included leadership development, practice-level resources, and engaging patients and trainees. The AIC model shows promise as a path for AMCs to catalyze health system transformation through primary care improvement. In addition to further evaluating the impact of practice transformation, expansion will require support from AMCs and payers, and the application of similar approaches on a broader scale.

  11. Use of Digital Resources in an Academic Environment: A Qualitative Study of Students' Perceptions, Experiences, and Digital Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Krystyna K.

    2010-01-01

    The use of information resources for teaching and learning in an academic environment is undergoing a dramatic transformation. The development of digital technologies and the growth of the Internet have changed the format as well as the dissemination methods of scholarly resources. Digital libraries have been created as part of the transition from…

  12. Processfolio: Uniting Academic Literacies and Critical Emancipatory Action Research for Practitioner-Led Inquiry into EAP Writing Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jayne

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the design and implementation of an alternative form of writing assessment in a UK English for Academic Purposes (EAP) pre-sessional course. The assessment, termed processfolio, was a response to research inquiry into how writing assessment in a local context negated student agency and inculcated disempowering models of…

  13. Evaluating the impact of geologic heritage on Earth science literacy: Adapting best practices from pedagogy and interpretation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    How might we authentically and practically evaluate the effects of a geologic heritage place or program on public Earth science literacy? This pedagogical form of evaluation is distinct from the evaluation of a place for its geological importance, heritage value, economic or cultural impact, and so on. Best evaluation practices from the realms of formal education, informal education, and interpretation start with a coherent set of evaluable learning outcomes, ideally recapitulated in one or more 'big ideas' that capture the essential attributes of the place or program. Learning outcomes may be classified as cognitive, affective, or psychomotor. Cognitive learning outcomes in a geoheritage context are the Earth-science concepts a visitor or student would be expected to uncover through on-site or virtual exploration of the stratigraphy, structure, landforms, and processes in a place. The Earth Science Literacy Principles (ESLP), and similar literacy documents relating to atmosphere, oceans, and climate; offer a template for mapping localized concepts onto more global ones. Quantitative instruments to evaluate understanding of the ESLP are in development, and the ESLP also map directly onto measures used in formal educational assessment, notably the Next Generation Science Standards in the USA. Nongeological place meanings (a component of sense of place) may suggest other cognitive outcomes. Affective learning outcomes for visitors and students in geoheritage sites are less readily defined, but may include place attachment (also a component of sense of place), attitudes, and interest. Multiple quantitative and qualitative methods of evaluating these outcomes exist. Psychomotor learning outcomes are even muddier, but accessibility (defined by statutes) offers a potential starting point. In practice, evaluation may be conducted synchronously or asynchronously with visitors' or students' interaction with the geoheritage place or program. Evaluation programs are typically

  14. Study of Ethical Values and Practices in Academic Programmes at a Higher Learning Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Kogilah; Shetty, M. V.

    The study on ethical values in academic programmes has attracted the attention of many researchers throughout the world especially in view of its important role today. Many academic programmes today focus on how to make profit both for the individual and the organization and on how to increase the firm`s market share and shareholders value and in the process may compromise on their ethical values and have unethical practices. Thus, this study is undertaken to evaluate the extent of integration of ethical values in the academic programmes of the higher learning operating institution involved with post graduate and higher level programs. The impact of demographics and race of the lecturer and students have been separately ascertained. The sample has been taken from one college, rated to be high in ethical values and practices, a sample of 120 students and 31 lecturers from a leading college (reputed for ethical values) have been collated and analyzed for validation of the objectives. The explanation on ethics has been done to a large extent in the study. The study also indicates the number of higher learning institutions to indicate the extent of impact if these issues are appropriately addressed. Government policy in this regard also needs to be reviewed and improved to avoid deterioration of ethical values and practices in the dynamic market place of today. This study review that, the level at which lecturers at the institutions have high ethical values and do incorporate it in their lectures and discussions in the classroom. The impact of demographic factors on the ethical values and practice of the lecturers have useful insights for academic staff recruitment and staff training. On the other hand, students` ethical values and behavior is a cause for concern to everyone as these future pillars of the nation have been found to have their ethical values and practices at low levels. The implications for the college management as to consider further emphasis on the

  15. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics: Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G.J.; Aardema, H.; ter Bogt, H.J.; Groot, T.L.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  16. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics : Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G. Jan; Aardema, Harrie; ter Bogt, Henk J.; Groot, Tom L. C. M.

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  17. Playful Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel

    these practices, which compose the taxonomy of tablet play. My contribution lies in identifying and proposing a series of theoretical concepts that complement recent theories related to play and digital literacy studies. The data collected through observations informed some noteworthy aspects, including how...... with tablets’ physical and digital affordances shape children’s digital play. This thesis presents how young children’s current practices when playing with tablets inform digital experiences in Denmark and Japan. Through an interdisciplinary lens and a grounded theory approach, I have identified and mapped...... vocabulary in children’s digital play experiences. These early digital experiences set the rules for the playgrounds and assert digital tablets as twenty-first-century toys, shaping young children’s playful literacy....

  18. Best practices in academic assessment in higher education: A case in formative and shared assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Manuel López Pastor

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false CA X-NONE X-NONE The aim of this article is three-fold: (a to present an example of best practices in formative assessment in university instruction, offering three different methods of learning and assessment to pass a subject; (b to analyze differences in academic performance depending on method of learning and assessment chosen; (c to consider professors´ and students´ evaluation of these assessment methods, as well as analyze the workload these methods suppose for both students and professors. The design is based on a single case study. The study analyzes the results obtained in a third- year course at the University of Valladolid (Spain that participated in an ECTS pilot program. Data was collected during academic year 2009-10. Total number of registered students was 77. This paper describes the procedure to develop a formative assessment system and collect data, as well as the main techniques to obtain and analyze data. Findings indicate that there are important differences in student academic performance depending on the learning and assessment method employed in an academic course. Courses are using formative and on going assessment result in significantly higher student academic performance than courses using other learning and assessment methods. Lastly, empirical data suggest that the workload is in line with the ECTS European Credit Transfer System, and is no excessive for the professor. However, students´ subjective perception is that this method involves a heavier workload. These findings may be important, given the current process of convergence towards the new Degrees and ECTS credit system, and the need to adapt these degrees and credits to students’ real workload.  

  19. Making the Invisible More Visible: Home Literacy Practices of Middle-Class and Working-Class Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthey, Sarah J.

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with eight families showed that literacy materials and goals for using literacy differed between middle and working class families, with middle class families drawing on more resources to learn about the child's classroom. However, all families expressed value for literacy activities, challenging the myth that working-class families do…

  20. Combining Self-Assessments and Achievement Tests in Information Literacy Assessment: Empirical Results and Recommendations for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the significance of information literacy self-assessments in higher education with a special focus on situational conditions increasing their explanatory power. First, it was hypothesised that self-assessments of information literacy correlate higher with factual information literacy if measured after the administration of…

  1. Critical Spaces for Critical Times: Global Conversations in Literacy Research as an Open Professional Development and Practices Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peggy; Cho, A. Ram; Shin, Ji Hye; Pang, Myoung Eun; Angay-Crowder, Tuba; Jung, Jin Kyeong; Pace, Christi L.; Sena, Mandi; Turnbull, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects an OER (Open Educational Resources) critical literacy project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR), (www.globalconversationsinliteracy.wordpress.com), now in its fourth year. GCLR annually hosts seven web seminars presented by internationally recognized literacy and education scholars. We outline key dimensions of…

  2. The Space Between: Pedagogic Collaboration between a Writing Centre and an Academic Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Tracey Morton; Simpson, Zachary

    2013-01-01

    The expectations placed on students with respect to appropriate academic writing may hinder successful participation in Higher Education. Full participation is further complicated by the fact that each discipline within the University constitutes its own community of practice, with its own set of literacy practices. While Writing Centres aim to…

  3. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Practice and quality improvement: successful implementation of TeamSTEPPS tools into an academic interventional ultrasound practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajan T; Sexton, J Bryan; Milne, Judy; Frush, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to implement an evidence-based teamwork system to improve communication and teamwork skills among health care professionals (TeamSTEPPS) into an academic interventional ultrasound program and to assess safety and team-work climate across team members both before and after implementation. Members of a change team (including master trainers) selected specific tools available within TeamSTEPPS to implement into an academic interventional ultrasound service. Tools selected were based on preimplementation survey data obtained from team members (n = 64: 11 attending faculty physicians, 12 clinical abdominal imaging fellows or residents, 17 sonographers, 19 nurses, and five technologist aides or administrative personnel). The survey included teamwork climate and safety climate domains from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Four months after implementation, respondents were resurveyed and post-implementation data were collected. Teamwork climate scores improved from a mean of 67.9 (SD, 12.8) before implementation to a mean of 87.8 (SD, 14.1) after implementation (t = -7.6; p ultrasound practice. The most notable improvements were seen in communication among team members and role clarification. We think that this model, which has been successfully implemented in many nonradiologic areas in medical care, is also applicable in imaging practice.

  5. Literacy in Social Studies: The Influence of Cognitive and Motivational Practices on the Reading Comprehension of English Learners and Non-English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada Barber, Ana; Buehl, Michelle M.; Beck, Jori S.; Ramirez, Erin M.; Gallagher, Melissa; Richey Nuland, Leila N.; Archer, Casey J.

    2018-01-01

    We examined the impact of cognitive and motivation practices within a social studies literacy intervention (United States History for Engaged Reading [USHER]) on Grade 6 English learners' (ELs) and non-ELs' history reading comprehension, cognitive strategy use, reading self-efficacy, and reading engagement. We used a switching replications…

  6. Connecting Research in Science Literacy and Classroom Practice: A Review of Science Teaching Journals in Australia, the UK and the United States, 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Yore, Larry D.; Jagger, Susan; Prain, Vaughan

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years (1994-2009), there has been considerable increased research interest in: (1) characterising the distinctive nature and constitutive elements of science literacy and (2) investigating classroom practices or necessary conditions that enable students to acquire this disciplinary capacity. This raises the question of the extent to…

  7. Schoolgirls in Cyberspace: A Cross-Case Analysis of the Literacy Practices of Three Fifth-Grade Girls in a Social Network Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Denise Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploratory study of the literacy practices of three fifth-grade girls as they used a social network site (SNS) for school related purposes. SNSs are widely used by adolescents, and because communication in these sites is accomplished mainly through writing, it is important to improve our understanding of what this kind of…

  8. Missing in Action: Writing Process-Based Instructional Practices and Measures of Higher-Order Literacy Achievement in Predominantly Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briddell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study of 1,974 fifth grade students investigated potential relationships between writing process-based instruction practices and higher-order thinking measured by a standardized literacy assessment. Writing process is defined as a highly complex, socio-cognitive process that includes: planning, text production, review, metacognition, writing…

  9. Australian Academic Librarians’ Experience of Evidence Based Practice Involves Empowering, Intuiting, Affirming, Connecting, Noticing, and Impacting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Marie Muellenbach

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Miller, F., Partridge, H., Bruce, C., Yates, C., & Howlett, A. (2017. How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded theory model. Library & Information Science Research, 39(2, 124-130. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003 Abstract Objective – To explore and enhance the understanding of how Australian library and information science (LIS practitioners experience or understand evidence based practice (EBP within the context of their day-to-day professional work. Design – Constructivist grounded theory methodology. Setting – University libraries in Queensland, Australia. Subjects – 13 academic librarians. Methods – Researchers contacted academic librarians by email and invited each participant to take part in a 30-60 minute, semi-structured interview. They designed interview questions to allow participants to explain their process and experience of EBP. Main results – This study identified six categories of experience of EBP using a constructivist grounded theory analysis process. The categories are: Empowering; Intuiting; Affirming; Connecting; Noticing; and Impacting. Briefly, empowering includes being empowered, or empowering clients, colleagues, and institutions through improved practice or performance. Intuiting includes being intuitive, or using one’s own intuition, wisdom, and understanding, of colleagues and clients’ behaviours to solve problems and redesign services. Affirming includes being affirmed through sharing feedback and using affirmation to strengthen support for action. Connecting includes being connected, and building connections, with clients, colleagues, and institutions. Noticing includes being actively aware of, observing, and reflecting on clients, colleagues, and literature within and outside of one’s own university, and noticing patterns in data to inform decision-making. Impacting includes being impactful, or having a visible impact, on clients, colleagues

  10. Factors in Information Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle Hale; Evans, Jocelyn Jones

    2008-01-01

    Information literacy has long been discussed in the field of library science but is only recently becoming applied in specific academic disciplines. This article assesses student learning of information literacy skills analyzing data collected from three semesters of the Introduction to Comparative Politics course. Variables such as major…

  11. Discourse Itineraries in an EAP Classroom: A Collaborative Critical Literacy Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Christian Wai

    2010-01-01

    This classroom ethnography documents the developing critical literacy pedagogy of an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) instructor over the course of several terms. My research, which involved extensive collaboration with the EAP instructor, explores how specific classroom practices and discourses are enacted and mediated through dialogic…

  12. Enseñar a Leer y a Escribir: ¿En qué Conceptos Fundamentar las Prácticas Docentes? Teaching Literacy: Which Concepts can Support Literacy Practices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Medina

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo postula que las deficiencias de los niños y niñas en lectura y escritura, medidas a través de pruebas nacionales e internacionales, podrían explicarse, entre otros factores, debido a los conceptos sobre los actos de leer y escribir reflejados en las prácticas docentes. En contraposición, destaca la necesidad de concebir la lectura y la escritura como prácticas culturales, como actos de construcción y comunicación de significados y como actos de movilización de la inteligencia; y propone un Programa Integrado de Desarrollo de las Competencias Lingüísticas y Comunicativas que apunta a un modelo equilibrado de enseñanza y aprendizaje del lenguaje oral y escrito.This article puts forward the idea that one of the factors that could explain children's deficiencies in literacy skills, measured through national and international tests, are the concepts that support teacher's literacy instruction. In comparison with the former, it emphasizes the need to conceive the act of reading and writing as a cultural practice, as acts of construction and communication of meaning, as an intelligent act; it ends by proposing an Integrated Program to Develop Literacy Skills, that aims to a balanced model for literacy instruction.

  13. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  14. Commercial Literacy Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Presents the first year's results of a continuing project to monitor the availability of software of relevance for literacy education purposes. Concludes there is an enormous amount of software available for use by teachers of reading and literacy--whereas drill-and-practice software is the largest category of software available, large numbers of…

  15. Innovative Practice in Advancement of Academic Nurse Educator Careers: Developing Scholarship From Program Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Linda L; Hoeksel, Renee; Fitzgerald, Cindy; Doutrich, Dawn

    We describe an innovative practice in advancing careers of academic nurse educators: demonstrating scholarly productivity from program grants. Scholarly productivity is often narrowly defined, especially in research-intensive institutions. The expectation may be a career trajectory based on the traditional scholarship of discovery. However, nurse educators, especially at the associate and full professor ranks, are often involved in leadership activities that include writing and managing program grants. We encourage the academy to value and support the development of program grants that include significant scholarly components, and we offer exemplars of associate and full professor scholarship derived from these projects.

  16. Collection development and outsourcing in academic health sciences libraries: a survey of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, D D; Hollander, S; Lanier, D

    1999-04-01

    Academic health sciences libraries in the United States and Canada were surveyed regarding collection development trends, including their effect on approval plan and blanket order use, and use of outsourcing over the past four years. Results of the survey indicate that serials market forces, budgetary constraints, and growth in electronic resources purchasing have resulted in a decline in the acquisition of print items. As a result, approval plan use is being curtailed in many academic health sciences libraries. Although use of blanket orders is more stable, fewer than one-third of academic health sciences libraries report using them currently. The decline of print collections suggests that libraries should explore cooperative collection development of print materials to ensure access and preservation. The decline of approval plan use and the need for cooperative collection development may require additional effort for sound collection development. Libraries were also surveyed about their use of outsourcing. Some libraries reported outsourcing cataloging and shelf preparation of books, but none reported using outsourcing for resource selection. The reason given most often for outsourcing was that it resulted in cost savings. As expected, economic factors are driving both collection development and outsourcing practices.

  17. The economic impact and multiplier effect of a family practice clinic on an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, R; Ellsbury, K; Hart, L G; Geyman, J P

    1989-07-21

    Academic medical centers are facing the need to expand their primary care referral base in an increasingly competitive medical environment. This study describes the medical care provided during a 1-year period to 6304 patients registered with a family practice clinic located in an academic medical center. The relative distribution of primary care, secondary referrals, inpatient admissions, and their associated costs are presented. The multiplier effect of the primary care clinic on the academic medical center was substantial. For every $1 billed for ambulatory primary care, there was $6.40 billed elsewhere in the system. Each full-time equivalent family physician generated a calculated sum of $784,752 in direct, billed charges for the hospital and $241,276 in professional fees for the other specialty consultants. The cost of supporting a primary care clinic is likely to be more than offset by the revenues generated from the use of hospital and referral services by patients who received care in the primary care setting.

  18. Multiple literacies: Linking the research on bilingualism and biliteracies to the practical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Therese; Masny, Diana

    2006-11-01

    The present article addresses the fundamental developmental differences between monolingualism and bilingualism, as outlined in the literature. It takes into account research using qualitative and quantitative methodologies and reviews the advantages and possible disadvantages of bilingualism in preschool children. It then moves on to biliteracies in early childhood education. The questions addressed are: Will the early learning of a second language delay a child's language development? What effect does bilingualism have on the development of phonemic awareness, and does that have an impact on reading development? Do bilingual children have an advantage over monolingual children? What happens when a child with language impairment is called upon to develop two languages? What are some challenges regarding the acquisition of biliteracies? The present article concludes with recommendations for physicians who counsel bilingual families regarding early childhood literacy promotion and development.

  19. How Can Marketing Academics Serve Marketing Practice? The New Marketing DNA as a Model for Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Paul; Hulbert, Bev

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to address how marketing academics can best serve marketing practice through marketing education. It is contended that, where technology is driving marketing in practice, it is afforded significantly less attention in both theory and education. Thus, the marketing graduates being produced from universities are often lacking in…

  20. A Latent Curve Model of Parental Motivational Practices and Developmental Decline in Math and Science Academic Intrinsic Motivation

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    Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Marcoulides, George A.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children's pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic…

  1. Frameworks for Understanding the Nature of Interactions, Networking, and Community in a Social Networking Site for Academic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conole, Grainne; Galley, Rebecca; Culver, Juliette

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new social networking site, Cloudworks, which has been developed to enable discussion and sharing of learning and teaching ideas/designs and to promote reflective academic practice. The site aims to foster new forms of social and participatory practices (peer critiquing, sharing, user-generated content, aggregation, and…

  2. The Pedagogical Benefits of Enacting Positive Psychology Practices through a Student-Faculty Partnership Approach to Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Alison; Schlosser, Joel Alden; Sweeney, Abigail; Peterson, Laurel M.; Cassidy, Kimberly Wright; Colón García, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Academic development that supports the enactment of positive psychology practices through student-faculty pedagogical partnership can increase faculty confidence and capacity in their first year in a new institution. When student partners practice affirmation and encouragement of strengths-based growth, processes of faculty acclimation and…

  3. Circulation Policies in Academic Medical Libraries: A Comparative Study of Allocation Strategies, Demographic Analysis, Service Offerings, and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Michele L.; Gutierrez, Laura; Miller, Melody

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of current academic medical library circulation polices and examine methods libraries utilize to meet patron needs. Key informants were selected from five states. Statistics regarding financial practices, users, services, space access, and circulation practices were collected via survey…

  4. Translating Knowledge Into Practice Through an Academic-Practice Partnership for Exploring Barriers That Impact Management of Homebound Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Mercedes

    A knowledge translation project involving an academic-practice partnership and guided by action-oriented research was used for exploring barriers that impact management of homebound heart failure patients. The intervention process followed an action research model of interaction, self-reflection, response, and change in direction. External facilitators (academia) and internal facilitators (practice) worked with clinicians to identify a topic for improvement, explore barriers, locate the evidence compare current practice against evidence-based practice recommendations, introduce strategies to "close the gap" between actual practice and the desired practice, develop audit criteria, and reevaluate the impact.

  5. Patient information materials in general practices and promotion of health literacy: an observational study of their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Joanne; Estacio, Emee Vida; Saidy-Khan, Sirandou

    2015-03-01

    Government policy in the UK emphasises providing patients with good health information to encourage participation in their health care. Patient information leaflets (PILs) form part of this policy and have been shown to affect patient health outcomes; however, many are poorly written. To describe the PILs in general practice surgeries in Stoke-on-Trent in terms of readability and variety of content. An observational study of randomly selected GP practices (n = 17) across Stoke-on-Trent. PILs were assessed for readability (Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level) and compared with national skills level data and with the recommended level for medical information. The PILs were also categorised for content using the Rudd (2007) health material classification framework. A total of 345 PILs were collected and assessed. Only 24.3% meet recommended reading-level criteria. Compared with national skills levels, over 75% of the PILs collected were too complex for at least 15% of the English population. Of the PILs, 47.8% were classified as 'systems navigation' (information regarding services); 22.9% were disease prevention (screening and immunisations); 14.2% personal and public safety; and less than 10% were for managing illness or health promotion. Current PILs in general practices do not all promote health literacy. Information only accessible to a proportion of higher skilled patients may increase inequalities in health. Less than 10% of PILs promote managing illness or healthy lifestyles. Processes must be put in place to improve the readability and variety of content of PILs in GP practices. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  6. Does literacy improve finance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Martha; Olen, Helaine

    2015-04-01

    When economists ask questions about basic financial principles, most ordinary people answer incorrectly. Economic experts call this condition "financial illiteracy," which suggests that poor financial outcomes are due to a personal deficit of reading-related skills. The analogy to reading is compelling because it suggests that we can teach our way out of population-wide financial failure. In this comment, we explain why the idea of literacy appeals to policy makers in the advanced industrial nations. But we also show that the narrow skill set laid out by economists does not satisfy the politically inclusive definition of literacy that literacy studies fought for. We identify several channels through which people engage with ideas about finance and demonstrate that not all forms of literacy will lead people to the educational content prescribed by academic economists. We argue that truly financial literate people can defy the demands of financial theory and financial institutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Using the Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning Assessment (QLRA for Early Detection of Students in Need of Academic Support in Introductory Courses in a Quantitative Discipline: A Case Study

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    Nathan Grawe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of young people attending college has increased, the diversity of college students� educational backgrounds has also risen. Some students enter introductory courses with math anxiety or gaps in their quantitative training that impede their ability to master or even grasp relevant disciplinary content. Too often professors learn of these anxieties and gaps only during the post mortem of the first midterm. By that time, a good portion of a student�s grade is determined and successful recovery may be impossible. During the 2016-17 academic year, the Department of Economics at Carleton College ran a pilot project using the Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning Assessment (QLRA as a pre-course diagnostic tool. Results show that the QLRA predicts student grades even after controlling for other SAT/ACT math scores and overall GPA. This finding suggests that quantitative reasoning is an important input into success in Principles of Economics (both Macro and Micro. When the QLRA alone is used to predict success in a course (as defined by either a grade of C- or better, or a grade of B- or better, we find that we could nearly always pick out students who were on the way to sub-par performance. On the other hand, the tool has a fairly high false positive rate; almost half of students identified as �at risk� based on QLRA performance went on to earn a successful grade in the course. In total, we argue that the QLRA may be a useful and inexpensive early-warning device for introductory courses in economics; it may be worth exploring a similar use of the instrument in other disciplinary settings where introductory courses require quantitative reasoning.

  8. Validity of the toddler feeding questionnaire for measuring parent authoritative and indulgent feeding practices which are associated with stress and health literacy among Latino parents of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerman, William J; Lounds-Taylor, Julie; Mitchell, Stephanie; Barkin, Shari L

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of parental feeding practices to childhood obesity among Latino children is a solution-oriented approach that can lead to interventions supporting healthy childhood growth and lowering rates of obesity. The purpose of this study was to confirm the reliability and validity of the Toddler Feeding Questionnaire (TFQ) to measure parental feeding practices among a sample of Spanish-speaking parent-preschool child pairs (n = 529), and to test the hypothesis that parent characteristics of body mass index (BMI), stress, and health literacy are associated with more indulgent and less authoritative feeding practices. Standardized parent-report questionnaires were completed during baseline interviews in a randomized controlled trial of an obesity prevention intervention. The TFQ includes subscales for indulgent practices (11 items), authoritative practices (7 items), and environmental influences (6 items) with response options scored on a 5-point Likert scale and averaged. Factor analysis confirmed a three-factor structure. Internal consistency was good for indulgent (α = 0.66) and authoritative (α = 0.65) practices but lower for environmental (α = 0.48). Spearman correlation showed indulgent practices and environmental influences were associated with unhealthy child diet patterns, whereas authoritative practices were associated with a healthier child diet. Multivariate linear regression showed higher parent stress was associated with higher indulgent and lower authoritative scores; higher parent health literacy was positively associated with indulgent scores. These results indicate the TFQ is a valid measure of authoritative and indulgent parent feeding practices among Spanish-speaking parents of preschool-age children and that stress and health literacy, potentially modifiable parent characteristics, could be targeted to support healthy feeding practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) Schools in the Delta Region According to Adult Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimberly J.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored factors that have influenced literacy success of Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of Arkansas. The study examined progress made since implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program had made upon student achievement in literacy at the…

  10. Implementation of medical scribes in an academic urology practice: an analysis of productivity, revenue, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Benjamin J; Deal, Allison; Borawski, Kristy M; Raynor, Mathew C; Viprakasit, Davis; Wallen, Eric M; Woods, Michael E; Pruthi, Raj S

    2018-04-10

    Pressure on physicians to increase productivity is rising in parallel with administrative tasks, regulations, and the use of electronic health records (EHRs). Physician extenders and clinical pathways are already in use to increase productivity and reduce costs and burnout, but other strategies are required. We evaluated whether implementation of medical scribes in an academic urology clinic would affect productivity, revenue, and patient/provider satisfaction. Six academic urologists were assigned scribes for 1 clinic day per week for 3 months. Likert-type patient and provider surveys were developed to evaluate satisfaction with and without scribes. Matched clinic days in the year prior were used to evaluate changes in productivity and physician/hospital charges and revenue. After using scribes for 3 months, providers reported increased efficiency (p value = 0.03) and work satisfaction (p value = 0.03), while seeing a mean 2.15 more patients per session (+ 0.96 return visits, + 0.99 new patients, and + 0.22 procedures), contributing to an additional 2.6 wRVUs, $542 in physician charges, and $861 in hospital charges per clinic session. At a gross collection rate of 36%, actual combined revenue was + $506/session, representing a 26% increase in overall revenue. At a cost of $77/session, the net financial impact was + $429 per clinic session, resulting in a return-to-investment ratio greater than 6:1, while having no effect on patient satisfaction scores. Additionally, with scribes, clinic encounters were closed a mean 8.9 days earlier. Implementing medical scribes in academic urology practices may be useful in increasing productivity, revenue, and provider satisfaction, while maintaining high patient satisfaction.

  11. Health care librarians and information literacy: an investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelham, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Until relatively recently, the concept of information literacy, and teaching the skills to enable it, was mainly a concern of academic libraries. Now, it is also seen to be of high importance within the context of health care libraries. Health care libraries and librarians can provide crucial support towards the implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care through both information literacy skills training and by conducting mediated searches on behalf of health care practitioners. This article reports the findings from an investigation conducted by Charlotte Kelham as part of her MA in Librarianship from the University of Sheffield. Her dissertation investigated how health care librarians understand the concept of information literacy, the implications of this for their role and their perceptions around how their role is valued. Charlotte graduated from Sheffield in 2013 and is currently job hunting. AM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  12. Information literacy during entry to practice: information-seeking behaviors in student nurses and recent nurse graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahoush, Olive; Banfield, Laura

    2014-02-01

    The ability to locate information pertinent to guide clinical practice is important for quality nursing care and patient safety. To date, little is known about the transfer of information literacy skills as student nurses transition to clinical practice as new graduates. This study begins to address this gap from the perspective of student nurses, recent nurse graduates (RNs), nurse leaders and library staff. To describe the information-seeking behaviors of student nurses and RNs within their clinical settings. This is a descriptive study that included both cross-sectional surveys and key informant interviews. Participants were senior-level undergraduate students and recently graduated RNs (graduated since 2008), and nurse leaders and library staff employed in one of the clinical sites accepting undergraduate students from the McMaster Mohawk and Conestoga BScN program. The study was completed in two large hospital corporations in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Student nurses and RNs were invited to complete online surveys to assess their access to and use of information sources and resources within clinical practice. Students completed a survey comprised of five open-ended questions, while RNs completed a survey comprised of 13 fixed choice and open-ended questions. Nurse leaders and library staff participated in qualitative interviews to verify the extent and availability of information resources. Eighteen RNs and 62 students completed their respective surveys. Three categories of information sources and resources were identified: electronic, print and interpersonal. Electronic sources of information were the most used resource by both students and RNs. More RNs reported using interpersonal sources, while students reported using more print sources of information. Recent RN graduates meet the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing performance indicators related to information access for the entry to practice Nursing Informatics competencies. Crown Copyright

  13. Teachers' Beliefs about Integrating Digital Literacy into Classroom Practice: An Investigation Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, Ayesha; Johnson, Barbara L.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored teachers' behavioral, normative, and control beliefs related to digital literacy integration into their classrooms. Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used as a theoretical framework to collect and analyze data. Findings revealed that teachers' integration of digital literacy were related to their behavioral beliefs…

  14. Independent Contributions of Mothers' and Fathers' Language and Literacy Practices: Associations with Children's Kindergarten Skills across Linguistically Diverse Households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jacqueline; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Home language and literacy inputs have been consistently linked with enhanced language and literacy skills among children. Most studies have focused on maternal inputs among monolingual populations. Though the proportion of American children growing up in primarily non-English-speaking homes is growing and the role of fathers in…

  15. Spatial and Literacy Practices of Chinese International Students across a Bridge Writing Classroom and WeChat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao

    2017-01-01

    The study is situated in a bridge writing course that serves multilingual international students during their first year in college. Based on interviews with 36 Chinese international students and detailed tracing of one focal student's literacy activities, this study examines the social production of a translocal literacy learning space that spans…

  16. Preschool Teachers' Beliefs about the Teaching and Learning of Language and Literacy: Implications for Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jacqueline; Owston, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Given the limited research on preschool teachers' beliefs about teaching language and literacy in the preschool years, as well as on their conceptual understanding of children's language and literacy development, this study examined the beliefs of 79 preschool teachers who had at least a 2-year diploma in early childhood education. All were…

  17. Lessons learned from a pharmacy practice model change at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoer, Scott J; Pastor, John D; Phelps, Pamela K

    2010-11-01

    The development and implementation of a new pharmacy practice model at an academic medical center are described. Before the model change, decentralized pharmacists responsible for order entry and verification and clinical specialists were both present on the care units. Staff pharmacists were responsible for medication distribution and sterile product preparation. The decentralized pharmacists handling orders were not able to use their clinical training, the practice model was inefficient, and few clinical services were available during evenings and weekends. A task force representing all pharmacy department roles developed a process and guiding principles for the model change, collected data, and decided on a model. Teams consisting of decentralized pharmacists, decentralized pharmacy technicians, and team leaders now work together to meet patients' pharmacy needs and further departmental safety, quality, and cost-saving goals. Decentralized service hours have been expanded through operational efficiencies, including use of automation (e.g., computerized provider order entry, wireless computers on wheels used during rounds with physician teams). Nine clinical specialist positions were replaced by five team leader positions and four pharmacists functioning in decentralized roles. Additional staff pharmacist positions were shifted into decentralized roles, and the hospital was divided into areas served by teams including five to eight pharmacists. Technicians are directly responsible for medication distribution. No individual's job was eliminated. The new practice model allowed better alignment of staff with departmental goals, expanded pharmacy hours and services, more efficient medication distribution, improved employee engagement, and a staff succession plan.

  18. Exploring methods in information literacy research

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    Lipu, Suzanne; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an overview of approaches to assist researchers and practitioners to explore ways of undertaking research in the information literacy field. The first chapter provides an introductory overview of research by Dr Kirsty Williamson (author of Research Methods for Students, Academics and Professionals: Information Management and Systems) and this sets the scene for the rest of the chapters where each author explores the key aspects of a specific method and explains how it may be applied in practice. The methods covered include those representing qualitative, quantitative and mix

  19. Co-Constructing Practice in an Online ESOL Literacy Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Megan Madigan; DeStefano, Megan; Kidwell, Tabitha; Ramirez, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how online approaches to teacher education can support teacher candidates (TCs) in the central work of teaching, that of engaging in practice with learners, has become increasingly important. This study is aligned with scholarship in core practices, which asserts that opportunities to examine, engage in and reflect upon the…

  20. Academic Employees’ perceptions of Work - Life Balance practices: A Case Analysis of Private Universities in Ogun State, Nigeria

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    Anthonia Adenike Adeniji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates academic employees' perceptions and experiences of work–life balance (WLB in private Universities in Ogun State. A descriptive research design involves in-depth interviews among 129 academic employees in private Universities in Ogun State. Specifically, the main objectives are to critically examine the practices of work-life balance in the Universities. The study assesses the types of WLB policies and practices within the Universities and factors which influence the employee’s perception of work-life balance within the framework of employment relationship in the various Universities in Nigeria. Using spill-over theory, the findings reveal various dimensions in the academic employees' concept of WLB and show that academic employee experience the strain of work intensification and long hours of work. There is a wide gap between corporate WLB practices and the academic employee understanding of WLB. The paper suggests policy implications which would aid the implementation of WLB policies within Private Universities and suggests directions for future research.

  1. Constitutions of Nature by Teacher Practice and Discourse in Ontario Grade 9 and 10 Academic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Darren Glen

    This thesis presents an ethnographic study, based broadly on principles and methods of institutional ethnography, on the constitution of nature by nine Ontario Grade 9 and 10 Academic Science teachers. The intent of this methodological approach is to examine how the daily practice of participants works toward constituting nature in specific ways that are coordinated by the institution (Ontario public school and/or school science). Critical Discourse Analysis and general inductive analysis were performed on interview transcripts, texts related to teaching science selected by participants, and policy documents (i.e. curriculum; assessment policy) that coordinate science teacher practice. Findings indicate specific, dominant, and relatively uniform ontological and epistemological constitutions of nature. Nature was frequently constituted as a remote object, distant from and different than students studying it. More complex representations included constituting nature as a model, machine, or mathematical algorithm. Epistemological constitutions of nature were enacted through practices that engaged students in manipulating nature; controlling nature, and dominating nature. Relatively few practices that allow students to construct different constitutions of nature than those prioritized by the institution were observed. Dominant constitutions generally assume nature is simply the material to study, from which scientific knowledge can be obtained, with little ethical or moral consideration about nature itself, or how these constitutions produce discourse and relationships that may be detrimental to nature. Dominant constitutions of nature represent a type of objective knowledge that is prioritized, and made accessible to students, through science activities that attain a position of privilege in local science teacher cultures. The activities that allow students to attain the requisite knowledge of nature are collected, collated, and shared among existing science teachers

  2. Vernacular Literacy on the Lake Titicaca High Plains, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Frank; Apaza, Emilio Chambi

    2006-01-01

    Ethnographic "New Literacy Studies" question the idea that literacy as such has any uniform effects, arguing instead that effects of literacy inhere in the social practices that impart it. What change, then, does literacy produce where it arrived from two opposed sets of practices? In Quechua-and Aymara-speaking villages on the high…

  3. Using Genre Pedagogy to Teach Adolescent English Learners to Write Academic Persuasive Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Kathleen Ann

    2015-01-01

    The new "Common Core State Standards" (CCSS) (NGACBP & CCSSO, 2010) require teachers to prepare all learners, including adolescent English learners (ELs), to develop academic literacy practices. This article describes an instructional intervention in an urban public high school using the genre-based "Reading to Learn" (Rose…

  4. Awareness, self-management behaviors, health literacy and kidney function relationships in specialty practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devraj, Radhika; Borrego, Matthew E; Vilay, A Mary; Pailden, Junvie; Horowitz, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    AIM To determine the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) awareness (CKD-A), self-management behaviors (CKD-SMB) knowledge, performance of CKD-SMBs, health literacy (HL) and kidney function. METHODS Participants were eligible patients attending an outpatient nephrology clinic. Participants were administered: Newest Vital Sign to measure HL, CKD self-management knowledge tool (CKD-SMKT) to assess knowledge, past performance of CKD-SMB, CKD-A. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was determined using the MDRD-4 equation. Duration of clinic participation and CKD cause were extracted from medical charts. RESULTS One-hundred-fifty patients participated in the study. eGFRs ranged from 17-152 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Majority (83%) of respondents had stage 3 or 4 CKD, low HL (63%), and were CKD aware (88%). Approximately 40% (10/25) of patients in stages 1 and 2 and 6.4% (8/125) in stages 3 and 4 were unaware of their CKD. CKD-A differed with stage (P level, duration of clinic participation, or CKD cause. Majority of respondents (≥ 90%) correctly answered one or more CKD-SMKT items. Knowledge of one behavior, “controlling blood pressure” differed significantly by CKD-A. CKD-A was associated with past performance of two CKD-SMBs, “controlling blood pressure” (P = 0.02), and “keeping healthy body weight” (P = 0.01). Adjusted multivariate analyses between CKD-A and: (1) HL; and (2) CKD-SMB knowledge were non-significant. However, there was a significant relationship between CKD-A and kidney function after controlling for demographics, HL, and CKD-SMB (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION CKD-A is not associated with HL, or better CKD-SMBs. CKD-A is significantly associated with kidney function and substantially lower eGFR, suggesting the need for focused patient education in CKD stages 1. PMID:29359119

  5. Positive Correlation Between Academic Library Services and High-Impact Practices for

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    Saori Wendy Herman, MLIS, AHIP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate the perceived alignment between academic library services and high-impact practices (HIPs that affect student retention. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – Public comprehensive universities in the United States of America with a Carnegie classification of master’s level as of January 2013. Subjects – 68 library deans or directors out of the 271 who were originally contacted. Methods – The author used Qualtrics software to create a survey based on the HIPs, tested the survey for reliability, and then distributed it to 271 universities. Library services were grouped into 1 of 3 library scales: library collection, library instruction, or library facilities. The survey consisted of a matrix of 10 Likert-style questions addressing the perceived level of alignment between the library scales and the HIPs. Each question provided an opportunity for the respondent to enter a “brief description of support practices” (p 477. Additional demographic questions addressed the years of experience of the respondent, undergraduate student enrollment of the university, and whether librarians held faculty rank. Main Results – The author measured Pearson correlation coefficients and found a positive correlation between the library scales and the HIPs. All three library scales displayed a moderately strong positive correlation between first-year seminars and experiences (HIP 1, common intellectual experiences (HIP 2, writing-intensive courses (HIP 4, undergraduate research (HIP 6, diversity and global learning (HIP 7, service learning and community-based learning (HIP 8, internships (HIP 9, and capstone courses and projects (HIP 10. The library collections scale and library facilities scale displayed a moderately strong correlation with learning communities (HIP 3 and collaborative assignments and projects (HIP 5. The library instruction scale displayed a strong positive correlation with HIP 3 and a very strong

  6. The Interdisciplinary Business Doctorate for Executives: A Novel Way to Bridge Academic Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grandon Gill

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an over view of a new type of degree program that is rapidly emerging and gaining acceptance in the U.S.: the business doctorate for executives. Roughly a dozen of these programs currently exist at institutions accredited by AACSB International, the nation's premier accrediting agency. Although they are research-focused, like their Ph.D counterparts, they are quite different in a number of ways. Among the most important of these: they target applicants with substantial executive experience, they are part time and assume their participants will continue working while in the program, they are interdisciplinary in focus and their emphasis is generally on applying research methods to practical business problems, as opposed to producing published research articles. As a consequence, they are well-positioned to serve as a bridge that increases partnering between academic research and practice. After summarizing the general nature of these programs, the paper considers the structure and objectives of the new Doctor of Business Administration (DBA program being offered by the Muma College of Business at the University of South Florida.

  7. CITATION PRACTICES AND ACADEMIC PLAGIARISM IN THE TEXTUAL ELABORATION OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

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    Rubén Comas Forgas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Locate, evaluate, manage and communicate information in writing academic essays have become basic skills that university students should possess. This article presents the results of a descriptive study developed by survey with a sample of 1.025 under-graduate students at the University of the Balearic Islands on the prevalence in the practice of citation and plagiarism when preparing essays. It should be highlighted from the results obtained, on the one hand, the fact that much of the students or directly do not quote resources used in the preparation of their work or do so sporadically or infrequently. Concerning the commission of plagiarism, the percentage of students who admitted carrying out this type of practice is certainly high. Based on these data, as well as those of other studies with similar characteristics, the authors propose, first, the need for increased research efforts to assess and understand the causes of the situation described and, secondly, advocate for the provision and implementation of training initiatives to improve the situation described.

  8. Social Software and Academic Practice: Postgraduate Students as Co-Designers of Web 2.0 Tools

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    Carmichael, Patrick; Burchmore, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop potentially transformative Web 2.0 tools in higher education, the complexity of existing academic practices, including current patterns of technology use, must be recognised. This paper describes how a series of participatory design activities allowed postgraduate students in education, social sciences and computer sciences to…

  9. Structure and Agency in Learning: A Critical Realist Theory of the Development of Capacity to Reflect on Academic Practice

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    Kahn, Peter; Qualter, Anne; Young, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Theories of learning typically downplay the interplay between social structure and student agency. In this article, we adapt a causal hypothesis from realist social theory and draw on wider perspectives from critical realism to account for the development of capacity to engage in reflection on professional practice in academic roles. We thereby…

  10. The Impact of Classroom-Based Meditation Practice on Cognitive Engagement, Mindfulness and Academic Performance of Undergraduate College Students

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    Napora, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the potential of classroom-based meditation practice as a tool to facilitate learning. Moreover, the impact of meditation on cognitive engagement, mindfulness and academic performance of undergraduate college students was investigated. Additionally, the relationships between mindfulness and cognitive engagement, and between…

  11. When Working Together Works: Academic Success for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

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    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Center for Homeless Education and the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education present this brief to help educators and child welfare advocates work together to support the academic success of children and youth in out-of-home care. The brief offers practical, proven strategies for implementing two federal laws collaboratively: The…

  12. Policies to Optimize Physician Billing Data in Academic Alternative Relationship Payment Plans: Practices and Perspectives

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    Ceara Tess Cunningham

    2017-04-01

    According to the majority of our respondents, financial disincentives (i.e. income at risk, financial clawbacks appear to be most effective as a mechanism to motivate physicians within an academic APP to submit their billings. However, key barriers to successful implementation and delivery of academic APPs include a lack of alignment between government stakeholders, academic leadership and APP physician members and differences in the organizational and accountability structures of APP plans between academic facilities. It is necessary in moving forward to achieve commonly defined standards and frameworks between the various APP models across provinces and academic institutions.

  13. Understanding the Development of Chinese EFL Learners' Email Literacy through Exploratory Practice

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    Chen, Yuan-shan

    2016-01-01

    While many empirical studies demonstrate the effects of instruction on enhancing second language (L2) learners' pragmatic competence (Rose, 2005), few have attempted to gain an understanding of the quality of classroom life in addition to instructional efficacy. Drawing on the framework of Exploratory Practice (Allwright, 2005), the present study…

  14. Navigating the Complex Practices of Specialized Literacy Professionals in Formalized Teacher Leadership Positions

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    Yurkewecz, Thea A.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation reports on how one school community engaged in a professional development grant initiative that incorporated teacher leadership. Teacher leaders may have numerous roles and responsibilities that support the professional learning and instructional practices of school communities. This study examined the experiences of three…

  15. Communicative Interactions in Everyday and College-Assessed Digital Literacy Practices: Transcribing and Analysing Multimodal Texts

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    Creer, Adele

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores integrating a range of digital media into classroom practice to establish the effectiveness of the media and its encompassing modes as a pedagogical tool with a focus on assessment. Directing attention on a communication skills module, research indicated that bringing a range of digital media into the classroom motivated and…

  16. Educating Emergent Bilinguals: Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Learners. Second Edition. Language and Literacy Series

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    Garcia, Ofelia; Kleifgen, Jo Anne

    2018-01-01

    Now available in a revised and expanded edition, this accessible guide introduces readers to the issues and controversies surrounding the education of language minority students in the United States. What makes this book a perennial favorite are the succinct descriptions of alternative practices for transforming our schools and students' futures,…

  17. 當代傳播思潮中的數位素養: 評介Digital Literacy for Technical Com Digital Literacy in Contemporary Communication: A Review of Digital Literacy for Technical Communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice

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    Tzong-Sheng, Deng

    2010-01-01

    The ever-advancing technology has reformed our work environment and also redefined our life styles. The advancement of computer and cyber technology has allowed “digital” jobs and products to infiltrate different aspects of our society, influencing the ways of modern communication as well as the future course of education practices. Comparing with conventional literacy concepts about “reading, writing, listening, and speaking”, “digital literacy” lays more emphasis on the effects and changes ...

  18. Literacy in the contemporary scene

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    Angela B. Kleiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I examine the relationship between literacy and contemporaneity. I take as a point of departure for my discussion school literacy and its links with literacies in other institutions of the contemporary scene, in order to determine the relation between contemporary ends of reading and writing (in other words, the meaning of being literate in contemporary society and the practices and activities effectively realized at school in order to reach those objectives. Using various examples from teaching and learning situations, I discuss digital literacy practices and multimodal texts and multiliteracies from both printed and digital cultures. Throughout, I keep as a background for the discussion the functions and objectives of school literacy and the professional training of teachers who would like to be effective literacy agents in the contemporary world.

  19. The Relationship of Health Literacy With Use of Digital Technology for Health Information: Implications for Public Health Practice.

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    Manganello, Jennifer; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Falisi, Angela; Strogatz, David

    An understanding of the association of health literacy with patterns related to access and usage of digital technologies and preferences for sources of health information is necessary for public health agencies and organizations to appropriately target channels for health information dissemination. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in New York State. Health literacy was assessed using the Morris Single-Item Screener, a self-report question. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE. The final sample size of New York State residents used for analysis was 1350. In general, self-report health literacy did not predict digital technology use (ie, Internet and smartphone use, text messaging) but was associated with certain digital activities. People with low self-report health literacy were less likely to use search engines (P = .026) but more likely to get health information from social networking sites (P = .002) and use health-related phone apps (P = .046). With respect to health information seeking, those with lower self-report health literacy reported greater difficulty with their most recent search for health information. Furthermore, they were more likely to prefer text messages (P = .013) and radio (P = .022), 2 text-limited communication channels, to receive health information than those with higher self-report health literacy. While self-report health literacy does not appear to influence access to and use of digital technologies, there is a strong association with experiences searching for health information and preferences for health information sources. Public health agencies and organizations should consider the needs and preferences of people with low health literacy when determining channels for health information dissemination. They should also consider implementing interventions to develop health information-seeking skills in populations they serve and prepare information and materials that are easily accessible and

  20. Reference Management Practices of Postgraduate Students and Academic Researchers are Highly Individualized

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    Kimberly Miller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Melles, A., & Unsworth, K. (2015. Examining the reference management practices of humanities and social science postgraduate students and academics. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 46(4, 250-276. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00048623.2015.1104790 Objective – To understand patterns in reference management practices of postgraduate students and faculty members at one institution. Design – Mixed methods online survey and semi-structured interviews. Setting – Public research university in Australia. Subjects – The survey included responses from 81 postgraduate students. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 postgraduate students and 13 faculty members. Methods – The researchers distributed an 18-item survey via email to approximately 800 people who previously registered for EndNote training sessions. Survey participants were also recruited via a website advertisement. The researchers recruited postgraduate student interview participants from the list of survey respondents. Librarians invited faculty members to participate in the semi-structured interviews. Interview audio recordings were transcribed and coded for data analysis. Main Results – The survey found that 71.4% (n=55 of respondents used reference management software (RMS and 29% (n=22 did not. Over half of the students who did not use an RMS described other ad hoc or “manual” (p. 255 methods for organizing and tracking references. The majority of participants reported using EndNote (67.53%, n=52, while few respondents reported using other RMS tools like Zotero (1.3%, n=1 or Mendeley (1.3%, n = 1. Software awareness (49.32%, n=36, recommendations from faculty members (30.14%, n=22, and University support (47.95%, n=35 were the primary motivations for choosing a specific RMS. Other important factors included ease of use (32.88%, n=24 and integration with Microsoft Word (46.58%, n=34. Students preferred RMS features that support the process of