WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic job market

  1. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  2. Progress on mobility and instability of research personnel in Japan: scientometrics on a job-posting database for monitoring the academic job market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-07-01

    This study has two purposes. The first purpose is to extract statistics from a database of jobposting cards, previously little-used as a data source, to assess the academic job market. The second purpose is to connect statistics on the academic job market with monitoring of indicators of policy progress related to the mobility and instability of research personnel. The data source used in this study is a job-posting database named JREC-IN Portal, which is the de facto standard for academic job seeking in Japan. The present results show a growing proportion of fixed-term researchers in the Japanese academic job market and that job information is increasingly diverse. (Author)

  3. Historians' Rocky Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafton, Anthony; Townsend, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how the historians' job market is perennially rocky. The history profession had its "golden age" in the 1950s and early 1960s when a generation born in the demographic trench of the Depression entered the market just as the first of the baby boomers began to swell college enrollments. But that moment was…

  4. Youth job market specific features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Yu. Zhuravleva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers youth job market peculiarities, its specific features and regulation means, determines theoretical and application tasks of qualitative and quantitative comparison of vocations, which are highly in demand at the job market.

  5. A survey on characteristics of Japanese academic job market and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domon, Koji; Kitamura, Yoshihiro

    2015-02-01

    During the Meiji era, at the end of the 19th century, Japan introduced western systems into many fields, economically developing later than other industrially developed countries. Japan introduced a higher education system modeled on the German system, focusing not on education but on research. The historical background has shaped contemporary Japanese academia differently from that of the United States and the European Union. In addition, because of geographical and linguistic barriers in Asia, intercommunication with researchers in other developed countries has been much less than that between the United States and the European Union, leaving Japanese academia relatively isolated. We survey the characteristics of the Japanese academic system in higher education, using the latest published data. This article indicates a concentration of research at former imperial universities and a rigidity of movement among universities both internationally and domestically. Furthermore, small differences in salary levels have provided little incentive to perform research. However, while most universities in Japan have not introduced evaluation systems for promotion and salary that are heavily dependent on journal rankings, as in the European Union and United States, Japanese academic performance has not declined. This article suggests that in Japan, salary incentives, the impact factor, and so on have had little influence on academic performance. Even though cultural and historical differences between countries affect academic behaviors, we hope that this article might trigger consideration of other possible evaluation schemes for the future. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Job search and academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klaauw, B.; van Vuuren, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The paper develops a structural model for the labor market behavior of students entering the labor market. We explicitly model the trade-off between devoting effort to studying and to job search. Furthermore, we allow for on-the-job search. The model is estimated using a unique data set of

  7. Hot Academic Jobs of the Future: Try These Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lee

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the academic job market is looking bleak, the author asked career experts and economic forecasters to predict where faculty job growth could come in the next decade. Many agreed that job prospects will be dim because of budget cuts and diminishing faculty pension funds that have made professors less likely to retire. In addition,…

  8. Marketing Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  9. Academics Job Satisfaction and Job Stress across Countries in the Changing Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress across 19 higher education systems. We classified the 19 countries according to their job satisfaction and job stress and applied regression analysis to test whether new public management has impacts on either or both job satisfaction and job stress. According to this study, strong market driven…

  10. The Trending Academic Library Job Market: An Analysis of Library Position Announcements from 2011 with Comparisons to 1996 and 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triumph, Therese F.; Beile, Penny M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to describe the number, types and titles, requested qualifications and skills, salary information, and locations of positions advertised in 2011 on the ALA JobLIST and ARL Job Announcements websites and in the print version of the Chronicle of Higher Education for purposes of determining the current state of…

  11. Labour market transitions and job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Bijwaard (Govert); A. van Dijk (Bram); J. de Koning (Jaap)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe paper investigates the relationship between job satisfaction and labour market transitions. Using a multinomial logit model, a model is estimated on the basis of individual data in which transitions are explained from individual characteristics, job characteristics, dissatisfaction

  12. Domestic Job Shortage or Job Maldistribution? A Geographic Analysis of the Current Radiation Oncology Job Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Chhabra, Arpit M; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Jhaveri, Jaymin; Sen, Neilayan; Patel, Pretesh R; Curran, Walter J; Abrams, Ross A; Patel, Kirtesh R; Marwaha, Gaurav

    2017-09-01

    To examine whether permanent radiation oncologist (RO) employment opportunities vary based on geography. A database of full-time RO jobs was created by use of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Career Center website posts between March 28, 2016, and March 31, 2017. Jobs were first classified by region based on US Census Bureau data. Jobs were further categorized as academic or nonacademic depending on the employer. The prevalence of job openings per 10 million population was calculated to account for regional population differences. The χ 2 test was implemented to compare position type across regions. The number and locations of graduating RO during our study period was calculated using National Resident Matching Program data. The χ 2 goodness-of-fit test was then used to compare a set of observed proportions of jobs with a corresponding set of hypothesized proportions of jobs based on the proportions of graduates per region. A total of 211 unique jobs were recorded. The highest and lowest percentages of jobs were seen in the South (31.8%) and Northeast (18.5%), respectively. Of the total jobs, 82 (38.9%) were academic; the South had the highest percentage of overall academic jobs (35.4%), while the West had the lowest (14.6%). Regionally, the Northeast had the highest percentage of academic jobs (56.4%), while the West had the lowest (26.7%). A statistically significant difference was noted between regional academic and nonacademic job availability (P=.021). After we accounted for unit population, the Midwest had the highest number of total jobs per 10 million (9.0) while the South had the lowest (5.9). A significant difference was also observed in the proportion of RO graduates versus actual jobs per region (P=.003), with a surplus of trainees seen in the Northeast. This study presents a quantitative analysis of the RO job market. We found a disproportionately small number of opportunities compared with graduates trained in the Northeast, as well

  13. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  14. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  15. A Marketing Manual for Job Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serapio, Manuel G., Jr.

    This manual is intended for job developers and people working in educational, vocational, and training organizations with responsibilities for job development and placement. It is designed to help them perform their responsibilities more effectively by making them more responsive to market needs and more efficient in executing their…

  16. Searching for an Academic Librarian Job: Techniques to Maximize Success

    OpenAIRE

    Angela R. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Job-hunting can be a confusing process for new librarians searching for their first professional position. Much of the literature available to potential job seekers focuses on general interview etiquette. This article provides advice to expedite the job hunt for academic library positions. The author draws upon personal experience to provide tips for an effective job hunt. These include how to prepare for a job search, locate job announcements, prepare application materials, typical interview...

  17. Academic Job Placements in Library and Information Science Field: A Case Study Performed on ALISE Web-Based Postings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated and analyzed the state of academic web-based job announcements in Library and Information Science Field. The purpose of study was to get in depth understanding about main characteristics and trends of academic job market in Library and Information science field. The study focused on web-based version announcement as it was…

  18. Job Satisfaction of University Academics: Perspectives from Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssesanga, Karim; Garrett, Roger M.

    2005-01-01

    Although several studies in the affluent world have examined the job satisfaction and dissatisfaction of lecturers in higher education, little is known about academic job satisfaction in the low-resource countries. This study probes those factors contributing to academic satisfaction and dissatisfaction in higher education in the developing world.…

  19. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  20. State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony; Jayasundera, Tamara; Repnikov, Dmitri; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    "State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States" analyzes the online college labor market on a state-by-state basis. We examine the geographic distribution of online job ads for college graduates within industries and occupational clusters, and compare the relative strength of the online college labor market across states. We…

  1. Factors Influencing the Job Satisfaction of Academics in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution. A questionnaire focused on teaching,…

  2. Job Satisfaction of Academic Librarians: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfakhrai, Mohammad H.

    This literature review on job satisfaction of academic librarians is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the conceptual framework which includes two theoretical approaches to job satisfaction. These theories include Maslow's Needs Hierarchy Theory and Herzberg's Two-Factor (Motivation/Hygiene) Theory. Criticisms of these…

  3. Factors influencing the job satisfaction of academics in higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution.

  4. Job Involvement as a Predictor of Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlis, Nick C.

    1978-01-01

    A job involvement measure was altered to reflect academic involvement and was employed as a predictor of academic performance. Contrary to the findings of prior industrial research, involvement was found to be correlated neither with age nor with course satisfaction; however, it did prove an efficacious predictor of course grade. (Author/JKS)

  5. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  6. Existing records and archival programmes to the job market ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Records and archival education and training programmes all over the world are facing increased pressure from the job market to produce records and archive practitioners that can meet the challenges of the rapidly changing job-market terrain. The lack of adequate resources including competent teaching/training ...

  7. Job rotation and internal marketing for increased job satisfaction and organisational commitment in hospital nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Yueh; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Tzu

    2015-04-01

    To develop or enhance the job satisfaction and organisational commitment of nurses by implementing job rotation and internal marketing practices. No studies in the nursing management literature have addressed the integrated relationships among job rotation, internal marketing, job satisfaction and organisational commitment. This cross-sectional study included 266 registered nurses (response rate 81.8%) in two southern Taiwan hospitals. Software used for data analysis were SPSS 14.0 and AMOS 14.0 (structural equation modelling). Job rotation and internal marketing positively affect the job satisfaction and organisational commitment of nurses, and their job satisfaction positively affects their organisational commitment. Job rotation and internal marketing are effective strategies for improving nursing workforce utilisation in health-care organisations because they help to achieve the ultimate goals of increasing the job satisfaction of nurses and encouraging them to continue working in the field. This in turn limits the vicious cycle of high turnover and low morale in organisations, which wastes valuable human resources. Job rotation and internal marketing help nursing personnel acquire knowledge, skills and insights while simultaneously improving their job satisfaction and organisational commitment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Research performance of marketing academics and departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soutar, Geoffrey N.; Wilkinson, Ian; Young, Louise

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of an analysis of the research impact of marketing academics using citation metrics for 2263 academics in the top 500 research universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities based in Australia and New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom and the USA. The metrics...... are computed for publications from 2001 to 2013, which were collected in 2014 and 2015. We also report the same metrics for all universities in Australia and New Zealand that employ more than 4 marketing academics. The results provide an objective measure of research impact and provide benchmarks that can...... be used by governments, universities and individual academics to compare research impact. In an appendix we rank the top 100 university marketing departments in the top 500....

  9. Job Satisfaction of Academics: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Taylor, Maria de Lourdes; White, Kate; Gouveia, Odilia

    2014-01-01

    Academic work in higher education has been influenced by global trends such as accountability, massification and deteriorating financial support. Within this broader context, the performance of academic staff as teachers and researchers has an impact on student learning and implications for the quality of higher education institutions (HEIs).…

  10. A view of the global conservation job market and how to succeed in it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jane; Gora, Evan; Alonso, Alfonso

    2017-12-01

    The high demand for conservation work is creating a need for conservation-focused training of scientists. Although many people with postsecondary degrees in biology are finding careers outside academia, many programs and mentors continue to prepare students to follow-in-the-footsteps of their professors. Unfortunately, information regarding how to prepare for today's conservation-based job market is limited in detail and scope. This problem is complicated by the differing needs of conservation organizations in both economically developed and developing regions worldwide. To help scientists identify the tools needed for conservation positions worldwide, we reviewed the current global conservation job market and identified skills required for success in careers in academia, government, nonprofit, and for-profit organizations. We also interviewed conservation professionals across all conservation sectors. Positions in nonprofit organizations were the most abundant, whereas academic jobs were only 10% of the current job market. The most common skills required across sectors were a strong disciplinary background, followed by analytical and technical skills. Academic positions differed the most from other types of positions in that they emphasized teaching as a top skill. Nonacademic jobs emphasized the need for excellent written and oral communication, as well as project-management experience. Furthermore, we found distinct differences across job locations. Positions in developing countries emphasized language and interpersonal skills, whereas positions in countries with advanced economies focused on publication history and technical skills. Our results were corroborated by the conservation professionals we interviewed. Based on our results, we compiled a nondefinitive list of conservation-based training programs that are likely to provide training for the current job market. Using the results of this study, scientists may be better able to tailor their training to

  11. MARKETING LIBRARY SERVICES IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the concept of marketing library and information services as an important library activity. It also stresses the need for librarians and information specialists especially those in academic libraries in developing countries to become proactive and to take marketing as a serious and obligatory library function ...

  12. On the academic job hunt, is there not a better way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Kevin

    After a decade or more of higher education, postdoctoral experience, the papers, proposals, rejections, and successes, one might think that earning a post as an assistant professor would not be so tough. Wrong.Many consider academia the pinnacle of the job market for Ph.D.s, particularly in the sciences. If we are not the best that we can be, we will not be funded, publish in well-read journals, or land that sought after job in the ivory tower, if that is our desire. Unfortunately the academic job hunt, particularly in the United States, is a labor-intensive, time-consuming, feedback-less, and drawn-out affair where excellence in one's chosen field and likely successful fulfillment of the job requirements are often not the determining factors as to whether a candidate is made the offer.

  13. Job Performance, Job Satisfaction and Human Capital in the Labour Market in Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ilgün

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the effect of job performance, job satisfaction and humancapital. It shows that together with monetary factors, such factors as theperception of the social importance of the job, the ability to meet good friendsin the team, and the atmosphere within which the respondents work, may alsohave a high level of impact on labour supply through human capital. The paperdemonstrates the power of non-monetary factors in achieving improvementsin the context of the ‘job performance-job satisfaction-human capital’ chain,thus bringing about positive changes in labour market supply in Bosnia.

  14. Engaging Academic Staff in Transnational Teaching: The Job Satisfaction Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Danny; McGill, Tanya; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Transnational education (TNE) is an important facet of the international education learning and teaching landscape. Ensuring academics are positively engaged in TNE is a challenging but necessary issue for this form of educational provision if the risks inherent in TNE are to be successfully mitigated. This article explores job satisfaction for…

  15. The job satisfaction of black female academics | Schulze | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this research was to investigate the job satisfaction of black, female academics at a distance education institution. To this end, a phenomenological method was employed. By means of purposeful and snowball sampling, ten participants from different departments in the humanities were recruited and interviewed.

  16. Job Satification And Performance Of Academic Librarians In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the examination of the factors that affect job satisfaction and performance of academic librarians was conducted on selected eight universities comprising both state and federal universities, in southwest Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was use to select 130 respondents across the institution of study.

  17. Personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries: A case study of the Federal College of Education Yola, Adamawa State. The objectives of the study were to: determine the methods used for personnel recruitment, determine the level of staff development, identify the motivational factors ...

  18. personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    The study examined personnel management and job satisfaction in academic libraries: A case study of the Federal College ... library Management of the Federal College of Education Yola library should widely recruit personnel and device the method of ..... salaries as the process of planning, organizing and controlling all ...

  19. Academic Superheroes? A Critical Analysis of Academic Job Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Rachael; Mewburn, Inger

    2016-01-01

    For over a decade, debate has raged about the nature and purpose of the PhD, including its role as preparation for working in academia. Academic work has changed a great deal in the last 60 years, yet our doctoral curriculum has remained relatively static. While there is increasing interest in matching PhD programmes to "real world"…

  20. Morocco's Job Market Policy Over the Last Fifteen Years: Graduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper's aim is to discuss Morocco's last fifteen years' job market policy and youth recruitment in the public sector. It is a know fact that there are youths who struggled before being recruited in the public sector, this paper will attend to the effects of three successive governments' policies on the Moroccan labour market.

  1. Academic health centers in competitive markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, J; Gaskin, D

    1997-01-01

    Academic health center (AHC) hospitals and other major teaching hospitals have funded a portion of their academic missions through patient care revenues. Using all-payer state discharge data, this DataWatch presents information on how these institutions are being affected by market changes. Although AHCs are not as successful as other hospitals are in attracting managed care patients, competitive pressures had not eroded AHCs' financial status as of 1994. However, increasing enrollment in managed care and potential changes in both Medicare and Medicaid suggest that pressure on the financing of these institutions' social missions will continue to grow over time.

  2. The Marketing Concept in an Academic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rešetová, Kvetoslava

    2013-01-01

    Universities, as subjects of the academic environment, are institutions with the priority of education and research. The task of the marketing concept in the academic field is to communicate with all important target groups to support a stronger position and their perception of the school. The aim of the intervention is to increase the prestige, improve awareness, support positive attitudes, and present successful results in all areas of activity. This means creation and protection of a positive image, which enables higher interest of all target groups and secures better awareness about it.

  3. Stand out in the scientific job market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2016-04-01

    Alaine Levine's book Networking for Nerds: Find, Access and Land Hidden Game-Changing Career Opportunities Everywhere aims to teach you how to build relationships within your large pool of potential colleagues, mentors and collaborators via conferences, job interviews and online networking.

  4. Job Discrimination, Market Forces and the Invisibility Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Milgrom

    1984-01-01

    The Invisibility Hypothesis holds that the job skills of disadvantaged workers are not easily discovered by potential new employers, but that promotion enhances visibility and alleviates this problem. Then, at a competitive labor market equilibrium, firms profit by hiding talented disadvantaged workers in low level jobs. Consequently, those workers are paid less on average and promoted less often than others with the same education and ability. As a result of the inefficient and discriminator...

  5. How Can Marketing Academics Serve Marketing Practice? The New Marketing DNA as a Model for Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Paul; Hulbert, Bev

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to address how marketing academics can best serve marketing practice through marketing education. It is contended that, where technology is driving marketing in practice, it is afforded significantly less attention in both theory and education. Thus, the marketing graduates being produced from universities are often lacking in…

  6. Relationship of Academic Job Involvement To Biographical Data, Personal Characteristics, and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jack E.; Waters, L. K.

    1980-01-01

    A job involvement measure adapted to reflect course involvement was unrelated to age, sex, class rank, and tested verbal ability. However, it was significantly and positively related to achievement motivation, locus of control, Protestant ethic attitudes, academic satisfaction, and performance. (Author/CP)

  7. Does Labour Market Training Motivate Job Search?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pico Geerdsen, Lars

    In the Paper it is argued that the improved performance of the Danish Labour Market may in part be due to the Danish Unemployment Insurance System (UI), which was reformed in 1994. - Denmark has experienced a remarkable constant fall in unemployment from more than 10 per cent in 1993 to a little ...

  8. Analysis of wind energy market and jobs in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perot, Olivier; Autier, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    This report presents an overview of wind energy production and of the wind energy sector in France. Illustrated by maps, graphs and tables, it notices and comments the steady situation of jobs, and the existence of a structured value chain, and a variety of actors. It describes and analyses job locations in metropolitan France and outlines that the wind energy sector is a lever for development and creates opportunities for regions. The second part addresses the wind energy market. It proposes an assessment of the French market (a new start in 2014, a competitive market with some dynamic regions) and a review of the technological evolution of the wind energy industry (continuous evolutions, strong emergence of wind farms, and an increasing production). Appendices propose presentations of actors per category (developers, operators, machine manufacturers, component manufacturer, public works and logistics, maintenance, consultants and experts), and sheets indicating the presence of actors, installed power and number of wind farms in the different French regions

  9. Marketing Academics' Perceptions of the Peer Review Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Charles D.; Hair, Joe F.; Hermanson, Dana R.; Crittenden, Victoria L.

    2012-01-01

    Publication in refereed journals is critical to career success for most marketing faculty members, and the peer review process is the gatekeeper for a refereed journal. The study reported here examines marketing academics' perceptions of this peer review process. Based on responses from 653 marketing academics, we find favorable overall…

  10. Are administration students in tune with the job market?

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Fábio Mosso; Queiroz, Timóteo Ramos; Macini, Nayele; Campeão, Gabriela Hermida

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a survey of the demands placed by the labor market in relation to the profile of business administration professionals. It describes the characteristics of such profile and analyzes how UNESP/Tupa´s administration students fare in relation to such questions. The points raised show that the labor market is interested not only in technical-academic knowledge but also in knowledge and interpersonal and extracurricular skills. These points were identified through studies of ...

  11. Influencing the job market by the quality of graduates--a biomedical engineering example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Ewa; Augustyniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Academic teaching of a new discipline, besides its contents and formal issues, requires participation of the university in development of a target job market. This was the case of biomedical engineering in Poland ten years ago. This paper presents examples of activities, taken up by our university in cooperation with prospective employers, and evaluated with a help of our first alumni. The evaluation survey shows that despite the immature job market, the number of graduates employed accordingly to their education systematically raises each year from 72,5% in 2011 to 93,8% in 2013. Another interesting result is the distribution of job searching period: 19.2% of graduates were already employed before the graduation, further 23.1% found their job in less than one month after the diploma examination and another 28.8% in less than three months. The paper also highlights the role the former graduates play in motivating teachers and students to efforts towards a better educational outcome.

  12. Worsening Work Conditions and Rising Levels of Job Satisfaction? Measuring the Happiness of Academics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Theresa; Fankhauser, Peter; Goodman, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Working conditions in academia are generally considered to be deteriorating. Data from surveys which look at the job satisfaction of academics, however, do not clearly support this notion. This appears to be especially true for the case of Japan. Much of the recent literature on academics' job satisfaction globally relies on the comparison of two…

  13. Migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruoyan

    2014-09-01

    This Letter introduces a new set of rate equations describing migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration. We divide the job market into two groups: native and immigrant. A reversible migration of jobs exists in both groups. The interaction between two groups creates a birth and death rate for the native job market. We find out that regardless of initial conditions or the rates, the total number of cities with either job markets decreases. This indicates a more concentrated job markets for both groups in the future. On the other hand, jobs available for immigrants increase over time but the ones for natives are uncertain. The native job markets can either expand or shrink or remain constant due to combined effects of birth and death rates. Finally, we test our analytical results with the population data of all counties in the US from 2000 to 2011.

  14. Job satisfaction as a unified mechanism for agent behaviour on a labour market with referral hiring

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvid, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Existing agent-based labour-market models include a very simplistic mechanism of choosing vacancies. This paper proposes to use job satisfaction as a unified mechanism for deciding on both starting to work on a particular job and quitting the current job. An enhanced job satisfaction mechanism consisting of monetary, social, content, and career components is proposed. As an illustrative context, a labour-market model with referral hiring and informal job search through own social networks is ...

  15. The Impact of Income on Academic Staff Job Satisfaction at Public Research Universities, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrad, Aida

    2014-01-01

    The presence of job satisfaction as a vital factor amongst academic staff in university is too considerable. Furthermore, recognizing principal factors that influence on job satisfaction assumed much significant, because of these factors appear various normal and abnormal behavior at workplace. In this case, the present study focused on income as external factor that impacts on job satisfaction and examines the association between these two factors among academic staffs at public universities...

  16. The Effect of Gender on Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Public Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ma’rof Bin Redzuan, Haslinda Abdullah, Aida Mehrad, Hanina Halimatussadiah

    2015-01-01

    Based on last due decades, job satisfaction assumed as one of the imperative organizational factors that has great role among staff at workplace; furthermore,focusing on this important factor and finding effective items that impact on the level of job satisfaction is very essential. The main purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between gender and job satisfaction of academic staff at public universities in Malaysia. The Job Descriptive Index inventory (JDI) was used to mea...

  17. [Job satisfaction in an Italian university: difference between academic and technical-administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Molino, Monica; Zito, Margherita; Curzi, Ylenia; Fabbri, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the academic world led to an increase in job demands and a decrease in the available job resources. In recent years, the positive image of work in academia has gradually blurred. The present study, within the theoretical framework of the job demands-resources model, aimed to analyse the relationship between some job demands (workload, work-family conflict and emotional dissonance) and some job resources (autonomy, supervisors' support and co-workers' support) and job satisfaction in a medium-sized Italian University, by observing the differences between the academic staff (professors and researchers) and the technical-administrative staff The research was conducted by administering a self-report questionnaire which allowed to detect job satisfaction and the mentioned variables. Respondents were 477 (177 from academic staff and 300 from technical-administrative staff). The analysis of variance (independent samples t-test) showed significant differences in variables of interest between academic staff and technical-administrative staff. Multiple regression pointed out that job autonomy is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the academic staff sample, whereas supervisor support is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the technical-administrative staff sample. This research represents one of the first Italian studies on these topics in the academic context and highlights the importance of further in-depth examinations of specific job dynamics for both teaching and technical-administrative staff. Among practical implications, the importance of keeping high levels of job autonomy for academic staff and of fostering an effective leadership development for technical-administrative staff emerged.

  18. Marketing Executives' Views of Academic Research in the Field of Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Mary F.; Stuart, Elanora

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 124 marketing executives from major companies investigated their perceptions of academic research on marketing, including their views on the role of academic research, willingness to collaborate on academic research, key research interests and perceived lack of attention to them, and general impressions. Substantially negative…

  19. Job Search, Networks, and Labor Market Performance of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Arceo-Gómez, Eva Olimpia

    2012-01-01

    We develop an on-the-job search model in which immigrants search for jobs through formal channels or networks, and the quality of job offers differs across search methods. The model predicts networks unambiguously lead to a larger share of network jobs in job-to-job transitions, whereas the effect is ambiguous in unemployment-to-job transitions.

  20. Olympic athletes’ job market entry strategies. A typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vilanova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish a typology of job market entry strategies among Olympic athletes. Guided by rational choice theory and social reproduction theory, we conducted a telephone survey among 94 athletes (68 men and 26 women. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify four distinct groups, which we called parallel life strategists, freelance strategists, lifetime athletes, and non-strategists: it’s a job. The results show that athletes from families with greater economic and cultural capital implement career transition strategies further in advance and achieve greater career success and satisfaction. These findings can be used to develop support programs tailored to the needs of athletes according to their profile.

  1. Determinants of academics' job satisfaction: empirical evidence from private universities in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kadar Muhammad Masum

    Full Text Available The job satisfaction of academics is related to a number of variables of complex function such as demographic characters, the work itself, pay, work responsibilities, variety of tasks, promotional opportunities, relationship with co-workers and others. Academics may be simultaneously satisfied with some facets of the job and dissatisfied with others. This paper aims at determining the influential factors that contribute to the enhancement or reduction of academics' job satisfaction among private universities in Bangladesh with special reference to Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. A total of 346 respondents are considered from ten private universities using non-probability sampling. A pre-tested and closed-ended questionnaire using a seven-point Likert scale is used for data collection. In this study, descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlation, multiple regression, and factor analysis are exercised as statistical tools. A conceptual model of job satisfaction is developed and applied for academics' job satisfaction. The results reveal that compensation package, supervisory support, job security, training and development opportunities, team cohesion, career growth, working conditions, and organizational culture and policies are positively associated with the academics' job satisfaction. Amongst them, three factors stood out as significant contributors for job satisfaction of academics i.e. compensation package, job security, and working conditions. Therefore, the management of private universities should focus their effort on these areas of human resource management for maintaining academics' job satisfaction and employee retention. The study will be useful for university management in improving overall job satisfaction as it suggests some strategies for employee satisfaction practices.

  2. Determinants of academics' job satisfaction: empirical evidence from private universities in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Abdul Kadar Muhammad; Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Beh, Loo-See

    2015-01-01

    The job satisfaction of academics is related to a number of variables of complex function such as demographic characters, the work itself, pay, work responsibilities, variety of tasks, promotional opportunities, relationship with co-workers and others. Academics may be simultaneously satisfied with some facets of the job and dissatisfied with others. This paper aims at determining the influential factors that contribute to the enhancement or reduction of academics' job satisfaction among private universities in Bangladesh with special reference to Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. A total of 346 respondents are considered from ten private universities using non-probability sampling. A pre-tested and closed-ended questionnaire using a seven-point Likert scale is used for data collection. In this study, descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlation, multiple regression, and factor analysis are exercised as statistical tools. A conceptual model of job satisfaction is developed and applied for academics' job satisfaction. The results reveal that compensation package, supervisory support, job security, training and development opportunities, team cohesion, career growth, working conditions, and organizational culture and policies are positively associated with the academics' job satisfaction. Amongst them, three factors stood out as significant contributors for job satisfaction of academics i.e. compensation package, job security, and working conditions. Therefore, the management of private universities should focus their effort on these areas of human resource management for maintaining academics' job satisfaction and employee retention. The study will be useful for university management in improving overall job satisfaction as it suggests some strategies for employee satisfaction practices.

  3. Using 4P Marketing Model in Academic Libraries: An Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Alipour Hafezi; Hassan Ashrafi Rizi; Zahra Kazempour; Mahri Shahbazi

    2013-01-01

    The present study mainly aims to demonstrate the weaknesses and strengths of using marketing principles in academic libraries and finally presenting some important suggestions in order to improve their marketing. This study proceeds through expressing the current marketing situation of studied academic libraries from the view point of 4P model. In this regard, the current situation is analyzed using a researcher-made questionnaire, and then the problems and shortcomings are highlighted in the...

  4. Job Market Polarization and Employment Protection in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertold-Gebicka, Barbara

    Although much attention has been paid to the polarization of national labor markets, with employment and wage growth occurring in both low- and high- but not middle-skill occupations, there is little consistent evidence on cross-country dierences in this process. I analyze job polarization in 12...... European countries using an occupational skill-intensity measure, which is independent of country-specific labor supply conditions. Extensive cross-country differences in the extent of polarization correspond to variation in economic conditions and to dissimilarities in the employment protection...

  5. Internal Marketing Practices and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from a Nigerian University Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaleke Oluseye Ogunnaike

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated internal marketing practices and its relationship with job satisfaction in a Nigerian university environment. Results indicated internal marketing as having resultant effects on three major areas or components; understanding of organizational vision and values, quality delivery of external marketing as well as quality delivery of interactive marketing. It was also established that there was strong and positive relationship between internal marketing and job satisfaction. The research measures showed good psychometric values. These findings were discussed and situated within the Nigerian university environment. It was recommended that the university should place more emphasis on internal marketing practices thereby enhancing the quality delivery of both interactive and external marketing of the university. The university was advised to promote extrinsic job satisfaction among its staff. Areas of further studies were alsosuggested.Keywords: Internal Marketing (IM, Job Satisfaction, Interactive Marketing, External Marketing, Factor Analysis, Nigeria.

  6. Physicians' job satisfaction and motivation in a public academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vasconcelos Filho, Paulo; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon; D'Ávila Viana, Ana Luiza

    2016-12-07

    Physician shortage is a global issue that concerns Brazil's authorities. The organizational structure and the environment of a medical institution can hide a low-quality life of a physician. This study examines the relationship between the hospital work environment and physicians' job satisfaction and motivation when working in a large public academic hospital. The study was restricted to one large, multispecialty Brazil's hospital. Six hundred hospital physicians were invited to participate by e-mail. A short version of the Physician Worklife Survey (PWS) was used to measure working satisfaction. Physicians were also asked for socio-demographic information, medical specialty, and the intention to continue working in the hospital. Data from 141 questionnaires were included in the analyses. Forty-five physicians graduated from the hospital's university, and they did not intend to leave the hospital under any circumstance (affective bond). The motivating factor for beginning the career at the hospital and to continue working there were the connection to the medical school and the hospital status as a "prestigious academic hospital"; the physicians were more satisfied with the career than the specialty. Only 30% completely agreed with the statement "If I had to start my career over again, I would choose my current specialty," while 45% completely agreed with the statement "I am not well compensated given my training and experience." The greater point of satisfaction was the relationship with physician colleagues. They are annoyed about the amount of calls they are requested to take and about how work encroaches on their personal time. No significant differences between medical specialties were found in the analysis. The participants were satisfied with their profession. The fact that they remained at the hospital was related to the academic environment, the relationship with colleagues, and the high prestige in which society holds the institution. The points of

  7. Internal Marketing Practices and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from a Nigerian University Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Olaleke Oluseye Ogunnaike; Omotayo Oyeniyi; Anthonia Adenike Adeniji

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated internal marketing practices and its relationship with job satisfaction in a Nigerian university environment. Results indicated internal marketing as having resultant effects on three major areas or components; understanding of organizational vision and values, quality delivery of external marketing as well as quality delivery of interactive marketing. It was also established that there was strong and positive relationship between internal marketing and job satisfactio...

  8. Employment relations: A data driven analysis of job markets using online job boards and online professional networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Marivate, Vukosi N

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available of the South African job market. We do this by analysing data from career websites as well as a South African online professional networks. Our goals are to be able to group jobs given their descriptions, characterise career paths as well as to have some...

  9. Relationship between Teachers' Job Satisfaction and Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif; Aziz, Fakhra; Farooqi, Tahir Khan; Ali, Shabbir

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: An extensive literature on Job satisfaction has shown, teachers who are satisfied with their jobs perform better. Along with various indicators of teachers' job satisfaction, variables such as organizational justice (Nojani, Arjmandnia, Afrooz, & Rajabi, 2012), organizational culture (Hosseinkhanzadeh, Hosseinkhanzadeh,…

  10. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  11. A lunch date with your future: Exploring non-academic jobs through personal interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article is a response to an article by Eileen Thorsos in which she describes how non-academic jobs can be explored through personal interviews. The response emphasizes the importance of finding people, rather than job titles, to interview. The same title can mean very different things in differ...

  12. Marketing library and information services in academic libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the marketing of library services in academic libraries in Niger state, Nigeria. The study employed a descriptive survey research design. The population consisted of seventy one academic librarians which were used for the study. Three research questions guided the study. Thirty four ...

  13. Migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ruoyan

    2014-09-05

    This Letter introduces a new set of rate equations describing migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration. We divide the job market into two groups: native and immigrant. A reversible migration of jobs exists in both groups. The interaction between two groups creates a birth and death rate for the native job market. We find out that regardless of initial conditions or the rates, the total number of cities with either job markets decreases. This indicates a more concentrated job markets for both groups in the future. On the other hand, jobs available for immigrants increase over time but the ones for natives are uncertain. The native job markets can either expand or shrink or remain constant due to combined effects of birth and death rates. Finally, we test our analytical results with the population data of all counties in the US from 2000 to 2011. - Highlights: • A rate equation model describing the migration of job market is proposed. • We study the migration-driven aggregation behaviors over the longer term. • An illustrative example is given to check the effectiveness of the model.

  14. Migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ruoyan

    2014-01-01

    This Letter introduces a new set of rate equations describing migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with direct foreign immigration. We divide the job market into two groups: native and immigrant. A reversible migration of jobs exists in both groups. The interaction between two groups creates a birth and death rate for the native job market. We find out that regardless of initial conditions or the rates, the total number of cities with either job markets decreases. This indicates a more concentrated job markets for both groups in the future. On the other hand, jobs available for immigrants increase over time but the ones for natives are uncertain. The native job markets can either expand or shrink or remain constant due to combined effects of birth and death rates. Finally, we test our analytical results with the population data of all counties in the US from 2000 to 2011. - Highlights: • A rate equation model describing the migration of job market is proposed. • We study the migration-driven aggregation behaviors over the longer term. • An illustrative example is given to check the effectiveness of the model

  15. The Dynamics in the Structure of Sugarcane Job Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselis Natalina Mazzuchetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como propósito averiguar a estrutura do mercado de trabalho na atividade de cultivo de cana-de-açúcar, à luz das mudanças recentes ocorridas no setor sucroalcooleiro, levando-se em conta os principais estados produtores de cana. Para tanto, realizou-se uma análise estatística descritiva e uma análise de regressão linear simples, com base nos dados da PNAD, de 1997 a 2009. Como corolário, constatou-se que houve uma redução da informalidade no mercado de trabalho em questão, sendo que esta redução foi mais expressiva em Alagoas. Confirmou-se, também, mudanças recentes nas ocupações do setor, com acréscimos nas atividades técnicas, representadas por tratoristas e operadores de máquinas. Evidenciou-se que o mercado de trabalho do setor em questão tem sua dinâmica diretamente ligada aos fatores que ocorrem na cadeia produtiva do setor sucroalcooleiro como um todo. Palavras-Chave: Mercado de Trabalho, Tecnologia, Agronegócios e Produção de cana-de-açúcar. *** Abstract: This research aims to verify the structure of sugarcane cultivation’s job market, considering the recent changes in this sector and the states with the major production. For that, descriptive and statistical analysis were made, as well as a simplified line regression analysis, based on the Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios - PNAD data, for the 1997-2009 period. As corollary, it was stated that there was a reduction in the informal jobs in the sugarcane production market, showing more expressivity in the state of Alagoas. Recent changes in the sector occupation were confirmed, as an increase in technical activities, represented by tractors and machinery operators. It was evidenced that this sector’s job market has its dynamics closely linked to the sugarcane production chain as a whole. Keywords: Job Market, Agribusiness, Technology, Sugarcane production. *** Sumario: Esta investigación tuvo como objetivo investigar la

  16. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job ...

  17. The White Paper and Restructuring the Academic Labour Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Kerry

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms that allow the strengthening of market and patriarchal forces in higher education, especially as they relate to the academic labor market, are illustrated. The Dawkins paper, "Higher Education, a Policy Statement" (the White Paper), represents an attempt to implement major restructuring in Australia. (MLW)

  18. Knowledge and Skill Requirements for Marketing Jobs in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the skills and conceptual knowledge that employers require for marketing positions at different levels ranging from entry- or lower-level jobs to middle- and senior-level positions. The data for this research are based on a content analysis of 500 marketing jobs posted on Monster.com for Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York…

  19. Worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic and administrative staff at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuli Ngonyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly it investigated the relationship between worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic staff and administrative staff at a South African university. Secondly it investigated if there is a statistically significant difference between worker participation levels of academic and non-academic staff. Most empirical work on worker participation has focused on workers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors of the economy, with limited focus on worker participation in the services sector. This study aims to address this gap through this exploratory study of the impact of worker participation on job satisfaction at a South African University.

  20. THE DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED EMPLOYEES OF TOURISM ON THE JOB MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Vetrakova, Milota

    2000-01-01

    The job market changes in Slovakia are influenced by product market changes. Changes in economic structure in the 1990s leaded to an overall unemployment. Tourism potential in Slovakia and governmental support of small and medium size businesses guarantee growing employment in tourism. Tourism sector in Slovakia offers about 90 000 jobs. Demand for work in manual and unskilled jobs is typical for small enterprises in tourism. The growth in demand for higher skilled occupations, university gra...

  1. Endocrine surgery fellowship graduates past, present, and future: 8 years of early job market experiences and what program directors and trainees can expect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram D; Gutnick, Jesse; Slotcavage, Rachel; Jin, Judy; Berber, Eren; Siperstein, Allan; Shin, Joyce J

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing number of endocrine surgery fellowship graduates, we investigated if expectations and job opportunities changed over time. American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) fellowship graduates, surgery department chairs, and physician recruiters were surveyed. Univariate analysis was performed with JMP Pro 12 software. We identified 141 graduates from 2008-2015; survey response rate was 72% (n = 101). Compared to earlier graduates, fewer academic opportunities were available for the recent graduates who intended to join them (P = .001). Unlike earlier graduates, recent graduates expected to also perform elective general surgery, which ultimately represented a greater percentage of their practices (both P job offers decreased. Overall, 84% of graduates matched their intended practice type and 98% reported being satisfied. Reponses from graduates, department chairs, and physician recruiters highlighted opportunities to improve mentor involvement, job search strategies, and online job board utilization. The endocrine surgery job market has diversified resulting in more graduates entering nonacademic practices and performing general surgery. This rapid evolution supports future analyses of the job market and opportunities for job creation. Almost every graduate reported job satisfaction, which encourages graduates to consider joining both academic and nonacademic practices equally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence-Based Marketing for Academic Librarians

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo-Seong Song

    2006-01-01

    Objective - In developing marketing strategies for the Business & Economics Library (BEL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), a survey was designed to answer the following questions: - Should BEL develop marketing strategies differently for East Asian business students? - What services do graduate business students want to receive from BEL? - With whom should BEL partner to increase visibility at the College of Business? Marketing research techniques were used to g...

  3. Determinants of Academics' Job Satisfaction: Empirical Evidence from Private Universities in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Abdul Kadar Muhammad; Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Beh, Loo-See

    2015-01-01

    The job satisfaction of academics is related to a number of variables of complex function such as demographic characters, the work itself, pay, work responsibilities, variety of tasks, promotional opportunities, relationship with co-workers and others. Academics may be simultaneously satisfied with some facets of the job and dissatisfied with others. This paper aims at determining the influential factors that contribute to the enhancement or reduction of academics’ job satisfaction among private universities in Bangladesh with special reference to Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. A total of 346 respondents are considered from ten private universities using non-probability sampling. A pre-tested and closed-ended questionnaire using a seven-point Likert scale is used for data collection. In this study, descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlation, multiple regression, and factor analysis are exercised as statistical tools. A conceptual model of job satisfaction is developed and applied for academics’ job satisfaction. The results reveal that compensation package, supervisory support, job security, training and development opportunities, team cohesion, career growth, working conditions, and organizational culture and policies are positively associated with the academics’ job satisfaction. Amongst them, three factors stood out as significant contributors for job satisfaction of academics i.e. compensation package, job security, and working conditions. Therefore, the management of private universities should focus their effort on these areas of human resource management for maintaining academics’ job satisfaction and employee retention. The study will be useful for university management in improving overall job satisfaction as it suggests some strategies for employee satisfaction practices. PMID:25699518

  4. Is It All Worth It? The Experiences of New PhDs on the Job Market, 2007-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brooke Helppie; Murray-Close, Marta; Willis, Robert J.; Chen, Uniko

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe job market experiences of new PhD economists, 2007-10. Using information from PhD programs' job candidate Web sites and original surveys, they present information about job candidates' characteristics, preferences, and expectations; how job candidates fared at each stage of the market; and predictors of outcomes at…

  5. Evidence-Based Marketing for Academic Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Seong Song

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - In developing marketing strategies for the Business & Economics Library (BEL at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, a survey was designed to answer the following questions: - Should BEL develop marketing strategies differently for East Asian business students? - What services do graduate business students want to receive from BEL? - With whom should BEL partner to increase visibility at the College of Business? Marketing research techniques were used to gather evidence upon which BEL could construct appropriate marketing strategies. Methods - A questionnaire was used with graduate business students enrolled at UIUC. The survey consisted of four categories of questions: 1 demographics, 2 assessment of current library services, 3 desired library services, and 4 research behavior. The data were analyzed using desriptive statistics and hypothesis testing to answer the three research questions. Results - East Asian business students showed similar assessment of current services as non-East Asian international business students. Survey results also showed the graduate business students had low awareness of current library services. The Business Career Services Office was identified as a co-branding partner for BEL to increase its visibility. Conclusion - A marketing research approach was used to help BEL make important strategic decisions before launching marketing campaigns to increase visibility to graduate business students at UIUC. As a result of the survey, a deeper understanding of graduate business students' expectations and assessment of library services was gained. Students' perceptions became a foundation that helped shape marketing strategies for BEL to increase its visibility at the College of Business. Creating marketing strategies without concrete data and analysis is a risky endeavor that librarians, not just corporate marketers, should avoid.

  6. Day jobs/nightwork: Academic staff studying towards higher degrees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Universities of Technology (UTs) offer career-focused education in a wide variety of disciplines and fields. Traditionally, UTs recruited academic staff with relevant workplace experience, rather than academic qualifications. The result of this strategy was, while many lecturers possessed professional qualifications in their field ...

  7. Day Jobs/Nightwork: Academic Staff Studying towards Higher Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, C.; Adams, A.; Esbach, J.; Groenewald, W.; Lakay, D.; Muzondo, I.; Randall, K.; Seane, G.; Siyepu, S.; Veeran, P.

    2010-01-01

    Universities of Technology (UTs) offer career-focused education in a wide variety of disciplines and fields. Traditionally, UTs recruited academic staff with relevant workplace experience, rather than academic qualifications. The result of this strategy was, while many lecturers possessed professional qualifications in their field, they did not…

  8. Competitive marketing strategies. A challenge for academic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinioris, M E

    1985-01-01

    A special challenge has been presented to academic medical practices by the new healthcare environment. While increased competition for patients and resources affects all medical groups, it is the academic practices who are responsible for training the physicians of tomorrow. Not only must they sharpen their students' awareness of the new environment and teach them to incorporate effective management strategies into their practices, but they must set an example in effective management as well. The basic concepts of competitive marketing strategy, along with helpful exhibits, are presented here, and strategies for effectively maximizing position are discussed from the viewpoints of product mix, process market, and financing.

  9. Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff: An Empirical Study on Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Boran

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the levels of job satisfaction among academicians in the universities of Turkey and to examine the effects of demographics on levels of satisfaction among them. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire-based study was conducted in 648 academicians working in the Universities of Turkey. Data…

  10. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Herzberg; motivational factors such as recognition, work tasks ... [2] Job satisfaction can lead to better organizational commitment of employees, which in turn can enhance the overall organizational success and its progress and lowers the employees' intentions .... in the fields of salary and benefits, promotion policies and.

  11. Labour Market Intermediaries: A Corrective to the Human Capital Paradigm (Mis)matching Skills and Jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Tony; Plows, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The orthodox supply-side human capital theory (HCT) paradigm is inadequate for understanding and adjusting to labour market volatility in UK regional economies like Wales. This article explores the role of regional labour market intermediaries (LMIs) in matching supply (skills) and demand (job opportunities) in regional labour markets. Some LMIs…

  12. A Research towards the Examination of Relationship Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction of Academics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Oge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Each individual has to work to sustain their own lives, to satisfy their own needs and to have a better quality of life. Satisfaction of individuals in their works will contribute to the development of organization and their own, so the organization will be able to produce a better quality of products and services as well. Employees's doing their job fondly will make them feel themselves as a part of organization and result in an increase in commitment to the organization. There is a need to understand the link between individuals and organizations in terms of conceptual framework of organizational commitment. Organizational commitment is an issue examined in a wide range of management and behavioral sciences literature as a key factor in the correlation between individuals and organizations. On the other hand, job satisfaction can be defined as individuals’ total feelings about their job and attitudes they have towards various aspects or facets of their job, as well as an attitude and perception that could consequently influence the degree of fit between the individual and the organization. Also, job satisfaction is a widely researched and complex phenomenon. In this study, we aimed to determine the correlation between organizational commitment and job satisfaction of academic staff working at Selcuk University. Also, it is examined that the inter-correlation among subdimensions of organizational commitment and job satisfaction for academic staff.

  13. The Rise of Market-Based Job Search Institutions and Job Niches for Low-Skilled Chinese Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zai Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, market-based job search institutions, such as employment agencies and ethnic media, are playing a more important role than migrant networks for low-skilled Chinese immigrants searching for jobs. We argue that two major factors are driving this trend: the diversification of Chinese immigrants’ provinces of origin, and the spatial diffusion of businesses in the United States owned by Chinese immigrants. We also identify some new niche jobs for Chinese immigrants and assess the extent to which this development is driven by China’s growing prosperity. We use data from multiple sources, including a survey of employment agencies in Manhattan’s Chinatown, job advertisements in Chinese-language newspapers, and information on Chinese immigrant hometown associations in the United States.

  14. Job Stress Among Academic Staff: a Cross-cultural Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Safaria, Triantoro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the sources of job stress and type of coping among academic staff from two countries; namely Pahang, Malaysia and Yogyakarta, Indonesia. This study used qualitative design, and phenomenology technique conducted to analyze the data. Twenty two academic staffs were involved in this study. The result found several interesting findings. Seven stressors categories were found; (1) inadequate role occupancy, (2) increasing work demands, (3) deficient role prepare...

  15. Academic Success and Initial Labor Market Outcomes for Pharmacy Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Murphy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines the relationship between academic success and labor market outcomes among graduating pharmacy students. Unlike previous studies, this paper characterizes labor market outcome not only as an individual's starting salary, but also whether or not the student had a position secured at the time of graduation, whether or not a signing bonus was received, and the setting in which (she will practice. Methods: A standard exit survey was administered to graduating Doctor of Pharmacy students at a Midwestern, public university within two weeks of graduation. The relationship between academic success and initial labor market outcome was assessed using cross-tabulations, chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results: There were no significant relationships between grade point averages and signing bonuses, starting salaries or employment offers. Students with higher grade point averages were less likely to work in chain community pharmacies, and more likely to work in a hospital or other health-system setting. Conclusions: The relationships between academic and direct measures of labor market outcomes (salary and bonuses were not necessarily positive, as standard economic theory predicts. Rather, the relationship is indirect, as it appears that students with greater academic success obtained employment in more clinical settings, which carry a different mix of pecuniary and non-pecuniary benefits. Type: Original Research

  16. The Impact of Automation on Job Requirements and Qualifications for Catalogers and Reference Librarians in Academic Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong

    1996-01-01

    Compares and analyzes job advertisements for catalogers and reference librarians in academic libraries from 1971 to 1990 to trace the impact of automation on job requirements and qualifications. Findings indicate that computer skills are needed, and there are more entry-level jobs being posted for both groups. (Author/JMV)

  17. Competition in online job marketplaces: towards a global labour market for outsourcing services?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, N.; Lambregts, B.

    2015-01-01

    A new form of service outsourcing has emerged, namely the global online job marketplace for freelance contractors. Such platforms are currently the closest proxy to the idea of a global labour market where everyone competes for jobs regardless of location. In this article, we examine how competition

  18. Unemployment Durations of Job Losers in a Labor Market in Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubyova, M.; van Ours, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Slovakia is one of the Central European countries in transformation from a centralised command system to a decentralised market economy. Along with the transition of the economy came unemployment. Other than before workers who lost their job did not find a new job immediately. This paper studies the

  19. Give Them a Tool Kit: Demystifying the Job Search Process for Marketing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paula T.; LeBaron, David; Arvi, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Few, if any, marketing students are adequately prepared to conduct a thorough job search that will lead them to enjoyable, meaningful employment upon graduation. We present a method we have used in several classes that helps demystify the job search process for students. Using our approach, students have been able to discover their career passions…

  20. Poverty, Job Quality and Labor Market Dynamics in the Middle East ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will explore links between labour market dynamics and the quality of jobs in three varied settings. Egypt features low job quality and a large gender gap. Morocco conforms to Egypt to a significant degree. Jordan offers an exception, however, apparently related to greater diversification and better industrial export ...

  1. Jobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple.......Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple....

  2. The Online College Labor Market: Where the Jobs Are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Jayasundera, Tamara; Repnikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    More than 80 percent of job openings for workers with a bachelor's degree or better are posted online, compared to less than 50 percent of job openings for workers with less education, according to a new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The report's findings suggest that careers in STEM fields--Science,…

  3. The Job Market for Business Librarians: 1983-1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakevich, Doris

    This paper analyzes a total of 235 job advertisements for business librarians from 1983 through 1992 listed in "Library Journal,""American Libraries,""C & RL News,""SpeciaList," and the Eastern edition of "The Wall Street Journal." Each advertisement was examined for level of job; type of…

  4. Job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in tehran, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; Sahebjamee, M; Kharazi, Mj; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-03-01

    Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties' overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction.

  5. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic Members in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; SahebJamee, M; Kharazi, MJ; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. Subjects and Methods: The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties’ overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Conclusion: Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction. PMID:24761236

  6. Careers in Academe: The Academic Labour Market as an Eco-System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the contrast between stable and dynamic labour markets in academe in light of career theories that were originally developed for business environments. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual design, offering the eco-system as a framework. Findings: It evaluates their relevance and applicability to dynamic and…

  7. Job satisfaction among obstetrician-gynecologists: a comparison between private practice physicians and academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darrel J; Bringman, Jay; Bush, Andrew; Phillips, Owen P

    2006-11-01

    Physician job satisfaction has been the subject of much research. However, no studies have been conducted comparing academic and private practice physician satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology. This study was undertaken to measure satisfaction levels for academic and private practice obstetrician-gynecologists and compare different aspects of their practice that contributed to their satisfaction. A survey was mailed to randomly selected obstetrician-gynecologists in Memphis, TN; Birmingham, AL; Little Rock, AR; and Jackson, MS. Physicians were asked to respond to questions concerning demographics and career satisfaction. They were also asked to assess the contribution of 13 different aspects of their practice in contributing to their job selection and satisfaction using a Likert scale. A score of 1 meant the physician completely disagreed with a statement regarding a factor's contribution or was completely dissatisfied; a score of 5 meant the physician completely agreed with a factor's contribution or was completely satisfied. Simple descriptive statistics, as well as the 2-sample t test, were used. Likert scale values were assumed to be interval measurements. Of the 297 questionnaires mailed, 129 (43%) physicians responded. Ninety-five (74%) respondents rated their overall satisfaction as 4 or 5. No significant difference was found between academic and private physicians when comparing overall job satisfaction (P = .25). When compared to private practice physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to overall job satisfaction for academic physicians were the ability to teach, conduct research, and practice variety (P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .007, respectively). When compared with academic physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to job satisfaction for private practice physicians were autonomy, physician-patient relationship, and insurance reimbursement (P = .0058, P = .0001, and P = .0098, respectively). When choosing a practice setting

  8. Job Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Academic Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovska, Gordana; Angelkoska, Slagana; Osmani, Fadbi; Grncarovska, Svetlana Pandiloska

    2017-01-01

    Education is the most important organization of a nation; it plays a significant role in the development of any country. Universities create and cultivate knowledge for the sake of building a modern world. The academic staff is the key resource within higher education institutions. A positive and healthy university structure results in increased…

  9. Gender and e-recruitment: a comparative analysis between job advertisements published for the German and the Italian labour markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nardone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The e-recruitment phenomenon has changed the way companies address job seekers around the world, but, whereas numerous academic studies have focused on e-recruitment and its social, cultural and psychological effects, little is known about its linguistic features and about the related gender issues.The main purpose of this contribution is to investigate generic masculine forms and gender-fair alternatives used in job advertisements published by German and Italian companies on their websites for the German and Italian labour markets.The initial hypothesis is that gender-fair language is used more often in German than in Italian both by Italian and German companies. In order to test this hypothesis, a sample of job advertisements has been collected from the career section of the websites of some German and Italian companies and two corpora have been built, one in German and one in Italian.The results of the analysis indicate that the initial hypothesis is only partially confirmed. Gender-fair strategies do appear more often in German job advertisements, especially concerning the use of the pronoun Sie, but, at the same time, due to both linguistic and cultural reasons, generic masculine forms remain the most common alternative both in German and in Italian.

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPETITIVE LEGAL STUDIES AS A RESPONSE TO THE DISORDERS IN THE LEGAL JOB MARKET (WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE IN ORDER TO PROMOTE THE INTEREST OF STUDENTS, SOCIETY AND NATIONAL ECONOMY? - THE NEED TO DECIDE BETWEEN HOLDING IN PLACE AND ACTIVATING AVAILABLE ACADEMIC RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Jelinić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author brings into context the issue of employability of law graduates with the current problems in legal education, namely with the fact that number of graduates coming from Croatian law schools have tremendous problems with finding a job after graduation. The author calls for a change in the system of legal education and makes a proposal that a new approach to the matter at issue needs to be adopted as soon as possible. The central part of reform should consider the development of completely new and competitive faculty curricula that would reflect changes in the national legal system and its surroundings as well as projections of development of markets for legal services at home and abroad. In the world of change only those who are able to adapt to the market needs and changes have a chance to survive in an ever faster changing world of law, markets and educational policies.

  11. Dementia care and labour market: the role of job satisfaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Faber, M.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Braat, D.D.M.; Raas, G.P.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A labour shortage in the dementia care sector is to be expected in the near future in the Netherlands and in many other European states. The objective of this study is to analyse why people quit or avoid jobs in dementia care. METHOD: An integrative analysis was used to study reports,

  12. Training in two-tier labor markets: The role of job match quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgündüz, Yusuf Emre; van Huizen, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This study examines training investments in two-tier labor markets, focusing on the role of job match quality. Temporary workers are in general more likely than permanent workers to leave their employer and therefore are less likely to receive employer-funded training. However, as firms prefer to continue productive job matches, we hypothesize that the negative effect of holding a temporary contract on the probability to be trained diminishes with the quality of the job match. Using a recent longitudinal survey from the Netherlands, we find that temporary workers indeed participate less frequently in firm-sponsored training. However, this effect is fully driven by mismatches: holding a temporary contract does not significantly decrease the probability to receive training for workers in good job matches. Depending on match quality, a temporary job can either be a stepping stone or a dead-end. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Graduate school and the job market of the '90s: A survey of young geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golde, Chris M.; Fiske, Peter

    The last 5 years have seen an explosion in concern about the health and vitality of the research job market. Once the subject of hushed conversations in the hallways and laboratories of the nation's research universities, fears of a “black hole in science employment” are featured headlines in newspapers, magazines, and broadcast media. While a genuine love of science remains the foundation of a healthy research career, nagging doubts about the availability of good jobs, job security, and compensation can cause even the most dedicated student to question the viability of a research career.

  14. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, Ptraining is thus a worthwhile endeavor. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Methodologies on labour market indicators: job vacancies, job creation and job destruction in small businesses in the Slovak Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyma, A.O.J.; de Graaf, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family of the Slovak Republic (MoLSAF) requires reliable information for policy making. An important way to strengthen the institutional capacities of MoLSAF in the field of labour market policies is to acquire a number of reliable labour market

  16. Structural Equation Models of Management and Decision-Making Styles with Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzat, Ismail Hussein; Idris, Datuk Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision-making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of 218 respondents. The instruments used in the study were the Teacher Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Decision…

  17. Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs as Determinants of Job Satisfaction and Students' Academic Achievement: A Study at the School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Barbranelli, Claudio; Steca, Patrizia; Malone, Patrick S.

    2006-01-01

    Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs were examined as determinants of their job satisfaction and students' academic achievement. Over 2000 teachers in 75 Italian junior high schools were administered self-report questionnaires to assess self-efficacy beliefs and their job satisfaction Students' average final grades at the end of junior high school were…

  18. The Role of Leadership Practices on Job Stress among Malay Academic Staff: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaria, Triantoro; bin Othman, Ahmad; Wahab, Muhammad Nubli Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Globalization brings change in all aspect of human life, including in how job and organizations operate. These changes create strain and stress not only among employee at business organization, but also among academic staff. The dean of faculty or department at university has important role in prevent the effects of job stress among the academic…

  19. Is it all worth it? The experiences of new PhDs on the job market, 2007–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brooke Helppie; Murray-Close, Marta; Willis, Robert J; Chen, Uniko

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the job market experiences of new PhD economists, 2007-10. Using information from PhD programs' job candidate websites and original surveys, the authors present information about job candidates' characteristics, preferences and expectations; how job candidates fared at each stage of the market; and predictors of outcomes at each stage. Some information presented in this paper updates findings of prior studies. However, design features of the data used in this paper may result in more generalizable findings. This paper is unique in comparing pre-market expectations and preferences with post-market outcomes on the new PhD job market. It shows that outcomes tend to align with pre-market preferences, and candidates' expectations are somewhat predictive of their outcomes. Several analyses also shed light on sub-group differences. PMID:27616783

  20. The Effect of Internal Marketing on Organizational Commitment: Job Involvement and Job Satisfaction as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Shueh-Chin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: After reviewing previous research, this study found that few school or educational studies have simultaneously explored both internal marketing and organizational commitment, and of those that have, only direct effects were examined. This study clarifies the relationship between school organization's internal marketing and teachers'…

  1. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic faculty members: do instructional and clinical staff differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Song, Jae W; Kim, H Myra; Woolliscroft, James O; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Gyetko, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between instructional and clinical faculty members. A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1898 academic faculty members at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organisation, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between faculty members on the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Response rates for the instructional and clinical faculty groups were 43.1% and 46.7%, respectively. Clinical faculty members reported being less satisfied with how they were mentored and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between the two faculty groups. Surprisingly, clinical faculty members with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were mentored and with career advancement, and were significantly less likely to choose an academic career if they had to do it all over again compared with instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty members were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty members compared with senior-level instructional faculty staff. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both groups included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. In the clinical track only, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Greater emphasis must be placed on faculty members' well-being at both the institutional level and the level of departmental leadership. Efforts to enhance job satisfaction and improve retention are more likely to succeed if they are directed by locally designed

  2. The relationship between competencies acquired through Swiss academic sports science courses and the job requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, T; Studer, F; Nagel, S

    2016-01-01

    In view of the changes in and growing variety of sports-related occupations, it is highly relevant for educational institutions to know how well the educational contents of their sport science courses meet the professional requirements. This study analyses the relationship between the competencies acquired through academic sports science courses and the requirements of the relevant jobs in Switzerland. The data for this empirical analysis were drawn from a sample of n = 1054 graduates of different academic sport science programmes at all eight Swiss universities. The results show that academic sport science courses primarily communicate sports-specific expertise and practical sports skills. On the other hand, most graduates consider that the acquisition of interdisciplinary competencies plays a comparatively minor role in sport science education, even though these competencies are felt to be an important requirement in a variety of work-related environments and challenges.

  3. Improving Student Job Placement and Assessment through the Use of Digital Marketing Certification Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    The area of digital marketing is a difficult one for course development. Not only is it a relatively new topic area--having become popular after many marketing faculty completed their academic training--it is a constantly changing one wherein "innovative" tools are continuously being replaced within the industry. After uncovering what…

  4. The Employers' View of "Work-Ready" Graduates: A Study of Advertisements for Marketing Jobs in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Ellen; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Pang, Bo; Alcaraz, Celeste

    2017-01-01

    This study of job advertisements extends our understanding of how employers, rather than researchers, describe the specific skills and attributes sought in candidates for employment in graduate marketing roles in Australia. The article presents the findings of a content analysis of 359 marketing job advertisements downloaded in 2016, in two…

  5. Job satisfaction among young board-certified surgeons at academic centers in Europe and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Dimitri Aristotle; Schlegel, Andrea; Tschuor, Christoph; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2012-11-01

    To identify independent factors influencing job satisfaction of academic surgeons within their first 10 years after board certification. Job satisfaction is increasingly recognized as a crucial factor for high performance of individuals and teams in most organizations. Sophisticated tools are now available to assess job satisfaction in medicine. A survey among 439 faculty surgeons from 16 European countries, United States, and Canada was conducted in 2011. Satisfaction at work was analyzed using the validated Global Job Satisfaction (GJS) instrument (score range, -36 to +36), modified to an extended version (eGJS) (score range, -87 to +87) covering additional personal and environmental factors. Independent factors were identified with multiple logistic regression analysis. Response rate was high at 59% (439/744). Median age of responders was 39 years, with 17% women. North American surgeons scored higher on the eGJS when compared with Europeans (median: 21 vs. 33, respectively, P factors of high job satisfaction included protected time for research (odds ratio [OR]: 9), good team relationship (OR: 7), female sex (OR: 5), having a partner (OR: 4), feeling enthusiastic about work (OR: 4), being pleased with life accomplishments (OR: 4), having the standard of living one deserves (OR: 3), and clinical autonomy (OR: 3). In contrast, independent predictors of poor job satisfaction were feeling frustrated by work (ie, a burnout item) (OR: 37), worrying about personal life at work (OR: 3), and having to work too many weekends (OR: 3). Satisfaction in young faculty members mostly relates to research opportunities, clinical autonomy, burnout, and lifestyle. Understanding satisfaction factors may improve productivity and competence.

  6. Moderation Effects of Personality and Organizational Support on the Relationship between Prior Job Experience and Academic Performance of Management Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Nishant; Mishra, Sushanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between prior job experience and current academic performance among management students in India. It further explores the impact of individual and situational factors on the above relationship. Based on a longitudinal study spanning over nine months in the academic year 2010-11 among a sample of 324…

  7. THE CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE JOB SATISFACTION OF ACADEMICS WITHIN SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES OF TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Ntisa; M. Dhurup; P.A. Joubert

    2016-01-01

    South African higher education has gone through numerous changes in terms ofrestructuring and transformation. Rapid changes of this nature, within the highereducation system, necessitate alternative work arrangements, which have potentialnegative effects on job satisfaction of academics. Research on the contracts ofemployment of academic staff in the context of developing countries such asSouth Africa has remained scarce. The primary purpose ...

  8. Job Requirements for Marketing Graduates: Are There Differences in the Knowledge, Skills, and Personal Attributes Needed for Different Salary Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Karns, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies in the business press and in the marketing literature point to a "transformation" of marketing caused by the availability of large amounts of data for marketing analysis and planning. However, the effects of the integration of technology on entry-level jobs for marketing graduates have not been fully explored. This study…

  9. Training in two-tier labor markets : The role of job match quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akgündüz, Yusuf Emre; van Huizen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This study examines training investments in two-tier labor markets, focusing on the role of job match quality. Temporary workers are in general more likely than permanent workers to leave their employer and therefore are less likely to receive employer-funded training. However, as firms prefer to

  10. Creating Markets or Decent Jobs? Group Training and the Future of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John; Evesson, Justine

    2004-01-01

    Group training organisations act as intermediaries between enterprises and apprentices and trainees to facilitate on- and off-the-job training. This report examines the role of the group training organisations (GTOs) in Australia's labour market. The authors find that GTOs, at their best, help promote sustainable work-based learning solutions by…

  11. The Promise of English: Linguistic Capital and the Neoliberal Worker in the South Korean Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2011-01-01

    English is often assumed to be a key to material success and social inclusion, and this belief commonly works to justify the global dominance of English, glossing over and rationalizing broader social inequalities. This paper extends the discussion of this fallacy of "the promise of English" to the domain of the South Korean job market,…

  12. A Poor Job Market and a Steady Currency Feed "Overseas-Study Fever" in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvistendahl, Mara

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese news media have a name for the craze that has gripped students here in the past few years: "overseas-study fever." And despite the worsening global financial crisis and a slowing domestic economy, it shows little sign of letting up. Recruiters say a high household savings rate, a difficult job market, and a steady currency,…

  13. Students' Use of Extra-Curricular Activities for Positional Advantage in Competitive Job Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    With the rise of mass higher education, competition between graduates in the labour market is increasing. Students are aware that their degree will not guarantee them a job and realise they should add value and distinction to their credentials to achieve a positional advantage. Participation in extra-curricular activities (ECAs) is one such…

  14. Experiential Learning: A Definitive Edge in the Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James; White, Gayle Webb

    2010-01-01

    The value of experiential learning is explored as it has now become a given among educators and corporate leaders that a university must provide experiential learning programs such as internships; real-life cases in marketing research, advertising, etc.; and voluntary student participation in income tax preparation for the needy and elderly; and…

  15. Better Jobs for Central American Women: Labour Market Dynamics ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It established a micro lending program for women entrepreneurs. The Ministry of Labour also implemented a program to promote self-employment and to provide technical and marketing skills to potential women entrepreneurs. In El Salvador, the government passed the Law of Equality, Fairness, and Elimination of ...

  16. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  17. Too Many PhD Graduates or Too Few Academic Job Openings: The Basic Reproductive Number R0 in Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard C; Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Xue, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The academic job market has become increasingly competitive for PhD graduates. In this note, we ask the basic question of 'Are we producing more PhDs than needed?' We take a systems approach and offer a 'birth rate' perspective: professors graduate PhDs who later become professors themselves, an analogue to how a population grows. We show that the reproduction rate in academia is very high. For example, in engineering, a professor in the US graduates 7.8 new PhDs during his/her whole career on average, and only one of these graduates can replace the professor's position. This implies that in a steady state, only 12.8% of PhD graduates can attain academic positions in the USA. The key insight is that the system in many places is saturated, far beyond capacity to absorb new PhDs in academia at the rates that they are being produced. Based on the analysis, we discuss policy implications.

  18. Firm-Specific Marketing Capital and Job Satisfaction of Marketers: Evidence from Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tho D.; Nguyen, Trang T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the resource-based view of the firm, this study aims to examine antecedents and outcomes of firm-specific marketing capital pool invested by marketers in a transition market, Vietnam. Design/methodology/approach: A sample of 528 marketers in Ho Chi Minh City was surveyed to test the theoretical model. Structural equation…

  19. The Recent Pathology Residency Graduate Job Search Experience: A Synthesis of 5 Years of College of American Pathologists Job Market Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratzinger, Dita; Johnson, Kristen A; Brissette, Mark D; Cohen, David; Rojiani, Amyn M; Conran, Richard M; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; McCloskey, Cindy B; Roberts, Cory A; Domen, Ronald E; Talbert, Michael L; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2018-04-01

    - Pathology residents and fellows tailor their training and job search strategies to an actively evolving specialty in the setting of scientific and technical advances and simultaneous changes in health care economics. - To assess the experience and outcome of the job search process of pathologists searching for their first non-fellowship position. - The College of American Pathologists (CAP) Graduate Medical Education Committee has during the past 5 years sent an annual job search survey each June to CAP junior members and fellows in practice 3 years or less who have actively searched for a non-fellowship position. - Job market indicators including job interviews, job offers, positions accepted, and job satisfaction have remained stable during the 5 years of the survey. Most survey respondents who had applied for at least 1 position had accepted a position at the time of the survey, and most applicants who had accepted a position were satisfied or very satisfied. However, most attested that finding a non-fellowship position was difficult. Despite a perceived push toward subspecialization in surgical pathology, the reported number of fellowships completed was stable. Respondent demographics were not associated with job search success with 1 significant exception: international medical school graduate respondents reported greater perceived difficulty in finding a position, and indeed, fewer reported having accepted a position. - Pathology residents and fellows seeking their first position have faced a relatively stable job market during the last 5 years, with most accepting positions with which they were satisfied.

  20. Next manager. Academic Background versus Labor Market Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Catalin Dobrea

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The employability of of graduates is today one of the major problems both of universities and economical environment. Also, employability, inserting optimum professional and social life is a problem of each graduate. It finds today, that a large part of are young drop out of school and thus possibility of qualify at a high level or have difficulty entering the labor market. European Commission recommends for member states reforming education, especially of the university so as to ensure the professionalization of the young people, developing their professional skills and transversal, harnessing their potential, enhance the relevance of education for youth and the labor market. Bologna Declaration shows that employability (ability to engage, to maintain the service and mobility in the labor market is defining higher education, whose role is to familiarize students with the skills and competencies that individuals need to place on the job. (Bologna, 1999 This paper addresses the issue of employability of higher economic studies graduates, and analyzes a positive experience resulting from the provision of complex information, guidance, advice and orientation to students in POSDRU "Practice today to become manager of tomorrow". The paper presents the results of a complex study conducted on the impact that these services have had on the students involved, from three perspectives: students, employers, who guided activity students at the university level. The results show that there is a direct relationship between the increase in the number of students who have benefited from guidance, counseling and professional development appropriate to their needs and the number who have developed personal skills to substantiate decisions regarding their career paths and educational because of of information, advice, guidance provided in the project. These services have helped students to develop, to know better, know their own skills and abilities and to focus

  1. Effects of internal marketing on nurse job satisfaction and organizational commitment: example of medical centers in Southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Chang, Hsin-Hsin

    2007-12-01

    As nurses typically represent the largest percentage of employees at medical centers, their role in medical care is exceptionally important and becoming more so over time. The quality and functions of nurses impact greatly on medical care quality. The concept of internal marketing, with origins in the field of market research, argues that enterprises should value and respect their employees by treating them as internal customers. Such a marketing concept challenges traditional marketing methods, which focus on serving external customers only. The main objective of internal marketing is to help internal customers (employees) gain greater job satisfaction, which should promote job performance and facilitate the organization accomplishing its ultimate business objectives. A question in the medical service industry is whether internal marketing can similarly increase the job satisfaction of nurses and enhance their commitment to the organization. This study aimed to explore the relational model of nurse perceptions related to internal marketing, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment by choosing nurses from two medical centers in Southern Taiwan as research subjects. Of 450 questionnaire distributed, 300 valid questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 66.7%. After conducting statistical analysis and estimation using structural equation modeling, findings included: (1) job satisfaction has positive effects on organizational commitment; (2) nurse perceptions of internal marketing have positive effects on job satisfaction; and (3) nurse perceptions of internal marketing have positive effects on organizational commitment.

  2. Searching for a Job on the Contemporary Labour Market: The Role of Dispositional Employability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Tomas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available By acknowledging the uncertainty and unpredictability of the job search process in an unemployment setting, the present study explored the predictive strength of dispositional employability in job search behaviours. Dispositional employability has been recognized as a potentially important personal resource that promotes job opportunities. However, it has rarely been assessed in an unemployment setting to date. According to recent employability models that differentiate between distal (i.e., personal strengths and proximal (e.g., perceived employability determinants of behaviour on the labour market, we hypoth- esized that: (i dispositional employability relates positively to job search intensity and (ii perception of one’s employment possibilities (i.e., perceived employability serves as an explanatory mechanism of this relationship. The hypothesized structural model was tested among a heterogeneous sample of 533 unemployed persons in Croatia. The results of structural equation modelling provided support for our hypotheses: dispositional employability related positively to job search intensity via perceived employ- ability. Accordingly, nurturing dispositional employability may be beneficial for unemployed persons as it relates positively to engagement in job search behaviour.

  3. EXECUTIVE SECRETARY PROFESSIONALS: GRADUATION, TRAINING AND JOB MARKET IN THE STATE OF SERGIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeri Ferraz Sabino

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the qualifications and the job market of secretaries to Sergipe, analyzing the history and evolution of the field before the formal preparation and market demands. After identifying the historical setting of the profession in Brazil, we attempted to verify the behavior of the class secretarial about your organization, qualification and market performance. The exploratory and descriptive research supported the case study, addressing the views of students of Executive Secretariat and managers in the market of Sergipe, besides the pioneering members in the constitution of the occupation in the state. The analysis points to the development of the profession, although later in the educational context. The labor market comes in irregular occupation of the vacancies for the Secretariat, a result that can be attributed to the scarcity of training and little effective dialogues of the class with employers.

  4. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  5. Marketing of Academic Library Services through Social Networking Sites: Implications of Electronic Word-of-Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddike, Md. Abul Kalam; Kiran, K.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the perceptions of academic librarians towards the marketing of library services through social networking sites (SNSs) and their understanding of using electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) as a marketing tool in academic libraries. This study follows a qualitative data-gathering approach of structured…

  6. Academic Researchers on the Project Market in the Ethos of Knowledge Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunila, Kristiina; Hannukainen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    How knowledge capitalism retools the scope of academic research and researchers is an issue which this article ties to the project market in the ethos of knowledge capitalism. In Finland, academic research has been forced to apply for funding in project-based activities reflecting European Union policies. The project market, which in this article…

  7. The Electronic Welcome Mat: The Academic Library Web Site as a Marketing and Public Relations Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Jeanie M.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the potential and reality of using the academic library Web site to market library resources and services, for fundraising, and to market special events. It explores such issues as the placement of a link to academic libraries from institutional home pages and the use of a library Web site to include links to news, exhibits,…

  8. Marketing Today's Academic Library: A Bold New Approach to Communicating with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In "Marketing Today's Academic Library", the author uses his vast experience to speak directly to the academic library practitioner about matching services with user needs. This book proposes new visions and ideas, challenging the traditional way of thinking and providing a framework to target users more precisely. Most library marketing intended…

  9. The Effect of Culture on the Academic Honesty of Marketing and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Janice; Reardon, James; McCorkle, Denny E.

    2010-01-01

    Two trends in marketing higher education include (a) growing opportunities for intercultural encounters in the classroom and (b) a growing concern about student academic honesty. Research regarding the relationship between specific cultural measures and academic honesty is sparse in the context of marketing and business programs in higher…

  10. Measuring job and academic burnout with the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI: Factorial invariance across samples and countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Reis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the factor structure and measurement invariance of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI across different groups (German employees vs. German students and tested academic burnout across samples from different countries (Greek vs. German students. Our results supported the proposed two-factor structure for each sample separately. In addition, multigroup analyses partially supported the equivalence of job and academic burnout within the German samples and the equivalence of academic burnout across Greek and German students. In sum, we suggest that the OLBI is a robust instrument for the measurement of burnout in both contexts: work and academic.

  11. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction. PMID:21981753

  12. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priporas Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  13. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Efthymios; Priporas, Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  14. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty: Findings from a faculty work-life and leadership survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence

    2017-03-01

    To identify predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members. A comprehensive Web-based survey of all faculty members in an academic department of family medicine. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with job satisfaction. The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario and its 15 affiliated community teaching hospitals and community-based teaching practices. All 1029 faculty members in the Department of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete the survey. Faculty members' demographic and practice information; teaching, clinical, administration, and research activities; leadership roles; training needs and preferences; mentorship experiences; health status; stress levels; burnout levels; and job satisfaction. Faculty members' perceptions about supports provided, recognition, communication, retention, workload, teamwork, respect, resource distribution, remuneration, and infrastructure support. Faculty members' job satisfaction, which was the main outcome variable, was obtained from the question, "Overall, how satisfied are you with your job?" Of the 1029 faculty members, 687 (66.8%) responded to the survey. Bivariate analyses revealed 26 predictors as being statistically significantly associated with job satisfaction, including faculty members' ratings of their local department and main practice setting, their ratings of leadership and mentorship experiences, health status variables, and demographic variables. The multivariable analyses identified the following 5 predictors of job satisfaction: the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment; being born in Canada; the overall quality of mentorship that was received being rated as very good or excellent; and teamwork being rated as very good or excellent. The findings from this study show that job satisfaction among academic

  15. JOBS FOR YOUTH – IS THERE A LABOUR MARKET FOR YOUTH IN ROMANIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina MOCANU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Romania is one of the European countries characterized by high rates of unemployment for youth aged 15-24 (21.7% in 2015 and long transitions of graduates from school to the world of work. Several policies were developed in order to facilitate the entrance of youth on the labor market, but with limited outcomes. The present paper aims to analyze the job opportunities for youth on the Romanian labor market in order to understand the demand-side opportunities and barriers. We use the data from a national representative survey among companies carried out in 2015 and we focus the analysis on the job vacancies for youth and the skills required, as well as on employers’ satisfaction on the skills and knowledge of newly hired graduates.

  16. THE CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE JOB SATISFACTION OF ACADEMICS WITHIN SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES OF TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ntisa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available South African higher education has gone through numerous changes in terms ofrestructuring and transformation. Rapid changes of this nature, within the highereducation system, necessitate alternative work arrangements, which have potentialnegative effects on job satisfaction of academics. Research on the contracts ofemployment of academic staff in the context of developing countries such asSouth Africa has remained scarce. The primary purpose of the study was toexplore the relationship between the status of the contract of employment and jobsatisfaction. Data were analysed from 494 (n academics within South Africanuniversities of technology. Correlation analysis was used to establish therelationship between the status of the contract of employment and job satisfaction.A negative correlation between the status of the contract and job satisfaction wasobserved. Significant differences were found between the status of the contractand job satisfaction. The results showed that those who are permanently employedexperience high levels of job satisfaction and those who have fixed-term andtemporary contracts experience lower levels of job satisfaction. This study concludes by discussing managerial implications of the results. Limitations andimplication for further research are explored.

  17. The Effect of Crime on the Job Market: An ARDL approach to Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Cerro, Ana María; Rodríguez Andrés, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides further evidence on the impact of crime on the job market using the time series data over the period 1980-2007 for Argentina. We also address methodological flaws by earlier crime studies by employing autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to cointegration advocated by Pesaran et al (2001). The results show that unemployment has a statistically positive effect on the crime rate, depending on the model used.

  18. Examining the Relationships between Labour Market Mismatches, Earnings and Job Satisfaction among Immigrant Graduates in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    McGuinness, Seamus; Byrne, Delma

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses graduate survey data and econometric methods to estimate the incidence and wage/job satisfaction effects of over-education and overskilling among immigrants graduating from EU 15 based universities in 2005. Female immigrants with shorter durations of domicile were found to have a higher likelihood of overskilling. Newly arrived immigrants incurred wage penalties' which were exacerbated by additional penalties resulting from overskilling in the male labour market and overeducat...

  19. "Job Quality, Labor Market Segmentation, and Earning Inequality: Effects of Economic Restructuring in the 1980s by Race and Gender"

    OpenAIRE

    Maury B. Gittleman; David R. Howell

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine the effects of employment restructuring in the 1980s on white, black, and Hispanic men and women within a labor market segmentation framework. Cluster analysis is used to determine whether jobs can be grouped into a small number of relatively homogeneous clusters on the basis of differences in job quality. With data centered on 1979, 621 occupation/ industry cells covering 94% of the workforce are analyzed with 17 measures of job quality, ranging from earnings and benefits...

  20. THE CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE JOB SATISFACTION OF ACADEMICS WITHIN SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES OF TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Ntisa, A. A.; Dhurup, M.; Joubert, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    South African higher education has gone through numerous changes in terms of restructuring and transformation. Rapid changes of this nature, within the higher education system, necessitate alternative work arrangements, which have potential negative effects on job satisfaction of academics. Research on the contracts of employment of academic staff in the context of developing countries such as South Africa has remained scarce. The primary purpose of the study was to explore the relationship b...

  1. Energy management and development of renewable energies: status of markets and jobs - Strategy et Etudes Nr 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, Thomas; Vesine, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and comments the results of an annual study of the status and evolutions of markets and jobs related to the main activities regarding the improvement of energy efficiency and the development of renewable energies in France. Data are given for the period 2006-2012. After a strong growth between 2006 and 2009, data reveal a lower but still positive growth. The evolution of jobs notably suffers from the decreased growth of the domestic market

  2. Organizational Culture And Emotional Intelligence As Predictors Of Job Performance Among Library Personnel In Academic Libraries In Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igbinovia, Magnus O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate organizational culture and emotional intelligence as predictors of job performance among library personnel in Edo state, Nigeria. The survey research design was employed for the study with a population size of 181 library personnel in the 15 academic libraries under study, and due to the manageable population size, total enumeration was adopted as the sampling technique. The questionnaire was used to elicit data from the respondents. Of the 181 copies of the questionnaire administered, 163 copies were retrieved and found valid for analysis constituting a 90% response rate. Four research questions and four null hypotheses (tested at 0.05 level of significance were formulated to guide the study. The tool used to analyze the research question was descriptive statistics (percentage, mean, and standard deviation and inferential statistics (correlation and multiple regression for testing the hypotheses. The findings of the study revealed that there is a high level of job performance, good organizational culture, and high level of emotional intelligence among the personnel. Organizational culture and emotional intelligence jointly and significantly predict job performance of personnel. There is significant positive correlation between organizational culture and job performance. The linear combination of emotional intelligence and organizational culture predict job performance of library personnel in the academic libraries under study. The research concludes that there is a need for high job performance in libraries which is predicted by the organizational culture of the library and the level of emotional intelligence of the library personnel.

  3. Trends in the job market of nurses in the view of managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jonas Sâmi Albuquerque de; Pires, Denise Elvira Pires de; Alvarez, Ângela Maria; Sena, Roseni Rosângela de; Medeiros, Soraya Maria de; Andrade, Selma Regina de

    2018-01-01

    to identify and interpret the main trends of the labor market for nurses in Rio Grande do Norte, based on the opinion of managers of training institutions and employers. Data were collected through interviews with key informants, organized using Atlas.ti software resources and examined under the thematic content review. the study showed six trends in the labor market of nurses: availability of professionals to the market; worsening working conditions with precariousness; indication for insertion in employment; unemployment for nurses; shortage of nurses; and the existence of a cooperative of nursing professionals. the current scenario of growth in the number of registered nurses without the expansion of the job supply has remained, unemployment tends to increase and work conditions will worsen.

  4. The Effects of Internal Marketing on Some Job Attitudes: A Study in Private Hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya ATLAY IŞIK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizations realize that one of their most crucial assets is the employee. This research evaluates internal marketing actions from the employers’ perspective, focusing on effects of internal marketing actions on employers perceptions of the firm. The aim of this study is to state and analyze a proposed model concerned with internal marketing (IM, organizational cynicism (OCY, organizational commitment (OC, job satisfaction (JS, and intention to leave (ITL amongst Turkish hospital employees. Research data is obtained from those 415 employees working in private hospitals in Mugla, Turkey. The data was analyzed through the SPSS 15.0 and LISREL 8.51 statistical packages and proposed relations are analyzed through Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. The findings supported hypotheses, demonstrating that while IM has positive effects on OC and JS, it has a negative impact on OCY. Moreover, as ITL is affected negatively by OC, it is positively influenced by OCY but no relationship to JS.

  5. The Investigation of Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfactions with Burnout Level of Academıcıans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taşlıyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this study is to ascertain if the emotional intelligence factors vary among some demographic characteristics through exposing the relationships between emotional intelligence factors and job satisfactions with burnout level. For this purpose, a research was conducted on total 291 academic staffs who work in various universities.This research was used a total of three scales were used for data collection. Measure emotional intelligence Chen (2004 and 2006 scale developed by EI12; to measure job satisfaction, D.J Weiss, R. V. Dawis, G.W England, L.H Lofquist developed by the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ-Short Form; to measure Maslach and Jackson burnout level (1981 developed by Maslach Burnou Inventory scale. Findings of the study revealed that there is a significant relationship between the subscales of emotional intelligence, job satisfactions and burnout. It was also determined that emotional intelligence factors vary among some demographic characteristics (gender, marital status and age.

  6. The Etiquette of Accepting a Job Offer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2013-01-01

    The academic job market is overcrowded, but departments are hiring, and each year thousands of graduate students and other candidates will get phone calls offering them tenure-track positions. It is typically a moment of mutual giddiness. The department heads are excited at the prospect of a terrific new colleague; the job applicants now know that…

  7. Effects of Active Labor Market Programs on the Transition Rate from Unemployment into Regular Jobs in the Slovak Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubyova, M.; van Ours, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The system of active labor market policies (ALMP) in the Slovak Republic consists to a large extent of the creation of socially purposeful and publicly useful jobs and of retraining of unemployed workers. So far, the effects of these types of active labor market policies have hardly been analyzed.

  8. Qualifications of Food Science and Technology/Engineering professionals at the entrance in the job market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Giannou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The qualifications of Food Science and Technology/Engineering (FST/E professionals were examined by a web-based survey conducted in 15 countries (14 EU and Turkey. The analysis of the responses showed that 65% of the respondents had a higher education (HE degree (BSc 29%, MSc 28%, and PhD 8%, and 20% carried out extracurricular training before entering in the job market. The main fields of study were Food Science and Technology/Engineering, followed by Agriculture, Nutrition and Health, Safety/Hygiene, and Chemical Engineering in all three levels of HE degrees. Differences in the level of degree between genders were not observed, although a higher percentage of female respondents (36% of all female respondents reported no higher qualification degree, compared to male respondents (33% of all male respondents. On the contrary, female respondents prevailed in extracurricular studies, compared to male ones. Gender, however, was a differentiating factor as far as the field of studies was concerned with female respondents prevailing in Nutrition and Health and male in Agriculture.A considerable percentage of the respondents acquired either a ΗΕ degree or had extracurricular training while working in the 1st job. Extracurricular training both before entering the job market and during work at the 1st workplace comprised mainly the topics Safety and Hygiene, Management, followed by Sensory Science, FST/E and Nutrition and Health. In addition, Marketing Science/Consumer Behaviour was also one of the main topics of company or other training during work at the 1st workplace.   

  9. Job satisfaction and motivation among physicians in academic medical centers: insights from a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina; Amelung, Volker E; Baker, Laurence C; Gaitanides, Michael; Schwartz, Friedrich W; Rundall, Thomas G

    2008-12-01

    Our study assesses how work-related monetary and nonmonetary factors affect physicians' job satisfaction at three academic medical centers in Germany and the United States, two countries whose differing health care systems experience similar problems in maintaining their physician workforce. We used descriptive statistics and factor and correlation analyses to evaluate physicians' responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Our study revealed that German physician respondents were less satisfied overall than their U.S. counterparts. In both countries, participation in decision making that may affect physicians' work was an important correlate of satisfaction. In Germany other important factors were opportunities for continuing education, job security, extent of administrative work, collegial relationships, and access to specialized technology. In the U.S. sample, job security, financial incentives, interaction with colleagues, and cooperative working relationships with colleagues and management were important predictors of overall job satisfaction. The implications of these findings for the development of policies and management tactics to increase physician job satisfaction in German and U.S. academic medical centers are discussed.

  10. Social network utilization and the impact of academic research in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenzweig, Stav; Grinstein, A.; Ofek, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The forces that drive the impact of academic research articles in the marketing discipline are of great interests to authors, editors, and the discipline's policy makers. A key understudied driver is social network utilization by academic researchers. In this paper, we examine how activating one's

  11. Demographic Profiling--A Determination of Academic Performance in a Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, J.; Beeming, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the direct effect of demographic variables on academic outcomes. The study concludes that ethnic group plays a pivotal role in determining the academic performance of students registered for the Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management at the University of Cape Town. White students (presumed to emanate from a privileged…

  12. Right Competencies for the right ICT Jobs – case study of the Croatian Labor Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Pažur Aničić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of information and communication technologies (ICT has led to the significant changes in many areas of human lives. One of the aspects becoming much more challenging is the education of ICT professionals. Latest statistics show that the labor market demand for ICT practitioners exceeds the number of higher education graduates in the field of ICT. This paper provides a brief overview of the past and current situation on the labor market regarding the demand for ICT professionals, as well as forecasts by 2020. Paper also provides a research of demanded competencies in ICT jobs advertisements, and their comparison with competencies defined within the e-Competence framework 3.0 and generic competencies defined by Tuning project.

  13. College Degree, Insertion in the Job Market and Social Background: Limitations and Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Heloísa da Costa Lemos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of college education on the professional insertion of undergraduates from the Business Administration Course. In order to help achieve its objectives, a study was launched in 2007, 2008 and 2009 with business administration students that studied at a famous private university in RJ, which intended to understand the possible relation in obtaining a diploma, the social status of those who get a diploma and its insertion in the job market. The students chosen to participate at this survey were attending the last semester and different variables were taken into consideration such as socioeconomic status, parents educational level and current occupation. The study intended to identify possible differences between the opportunities to find a job among the participants with higher or lower income. The research results did not indicate that there is any difference between the two groups as possibilities of insertion in the market place, reinforcing the idea that the decisive factor in regard to social and professional insertion is related to education.

  14. Perceptions of dental students regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Simone de Melo; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Durães, Sarah Jane Alves; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti

    2012-05-01

    The scope was to analyze the perceptions of dentistry students at the State University of Montes Claros, Brazil, regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system. For this, a triangulation method was employed, using a self-administered questionnaire and interviews. The quantitative data were submitted to univariate and multivariate analysis, using Poisson regression, where ppublic healthcare system, stated that the dentistry course prepares students for this market as the curriculum integrates both teaching and service, reported being in favor of greater experience in the public healthcare system and said they would not take classes in Public Health if they were optional. Contact with the social context through teaching/service integration in the advanced semesters of the dentistry course appears to contribute to the development of new professional skills for working in the public sector. However, the students' perceptions revealed contradictions, considering the low value they attributed to the classes on Public Health and their perception of the public system as a residual job option.

  15. Mapping the global health employment market: an analysis of global health jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keralis, Jessica M; Riggin-Pathak, Brianne L; Majeski, Theresa; Pathak, Bogdan A; Foggia, Janine; Cullinen, Kathleen M; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; West, Heidi S

    2018-02-27

    The number of university global health training programs has grown in recent years. However, there is little research on the needs of the global health profession. We therefore set out to characterize the global health employment market by analyzing global health job vacancies. We collected data from advertised, paid positions posted to web-based job boards, email listservs, and global health organization websites from November 2015 to May 2016. Data on requirements for education, language proficiency, technical expertise, physical location, and experience level were analyzed for all vacancies. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the aforementioned job characteristics. Associations between technical specialty area and requirements for non-English language proficiency and overseas experience were calculated using Chi-square statistics. A qualitative thematic analysis was performed on a subset of vacancies. We analyzed the data from 1007 global health job vacancies from 127 employers. Among private and non-profit sector vacancies, 40% (n = 354) were for technical or subject matter experts, 20% (n = 177) for program directors, and 16% (n = 139) for managers, compared to 9.8% (n = 87) for entry-level and 13.6% (n = 120) for mid-level positions. The most common technical focus area was program or project management, followed by HIV/AIDS and quantitative analysis. Thematic analysis demonstrated a common emphasis on program operations, relations, design and planning, communication, and management. Our analysis shows a demand for candidates with several years of experience with global health programs, particularly program managers/directors and technical experts, with very few entry-level positions accessible to recent graduates of global health training programs. It is unlikely that global health training programs equip graduates to be competitive for the majority of positions that are currently available in this field.

  16. Marketing the University: The Subjective Perceptions of Israeli Academics of Their Role in Attracting New Students to Their Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Israeli academics' perceptions of the introduction of educational markets and, particularly, their attitudes towards academics' roles and responsibilities in the new marketing-led university, as well as to obtain a greater understanding of their actual patterns of involvement in the marketing of…

  17. Academic Labor Markets and Assistant Professors' Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Lowell L.

    2012-01-01

    Using data for 638 assistant professors who joined graduate sociology departments between 1975 and 1992, I examine the claim that when the labor market for new doctorates is weak, assistant professors experience less favorable employment outcomes than when that labor market is strong. Surprisingly, I find that those hired during the weak…

  18. 2015 wind energy observatory. Analysis of market, jobs and future of the wind energy sector in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perot, Olivier; Autier, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    This Power Point presentation proposes graphs, figures, tables and comments on the status and evolution of jobs in the wind energy sector (a growing sector, analysis of job locations), of the wind energy market (assessment of a growing market, dynamic French regions, competitive context, evolution of technologies with higher machines, larger wind farms and a growing production), and on the future of wind energy (a growing number of training courses, an active R and D all over the country, a structuring sector). Sheets presenting actors per categories, and maps of regional activity location are provided in appendix

  19. Impacts of teachers’ competency on job performance in research universities with industry characteristics: Taking academic atmosphere as moderator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anguo Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Research universities with industry characteristics play an irreplaceable role in national economic development and social development. With the rapid development of research universities with industry characteristics in China, these universities face new challenges in managing teachers and promoting their quality. This paper aims to examine the impact of teachers’ competency on job performance in research university with industry characteristics Design/methodology/approach: Based on the behavioral event interview and questionnaire methods, a four-dimension (i.e. basic quality, teaching ability, industry awareness and research capacity competency model was proposed, the influence mechanism of competency on job performance was examined using empirical research. Findings: We found that there is a significant positive correlation between the teachers’ competency level, four dimensions and job performance in research universities with industry characteristics, especially between research capacity, teaching ability, industry awareness and job performance. And academic atmosphere plays a regulatory role in the interaction between the competency and job performance. Practical implications: Our findings can help to improve the management level of teachers in research universities with industry characteristics.Originality/value: The paper introduces the competency theory to the teacher management in research universities with industry characteristics, and gives some interesting findings.

  20. Ergonomics and the inclusion of disabled people in the Brazilian job market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L B; Cabral, A K P S

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of persons with disabilities (PD) has been widely discussed in Brazil. The main purpose of this paper is to identify the contributions of ergonomics in the process of including disabled people in the job market and to discuss the situation in Brazil. It was found that ergonomics is an important tool within organizations. Using it allows space, work stations and tools to be matched workers' needs, including those with disabilities, on behalf of whom it is necessary to adjust the demands of work to their specific needs. However, further research is needed in Brazil on the existing methods of ergonomic intervention for this population in order to suit their needs and optimize potential.

  1. The Romanian generation y: Preparing today’s students for tomorrow’s job market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra VASILESCU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Who are they, what do they want, but most of all, where are they? Teaching for the generation Y is a total challenge for today’s teachers. But become acquainted with the habits and expectations of the Generation Next might help us to bring them back into the classroom and train them properly for the job market. It is imperative to understand the new directions set by Generation Y itself, on their terms, to develop a methodology that might ensure their future success. This paper is a comparison of the members of the so-called Generation Y in the USA, Europe and Romania, their different environment and expectations, with a particular focus on the Romanian GenY and the students of Spiru Haret University.

  2. Vocational Education, On-the-Job Training, and Labour Market Integration of Young Workers in Urban West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, Christophe J.; Pasquier-Doumer, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Young people in Africa encounter many difficulties in entering the labour market and in searching for decent and productive jobs. Research on the links between formal education and vocational training and their economic returns are especially crucial in understanding the inadequate demand for their labour. This article presents evidence based on…

  3. Job Search on the Internet, E-Recruitment, and Labor Market Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    discusses the use of Internet search engines, online application forms, email auto -responders, and mailing lists by HR departments. This study argues... Insignia - Careers and Jobs: Overview, Help Choosing a Career / Job, Search Careers & Jobs, Browse Career & Job Categories, Army Friendly

  4. ACADEMIC FORMATION IN ACCOUNTING SCIENCES AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LABOR MARKET: THE PERCEPTION OF THE ACCOUNTING SCIENCES´ STUDENTS OF A HIGHER EDUCATION FEDERAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdineide dos Santos Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The labor market demands have required from the accounting professionals to enhance their skills and competences so as to meet, effectively, the current requirements. This piece of research aimed at understanding the students´ perception of the Accounting Sciences course, of a Higher Education Federal Institution, in regard to the academic formation that they have been receiving and the professional guidance they are meant to have in order to enter the labor market. The study encompassed 105 students from the 7th and 8th morning/afternoon terms and from the 9th and 10th evening term of the Accounting Sciences course of a Federal Institution of Higher Education. As concerns the methodology, it was based on the exploratory approach with qualitative approach and the descriptive research with quantitative approach, by means of the bibliographical research and the use of questionnaire. The surveyed variables refer to the student´s profile, the professional requirements in relation to the job market demands, the students´ necessary competences and perception on the academic formation they are receiving as well as their training for entering the labor market. It was noticed that the students, in their majority, do not take part, regularly, in extracurricular activities, such as: conferences, seminars and lectures.  They also do not demonstrate complete agreement regarding the fact that they are acquiring the necessary competences for entering and acting in the labor market and, in an emphatically way, they reveal disagreement in relation to the adequacy of the curricular grid of this Institution´s course to the current accountant formation. It can be concluded that the Higher Education Institution must prioritize the development of competences, skills and values that ensure the students conditions for their professional entry to the job market.

  5. Job Satisfaction among Faculty of Color in Academe: Individual Survivors or Institutional Transformers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Berta Vigil; Hagedorn, Linda Serra

    2000-01-01

    Discusses satisfaction and issues pertaining to job retention among college faculty of color. Considers their satisfaction in environments where they are a minority, their perseverance and survival in tenure and promotion, reactions to a nonsupportive environment, and specific factors contributing to job satisfaction. Concludes that faculty of…

  6. Academic Administrator Leadership Styles and the Impact on Faculty Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateh, Justin; Heyliger, Wilton

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of three leadership styles as a predictor of job satisfaction in a state university system. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire was used to identify the leadership style of an administrator as perceived by faculty members. Spector's Job Satisfaction Survey was used to assess a faculty member's level of job…

  7. How Marketing Academics View A-Level Journals: Psychological Insights into Differences between Published and Striving Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Riley G.; Kellaris, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Many colleges of business demand A-level journal publications from marketing faculty as a condition for professional advancement. Yet only around 10 percent of marketing academics ever publish in the "Big 4," A-level journals ("Journal of Marketing," "Journal of Marketing Research," "Journal of Consumer…

  8. Academic Job Satisfaction and Motivation: Findings from a Nationwide Study in Portuguese Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lourdes Machado-Taylor, Maria; Meira Soares, Virgílio; Brites, Rui; Brites Ferreira, José; Farhangmehr, Minoo; Gouveia, Odília Maria Rocha; Peterson, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Academic staff is a key resource in higher education institutions (HEIs) and therefore has a major role in the achievement of the objectives of these institutions. Satisfied and well-motivated academic staff can build a national and international reputation for themselves and their institutions. Moreover, the performance of academic staff impacts…

  9. The Labour Market Relevance of PhDs: An Issue for Academic Research and Policy-Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    In the difficult current socio-economic context, overqualified graduates are increasingly facing challenges in terms of entering the job market and finding jobs which fit their levels of qualifications and satisfaction. Grounded in an auto-ethnography approach, this paper reflects on the challenges that the author (a young female European PhD…

  10. The Market for Academic Knowledge: Its Historical Emergence and Inherent Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weik, Elke

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the discussion about the marketisation of universities by providing a historical perspective. Going back to the time when the market for academic knowledge emerged, I argue that it was created through incorporating a number of inherent tensions that have been, and still are, shaping its development. I show how these…

  11. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  12. Kamu Üniversiteleri Öğretim Elemanlarının İş Tatmini Düzeyini Etkileyen Faktörler(The Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction Level of Public Universities’ Academics)

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz KARAMAN; Ali Ender ALTUNOĞLU

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most discussed subjects in the management pschology field. However, there are not sufficient research concerning with job satisfaction level of academics. The aims of this research are to fill this gap to some extent and to point out the factors affecting job satisfaction. For this reason, the data were collected from 138 academics working in eight different public universities. According to the research, job satisfacton is affected by freedom to give decis...

  13. Patterns and Regularities in the European Marketing Academic Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios; Ormrod, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    ) and to examine the appearance of patterns and regularities in the way EMAC members choose collaboration partners. The work is based on a Social Network Analysis of the co-authored publications presented at the 2000-2010 EMAC conferences. Results show that the main selection criteria for choosing collaboration...... partners is socio-cultural and geographical proximity rather than marketing sub-discipline, pointing towards a very systematic tendency for EMAC members to be organised around institutions in the same or culturally related countries....

  14. Patterns and Regularities in the European Marketing Academic Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios; Ormrod, Robert P.; Christensen, Katrine

    2011-01-01

    ) and to examine the appearance of patterns and regularities in the way EMAC members choose collaboration partners. The work is based on a Social Network Analysis of the co-authored publications presented at the 2000-2010 EMAC conferences. Results show that the main selection criteria for choosing collaboration...... partners is socio-cultural and geographical) proximity rather than marketing sub-discipline, pointing towards a very systematic tendency for EMAC members to be organised around institutions in the same or culturally related countries....

  15. Graduation, retention and job market needs in Earth Science in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosters, E. C.; Raeside, R.; Eaton, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Ca. 40 Canadian university departments offer a range of Earth Science degree programs. Most departments participate in the Council of Chairs of Canadian Earth Science Departments, which has collected statistics since 1974. Ca. 5,000 students are currently enrolled in these programs, ca. 75% in BSc programs. Enrollment figures are cyclical, peaking in the early 1980`s and late 1990`s. Graduation figures and graduation-to-enrollment proportions suggest that retention averages about 90%. This figure is probably a bit flattered by students entering laterally after their second year. The % of women students in all BSc programs combined has remained more-or-less constant at 40% since data became available (1995), but the % of women students in MSc and PhD programs during this period rose significantly from job market in Canada is largely resource-driven. Expected growth in mining and environmental/geotechnical (E/G) sectors outpaces those in petroleum, government and academia. Mining and E/G job opportunities are partly coupled as the mining sector increasingly employs E/G specialists. The petroleum industry is increasingly focused on unconventional plays, requiring re-examination and adaptation of traditional programs to ensure relevance. In addition, the aging petroleum industry infrastructure requires increasing numbers of environmental graduates. A 2007 CFES employer survey indicated that personnel in all Canadian sectors are aging, the E/G sector the least so, suggesting that the next generation is more motivated for E/G careers than for careers in resource extraction. Exceptions to this trend exist, mostly in regions where resource industries are prominent. The Canadian petroleum sector has traditionally largely recruited BSc-level graduates. The desire to upgrade educational credentials for greater international mobility within this sector is creating demand for graduate-degree upgrades. A different challenge characterizes the mining industry, which employs at

  16. The impact of government income transfers on the Brazilian job market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Marinho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to analyze the impact of transferences over the formal and informal labor supply from the family heads. For the analyze of the effects in scope of the entrance decisions in job market it was estimated a multinomial logit, while in the scope of the working time it was used a variation of the method of Durbin and McFadden (1984 for selection bias correction. It has verified that transferences have positive effect over the probabilities that the individual doesn't work and does informally work. However, this last one seems to be related to a substitution effect, once it has been observed a parallel negative effect over the probability to work on the formal sector. It has been obtained yet that the benefits negatively impacts on the offered hours by the family heads whether in the formal or non-formal sector, effect that has happened to be verified on the hours offering in formal sector of all individuals. On the other hand, as we consider the hours of working of those who are engaged in informal sector, it has obtained that income transferences perform not as a discourage issue but as a magnifier factor of worked hours.

  17. Performance Appraisal System Impact on University Academic Staff Job Satisfaction and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambakuwa, Yustina; Mufunda, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) introduced a performance appraisal system (PAS) designed to improve performance indicators across the board in Public Service including academic/faculty staff at the University of Zimbabwe as part of a nation wide strategy. The Public service is a body responsible for all civil workers including academic staff,…

  18. Transplant surgery fellow perceptions about training and the ensuing job market-are the right number of surgeons being trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, D J; Magee, J C; Gifford, K; Merion, R M; Roberts, J P; Klintmalm, G B G; Stock, P G

    2011-02-01

    The American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) sought whether the right number of abdominal organ transplant surgeons are being trained in the United States. Data regarding fellowship training and the ensuing job market were obtained by surveying program directors and fellowship graduates from 2003 to 2005. Sixty-four ASTS-approved programs were surveyed, representing 139 fellowship positions in kidney, pancreas and/or liver transplantation. One-quarter of programs did not fill their positions. Forty-five fellows graduated annually. Most were male (86%), aged 31-35 years (57%), married (75%) and parents (62%). Upon graduation, 12% did not find transplant jobs (including 8% of Americans/Canadians), 14% did not get jobs for transplanting their preferred organ(s), 11% wished they focused more on transplantation and 27% changed jobs early. Half fellows were international medical graduates; 45% found US/Canadian transplant jobs, particularly 73% with US/Canadian residency training. Fellows reported adequate exposure to training volume, candidate selection, pre/postoperative care and organ procurement, but not to donor management/selection, outpatient care and core didactics. One-sixth noted insufficient 'mentoring/preparation for a transplantation career'. Currently, there seem to be enough trainees to fill entry-level positions. One-third program directors believe that there are too many trainees, given the current and foreseeable job market. ASTS is assessing the total workforce of transplant surgeons and evolving manpower needs. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Marketing strategy: an essential component of business development for academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souba, W W; Haluck, C A; Menezes, M A

    2001-02-01

    Historically, academic health centers (AHCs) have detached themselves from commercialism and entrepreneurism, viewing these activities as being inconsistent with many of their core academic values. Word-of-mouth promotion was their primary, if not sole, marketing strategy. Less emphasis was placed on preparing, pricing, distributing, and promoting these services to targeted audiences. Understanding customers' needs was not a top priority. The marketing strategies and tools currently being developed and utilized by AHCs were reviewed. In an effort to attract customers and win contracts, AHCs are aggressively marketing themselves by designing new services, promoting those services much more intensely, restructuring the entire distribution system that delivers those services, and crafting pricing strategies that build in flexibility. With growing frequency, these marketing tactics are part and parcel of a carefully crafted data-driven strategic plan designed to meet the business-development goals of the institution. In order to carry out their missions, AHCs have recognized that they can no longer rest on their "ivory tower" laurels. They must learn how to market themselves in a market economy.

  20. 2016 wind energy observatory. Analysis of market, of jobs, and of the future of wind energy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Nicolas; Petit, Frederic; Autier, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    Illustrated by many graphs and tables of data, this publication first focuses on jobs in the wind energy sector as this sector keeps on growing (a stronger growth, a confirmed dynamics, a value chain in evolution, a diversity of actors all along the value chain) and keeps on creating jobs on the French territory (a fine meshing of the territory, a lever for regional development on the whole value chain). The second part focuses on the market and proposes an assessment of the wind energy market (a still growing market but still under objectives defined by the multi-annual energy programme or PPE, a competitive market which carries on its consolidation, a European growth with high discrepancies among countries) and a comment of the evolution of technologies (more powerful and more efficient machines, a concentrated technical offer, an always more important share in electricity production in France). The third part addresses the future of the sector by evoking adapted training programmes (training on all aspects, specialised training at all levels, a set of international training), research and development activities present on the whole French territory (a French sector strengthened by the offshore, new comers in the chain value), and the structuring of the sector with its multiple actors. Appendices respectively propose maps of locations of actors of the sector in French regions with additional information (number of jobs, main employer, distribution of jobs among the value chain, installed power, number of wind farms, main actors), and an analysis of the main characteristics of actors of different categories (developer or operator, machine manufacturer and maintenance activities, component manufacturer, civil or electric engineering and logistics, maintenance and subcontracting, engineering consulting and expertise)

  1. Labour Market Insecurity: The Effects of Job, Employment and Income Insecurity on the Mental Well-being of Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Vulkan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the insecurity facing employees in the labour market can be viewed as a multifaceted concept that encompasses job insecurity, employment insecurity and income insecurity, as well as the cognitive and affective dimensions of each of these. The results indicate the validity of using this concept in order to better understand how insecurity relates to mental well-being by affecting both the manifest and latent functions of work.

  2. Examining Herzberg's Theory: Improving Job Satisfaction among Non-Academic Employees at a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerek, Ryan E.; Peterson, Marvin

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the results of a survey of 2700 employees in business operations at a large public, research university. The analysis tests Herzberg et al.'s ("1959") well-known, duality theory of motivators and hygiene factors and the impact of personal characteristics and job characteristics on perceptions of the work environment and job…

  3. Gender-Job Satisfaction Differences across Europe: An Indicator for Labor Market Modernization

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz C. Kaiser

    2005-01-01

    In 14 member states of the European Union, women?s relative to men?s levels of job satisfaction are compared by using data of the European Household Community Panel. The countries under consideration can be assigned to three different groups. Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands do not show significant gender-job satisfaction differences. In contrast, in Portugal men are more satisfied with their jobs than women. However, in the vast majority of the investigated countries female workers show ...

  4. An Essential Job: Marketing the Placement Office to Faculty and Employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Marcy; Brooks, Jennifer E.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of marketing by college career services offices. Defines marketing, explains the marketing process, and discusses needs assessment. Section on the marketing mix identifies the product, price, place, and promotion components of both faculty and employer marketing programs. Includes results, in tabular form, of faculty survey on…

  5. The Radiation Oncology Job Market: The Economics and Policy of Workforce Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falit, Benjamin P., E-mail: bfalit2@allianceoncology.com [Pacific Cancer Institute, Wailuku, Hawaii (United States); Pan, Hubert Y.; Smith, Benjamin D. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alexander, Brian M. [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Examinations of the US radiation oncology workforce offer inconsistent conclusions, but recent data raise significant concerns about an oversupply of physicians. Despite these concerns, residency slots continue to expand at an unprecedented pace. Employed radiation oncologists and professional corporations with weak contracts or loose ties to hospital administrators would be expected to suffer the greatest harm from an oversupply. The reduced cost of labor, however, would be expected to increase profitability for equipment owners, technology vendors, and entrenched professional groups. Policymakers must recognize that the number of practicing radiation oncologists is a poor surrogate for clinical capacity. There is likely to be significant opportunity to augment capacity without increasing the number of radiation oncologists by improving clinic efficiency and offering targeted incentives for geographic redistribution. Payment policy changes significantly threaten radiation oncologists' income, which may encourage physicians to care for greater patient loads, thereby obviating more personnel. Furthermore, the implementation of alternative payment models such as Medicare's Oncology Care Model threatens to decrease both the utilization and price of radiation therapy by turning referring providers into cost-conscious consumers. Medicare funds the vast majority of graduate medical education, but the extent to which the expansion in radiation oncology residency slots has been externally funded is unclear. Excess physician capacity carries a significant risk of harm to society by suboptimally allocating intellectual resources and creating comparative shortages in other, more needed disciplines. There are practical concerns associated with a market-based solution in which medical students self-regulate according to job availability, but antitrust law would likely forbid collaborative self-regulation that purports to restrict supply. Because Congress is unlikely

  6. The Radiation Oncology Job Market: The Economics and Policy of Workforce Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falit, Benjamin P.; Pan, Hubert Y.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Alexander, Brian M.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    Examinations of the US radiation oncology workforce offer inconsistent conclusions, but recent data raise significant concerns about an oversupply of physicians. Despite these concerns, residency slots continue to expand at an unprecedented pace. Employed radiation oncologists and professional corporations with weak contracts or loose ties to hospital administrators would be expected to suffer the greatest harm from an oversupply. The reduced cost of labor, however, would be expected to increase profitability for equipment owners, technology vendors, and entrenched professional groups. Policymakers must recognize that the number of practicing radiation oncologists is a poor surrogate for clinical capacity. There is likely to be significant opportunity to augment capacity without increasing the number of radiation oncologists by improving clinic efficiency and offering targeted incentives for geographic redistribution. Payment policy changes significantly threaten radiation oncologists' income, which may encourage physicians to care for greater patient loads, thereby obviating more personnel. Furthermore, the implementation of alternative payment models such as Medicare's Oncology Care Model threatens to decrease both the utilization and price of radiation therapy by turning referring providers into cost-conscious consumers. Medicare funds the vast majority of graduate medical education, but the extent to which the expansion in radiation oncology residency slots has been externally funded is unclear. Excess physician capacity carries a significant risk of harm to society by suboptimally allocating intellectual resources and creating comparative shortages in other, more needed disciplines. There are practical concerns associated with a market-based solution in which medical students self-regulate according to job availability, but antitrust law would likely forbid collaborative self-regulation that purports to restrict supply. Because Congress is unlikely

  7. Reinsertion of the aging worker on job market: is cluster an alternative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique dos Santos Foguel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay  focus  on the reinsertion of the aging worker,  specialized  worker,  connected  to  the productive  sector  of  micro,  small  and  middle companies,  satisfactorily  and  deservingly,  in  a cluster  or  in  a  Local  Productive  Arrangement (LPA, defined for this study as community. Aging people  is considered,  in  this work, as  a multiplier  of  knowledge,  bringing  as  consequence the  valuation  and  the  perpetuation  of  the  local culture, by means of the permanence of the new generations on their communities, resulting on a sustainable development. The study of this ques-tion is justified by the necessity of a greater com-mitment and effort  from each  society sector on creation of a new paradigm  to the work,  which includes the aging people reinsertion together the young  workers  insertion.  An  effort  which  will preserve  the  competitiveness  market  benefits with clear rules and borders, keeping the human development  and the  equity  as main objectives, which enlarges the child and the young formation focused  on  the  market  job,  creating  conditions of  work to  aging  people, that are abandoned  in many aspects of their social life, specially by the family, and that in its great majority are destitute of financial resources to live with dignity. 

  8. An academic-marketing collaborative to promote depression care: a tale of two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Richard L; Epstein, Ronald M; Bell, Robert A; Rochlen, Aaron B; Duberstein, Paul; Riby, Caroline H; Caccamo, Anthony F; Slee, Christina K; Cipri, Camille S; Paterniti, Debora A

    2013-03-01

    Commercial advertising and patient education have separate theoretical underpinnings, approaches, and practitioners. This paper aims to describe a collaboration between academic researchers and a marketing firm working to produce demographically targeted public service anouncements (PSAs) designed to enhance depression care-seeking in primary care. An interdisciplinary group of academic researchers contracted with a marketing firm in Rochester, NY to produce PSAs that would help patients with depressive symptoms engage more effectively with their primary care physicians (PCPs). The researchers brought perspectives derived from clinical experience and the social sciences and conducted empirical research using focus groups, conjoint analysis, and a population-based survey. Results were shared with the marketing firm, which produced four PSA variants targeted to gender and socioeconomic position. There was no simple, one-to-one relationship between research results and the form, content, or style of the PSAs. Instead, empirical findings served as a springboard for discussion and kept the creative process tethered to the experiences, attitudes, and opinions of actual patients. Reflecting research findings highlighting patients' struggles to recognize, label, and disclose depressive symptoms, the marketing firm generated communication objectives that emphasized: (a) educating the patient to consider and investigate the possibility of depression; (b) creating the belief that the PCP is interested in discussing depression and capable of offering helpful treatment; and (c) modelling different ways of communicating with physicians about depression. Before production, PSA prototypes were vetted with additional focus groups. The winning prototype, "Faces," involved a multi-ethnic montage of formerly depressed persons talking about how depression affected them and how they improved with treatment, punctuated by a physician who provided clinical information. A member of the

  9. Institutional Stratification and the Postcollege Labor Market: Comparing Job Satisfaction and Prestige across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongeun; Kim, Jiyun; Jaquette, Ozan; Bastedo, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Employing NCES databases, we investigate how college selectivity influences job satisfaction and prestige from the 1970s to the 1990s and across different racial categories. We find that the effect of college selectivity has essentially disappeared over time and that minority students are particularly disadvantaged with respect to job satisfaction.

  10. Dual Embeddedness: Informal Job Matching and Labor Market Institutions in the United States and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Steve; Benton, Richard A.; Warner, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the embeddedness, varieties of capitalism and macrosociological life course perspectives, we examine how institutional arrangements affect network-based job finding behaviors in the United States and Germany. Analysis of cross-national survey data reveals that informal job matching is highly clustered among specific types of individuals…

  11. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently.

  12. Analysis of Job Satisfaction and Professional Academic Performance of Graduates in Psychology from a University in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Leonel Rosales-Jaramillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in higher education institutions provide important information about professional performance. The present study had as objective to determine the level of job satisfaction, and establish correlation between this construct and extrinsic factors that can intervene in this job satisfaction. This is a descriptive, correlational, probabilistic, and non-experimental work. There is a population of 1207 professionals and the calculated sample was of 307. Theoretical and empirical methods were implemented, such as analysis, synthesis, historical-logical method, literature review, survey, and for the statistical processing, the Chi-squared test was used to cross qualitative variables. It was concluded that there is a strong correlation between the dependent variable and the variables of salary, positions held, and employment sectors. The relation between satisfaction and academic performance is weak. It is recommended to conduct a study with a more extended sample, with the integrator model of satisfaction, and to develop strategies from the pregraduate training to contribute to keep high levels of satisfaction in professional graduates in psychology.

  13. How do academics handle their job-related stress? | Olivier | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academics at tertiary institutions often reflect on the emotional impact their profession has on them and they mention tension, anxiety and stress. Research on stress has indicated that people in the helping professions dealing with people, especially those in the teaching professions, are particularly prone to emotional

  14. Whose Job Is It? Exploring Subject Tutor Roles in Addressing Students' Academic Writing via Essay Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Krista; Johnson, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Strong arguments have been forwarded for embedding academic writing development into the UK higher education curriculum and for subject tutors to facilitate this development (Hyland, 2000; Lea & Street, 2006; Monroe, 2003; Wingate, 2006). This small-scale case study explores subject tutors' practices and beliefs with regard to the provision of…

  15. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  16. An Academic-Marketing Collaborative to Promote Depression Care: A Tale of Two Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Bell, Robert A.; Rochlen, Aaron B.; Duberstein, Paul; Riby, Caroline H.; Caccamo, Anthony F.; Slee, Christina K.; Cipri, Camille S.; Paterniti, Debora A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Commercial advertising and patient education have separate theoretical underpinnings, approaches, and practitioners. This paper aims to describe a collaboration between academic researchers and a marketing firm working to produce demographically targeted public service anouncements (PSAs) designed to enhance depression care-seeking in primary care. Methods An interdisciplinary group of academic researcherss contracted with a marketing firm in Rochester, NY to produce PSAs that would help patients with depressive symptoms engage more effectively with their primary care physicians (PCPs). The researchers brought perspectives derived from clinical experience and the social sciences and conducted empirical research using focus groups, conjoint analysis, and a population-based survey. Results were shared with the marketing firm, which produced four PSA variants targeted to gender and socioeconomic position. Results There was no simple, one-to-one relationship between research results and the form, content, or style of the PSAs. Instead, empirical findings served as a springboard for discussion and kept the creative process tethered to the experiences, attitudes, and opinions of actual patients. Reflecting research findings highlighting patients’ struggles to recognize, label, and disclose depressive symptoms, the marketing firm generated communication objectives that emphasized: a) educating the patient to consider and investigate the possibility of depression; b) creating the belief that the PCP is interested in discussing depression and capable of offering helpful treatment; and c) modelling different ways of communicating with physicians about depression. Before production, PSA prototypes were vetted with additional focus groups. The winning prototype, “Faces,” involved a multi-ethnic montage of formerly depressed persons talking about how depression affected them and how they improved with treatment, punctuated by a physician who provided clinical

  17. THE AUTOMATIZATION OF SPEAKING SKILLS IN THE PROCESS OF BUILDING AN ACADEMIC ENGLISH PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE IN SPEAKING OF PROSPECTIVE MARKETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аndriana Onufriv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of automatization of speaking skills in the process of building an academic English professional competence in speaking of prospective marketers is highlighted. The essence of an academic English professional competence in speaking of prospective marketers has been analyzed. The structure of an academic English professional competence in speaking of prospective marketers (abilities, skills, knowledge, communicative aptitudes has been studies. Building of speaking skills is based on the acquisition of declarative and procedural knowledge. The presentation is suggested as a leading tool of building an academic English professional competence in speaking of prospective marketers. The ways of automatization of speaking operations in the process of building an academic English professional competence in speaking of prospective marketers has been grounded. It has been established that automatization of speaking operations in the process of building an academic English professional competence  in speaking of prospective marketers occur by the means of developing phonetic, grammar and lexical speaking skills. The automatization   of speaking skills is reached by performing certain exercises and tasks. These assignments are receptive, reproductive ones (by a criterion of leading kind of speaking; warming, stereotype-situational and variant-situational ones (by a criterion of the stages of developing skills; simulative and communicative ones (by a criterion of communication. The most widespread exercise and tasks for developing speaking skills, defined by a criterion of communication, are   non-communicative, simulative and communicative ones.

  18. Fully aligned academic health centers: a model for 21st-century job creation and sustainable economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, E Albert; Chrencik, Robert A; Miller, Edward D

    2012-07-01

    Alignment is the degree to which component parts of academic health centers (AHCs) work cohesively. Full alignment allows AHCs to act quickly and cohesively toward common goals and to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves, particularly where collaboration is essential. Maryland's two major AHCs-University of Maryland Medicine (UMM) and Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM)-have experienced periods of significant misalignment during each of their histories. Their most recent periods of misalignment caused significant negative economic and academic impacts. However, the process of realigning their clinical and research missions has not only given them a renewed economic vigor but has also paid significant dividends for the state of Maryland, helping it weather the current recession much better than other regions of the country. The two AHCs' continued economic success during the recession has led Maryland lawmakers to increasingly seek out their expertise in attempts to stimulate economic development. Indeed, UMM, JHM, and other fully aligned AHCs have shown that they can be powerful economic engines and offer a model of job growth and economic development in the 21st century.

  19. Adolescents' Perceptions of the Economy: Its Association with Academic Engagement and the Role of School-Based and Parental Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy E; Liang, Belle; Bravo, Diamond Y; Price, Maggi; Polk, Whitney; Perella, John; Savitz-Romer, Mandy

    2018-05-01

    In the context of widespread media coverage of economic problems, un- and under-employment, and overwhelming student loan debt, youth are making sense of the prospects of getting a job and value of education. Further, they are assessing the implications of the job market in curtailing or enhancing their future success. School-based and familial relationships may support students in making sense of the job market. The current study focuses on how youth view the economy, its association with academic engagement, and how parental and school-based relationships shape views of the job market and their impact on academic engagement. With an ethnically diverse sample of high school students (N = 624; 54% female), perceptions of the job market were tested as mediators and moderators of the relations between school-based relationships and parenting on academic engagement. Using structural equation modeling, job market pessimism mediated the relation between school-based relationships and engagement. School-based relationships and parenting practices moderated the relation between job market pessimism and academic engagement. At high levels of parental and school support, interpreted as increased centrality and salience of academic success, there was a stronger negative association between job market pessimism and academic engagement. This set of findings indicates that high school students are thinking about the job market in ways that impact their engagement in school. These findings extend theories that have focused on the job market and the likelihood of dropping out of school or enrolling in post-secondary education. These findings are significant because just staying in school is not enough to succeed. With increased emphasis on college and career readiness, students are required to be more planful and purposeful during high school in order to succeed in the job market.

  20. Impact of Brand Orientation, Internal Marketing and Job Satisfaction on the Internal Brand Equity: The Case of Iranian’s Food and Pharmaceutical Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Azizi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal branding has been emerging recently as an important issue in marketing field. This study provides insights into how job satisfaction, internal marketing and brand orientation shape employees internal brand equity. Empirical data were collected by a questionnaire distributed to food and pharmaceutical firms. The empirical results indicated that while brand orientation and internal marketing were found to have impact on internal brand equity, job satisfaction has no effect on internal brand equity. Additionally, it was observed that job satisfaction and internal marketing has direct and positive impact on brand orientation and therefore indirect and positive impact on internal brand equity through brand orientation. Results of this study can help organizations to improve their financial performance through more awareness of the determinants of internal brand equity.

  1. New accountant job market reform by computer algorithm: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirose Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the matching of new accountants with accounting firms in Japan. A notable feature of the present study is that it brings a computer algorithm to the job-hiring task. Job recruitment activities for new accountants in Japan are one-time, short-term struggles. Accordingly, many have searched for new rules to replace the current ones of the process. Job recruitment activities for new accountants in Japan change every year. This study proposes modifying these job recruitment activities by combining computer and human efforts. Furthermore, the study formulates the job recruitment activities by using a model and conducting experiments. As a result, the Deferred Acceptance (DA algorithm derives a high truth-telling percentage, a stable matching percentage, and greater efficiency compared with the previous approach. This suggests the potential of the Deferred Acceptance algorithm as a replacement for current approaches. In terms of accurate percentage and stability, the DA algorithm is superior to the current methods and should be adopted.

  2. Academics in the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The job market on North American campuses may be heading for the deep freeze, but hundreds of positions are opening up in the Persian Gulf as American universities scramble to set down roots in those petrodollar-rich states. The combination of money and opportunity on offer may seem hard to resist. But academics who trade the rich intellectual…

  3. Some considerations on adapting academic qualifications to the Romanian labor market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denes Calin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of some research carried out by the authors during the activities of the “Academic Entrepreneurial Laboratory – Progress through Innovation and Practice – (Univers Practic” and seeks to evince certain key aspects pertaining to the adaptation of university qualifications to the needs of the Romanian workforce. First, the general context of higher education and the current state of affairs, as reflected by the analysis of relevant works in the field are presented. This is followed by a presentation of the main results of a questionnaire-based study that evinces the opinions of students, graduates, and company managers with regard to the necessity of adapting academic qualifications to the Romanian labor market. Lastly, the conclusions of the paper are delineated and several recommendations concerning the relationship of universities with the business environment and other stakeholders are elaborated, with the aim of improving the interactions of the university with the entire society.

  4. Job Contract at Birth of the First Child as a Predictor of Women’s Labor Market Attachment: Trajectory Analyses over 11 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Peutere; Jussi Vahtera; Mika Kivimäki; Jaana Pentti; Pekka Virtanen

    2015-01-01

    There is a lot of evidence that pre-birth employment and access to parental leave are important predictors of mothers’ labor market attachment after childbirth. This register-based study from Finland aimed to analyze in which ways the type of job contract (none, temporary, or permanent) at the start of maternity leave predicts labor market attachment in the long term. The mother cohorts were followed up for 11 years. Labor market attachment was analyzed with latent class growth analysis, whic...

  5. Teaching, research, and job satisfaction of prosthodontic faculty members in Indian academic dental institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigli, Kamal; Hebbal, Mamata; Nair, K Chandrasekharan

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine prosthodontic faculty members' satisfaction with their roles of teaching, research, and service in academic dental institutions of India. The head of the prosthodontic department of each institution was informed of the study by telephone and asked to invite his or her staff members to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire used a rating scale of 1=very dissatisfied, 2=dissatisfied, 3=neutral, 4=satisfied, and 5=very satisfied. The satisfaction score for each of the three categories was determined by summing the weights for all items related to the variable. In the study, 386 prosthodontic faculty members from 184 dental institutions were invited to participate, and 341 faculty members from 139 dental institutions completed the questionnaire. The data obtained were analyzed using statistical software. Most of the respondents were satisfied with their teaching and service items. Neutral responses were made for institutional teaching rewards, institutional financial support for research, release time offered by the institution, support for sabbatical leaves, technical assistance in analyzing data, secretarial and technical assistance, institutional research rewards, in-service training opportunities, and institutional service rewards. Dissatisfied responses were made regarding financial and academic support for making scientific presentations and attending conferences and seminars.

  6. Kamu Üniversiteleri Öğretim Elemanlarının İş Tatmini Düzeyini Etkileyen Faktörler(The Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction Level of Public Universities’ Academics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz KARAMAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction is one of the most discussed subjects in the management pschology field. However, there are not sufficient research concerning with job satisfaction level of academics. The aims of this research are to fill this gap to some extent and to point out the factors affecting job satisfaction. For this reason, the data were collected from 138 academics working in eight different public universities. According to the research, job satisfacton is affected by freedom to give decisions, good conditions for implementing new programs, cooperation with colleagues and wage factors.

  7. Academic health centers on the front lines: survival strategies in highly competitive markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, D; Weissman, J S; Griner, P F

    1999-09-01

    The authors describe approaches that five academic health centers (AHCs) have taken to reduce costs, enhance quality, or improve their market positions since the onset of price competition and managed care. The five AHCs, all on the West Coast, were selected for study because they (1) are located in markets that had been highly competitive for the longest time; (2) are committed to all the major missions of AHCs; and (3) own or substantially control their major clinical teaching facilities. The study findings reflect the status of the five AHCs during the fall of 1998. Although some findings may no longer be current (especially in light of ongoing implementation of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997), they still provide insights into the options and opportunities available to many AHCs in highly competitive markets. The authors report on the institutions' financial viability (positive), levels of government support (advantageous), and competition from other AHCs (modest). They outline the study AHCs' survival strategies in three broad areas: increasing revenues via exploiting market niches, reducing costs, and reorganizing to improve internal governance and decision making. They also report how marketplace competition and the strategies the AHCs used to confront it have affected the AHCs' missions. The authors summarize the outstanding lessons that all AHCs can learn from the experiences of the AHCs studied, although adding that AHCs in other parts of the country should use caution in looking to the West Coast AHCs for answers.

  8. Going Green Online: Distance Learning Prepares Students for Success in Green-Collar Job Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Githens, Rod; Sauer, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama has touted the development of a new green economy as a tool to rebuild the American economy while creating new jobs. This new economy requires entrepreneurs and innovators to create new businesses and invent new technologies. It also requires technicians with specialized skills to build wind farms, operate renewable fuels…

  9. Local Workforce Rx: Training Students to Meet the Needs of a Changing Health Care Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Corey; Ullman, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Those following recent employment trends have heard about the nursing shortage. A combination of increased demand and impending retirements means 1 million nurses will be needed in hospitals, homes, and medical facilities by 2018. That's good news for job seekers. But it is not just shortages in nursing. Allied health careers, including…

  10. Career Centers See More Students and Fewer Recruiters in Tight Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolowich, Steve

    2009-01-01

    As students and alumni have crowded into campus career centers seeking help in their job searches, corporate recruiters have made themselves scarce. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, these are common symptoms during the economic downturn. Of the 50 or so colleges and universities the group surveyed…

  11. An examination of the dynamics in the job market in Ghana and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, in Ghana, the popularity of business courses has dominated the arts; several new universities have been established in Ghana, which provide business programmes. Yet, very little is known if graduates offering business courses are prepared to take up jobs that may require competence in language skills.

  12. Economic analysis of labour market disrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Brčák, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this academic paper is to analyse the possible presence of discrimination against women in the job market. The analysis attempts to endogenous the discrimation section within the model. That is the essential difference in regard to other papers on this topic as these ascribe the influence of discrimination to the unexplained gender wage gap. The basic thought of this model is the idea, that if dicrimination against women is present in the job market, then it must exhibit the signs ...

  13. The Hog Cycle of Law Professors: An Econometric Time Series Analysis of the Entry-Level Job Market in Legal Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Hamann, Hanjo

    2016-01-01

    The (German) market for law professors fulfils the conditions for a hog cycle: In the short run, supply cannot be extended or limited; future law professors must be hired soon after they first present themselves, or leave the market; demand is inelastic. Using a comprehensive German dataset, we show that the number of market entries today is negatively correlated with the number of market entries eight years ago. This suggests short-sighted behavior of young scholars at the time when they decide to prepare for the market. Using our statistical model, we make out-of-sample predictions for the German academic market in law until 2020.

  14. Determining Performance Levels of Competencies for Job Entry. Final Report. Marketing and Retail Sales Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Warren; And Others

    To provide input for curriculum evaluation, a study to identify basic competencies required for entry-level positions in the marketing/merchandising field was conducted in Wisconsin vocational education districts. Marketing and merchandising graduates and their employers were surveyed by mailed questionnaire to determine the degree of performance…

  15. Assessing Faculty Beliefs about the Importance of Various Marketing Job Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Michael R.; Hu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    The need to improve the professional skills of those with marketing degrees has spurred surveys of current students, alumni, practitioners, and faculty about the importance of various professional skills; however, previous surveys of marketing faculty have focused only on computer skills. To address this limitation, the goals of this study were…

  16. Digital Literacy in the Marketing Curriculum: Are Female College Students Prepared for Digital Jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Karen E.; Wilder, Kelly; Mishra, Aneil K.

    2017-01-01

    Employers seeking to capitalize on current marketing graduates' technological savvy may find a disappointing gap between their expectations and students' digital preparedness. This study examines these issues by investigating female students' attitudes and expectations with regard to using digital tools in marketing coursework and in a future…

  17. Students Do Not Need High-Level Skills in Today's Job Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the "high-skills hoax"--the notion that everyone must have high skills to be employable. While he recognizes the civil rights issue in the debate--everyone should have the opportunity to develop the skills to land a high-paying job--the law of supply and demand dictates that more high-skilled workers would…

  18. Job Rotation in an Academic Library: Damned if You Do and Damned if You Don't!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinski, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Considers job rotation, the systematic movement of employees from one job to another, as one of the tools for organizational development. Reviews relevant print and Internet literature, discusses the pros and cons of job rotation, and describes experiences at the Ryerson University library to illustrate process. (Author/LRW)

  19. Job stress and job involvement of professionals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Job stress and job involvement of professionals and paraprofessionals in academic libraries: A case study of University of Ibadan, Nigeria and Obafemi Awolowo ... between job stress and job involvement of library professionals and Para profe ssionals, no significant difference in job involvement of professionals and Para ...

  20. Analysis of corporate volunteering in internal market orientation and its effect on job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ruizalba, Jose; Vallespín, María; González Porras, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses some of the factors comprising Internal Market Orientation (IMO) in family businesses in Andalusia (Spain): Management Concern, Training and Work-Family-Balance. Corporate Volunteering (CV) has been incorporated for the first time in IMO. A statistical analysis shows that CV can be inserted within the dimension of response to internal market intelligence and, its incorporation is proposed for future IMO models as a part of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The impact ...

  1. The job market and temporary work programs. ANalysis of the case of the Greater La Plata conglomerate 2003-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Santa María

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at looking into the job market situation in the Greater La Plata conglomerate, focusing its attention on the implementation of Temporary Work Programs as a clearly passive tool used by the State -especially during the last few decades- to deal with the population's employment issues. Based on the situation that the region presents, the specific situation of the municipality of Berisso which is part of the conglomerate will be looked into, in order to carry out an in-depth analysis of these types of policies' effective implementation forms and strategies on the municipal level. The Permanent Home Survey (EHP - INDEC, information provided by the Municipality and documents on Employment Policies and Programs will be used in order to complete this work.

  2. Role of internal marketing, organizational commitment, and job stress in discerning the turnover intention of Korean nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Yoon, Jung-A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the discriminating factors of Korean nurses' turnover intention (TI) among internal marketing (IM), organizational commitment (OC), and job stress (JS). Nurses (n = 185) who had worked for 1-10 years were surveyed from six general hospitals in South Korea. The data were collected by using questionnaires and were analyzed with descriptive statistics and discriminant analysis. The participants were grouped into three groups, depending on the level of their TI: "low TI group" (n = 58), "moderate TI group" (n = 96), and "high TI group" (n = 31). One function significantly discriminated between the high TI and low TI groups. The function correctly classified 84.3% of the participants into the two groups and 75.3% were correctly classified in the cross-validation. Organizational commitment was the most important factor. Job stress and the IM components of staffing-promotion, reward, management philosophy, working environment, and segmentation were significant discriminant factors of TI. Based on the findings of this study, we could conclude that OC, JS, and IM play important roles in the TI of nurses. Implying a career development system as an OC management strategy, an innovative promotion policy to change conservative organizational climates and a balance of effort-reward can be considered as managerial interventions to reduce nurses' TI. © 2010 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2010 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  3. The View of the Academy and the Job Market on Teaching Auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonatan Hoff

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the perception of audit teaching according to the academy and the labor market, based on the evaluation of the importance professionals and teachers grant to the main conceptual and normative aspects of the audit area. In order to achieve the proposed objective, the perception of the teachers responsible for the audit discipline and the auditors working in the labor market was collected through a questionnaire structured in the form of a Likert scale. The research sample comprised all the federal and state universities that offer accounting courses and all the audit companies registered in the database of the Brazilian Securities Commission (CVM. The responses were treated using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney and Spearman’s correlation tests. The results show that, in approximately 75% of the topics raised in this study, the academy tends to correspond to the expectation the market holds about the importance given to such contents within the audit discipline. The main differences are related to Assurance Service, Audit of Non-Profit Entities, Audit of Governmental Agencies, Quality Control and Audit of Information Systems, which do not receive emphasis within the academy, according to the market perspective. The results presented here can be used for teachers to evaluate the disposition of the contents covered within the discipline, considering the relevance attributed by the market.

  4. 20 Years of Publications on Relationship Marketing in Brazil: An Analysis of the 1992 Academic Production a 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Lima Faria

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work, using as sample the ENANPAD`s annals and the periodics RAE and RAUSP, analyzed the academic production on relationship marketing from 1992 to 2012. For this, we used, as basis methodological, six aspects observed in the study de Almeida, Lopes and Pereira (2006, which provided comparisons of results, allowing to build an overview of 20 years of research on relationship marketing in Brazil.    

  5. A Regression Study of Salary Determinants in Indian Job Markets for Entry Level Engineering Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rajveer

    2016-01-01

    The economic liberalisation of Indian markets in early 90s boosted the economic growth of the nation in various sectors over the next two decades. One such sector that has seen a massive growth in this time is Information Technology (IT). The IT industry has played a very crucial role in transforming India from a slow moving economy to one of the largest exporters of IT services. This growth created a huge demand in the labour markets for skilled labour, which in turn made engineering one of ...

  6. A Bermuda Triangle of Policy? "Bad Jobs", Skills Policy and Incentives to Learn at the Bottom End of the Labour Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keep, Ewart; James, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A focus of Government policy has been the need to ensure that those at the lower end of the labour market invest in their human capital through re-engaging with learning, which has been assumed to enable progress into better-paid employment. This article explores the problems created by "bad jobs" and the evidence for the existence of a…

  7. Regional Labour Markets and Job Accessibility in City Network Systems in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiani, A.; Bucci, P; Russo, G.; de Haas, A.; Nijkamp, P.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial labour markets are subjected to the forces of regional economic activity and competing network effects. Commuting is, therefore, an important equilibrating vehicle in a City Network constellation. Cities act as attractors of commuters, as most economic activity occurs in cities, thus

  8. Poverty, Job Quality and Labor Market Dynamics in the Middle East ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The problem is compounded by youthful populations, low quality education, bloated public sectors and low productivity levels in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). This project will ... Morocco conforms to Egypt to a significant degree. Jordan offers an ... Impact of labor market reforms on informality in Egypt. Documents.

  9. Inside Moves: As Technologies and Job Descriptions Change, Communications and Marketing Offices Opt for Strategic Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Maura King

    2011-01-01

    Realists recognize reorganizations for what they are: opportunities to do things better--to change business as usual to reflect best practices, new tools and technologies, and current challenges in the marketplace. At educational institutions, perhaps no area is as sensitive to those shifts as communications and marketing offices. The advances in…

  10. Racial Discrimination in the Job Market: The Role of Information and Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John J.

    The theory developed in this study assumes that the value of discrimination is positive, and its magnitude is a function of the business cycle. A changing economic environment induces employers to engage in experiments, such as hiring nonwhites in periods of tight labor markets. When these experiments alter employer attitudes, reduced…

  11. Job Developers’ Training and Employer Education for Integration of Internationally Educated Professionals in the Canadian Labour Market

    OpenAIRE

    Habib Ullah

    2015-01-01

    Job developers promote job seekers including internationally educated professionals to local employers. In order to excel in doing this; they need to be appropriately trained so that they can educate employers about the benefits of hiring internationally educated professionals. In absence of adequate professional training for job developers, government-funded employment agencies need to provide structured on-the-job-training so that job developers become skilled in promoting their clients to ...

  12. Mathematics in industry: The job market of the future. 1994 SIAM Forum final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States). Mathematical Sciences Dept.

    1994-12-10

    The 1994 SIAM Forum examined applied mathematics in industry with a particular focus on the ingredients for a successful career. The presentations were a mix of panel discussions and individual speakers. In their presentations and discussions, members of four different panels explored: the experiences of recent graduates whose first job was in industry; the hiring process from the point of view of managers; the place of mathematics and of mathematicians in smaller firms; the insights of industrial applied mathematicians whose terminal degree is not in mathematics. Another view of careers in business, industry, and government was provided by a presentation of preliminary data from SIAM`s Mathematics in Industry (MII) project. Finally, techniques for building bridges from academia to industry were described by several experienced speakers. In spite of the diverse backgrounds of the Forum`s panelists and speakers, the central ideas they presented were strikingly similar. These common themes are outlined here. The Forum program is appended to this report.

  13. Higher Education Marketing Strategies Based on Factors Impacting the Enrollees' Choice of a University and an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Dobrotvorskaya, Svetlana G.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of studying the stated problem is due to the fact that for increasing the efficiency of higher education marketing it is necessary to take into account several factors, namely, factors that impact the choice of a university and an academic program by enrollees, as well as socio-psychological characteristics of the latter, while…

  14. Brexit and the European financial system: mapping markets, players and jobs

    OpenAIRE

    Batsaikhan, Uuriintuya; Kalcik, Robert; Schoenmaker, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    London is an international financial centre, serving European and global clients. A hard Brexit would lead to a partial migration of financial firms from London to the EU27 (EU minus UK) to ensure they can continue to serve their EU27 clients. Four major cities will host most of the new EU27 wholesale markets - Frankfurt, Paris, Dublin and Amsterdam. These cities have far fewer people employed in finance than London. Moreover, they host the European headquarters of fewer large companies. The ...

  15. Merits and demerits of engaging in athletic, academic and part-time job roles among university student-athletes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Motoki; Ebara, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Masataka

    2011-12-01

    Although role conflict management is necessary for the prevention of dropout from participation in sports, little has been known about it, especially regarding Japanese university student-athletes. Hence, this study examined the aspects of merit and demerit involved in their performances of academic, athletic, part-time job, family and human relationship roles. The merits and demerits were evaluated using the theoretical concepts of negative spillover (NSP), positive spillover (PSP), compensation and segmentation. In the research, a total of 108 participants (63 males, 45 females) described information about their multiple roles in the Multiple Roles Map (MRM) form. NSP with high frequency rates (3rd quartile) showed demerit that negative condition in athletic and part-time job roles tended to disturb performance of other roles (male ≥ 17.5%, female ≥ 15.6%). The results of PSP showed merit that positive condition in the athletic, part-time job and academic roles contributes to accomplishment of good performance in other roles (male ≥ 19.0%, female ≥ 17.8%). Compensation indicated that negative conditions in the roles were compensated by satisfaction in the human relationships and family roles and private time (male ≥ 9.5%, female ≥ 11.1%). The family role was segmented from other roles (male ≥ 71.4%, female ≥ 68.9%). Sharing these findings will be effective in helping to solve role conflict problems of university student-athletes in Japan.

  16. Job Hunting, Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Ed; Stringer, Susan

    1998-05-01

    The AAS is again sponsoring a career workshop for Astronomers seeking employment. The workshop will cover a wide range of tools needed by a job seeker with a background in astronomy. There are increasingly fewer job opportunities in the academic areas. Today, astronomers need placement skills and career information to compete strongly in a more diversified jobs arena. The workshop will offer practical training on preparing to enter the job market. Topics covered include resume and letter writing as well as how to prepare for an interview. Advice is given on resources for jobs in astronomy, statistics of employment and education, and networking strategies. Workshop training also deals with a diverse range of career paths for astronomers. The workshop will consist of an two approximately three-hour sessions. The first (1-4pm) will be on the placement tools and job-search skills described above. The second session will be for those who would like to stay and receive personalized information on individual resumes, job search problems, and interview questions and practice. The individual appointments with Ed Goldin and Susan Stringer that will take place during the second session (6-9pm) will be arranged on-site during the first session. A career development and job preparation manual "Preparing Physicists for Work" will be on sale at the workshop for \\9.00. TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION: How to prepare an effective resume How to research prospective employers Interviewing skills Networking to uncover employment Job prospects present and future Traditional and non-traditional positions for astronomers This workshop will be presented by Ed Goldin and Susan Stringer of the American Institute of Physics. The cost of the workshop is \\15.00 which includes a packet of resource materials supporting the workshop presentation. Please send your request for attendance by 8 May 1998 to the Executive Office along with a check, payable to the AAS, for the fee. Credit cards will not be

  17. Trends in market demand for internal medicine 1999 to 2004: an analysis of physician job advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Andrew D; Chlouber, Richard; Singler, Jennifer; Lurie, Jon D; Bostrom, Alan; Wachter, Robert M

    2006-10-01

    The health care marketplace has changed substantially since the last assessment of demand for internal medicine physicians in 1996. We reviewed internal medicine employment advertisements published in 4 major medical journals between 1996 and 2004. The number of positions, specialty, and other practice characteristics (e.g., location) were collected from each advertisement. Four thousand two hundred twenty-four advertisements posted 4,992 positions. Of these positions, jobs in the Northeast (31% of positions) or single specialty groups (36.8% of positions) were most common. The relative proportion of advertisements for nephrologists declined (P Internal Medicine) declined (-2.7% relative annual change, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -4.1%, -1.2%) between 1996 and 2004, a decrease largely due to a substantial decline in advertisements noted between 1996 and 1998. However, over the entire time period, the combined proportion of advertisements for all generalists (hospitalists and outpatient-based generalists) did not change (0.5% relative annual change, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.0%). Since 1996, demand for the majority of medical subspecialties has remained constant while relative demand has decreased for primary care and increased for hospitalists and critical care. Increase in demand for generalist-trained hospitalists appears to have offset falling demand for outpatient generalists.

  18. Keeping marketisation at bay: The quality of academic worklife in Czech universities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zábrodská, Kateřina; Mudrák, Jiří; Květon, Petr; Blatný, Marek; Machovcová, Kateřina; Šolcová, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2016), s. 347-374 ISSN 0038-0288 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02098S Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : quality of worklife * academic staff * job satisfaction * job stress * market isation * professor-oriented system * higher education Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.143, year: 2016

  19. Competences acquisition of university students: Do they match job market's needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pujol-Jover

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims at analyzing the skills and competences acquired by students during their university studies, in order to identify the extent to which they fit into society’s labor market demands. Design/methodology/approach: We use data from a survey for firm supervisors corresponding to practices in the Faculty of Economics and Business for the course 2013-14. We analyze the achievement of basic and specific competences and other training project skills, distinguishing by degrees. Findings: Companies find some lacks in the ability to manage time properly, in being versatile, in the communication skills, the ability to work as a team and specially in having an entrepreneurial view. At the university level, this requires training processes more oriented towards experimentation and problem solving. Research limitations/implications: The database used refers only to one Faculty of the University of Barcelona. It would be interesting to collect more data and extend the results to a more general context. Practical implications: It might be interesting both for firms and universities to move closer to one another in a cooperative way. More programs are needed to further enhance the employability of graduates and encourage the mobility of teachers in order for them to spend some time performing their research directly at a firm. Originality/value: This paper explores the immediate and direct relationship established between the university and the labor market through the training period students make during the final stages of their studies.

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELEMENTS OF JOB ENRICHMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE AMONG THE NON ACADEMIC STAFF IN NIGERIAN PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odunayo SALAU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Job enrichment has become an essential aspect in motivating employees for better and greater performance through a mutual sense for skill variety, task identity, task significance and autonomy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the elements of job enrichment and organization performance among the non-teaching staff in Nigerian public universities. Descriptive research method was adopted for this study using one hundred and ninety seven (197 valid questionnaires which were completed by selected public universities in Ogun State, South-West Nigeria. A stratified and simple random sampling techniques were adopted for the study. The data collected were statistically analyzed in a significant manner. The result of the findings revealed that there are positive correlation between job depth, on the job training and core job dimension elements of the job enrichment and workers/organizational performance while there was no correlation between motivators’ elements and performance. Hence, increased recognition of task significance will stimulate the employees to further raise their commitment towards the attainment and realization of the goal and objectives of the institutions/organizations.

  1. STUDY ON ORGANIZATIONAL PATHOLOGY AND IMPLICATIONS ON HUMAN RESOURCES JOB SATISFACTION, ALSO ON THE EMPLOYMENT OF THE LABOR MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Elena, SERB

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People need to face the demands resulting induced neurotic styles of their leaders. The result is lower morale, affect behavior, dissatisfaction at work. This paper aims to present the point of view of theoretical and practical implications of failures in the organization on job satisfaction of employees. The practical part of this article is the analysis of statistically labor employment level , and a marketing research field, a survey using questionnaire as the main instrument. The main objectives during the research aims: knowledge labor employment in Romania, identify employee satisfaction on labor relations between managers and subordinates, knowledge of the involvement of the manager in providing a suitable work environment, to determine the extent the problems arising in the workplace creates dissatisfaction which ultimately rebounds on return. The main results drawn as a result of research carried out show that existing pathology in an organization is felt on one side by the employee the aggression and persecution has implications for morale, and on the other hand these disturbances are felt at employment in that workplace, stress employees resign and this leads to higher unemployment.

  2. Bangladesh Jobs Diagnostic

    OpenAIRE

    Farole, Thomas; Cho, Yoonyoung

    2017-01-01

    This Jobs Diagnostic presents the characteristics and constraints of the labor market in Bangladesh, identifies the objectives of the jobs agenda, and proposes a policy framework to progress toward them. This multisectoral diagnostic assesses the relationships between supply- and demand-side factors that interact to determine job creation, quality, and inclusion outcomes. Understanding the...

  3. Job Contract at Birth of the First Child as a Predictor of Women’s Labor Market Attachment: Trajectory Analyses over 11 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Peutere

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lot of evidence that pre-birth employment and access to parental leave are important predictors of mothers’ labor market attachment after childbirth. This register-based study from Finland aimed to analyze in which ways the type of job contract (none, temporary, or permanent at the start of maternity leave predicts labor market attachment in the long term. The mother cohorts were followed up for 11 years. Labor market attachment was analyzed with latent class growth analysis, which makes it possible to identify subgroups with differing track and level of development. Lack of employment and having a temporary contract at baseline were associated with slower and weaker labor market attachment irrespective of mother’s age, socioeconomic status, and subsequent births. These findings suggest that the polarization of women into the core and periphery of the labor market structure tends to continue after the birth of the first child. Temporary employment might be an obstacle for having rights for a job-protected family leave and have long-term consequences on the continuity of employment and the division of paid and unpaid work in the family.

  4. The Emergence of Industrial Marketing Management as the Leading Academic Journal in Business-to-Business Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Benedetto, C. Anthony; Lindgreen, Adam

    2018-01-01

    During 1994–2016, Peter LaPlaca served as editor-in-chief of Industrial Marketing Management, an era in which the research discipline surrounding business-to-business marketing showed remarkable growth and attracted the attention of scholars worldwide. This article traces the evolving maturity...... and editorial board members, and the arrival of meta-analyses and special issues on emerging research topics all indicate the level of maturity and scope of the business-to-business marketing research discipline attained during this period— thanks to the expert guidance and tireless efforts of Professor La...... of the discipline during these years by analyzing not just statistics but also the content of the premier journal in this area, Industrial Marketing Management. The number of papers submitted and articles published per year, the growth in the journal's impact factor, the increased presence of international authors...

  5. The Role of Personality in the Job Demands-Resources Model: A Study of Australian Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B.; Boyd, Carolyn M.; Dollard, Maureen; Gillespie, Nicole; Winefield, Anthony H.; Stough, Con

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The central aim of this study is to incorporate two core personality factors (neuroticism and extroversion) in the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. Design/methodology/approach: It was hypothesized that neuroticism would be most strongly related to the health impairment process, and that extroversion would be most strongly related to…

  6. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat Nazari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%, depersonalization (81.1%, and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%. Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members.

  7. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Hedayat; Jariani, Mojgan; Beiranvand, Shorangiz; Saki, Mandana; Aghajeri, Nasrin; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad

    2016-03-01

    Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R). Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%), depersonalization (81.1%), and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%). Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members.

  8. Labour Market Interventions as Predictors of Re-employment, Job Seeking Activity and Psychological Distress among the Unemployed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Jukka; Vesalainen, Janne

    1999-01-01

    Finnish job seekers (n=559) were followed up after 1 year (n=401) after 84.3% participated in guidance courses, subsidized employment, vocational training, or some combination. Guidance courses enhanced reemployment. None of the interventions increased job-seeking activity. Training temporarily decreased psychological distress. Deteriorating…

  9. MASTER STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ON THE CORRELATION BETWEEN ACADEMIC CURRICULA AND LABOR MARKET REQUIREMENTS - A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MASTER PROGRAMS IN ECONOMICS FROM BUCHAREST AND SIBIU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika\tMARIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between academic curricula and labor market requirements is a key issue of modern education and a primary pillar of the Bologna process. Romanian universities have adjusted in the last decade or so their curricula and academic offer to the labor market needs. Recently, the field of Project Management has gained more prominence in the Romanian labor market, which makes one enquire about the academic preparation that Master students get in this area of study. Our research aims at shedding light on the way competences, abilities and academic curricula in Economics specializations are related to the Romanian labor market needs, with a focus in the field of Project Management. We are conducting a survey among Master students of two renowned Romanian universities - Bucharest University of Economic Studies and Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu. A number of two samples of students will be selected to conduct the survey, one for each university. The students and all enrolled in Master program with a specialization in Economics. Our study is useful for both academics and labor market, as interested bodies from both sides might learn more about the perception of future graduates on the academic program they follow and the competences and abilities they gain, on one hand, and on the labor market realities in terms of requirements for future employees, on the other hand.

  10. Jobs and welfare in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam; Tarp, Finn

    , this study focuses on labour market trends. We ask: (a) what has happened to jobs in Mozambique over the past 15 years; (b) what has been the link between jobs and development outcomes; and (c) where should policymakers focus to create more good jobs? We conclude that jobs policy must seek to raise...

  11. Markets, jobs, and energetic challenge of activities related to renewable energies and to energy efficiency. Situation in 2007-2008. Perspectives for 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    This study proposes an annual evolution survey of markets and jobs related to the development of renewable energies and to the improvement of energy efficiency in the housing and transport sectors. Markets are related to wind energy, thermal and photovoltaic energy, heat pumps, wood, bio-diesel, bio-ethanol, biogas, waste energetic valorization, geothermal energy, and hydro-energy. Energy efficiency improvements in the housing sector are related to energetic improvement of existing dwellings, condensing boilers, energetically performing household electrical appliances, and compact fluorescent lamps. In the transport sector, energy efficiency improvements concern rail transports and tramways as well as individual vehicles. New markets are identified and discussed: research and development for renewable energies, energy consultancy and diagnosis, energy efficiency in the office building sector and in the industrial sector

  12. WE-G-204-01: Building a Career in Academic Medical Physics: The Hardest and Best Job You Will Ever Have!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazle, J.

    2016-01-01

    While many indicators for academic medical physics are distressing – jobs are tight, demands on clinical time are high (and getting worse) and national funding has been flat for several years (meaning less money in reality) the present is perhaps one of the most exciting times in cancer research history, and medical physicists have an opportunity to make a difference. Many of us predict the impact of medical physics on cancer research over the next decade to be more significant than ever. Why is that? First, medical imaging is used for every cancer patient in developed countries. Every improvement in the acquisition, processing or analysis of radiological images has the potential to impact patients. The use of radiation therapy is at an all-time high – and virtually cannot be performed without medical physics. Many of the advances in both biomedical imaging and radiation oncology are the result of the hard work of academic medical physicists who are thinking of the next generation of technologies that will be used against cancer or an even broader spectrum of diseases. A career in academic medical physics is demanding, particularly for those with clinical responsibilities. As the demands for justification of their clinical effort become increasingly metricized, the ability to do “unfunded research” will become even more difficult. This means that many will have to generate external salary support to justify their efforts in research and development. This comes at a time when funding for research is compressed and harder to obtain. Generally speaking, if you are not contributing 50% or more of your effort to research, you are competing at a disadvantage and it is very unlikely you will get an NIH/NCI/NIBIB grant. Furthermore, in the ongoing effort to improve patient care and safety, we have developed credentialing pathways that now require at least two-years of residency training. This full-time clinical training creates a gap in the research trajectory of

  13. Opening a Can of Worms: The Schools/ Math/Science/ 2-4 year Colleges and the Job Market - Are We just 'Fishing' for Solutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M. Yukech

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The content of this paper confronts some of the biggest problems educators face in the teaching of math and science. The article focuses on a grass roots method called the Algebra project. The Algebra project has improved algebra skills among groups of students who are either steered away from upper level math or who may not ever have the chance to take an advanced math course. According to the data by the department of labor and statistics many jobs are going unfilled. This paper discusses where the jobs are, the courses that are the gateway to employment and the skill sets students need to fill the jobs. Math and science courses need to be used as a tool for liberation of such a problem. We have to ask ourselves why we have a society where only a small group of students are prepared for their future. We need to determine where the knowledge gap is and provide courses that prepare students for the job market and transfer credit from the 2 year to 4 year colleges. This paper also looks at factors that effect change, who the change agents are and what mind set implement solutions.

  14. Humboldt Goes to the Labour Market: How Academic Higher Education Fuels Labour Market Success in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabian, Petr; Sima, Karel; Kyncilova, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    The Czech Republic is one of the post-communist countries where the transformation from late industrial to knowledge economies and knowledge societies was complicated by the simultaneous transformations from communist centrally planned economies to democratic regimes and market economies. Furthermore, the transformation of higher education itself…

  15. Job Search Strategies and Labour Market Outcomes of Young Recent Migrants from Central & Eastern Europe in EU15 Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leschke, Janine; Weiss, Silvana

    job search methods. In particular, young recent migrants are affected rather often by over-qualification and most of them have rather low earnings. Thus using established social networks for job search might go hand in hand with sub-optimal qualitative employment outcomes. Immigrant occupational......, the standard measures on over-qualification are problematic in that they are usually based on occupational information. Importantly, the special module also contains information on how they found their current job including the use of social networks (relatives, friends or acquaintances), another variable...... of our main interest. Furthermore, beyond the standard demographics and employment characteristics the data also includes information on language competences and other hurdles preventing a person to have a job corresponding with their qualifications including a lack of recognition of qualifications...

  16. The Validity of Interpersonal Skills Assessment via Situational Judgment Tests for Predicting Academic Success and Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Sackett, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides conceptual and empirical arguments why an assessment of applicants' procedural knowledge about interpersonal behavior via a video-based situational judgment test might be valid for academic and postacademic success criteria. Four cohorts of medical students (N = 723) were followed from admission to employment. Procedural…

  17. Fully Integrating Academic Advising with Career Coaching to Increase Student Retention, Graduation Rates and Future Job Satisfaction: An Industry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Thomas R.

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions in the United States are under increasing pressure to retain and graduate more students. Traditionally, the academic advisor helps students to meet degree graduation requirements and may also do some minor career advising. A new approach is proposed, in which career coaching with industry help becomes just as…

  18. A Study on the Measurement of Job-Related Stress among Women Academics in Research Universities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili

    2010-01-01

    This study intends to gain an understanding of the sources of stress among women academics in research universities of China. Studies have shown that, compared with their male counterparts, women report higher level of stress in work/family conflicts, gender barriers and career development. Based on the results of this study, the following…

  19. Declining job security

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Valletta

    1998-01-01

    Although common belief and recent evidence point to a decline in "job security," the academic literature to date has been noticeably silent regarding the behavioral underpinnings of declining job security. In this paper, I define job security in the context of implicit contracts designed to overcome incentive problems in the employment relationship. Contracts of this nature imply the possibility of inefficient separations in response to adverse shocks, and they generate predictions concerning...

  20. An Exploratory Investigation of the Periodic Performance Evaluation Processes for Marketing Faculty: A Comparison of Doctoral-Granting and Non-Doctoral-Granting Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, C. David; Carley, Susan S.; Stuart, Randy S.

    2009-01-01

    Whether a first entrant into the academic job market or a seasoned professional, career outcomes for marketing educators depend heavily on the evaluation process used at their institutions. This research explores the periodic performance evaluation process for marketing faculty members using data collected from a national sample of marketing…

  1. Digital Marketing: The Time for a New "Academic Major" Has Arrived

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymbs, Cliff

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly emerging digital economy is challenging the relevance of existing marketing practices, and a radical redesign of the marketing curriculum consistent with the emerging student and business needs of the 21st century is required. To remain relevant to our students and to the ultimate consumers of our output, businesses, the marketing…

  2. Home Ownership, Job Duration, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Rosholm, Michael; Svarer, Michael

    We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobility both in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labour market. In addition, there is a clear negative...

  3. An Analysis of Brazilian Academic Production in Sports Marketing as a Multidisciplinary Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Mazzei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sport Industry has considerable numbers and its social, cultural, and economic impacts are significant in Brazil and worldwide. Marketing performs actions of creation, promotion, and delivery of products and services and applies techniques to influence the level, speed, and composition of consumption demand. Strategically, marketing can be critical to the growth of organizations. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the scientific production in Sports Marketing in Brazil, using a comprehensive database and considering this field in a multidisciplinary context of Sport Management. We concluded a low number of articles were published in Brazilian journals and identified primary or descriptive approaches. There are a predominance of "Essays" and issues related to the Promotion segment of the Sport Industry. This fact opens great prospects for the development of future research with Sports Marketing. Regardless of the current context, the need to apply marketing concepts in sport is effective mainly through the pressure for good sporting and economic results of sports’ organizations. This paper presented a frame of scientific production in Sports Marketing in Brazil, and identified some gaps that can be explored by researchers interested in this topic.

  4. An Approach to Determining the Market for Academic Positions: Application to the Discipline of Agricultural Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Terence; Casavant, Ken; Jessup, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present issues that are relevant to pursuing an academic career in the chosen discipline of each student. The application will be a general case study of agricultural economics. The analytical model will be used to evaluate options for Ph.D. graduates in a supply and demand context. The first issue presented is a…

  5. A Relationship Marketing Approach to Academic Initiative Planning: A Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Mary F.; Basciano, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Many higher education initiatives are dependent upon the development of multiple relationships across academic and support functions. The probability of achieving superior initiative outcomes rests, in part, on the construction of an infrastructure that supports the goals, strategies, tactics, and ongoing mission of a defined project. Through…

  6. Closed Labor Markets: Underrepresentation of Blacks, Hispanics and Women in New York City's Core Industries and Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Walter W.

    Federal and State employment data were examined in a study of the industrial, occupational, and job segmentation of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites by sex in New York City's private sector. Primary focus was placed on the effects of the city's growing service-oriented economy on the employment patterns of Blacks and Hispanics. The study found that…

  7. Promoting Professionalism, and Academic Librarianship: Observations on the Marketing of the M.L.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cameron

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the requirement for librarians to hold an MLS or equivalent, many libraries have not sought opportunities to publicize their credentials. In the college and university environment, this is surprising given the importance placed on credentials and advanced degrees. A brief survey of academic library websites reveals that few are using the web to publicize librarian credentials, and as a result, are missing opportunities to promote their expertise and advanced qualifications to their community.

  8. Promoting Professionalism, and Academic Librarianship: Observations on the Marketing of the M.L.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cameron

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the requirement for librarians to hold an MLS or equivalent, many libraries have not sought opportunities to publicize their credentials. In the college and university environment, this is surprising given the importance placed on credentials and advanced degrees. A brief survey of academic library websites reveals that few are using the web to publicize librarian credentials, and as a result, are missing opportunities to promote their expertise and advanced qualifications to their community.

  9. What is Being Said About Internal Marketing? A Study of the Brazilian Business Administration Academic Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Roda de Souza Araújo Cassundé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study had the purpose of identifying how internal marketing is being addressed in the Brazilian production in the field of Administration. To this end, the major periodicals in the field and the database of the National Association of Graduate Programs in Business Administration (Anpad and Scientific Periodicals Electronic Library (SPELL were investigated under the guidance of research propositions found in Farias (2010. After a search of the entire historical database of publications adopted as corpus, only 13 articles were discovered and retrieved from the period 1961-2012.The findings of this study show that the state of knowledge about internal marketing in Administration is quite specific and, in some cases, surprisingly nonexistent. This aspect allows us to notice various concerns, among which the most significant one is: for what reason has internal marketing not been receiving - at least with respect to periodic and national Administration congresses - the attention it deserves? It is expected to contribute to the understanding of how scholars are studying the internal marketing of the area in the Brazilian context.

  10. Market Metaphors, Neo-liberalism and the Construction of Academic Landscapes in Aotearora/New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael M.; Berg, Lawrence D.

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes New Zealand's adoption of market-oriented higher education--universities as "knowledge businesses" and students as "consumers." Argues that the competitive capitalist economic model advocated by the state replicates societal structural inequalities and is wholly inappropriate for a university. Recommends a return to…

  11. The Effect of Internal Marketing on Organizational Citizenship Behavior of Academic Staff in Higher Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Suleyman M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their important roles in organizational performance, internal marketing and organizational citizenship behavior have become more interesting subjects among researchers and practitioners. However, empirical research is limited in the literature, and the relationship between these two variables in higher educational institutions is not clear.…

  12. Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Elizabeth Popp

    2012-01-01

    American universities today serve as economic engines, performing the scientific research that will create new industries, drive economic growth, and keep the United States globally competitive. But only a few decades ago, these same universities self-consciously held themselves apart from the world of commerce. "Creating the Market University" is…

  13. The Economics of Community College Labor Markets: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Hirschel

    2009-01-01

    The community college has many roles and constituents: academic, professional, and vocational. Its curriculum may be distinguished from that of other institutions of higher education by its many courses designed to enhance students' immediate career opportunities, especially with nearby employers. This article focuses on the job markets for…

  14. The Exchange Between Academic and Applied Social Research: The Current State of Qualitative Market, Media and Opinion Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M. Marlovits

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The impetus for the current FQS issue was the growing impact of qualitative methods in applied market, media and opinion research. The quantity and variety of contributions submitted revealed the creative potential of qualitative methods not only for academic research, but also—and especially—in the realm of applied research, and indicated how science and practice can engage in an exchange that is productive and inspiring for both sides. This article begins by providing an introduction to the spectrum of contributions accepted for publication in FQS 5(2. It then reflects upon topics that were not addressed in the submissions despite our Call for Papers as a potential indication of problems and "blind spots. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402232

  15. Conference 'Renewable energies, between job market growth and lack of qualified manpower - The wind energy example in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettry, Marion; Hirschl, Bernd; Kopp, Clement; Tchernia, Marianne; Nirup, Christina; Kaern, Moses; Andretto, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on recruitment and training requirements in the wind power industry. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, participants exchanged views on the actual development of the wind energy industry in both countries and provided a comprehensive overview of manpower needs and training offers. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Wind energy in France: a chance for the industry and the job market (Marion Lettry); 2 - economical issue and potentialities of products and services in the renewable energies sector (Bernd Hirschl); 3 - Challenge of the wind energy market: recruitment and knowledge transfer in an international market (Clement Kopp, Marianne Tchernia); 4 - Continuing training of professionals - Towards a diversification of the offer? (Christina Nirup); 5 - Who ensures the training of the future wind energy managers today? Qualification and curriculum in Germany (Moses Kaern); 6 - Technical maintenance of wind farms - Further training. How to ensure continuity? (Jean-Pierre Andretto)

  16. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  17. Learning about Job Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmann, Steffen; Falk, Armin; Jäger, Simon

    We conduct a large-scale field experiment in the German labor market to investigate how information provision affects job seekers’ employment prospects and labor market outcomes. Individuals assigned to the treatment group of our experiment received a brochure that informed them about job search...... strategies and the consequences of unemployment, and motivated them to actively look for new employment. We study the causal impact of the brochure by comparing labor market outcomes of treated and untreated job seekers in administrative data containing comprehensive information on individuals’ employment...... status and earnings. While our treatment yields overall positive effects, these tend to be concentrated among job seekers who are at risk of being unemployed for an extended period of time. Specifically, the treatment effects in our overall sample are moderately positive but mostly insignificant...

  18. Systematic Analysis of the Current Academic Research on Social Media Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klepek Martin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of social media where customers have the technical ability to upload own content the change occurred in some of the communication habits online. This world of constant communication is a challenge for businesses as well researchers. Academic research in this area is bringing valuable insights into people attitudes and behaviour on the social media. What is the current situation and where the research field is heading is a question of high importance. This study uses the systematic approach to reviewing the literature and to show the development of publications produced at Czech universities. Although the results show an increasing number of studies, Czech research is lagging behind other similar countries. Compared with the best countries, it is lagging behind in the number of quotations per article. On the basis of these analyses, suggestions for future research that can help to promote future theory development are proposed.

  19. Marketing is Dead! Long Live Marketing!

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanova Jovanov, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The contents of the lectures included: Why marketing? Citizen, Consumer, Customer (Behavior) Who is the Father of Marketing? Some Antecedents of Marketing When Did Marketing Start? The Contributors of Marketing Where Did Marketing Start? Job Positions in Today’s Marketing Organization The Role of the Chief Marketing Officer Four Different CEO Views of Marketing Reality – Truth – Challenge (Why Can’t We Make It?) The Strong and Steady Progress of Marketi...

  20. Job Satisfaction among Mexican Alumni: A Case of Incongruence between Hunch-based Policies and Labor Market Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Alberto F.; de Vries, Wietse; Anderson, Shaquana

    2007-01-01

    During decades, the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (BUAP) like many other Mexican universities has tried to contribute to the national development by offering different educational programs presumed to be better attuned to the needs of the labor market. In this paper we explore the association of three different waves of major offering…

  1. Get a Job! Active Labour Market Policies and Persons with Disabilities in Danish and European Union Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waddington, Lisa; Pedersen, Mads; Ventegodt Liisberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the overall level of employment is a goal of the Europe 2020 strategy and Active Labour Market Policies (ALMPs) have become a key tool used by the European Union and its Member States with a view to increasing employment. This article examines the use of ALMPs, with a special focus on

  2. Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, David L.

    This booklet suggests ways in which institutions--Catholic schools in particular--can move beyond public relations and advertising to engage in the broader arena of marketing with its focus on consumer satisfaction. The first of the book's three chapters reviews the concept of marketing, providing definitions of key terms, clarification of…

  3. Building a French for Business and Technology Program Abroad: Giving Students an Edge in an Expanding Global Job Market

    OpenAIRE

    Lemarchand, Lionel J.

    2010-01-01

    The reality of globalization has made international programs more significant than ever before. Students from all over the world are accessing an increasingly competitive world market. Understanding other cultures in the social sense and in the business culture sense is crucial not only for their own benefits but also for their careers. This article describes how to develop an “Abroad Business and Technology Program” and presents the principal components that can insure its success. It also s...

  4. Searching for the Next Generation of Teacher Educators: Assessing the Success of Academic Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Susan B.; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Williams, James; Green, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    In light of a documented shortage of candidates for teacher education faculty positions, this article explores the academic labor market for teacher education faculty using job announcements from the Chronicle of Higher Education and a survey of search chairs to examine the qualifications sought. The authors conclude that the demand for teacher…

  5. Radiology Jobs: Uncovering Hidden and Not-So-Hidden Opportunities From the ACR Jobs Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Alexander S; Saini, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Anand M

    2016-04-01

    The radiology job market remains daunting. Trainees choosing fellowships benefit from understanding employers' likely future needs. Radiology practices may similarly refine recruiting practices. This study quantitatively analyzes the current radiology job landscape. Job postings on the ACR Career Center online portal between June 2014 and June 2015 were reviewed. As entries are frequently added and removed, posts were manually collected weekly. Postings were recorded in a database and included date, practice, location, specialty/subspecialty, job type, years of experience, salary, and job description. The database was analyzed to characterize employer needs, salary, partnership track availability, and job availability by geography. A total of 1,778 jobs were posted during the study period. Of these, 1,529 (86.0%) were diagnostic; 240 (13.5%) were interventional; and 9 (0.5%) were administrative. Most jobs were in private practice (75.7%), compared with academic (16.3%) and other (7.9%). Although many did not require a specific specialty (46%), the most-frequent needs were breast (17%), neuroradiology (11%), musculoskeletal (8%), and body (7%). Of non-breast-imaging jobs, roughly 30% indicated an interest in breast-imaging skills. A minority (13%) requested prior experience of greater than 1 year, with some seeking 7-10 years of experience. Although most (87%) were full-time positions, part-time, temporary, and contractor roles were described in the remaining 13%. Salary data were rarely reported (7%), with a range of $98,967-$1,000,000. The most jobs were based in California (11%); New York (7%); Pennsylvania (7%); and Illinois (6%). However, when indexed per million population, the highest job rates were in Nevada (14.1); Washington DC (13.7); Hawaii (13.4); Montana (9.8); and Pennsylvania (9.1). Roughly 31% of postings described partnership tracks, with the highest rates in New England (58%), the Pacific Northwest (56%), the Midwest (40%), and Southern (40

  6. EXECUTIVE SECRETARY PROFESSIONALS: GRADUATION, TRAINING AND JOB MARKET IN THE STATE OF SERGIPE SECRETARIADO: FORMAÇÃO E MERCADO NO ESTADO DE SERGIPE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeri Ferraz Sabino

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    This study aimed to investigate the qualifications and the job market of secretaries to Sergipe, analyzing the history and evolution of the field before the formal preparation and market demands. After identifying the historical setting of the profession in Brazil, we attempted to verify the behavior of the class secretarial about your organization, qualification and market performance. The exploratory and descriptive research supported the case study, addressing the views of students of Executive Secretariat and managers in the market of Sergipe, besides the pioneering members in the constitution of the occupation in the state. The analysis points to the development of the profession, although later in the educational context. The labor market comes in irregular occupation of the vacancies for the Secretariat, a result that can be attributed to the scarcity of training and little effective dialogues of the class with employers.Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a qualificação e o mercado de trabalho do secretário no Estado de Sergipe, analisando-se a trajetória e evolução do campo de atuação diante da preparação formal do indivíduo e demandas do mercado. A partir da identificação do cenário histórico da profissão no Brasil, buscou-se verificar o comportamento da classe secretarial sergipana sobre a sua organização, qualificação e atuação no mercado. A pesquisa exploratória e descritiva subsidiou o estudo de caso, abordando a visão de estudantes do curso de Secretariado Executivo da Universidade Federal de Sergipe e gestores no mercado sergipano, além de membros pioneiros na constituição da ocupação no Estado. As análises apontam para o desenvolvimento da profissão, embora tardio, no âmbito educacional. Já o mercado de trabalho apresenta-se sob ocupação irregular das vagas destinadas ao Secretariado, conseqüência que pode ser atribuída à escassa oferta de

  7. Higher effort-reward imbalance and lower job control predict exit from the labour market at the age of 61 years or younger: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsa, T; Kouvonen, A; McCann, M; Jokela, M; Elovainio, M; Demakakos, P

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether higher effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and lower job control are associated with exit from the labour market. There were 1263 participants aged 50-74 years from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing with data on working status and work-related psychosocial factors at baseline (wave 2; 2004-2005), and working status at follow-up (wave 5; 2010-2011). Psychosocial factors at work were assessed using a short validated version of ERI and job control. An allostatic load index was formed using 13 biological parameters. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Exit from the labour market was defined as not working in the labour market when 61 years old or younger in 2010-2011. Higher ERI OR=1.62 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.61, p=0.048) predicted exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupational class, allostatic load and depression. Job control OR=0.60 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.85, p=0.004) was associated with exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupation and depression. The association of higher effort OR=1.32 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.73, p=0.045) with exit from the labour market was independent of age, sex and depression but attenuated to non-significance when additionally controlling for socioeconomic measures. Reward was not related to exit from the labour market. Stressful work conditions can be a risk for exiting the labour market before the age of 61 years. Neither socioeconomic position nor allostatic load and depressive symptoms seem to explain this association. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Higher effort–reward imbalance and lower job control predict exit from the labour market at the age of 61 years or younger: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsa, T; Kouvonen, A; McCann, M; Jokela, M; Elovainio, M; Demakakos, P

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined whether higher effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and lower job control are associated with exit from the labour market. Methods There were 1263 participants aged 50–74 years from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing with data on working status and work-related psychosocial factors at baseline (wave 2; 2004–2005), and working status at follow-up (wave 5; 2010–2011). Psychosocial factors at work were assessed using a short validated version of ERI and job control. An allostatic load index was formed using 13 biological parameters. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Exit from the labour market was defined as not working in the labour market when 61 years old or younger in 2010–2011. Results Higher ERI OR=1.62 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.61, p=0.048) predicted exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupational class, allostatic load and depression. Job control OR=0.60 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.85, p=0.004) was associated with exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupation and depression. The association of higher effort OR=1.32 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.73, p=0.045) with exit from the labour market was independent of age, sex and depression but attenuated to non-significance when additionally controlling for socioeconomic measures. Reward was not related to exit from the labour market. Conclusions Stressful work conditions can be a risk for exiting the labour market before the age of 61 years. Neither socioeconomic position nor allostatic load and depressive symptoms seem to explain this association. PMID:25631860

  9. The Role of Culture, Competitiveness and Economic Performance in Explaining Academic Performance: A Global Market Analysis for International Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Hamin

    2011-01-01

    A nation's culture, competitiveness and economic performance explain academic performance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) testing of 2252 students shows culture affects competitiveness and academic performance. Culture and economic performance each explain 32%; competitiveness 36%. The model predicts academic performance when culture, competitiveness…

  10. Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Wear; Jeffrey Prestemon; Robert Huggett; Douglas Carter

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsAlthough timber production in the South more than doubled from the 1960s to the late 1990s, output levels have declined over the last 10 years, signaling structural changes in timber markets.For softwood products, production declines are most clearly related to demand issues. Demand for softwood solid wood products...

  11. Hospital marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  12. The Application of Marketing Theory to Community College Faculty Recruitment: An Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature on faculty recruitment at community colleges. Describes a study using job-marketing theory and Winter's educational recruitment model to assess reactions to recruitment advertisements for a business faculty position. Reports that participants responded favorably to emphases on academic transfer program content. Discusses…

  13. Job Creation and Job Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Johan M.; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    We extend earlier analyses of the job creation of start-ups vs. established firms by taking into consideration the educational content of the jobs created and destroyed. We define educationspecific measures of job creation and job destruction at the firm level, and we use these to construct...... high-skilled jobs. Moreover, start-ups “only” create around half of the surplus jobs, and even less of the high-skilled surplus jobs. Finally, our approach allows us to characterize and identify differences across industries, educational groups and regions....

  14. Job Creation and Job Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Johan M.; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    We extend earlier analyses of the job creation of start-ups vs. established firms by taking into consideration the educational content of the jobs created and destroyed. We define educationspecific measures of job creation and job destruction at the firm level, and we use these to construct...... a measure of “surplus job creation” defined as jobs created on top of any simultaneous destruction of similar jobs in incumbent firms in the same region and industry. Using Danish employer-employee data from 2002-7, which identify the start-ups and which cover almost the entire private sector......, these measures allow us to provide a more nuanced assessment of the role of entrepreneurial firms in the job-creation process than previous studies. Our findings show that while start-ups are responsible for the entire overall net job creation, incumbents account for more than a third of net job creation within...

  15. Job Creation and Job Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Johan Moritz; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We extend earlier analyses of the job creation of start-ups versus established firms by considering the educational content of the jobs created and destroyed. We define education-specific measures of job creation and job destruction at the firm level, and we use these measures to construct...... a measure of “surplus job creation”, defined as jobs created on top of any simultaneous destruction of similar jobs in incumbent firms in the same region and industry. Using Danish employer-employee data from 2002–2007 that identify the start-ups and that cover almost the entire private sector......, these measures allow us to provide a more nuanced assessment of the role of entrepreneurial firms in the job-creation process than in previous studies. Our findings show that although start-ups are responsible for the entire overall net job creation, incumbents account for more than one-third of net job creation...

  16. Social Justice and Job Distribution in Japan: Class; Minority and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kaori H.

    2000-11-01

    Japanese schools have a mechanism for helping their students to find jobs, rather than leaving this function to market forces. The system embodies three principles. First, it tries to ensure that every graduating student within a school obtains a job. Second, it gives special assistance to students who are seen as "vulnerable" in the job market. Third, it takes into account individual merit (i.e. academic marks, school attendance and extra-curricular activities). The system recognises that a young person's initial full-time employment is crucial in obtaining an adult identity; that high school graduates are still immature and vulnerable, needing professional adult assistance to find "suitable" employment, and that they have unequal access to such assistance in their families. A key role is played by the teachers, who strive to obtain what they consider to be the most suitable employment for all their graduating students.

  17. Job disamenities, job satisfaction, and on-the-job search: is there a nexus?

    OpenAIRE

    Petri Böckerman; Pekka Ilmakunnas

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the potential role of adverse working conditions at the workplace in the determination of on-the-job search in the Finnish labour market. The results reveal that workers currently facing adverse working conditions have greater intentions to switch jobs and they are also more willing to stop working completely. In addition, those workers search new matches more frequently. There is evidence that adverse working conditions consistently increase the level of job dissatisfacti...

  18. Connections, Productivity and Funding: An Examination of Factors Influencing Scientists' Perspectives on the Market Orientation of Academic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Emily Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines scientists' perceptions of the environment in which they do their work. Specifically, this study examines how academic and professional factors such as research productivity, funding levels for science, connections to industry, type of academic appointment, and funding sources influence scientists' perceptions of the…

  19. Jobs API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This Jobs API returns job openings across the federal government and includes all current openings posted on USAJobs.gov that are open to the public and located in...

  20. Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    MANDELÍČKOVÁ, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Bachelor thesis deals with job satisfaction. It is often given to a context with the attitude to work which is very much connected to job satisfaction. Thesis summarises all the pieces of information about job satisfacion, factors that affect it negatively and positively, interconnection of work satisfaction and work motivation, work behaviour and performance of workers, relationship of a man and work and at last general job satisfaction and its individual aspects. In the thesis I shortly pay...

  1. Job Satisfaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    of congruence between the job and the reward that the job provides.1 Job satisfaction can be viewed in the context of two decisions people make about their work in joining and remaining in the organization (decision to feel belonged) and working hard in pursuit of high levels of task performance (decision to perform).1.

  2. Working Vacations: Jobs in Tourism and Leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vacation jobs often mix work and play. For some, the job is their ticket to career happiness. The article's first section describes four jobs specific to entertainment and leisure: (1) cruise ship musician; (2) destination marketing manager; (3) resort activities director; and (4) river rafting guide. The second section helps a person decide if a…

  3. Literacy Requirements for Customer Service Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Paul; Ross, Reginald G.

    A study identified the reading and mathematics job requirements for three sales and service jobs. Subjects were 296 employees of a marketing division of a large telecommunication company. The readability of 420 passages from job and training materials was assessed by the Flesch Reading Ease index, which generated a value that was transformed to a…

  4. Performance of Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) Students in Their On-the-Job Training (OJT) for the Academic Year 2016-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerios, Jefferson L.; Sapin, Sherwin B.

    2017-01-01

    Students' performance in their respective On-the-Job Training (OJT) is one of the success stories that may provide significant contribution to the total effectiveness of the curriculum designed and participated by stakeholders from various industry representation. Students were deployed in different companies to gain knowledge, skills, attitudes,…

  5. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so...

  6. How is new technology changing job design?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The information technology revolution has had dramatic effects on jobs and the labor market. Many routine and manual tasks have been automated, replacing workers. By contrast, new technologies complement non-routine, cognitive, and social tasks, making work in such tasks more productive. These effects have polarized labor markets: While low-skill jobs have stagnated, there are fewer and lower paid jobs for middle-skill workers, and higher pay for high-skill workers, increasing wage inequality...

  7. Online Job Search and Matching Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Mang

    2012-01-01

    The Internet has fundamentally changed the way workers and firms are matched on the job market. Compared to newspapers and other traditional employment resources, online job boards presumably lead to better matches by providing a wider choice of job advertisements and more sophisticated methods for finding suitable vacancies. This study investigates the association of online job search and matching quality using individual-level data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). My results sho...

  8. Academic Libraries Should Consider a Strategic Approach to Promotion and Marketing of e-Books. A Review of: Vasileiou, M. & Rowley, J. (2011. Marketing and promotion of e-books in academic libraries. Journal of Documentation, 67(4, 624-643. doi: 10.1108/00220411111145025

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Torabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The main objectives of this study were the following:1 To determine the existence of a formal promotion or marketing strategic plan for e-books in academic libraries.2 To identify the marketing and promotion tools being used for e-book marketing.3 To understand the role of faculty in promoting e-books.4 To explore the issues and challenges that the libraries are facing in promoting e-books.5 To investigate the future plans for the promotion of e-books.Design – Qualitative study involving individual interviews followed by thematic analysis.Setting – The research setting was seven academic libraries with various sizes of e-book collections (~9,000 to ~500,000 and ranging from research leading to teaching focused universities.Subjects – The interviews were conducted with 25 academic librarians, including 19 subject librarians, 4 e-resources librarians, 1 collection development manager, and 1 acquisition and metadata officer.Methods – Using a multiple case approach, the researchers interviewed 25 librarians from 7 academic libraries. The interviews were digitally recorded. The interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. The researchers recorded information about the type and size of the university, number of e-books, and the role of interviewees, and then conducted a semi-structured interview. The following questions were asked:1 “Do you have a promotion/marketing strategy for e-books (or e-resources? If not, is there a need for one?2 What are the marketing and promotion tools you use for e-books?3 What are the issues and challenges in promoting e-books?” (p. 629Main Results – While none of the cases had a formalized marketing strategy, most participants (19 out of 25 acknowledged the importance of developing one. Those who did not find it necessary argued that their users had good knowledge of library e-resources, thus, marketing was unnecessary. Although there was a lack of a marketing

  9. Job hunting by through the internet: The experiences of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each year, thousands of graduates are turned into the labour market from over fifty tertiary institutions in Nigeria in search of jobs. In addition to the traditional methods of job-hunting, most of these graduates are increasingly using the Internet as a veritable source of job opportunities. However, job-hunting through the ...

  10. Non-Academic Jobs for Fellows in Law Firms, Patent and Trademark Office and Scientific Intellectual Property | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This workshop helps CCR fellows and staff scientists learn about and better position themselves for potential job opportunities at law firms, patent and trademark, and intellectual property protection across the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Guest speakers will shed light on how to best position yourself for obtaining these types of positions and how to improve your chances of success. They will describe ways in which you can use your time at NIH to better prepare for opportunities that may arise down the road in these fields.

  11. Unions, Within-Workplace Job Cuts and Job Security Guarantees

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Bryson; Michael White

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey 1998, this paper shows that unionisation increased the probability of within-workplace job cuts and the incidence of job security guarantees. As theory predicts, both are more prevalent among market-sector workplaces with higher union density and multi-unionism. Expectations that these effects would be more muted in the public sector were also confirmed.

  12. Academic Language in Preschool: Research and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Luna, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Developing and scaffolding academic language is an important job of preschool teachers. This Teaching Tip provides five strategies that extend the topic of academic language by integrating previous research and field-based data into classroom practice.

  13. Teacher Workforce Developments: Recent Changes in Academic Competiveness and Job Satisfaction of New Teachers. CEPA Working Paper No. 15-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Susanna; Master, Benjamin; Sun, Min

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of the nation's public schools to recruit and retain highly skilled teachers is a perennial concern of policy makers and school leaders. Over the past two decades, major policy strategies including the federal No Child Left Behind Act and alternative pathways to teaching, as well as changes in the broader labor market, have altered…

  14. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...... a number of new theoretical results, which are essential for the empirical application of this type of model to matched employer-employee microdata. First, we o¤er a robust equilibrium concept in which there is a continu- ous dispersion of job productivities and wages. Second, we show that our model can...... be readily solved with continuous exogenous worker heterogene- ity, where high type workers (high outside options and productivity) earn higher wages in high type jobs and are hired at least as frequently to the better job types as low type workers (low outside options and productivity). Third, we...

  15. A Framework for Higher Education Labor Market Alignment: Lessons and Future Directions in the Development of Jobs-­-Driven Strategies. Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Jennifer; Van Noy, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The Great Recession and several other factors have heightened concerns among policymakers and the public at large about higher education's role in employment, leading to a renewed wave of pressures, policies, and incentives to create job-driven strategies at all levels. Policymakers and the public often assume that aligning higher education with…

  16. Job Attitudes of Workers with Two Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickar, Michael J.; Gibby, Robert E.; Jenny, Tim

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the job attitudes of people who hold more than one job. Satisfaction, stress, and organizational (continuance and affective) commitment were assessed for both primary and secondary jobs for 83 full-time workers who held two jobs concurrently. Consistency between job constructs across jobs was negligible, except for…

  17. Home ownership, job duration, and wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Rosholm, Michael; Svarer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobility both in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labor market. In addition, there is a clear negative...... effect of home ownership on the unemployment risk and a positive impact on wages. These results are robust to different strategies for correcting for the possible endogeneity of the home owner variable...

  18. Academic attainment in the light of the psychological aspects and requirements of the labor market –a field study-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Sellami, Dr.

    2014-06-01

    Despite the human potential and material secured by the University of Algeria, and in order to acquire appropriate educational services, the nature of psychiatric conditions is one the most important factors that create a pressure on students. A sample of 104 students representing the 3rd year class of Arabic language had been chosen for a questionnaire. They belong to the department of Art and Arabic Language Department at the Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences at the University of Tlemcen for the academic year 2005-2006. The result of this research will confirm and enhance the proposed recommendations to improve the quality of educational services.

  19. The Effects of Financial Aid in High School on Academic and Labor Market Outcomes: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    We investigate the effects of financial aid on student employment and academic outcomes in high school. We exploit administrative differences in the amount of financial aid received based on timing of birth to identify the causal effects of interest. Specifically, individuals born early...... in a quarter receive less financial aid than comparable individuals born late in the previous quarter. We find that receiving less aid induces individuals to work more during high school. However, we do not find any evidence that receiving less financial aid and thereby working more is associated with any...

  20. Marketing marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Karel Jan van Alsem

    2013-01-01

    In deze installatierede betoogt Karel Jan Alsem dat marketing een grotere strategische rol in organisaties zou moeten krijgen. Want marketing is bij uitstek de verbinding tussen klantwensen en het DNA van een organisatie. Doordat merken gemiddeld voor mensen niet heel belangrijk zijn, is goede

  1. Job hazards and job security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the link between occupational health hazards and job security. Consistent with the underlying hypothesis that firms utilizing hazardous technologies tend to employ low-skilled workers who can be discharged easily in case of a downturn in business, the analysis indicates that workers in hazardous positions are more likely to face involuntary job loss than are those in safe positions. These workers may be particularly sensitive to political arguments that efforts to reduce exposure to toxins in the workplace and the general environment are responsible for layoffs and plant closures. The paper discusses policy alternatives that could reduce the impact of health regulations on job security.

  2. Problems militating against job satisfaction among librarians in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research work examined the problems militating against job satisfaction among librarians in academic libraries in Niger State , Nigeria. The aim is to identify the problems associated with job satisfaction among librarians in academic libraries in Niger State. the population of the study was 58 librarians in Niger State.

  3. Measuring urban job accessibility with distance decay, competition and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.; Bertolini, L.

    2013-01-01

    As a key interface between urban transport and land use (workers and jobs) systems, job accessibility can provide a framework within which spatial and social interactions can be understood and interpreted. The extensive academic literature on job accessibility measurements suggests that there are

  4. No time for the gym? Housework and other non-labor market time use patterns are associated with meeting physical activity recommendations among adults in full-time, sedentary jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsey P; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-11-01

    low financial and time resources. Consideration of non-labor market time use patterns may improve strategies to increase physical activity and decrease inactivity among full-time employed adults in sedentary jobs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of job satisfaction of employees

    OpenAIRE

    Procházka, Lukáš

    2011-01-01

    This thesis examines the problem of job satisfaction. It explains basic concepts and methods of most widely used theories of job satisfaction. The work contains survey on job satisfaction on a specific market entity - the company Telefónica Czech Republic, a.s., the findings of current situation and it proposes alternative procedures to improve the situation. Data collection was performed using a questionnaire submitted by employees of the company Telefónica Czech Republic, a. s. On the basis...

  6. Increasing Enrollments: A Marketing Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannick, Michael K.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how market concepts (e.g., product, promotion, pricing, and place distribution) can be applied to job training and education. Offers a step-by-step explanation of how to analyze markets and plan strategically. (AYC)

  7. The Paradox of Falling Job Satisfaction with Rising Job Stickiness in the German Nursing Workforce Between 1990 and 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Bauer, Jan Michael; Richter, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature reports a direct relation between nurses' job satisfaction and their job retention (stickiness). The proper planning and management of the nursing labor market necessitates the understanding of job satisfaction and retention trends. The objectives of the study are to identify...... trends in, and the interrelation between, the job satisfaction and job stickiness of German nurses in the 1990-2013 period using a flexible specification for job satisfaction that includes different time periods and to also identify the main determinants of nurse job stickiness in Germany and test...... probability of remaining in the current position. The changing association between job satisfaction and job stickiness is measured using job satisfaction data and multivariate regressions assessing whether certain job stickiness determinants have changed over the study period. Results: Between 1990 and 2013...

  8. Charter Schools and the Teacher Job Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the position of charter schools in prospective elementary teachers' job search decisions. Using a labor market segmentation framework, it explores teacher applicants' decisions to apply to charter schools. The data come from a mixed-methods longitudinal study of prospective teachers looking for their first job. This article…

  9. Job creation potential of solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMonagle, R.

    2005-01-01

    This document defines the size of the job market within Canada's solar industry and presents a preliminary forecast of the employment opportunities through to 2025. The issue of job potential within Canada's solar technologies is complicated by the wide range of different fields and technologies within the solar industry. The largest energy generator of the solar technologies is passive solar, but the jobs in this sector are generally in the construction trades and window manufacturers. The Canadian Solar Industries Association estimates that there are about 360 to 500 firms in Canada with the primary business of solar technologies, employing between 900 to 1,200 employees. However, most solar manufacturing jobs in Canada are for products exports as demonstrated by the 5 main solar manufacturers in Canada who estimate that 50 to 95 per cent of their products are exported. The main reason for their high export ratio is the lack of a Canadian market for their products. The 3 categories of job classifications within the solar industry include manufacturing, installation, and operations and maintenance. The indirect jobs include photovoltaic system hardware, solar hot water heating, solar air ventilation, and glass/metal framing. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Role of the public university in the labor market of its graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barragan, J. N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The market labor for the University graduates has become one of the top issues in academic daily occupation. Education institutions must understand that they had to be part of the occupational efforts made by its graduates. When I was teaching in Germany, the university official told and make very clear that I must not talk about the entrepreneurship sprit to the students; “there is a greart unemployment out there, there is no job available for our students, our only commitment is give them education, find a job is on their own”. Doing nothing to help them to relocate in the labor market, is worst, and I consider is our job to.

  11. Technological progress and average job matching quality

    OpenAIRE

    Centeno, Mário; Corrêa, Márcio V.

    2009-01-01

    Our objective is to study, in a labor market characterized by search frictions, the effect of technological progress on the average quality of job matches. For that, we use an extension of Mortensen and Pissarides (1998) and obtain as results that the effects of technological progress on the labor market depend upon the initial conditions of the economy. If the economy is totally characterized by the presence of low-quality job matches, an increase in technological progress is accompanied by ...

  12. Family Networks and Youth Access to Jobs

    OpenAIRE

    O'Regan, Katherine M.; Quigley, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Some networks may be more useful than others in affecting labor market outcomes. In particular, social contacts who are employed may be more useful in job referral than those who are not employed. Also, social networks containing non minority workers or male workers may have better and more extensive labor market contacts. This paper considers indirect evidence on the importance of job access via networks for the employment of urban youth. We measure the extent to which probabilities of emplo...

  13. Tomorrow's Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today's Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Synopsis of Department of Labor projections for coming decade shows continuing growth in professional, service, clerical, sales employment, slower growth rate for craftsmen, mechanics, managers and proprietors with relatively same demand for semi-skilled, laborers and farmers. By 1980 labor force and job seekers will increase approximately 17…

  14. Job autonomy and job satisfaction: new evidence

    OpenAIRE

    J Taylor; S Bradley; A N Nguyen

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of perceived job autonomy on job satisfaction. We use the fifth sweep of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (1988-2000), which contains personally reported job satisfaction data for a sample of individuals eight years after the end of compulsory education. After controlling for a wide range of personal and job-related variables, perceived job autonomy is found to be a highly significant determinant of five separate domains of job satisfaction (pay, ...

  15. An Unfinished Job? The Effect of Subject Choice and Family Formation Processes on Labour Market Outcomes of Young Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquet, Nils; Glorieux, Ignace; Laurijssen, Ilse; Van Dorsselaer, Yolis

    2010-01-01

    Despite their generally higher educational attainment, young women are characterised by lower labour market positions than men in Belgium. Using regression and decomposition analyses on data from the longitudinal SONAR survey on the transition from school to work, we examine to what extent subject choice and processes of family formation can…

  16. What effects do student jobs have on the study performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this research is to find out if students who have a student job improve their chances in the labour market. It will be researched whether having a student job has an influence on study results. The research will explore what competencies are needed for a student job and what the added value to the career ...

  17. Job hunting by through the internet: The experiences of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each year, thousands of graduates are turned into the labour market from over fifty tertiary institutions in Nigeria in search of jobs. In addition to the traditional methods of job-hunting, most of these graduates are increasingly using the Internet as a veritable source of job opportunities. However, jobhunting through the Internet ...

  18. Short Term Gain, Long Term Pain:Informal Job Search Methods and Post-Displacement Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the role of informal job search methods on the labour market outcomes of displaced workers. Informal job search methods could alleviate short-term labour market difficulties of displaced workers by providing information on job opportunities, allowing them to signal their productivity and may mitigate wage losses through better post-displacement job matching. However if displacement results from reductions in demand for specific sectors/skills, the use of informal job searc...

  19. Novice Academic Librarians Provide Insight into Choosing Their Careers, Graduate School Education, and First Years on the Job. A Review of: Sare, L., Bales, S., & Neville, B. (2012. New academic librarians and their perceptions of the profession. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(2, 179-203. doi: 10.1353/pla.2012.0017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-12-01

    profession solid, safe, and/or noble. They had further explored librarianship to determine its compatibility with their personal characteristics. Such personal reflection had led participants to graduate school where they gained a real understanding of librarianship. The participants had not generally found graduate school to be academically challenging. They had also valued practical over theoretical instruction. Once in the workplace, the participants noted the value of continuing education to strengthen the skills they had learned in graduate school. Participants benefitted the most from informal mentoring and on-the-job training, i.e. “learning by doing” (p. 192. As novice librarians, the participants had learned to feel their way around their job expectations and note the differences between their responsibilities and those of paraprofessionals in the library. As the novice librarians further defined their work, they had also learned that academic librarianship is the sum of many parts, including collaboration with peers. In evaluating their work, the participants noted that they had come to distinguish “real” academic library work, that which uses their expertise and helps society, from “other” work such as clerical work (pp. 195-196. The sixth and final category was “(reimagining the future.” Most of the participants predicted having advanced as academic librarians in the next five years but were otherwise unsure about what their futures would hold.Conclusion – The researchers made a number of valuable observations in their work with novice librarians. As the step of deciding upon a career seemed to be a murky quest, they thought it would be helpful to analyze public opinion of librarianship and use that information to offset misperceptions about what librarians do. This might help those considering librarianship to make informed and conscious decisions.The study data also provided insight into graduate school. The fact that the participants did not

  20. Sports Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for sports marketing. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 999 specialty key indicators for evaluating mastery of 113 competencies in…

  1. Koordinasi Pelaksanaan Job Expo oleh Dinas Tenaga Kerja Kota Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    sari, Nila; ", Zulkarnaini

    2017-01-01

    Job market or often known as job expo is an annual event organized by the City Workforce Pekanbaru with the aim to reduce unemployment in the City Pekanbaru. In the implementation of this job expo the City Workforce Pekanbaru cooperating with the company in the City Pekanbaru. In the implementation job expo is still low placement of workers absorbed, the number of job vacancies ar little considering the number of job seekers are increasing, then the law number 13 0f 2003 on employment to give...

  2. Marketing Prior Learning Assessment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, Gerald A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiential learning programs must be marketed effectively if they are to succeed. The formulation of market strategy is discussed including: strategic planning; identification of a market target; and development of a market mix. A commitment to marketing academic programs is seen as a commitment to self-assessment. (MW)

  3. Modeling the marketing strategy-performance relationship : towards an hierarchical marketing performance framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, Eelko K.R.E.; Zengerink, Evelien

    2001-01-01

    Accurate measurement of marketing performance is an important topic for both marketing academics and marketing managers. Many researchers have recognized that marketing performance measurement should go beyond financial measurement. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework that models

  4. The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2006-01-01

    The paper assesses the current standing of the 4Ps Marketing Mix framework as the dominant marketing management paradigm and identifies market developments, environmental changes, and trends, as well as changing academic attitudes likely to affect the future of the Mix as theoretical concept and also the favourite management tool of marketing practitioners. It reviews the criticism on the 4Ps emanating from five traditional marketing areas - Consumer Marketing, Relationship Marketing, Service...

  5. Better an insecure job than no job at all? Unemployment, job insecurity and subjective wellbeing

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Knabe; Steffen Rätzel

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the impact of a person’s current employment status and expectations about his or her future labor market status on life satisfaction, using long -run panel data for Germany. Our findings suggest that future expectations (measured by perceived job security for the employed and chances to find a new job for the unemployed) are at least as important for a person ’s subjective well-being as his or her current employment status. This implies that an unemployed person who thinks it will ...

  6. A Portrait of the Changing Academic Profession in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaap, Harm G.; de Weert, Egbert; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Arimoto, Akira; Teichler, Ulrich; Brennan, John

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes, based on the Netherlands’ CAP (Changing Academic Profession) survey, the personal backgrounds, attitudes toward careers and career trajectories, the views on scholarship and job satisfaction of academics in Netherlands. The survey considered a representative sample of the

  7. Alumni Job Search Strategies, Class of 2011. GMAC[R] Data-to-Go Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Examining the job search strategies and employment outcomes for Class of 2011 graduate business school alumni sheds light on current job market trends and the effort required to secure a first job after earning a graduate business degree. This fact sheet highlights the job search methods used by Class of 2011 business school graduates as reported…

  8. Financial Services Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lucretia Maria

    This manual contains student assignments in the financial services area of the marketing process. The individualized competency-based materials are intended to enhance and supplement instruction or to provide the basis for a course of instruction by the teacher-coordinator. Information on skills needed in jobs in financial marketing is first…

  9. Repositioning an Academic Department to Stimulate Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Cassandra C.; Daughton, William J.; Murray, Susan L.; Fisher, Caroline M.; Flachsbart, Barry B.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the market in higher education, and the lack of literature regarding marketing, particularly branding, at the academic department level, presented an opportunity to establish a systematic process for evaluating an academic department's brand meaning. A process for evaluating a brand's meaning for an academic department is…

  10. Physicians' Job Satisfaction.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    job satisfaction. The job demand resource model was used to characterize working conditions by two categories: job demands and job resources. Job demands refer to organizational, physical, psychological or social characteristics of work environment, demanding one's time and cognitive or physical efforts.(5) Examples of ...

  11. Make academic job advertisements fair to all

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2015-01-01

    Too many university posts are given to men without proper competition, says Mathias Wullum Nielsen......Too many university posts are given to men without proper competition, says Mathias Wullum Nielsen...

  12. An approach to marketing in special and academic libraries of Sri Lanka : a survey with emphasis on services provided to the clientele

    OpenAIRE

    Garusing Arachchige, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of marketing covers not only the buying and selling for financial gain, but also the achievement of organizational objectives successfully. Thus the term 'marketing' has a wider and deeper sense, which proliferates the organization's successive achievements. Modern marketing is applied not only to the profit making organizations, but also to the non-profit sector and social service organizations like libraries. Marketing in the library service sector intends the performances of pl...

  13. Second Job Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenert, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    Data from the Current Population Survey reveal characteristics of second-job entrepreneurs, occupations in which these workers hold their second jobs, and the occupational and earnings relationships between their second and primary jobs. (Author)

  14. Job Satisfaction and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F. William

    1981-01-01

    Sources of job satisfaction and job related stress among public school physical educators are examined. Recommended techniques are offered for physical education administrators to reduce their employees' job-related stress and to improve the quality of worklife. (JN)

  15. Overcoming job stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000884.htm Overcoming job stress To use the sharing features on this page, ... stay healthy and feel better. Causes of Job Stress Although the cause of job stress is different ...

  16. Job burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslach, C; Schaufeli, W B; Leiter, M P

    2001-01-01

    Burnout is a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, and is defined by the three dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy. The past 25 years of research has established the complexity of the construct, and places the individual stress experience within a larger organizational context of people's relation to their work. Recently, the work on burnout has expanded internationally and has led to new conceptual models. The focus on engagement, the positive antithesis of burnout, promises to yield new perspectives on interventions to alleviate burnout. The social focus of burnout, the solid research basis concerning the syndrome, and its specific ties to the work domain make a distinct and valuable contribution to people's health and well-being.

  17. Revisiting the Relationship between Marketing Education and Marketing Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    In a replication of a classic article by Hunt, Chonko, and Wood, regression analysis was conducted using data from a sample of 864 marketing professionals. In contrast to Hunt, Chonko, and Wood, an undergraduate degree in marketing was positively related to income in marketing jobs, but surprisingly, respondents with some nonmarketing majors…

  18. Defining Political Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.

    ’ and ‘narrow’ interpretations of political marketing, the nature of the political marketing exchange, political relationship marketing and how one can integrate the stakeholder concept into an understanding of political marketing. Finally, we propose a definition of political marketing that differs from......The aim of this working paper is to develop a definition of political marketing that builds on the political rather than commercial marketing literature. This aim is motivated by the need to make explicit our understanding of what political marketing is, a necessary exercise when discussing theory......, concepts and empirical methods in political marketing. We first present five existing definitions of political marketing that have been selected to represent advances in research from the origins of academic research into political marketing in the mid-1970’s to the present day. After this we discuss ‘wide...

  19. The Changing Nature of Jobs: A Paraprofessional Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carol P.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined job descriptions (1975, 1981, 1990) of three paraprofessional jobs in an academic library technical services department at a small, private liberal arts college to determine changes occurring as a result of automation. It found no significant differences. Although changes were more idiosyncratic than expected, they may indicate…

  20. Steve Jobs: Nobel Laureate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable achievements of one of the world's greatest entrepreneurs offer profound insights into the fundamental nature of economy and essential missing links in prevailing economic theory. The career of Steve Jobs dramatically illustrates the central importance of human capital in modern economy and the almost incalculable contribution that a single individual can make to technological advancement, social innovation and wealth creation, while enhancing the lifestyle of hundreds of millions of people. Jobs demonstrated that the real basis of economic value is providing valuable products and services that fulfill human needs and aspirations, not unregulated markets and financial speculation. His apparent failures point to the dual nature of uncertainty that presides over all human activity - both the ever present threat of error and the untold opportunities hidden behind the veil. Widely regarded as a genius for inventing better products, his greatest commercial achievement has been in recognizing the central importance of services in modern society and fashioning integrated social service systems within which products act as an enabling technology.

  1. From Academic to Post-Academic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Ghaneirad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the cultural change in science from academic science to post-academic science by the use of documentary studying and analytical reasoning. The aim of this study is determining the direction of cultural change in science and comparing it with cultural change in society.The knowledge production which surrounds academy has little relationship with the values of society and epistemological norms regulate scientists' behavior from within the scientific system. But in post-academic science the relationship between science and society operates in the same line with market and government and science produce within the social context and scientists' behavior controlled by the norms out of the scientific system. So the culture of science has changed because science applied to meet the requirements of market and industry. The result is that contrary to cultural change in society that goes from materialism to post-materialism, cultural change in science moves from post-materialism to materialism.

  2. A Reappraisal on Marketing Definition and Marketing Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ran Liu

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the definition of marketing and different marketing theories for academic research based on historical literature review. After a comprehensive review on different approaches on marketing definition, the paper gives its own description of marketing, with a highlight on value creation and exchange. The paper also attempts to discuss the possibility that a potential new paradigm of marketing as a science by a value creation theory, which focus on the new role of marketing in...

  3. The Mediating Role of Job Satisfaction on the Relationship between Teachers' Perceptions of Supervisor Support and Job Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Tevfik; Ozdem, Güven

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between teachers' perceptions of supervisor support and job performances and the mediating role of job satisfaction in this relationship. The study group consists of 206 teachers working in the public high schools in the Giresun province centre during the 2016-2017 academic year. The…

  4. Efforts Towards Gender Equity in Academic and Employment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Job-opportunities specify educational levels, types and quality, which an applicant must have to secure the job opportunity. As such ... in narrowing down the gap between female and male university students' enrolment in academic programmes and academics, technical and administrative staff in employment opportunities.

  5. Interactive Relationship between Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, Organisational Citizenship Behaviour, and Organizational Commitment in Nigerian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    B.M. Nwibere

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the interactive relationship between job involvement, job satisfaction, organisational commitment citizenship behaviour (OCB) and organisational commitment among employees of Nigerian universities. The sample for the study consisted of two hundred and ten academic members of staff (210) from five (5) Federal Government owned universities in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. The study utilized both quantitative data (questionnaire) and qualitative data (interview). The Mult...

  6. Gender differences in job separation rates and employment stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    I analyze the job separation process to learn about gender differences in job separation rates and employment stability. An essential finding is that employer-employee data are required to identify gender differences in job separation probabilities because of labor market segregation. Failure...... to recognize this may potentially lead to statistical discrimination. Three important empirical results are obtained from the analysis. First, women have higher unconditional job separation probabilities. Second, there are no gender differences in job separation probabilities for employees working in similar...

  7. Causal Relationship between Teachers' Job Performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated teachers' job performance and students' academic achievement in secondary schools for the existence of bi-causal relationship in Nigeria. The ex-post facto research design was adopted in the study. The population of the study covered all the Economic teachers and senior school students in class ...

  8. On-the-job-training, job search and job mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Zweimüller; Rudolf Winter-Ebmer

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of formal training on worker mobility. Using data from the Swiss Labor Force Survey, we find that both general and specific training significantly affects on-the-job search activities. The effect of training on actual job mobility differs between searchers and non-searchers. In line with human capital theory, we find that specific (general) training has a negative (positive) impact on job mobility for previous non-searchers. For individuals who have been looking...

  9. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  10. Market Aspects of an Interior Design Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Judy E.

    A project was conducted to evaluate a proposed interior design program in order to determine the marketability (job availability in the field of interior design and home furnishings merchandising) and the feasibility (educational requirements for entrance into the interior design and home furnishings merchandising job market) of the program. To…

  11. Relationship Of Core Job Characteristics To Job Satisfaction And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to clarify the conceptual and empirical distinction between job satisfaction and job involvement constructs, this study investigates the relationship between construction workers core job characteristics, job satisfaction and job involvement. It also investigates the mediating role of job satisfaction between core job ...

  12. Exploring employer job requirements: An analysis of pharmacy job announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James S; Ngo, Tien; Cecil, Jasmine; Borja-Hart, Nancy

    Postgraduate training, dual degrees, and board certifications are credentials viewed by academic pharmacy communities and professional organizations as positive assets for those seeking pharmacist jobs; however, a key question merits further investigation: do these views match employer expectations? The primary objective of this study was to identify the most common qualifications employers require as stated in job advertisements. Pharmacist job postings from the aggregate jobs website Indeed.com were evaluated for the 20 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Search criteria included: pharmacist, full-time, and within a 50-mile radius of the metropolitan area. Positions were excluded if they were not pharmacist specific, did not require a pharmacy degree, were part-time, or were temporary. Required and preferred qualifications were collected in the following categories: practice type, experience needed, training, certification, and desired skills. Six hundred and eleven of 1356 postings met inclusion criteria. Positions were classified as community (113), health-system (264), industry (149), academia (9), or other (76). Four hundred and six (66.4%) required a minimum of a Bachelor's of Pharmacy degree, while 174 (28.4%) required a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Experience was required for 467 positions (range of 6 months to 14 years). Postgraduate training was required for 73 positions (66 residency/7 fellowship). One job required a Master's degree, type unspecified. BPS certifications were required for 7 positions (1.1%) and preferred for 22 positions (3.6%). Certifications and skills most required by employers were verbal and written skills (248), Microsoft Office proficiency (93), immunization certifications (51), and Basic Life Support/Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation certifications (37). Postgraduate training, dual degrees, and board certification were not significant factors in the qualification criteria for the positions identified. The qualifications

  13. The library marketing toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, Ned

    2012-01-01

    A guide that offers coverage of various elements of library marketing and branding for different sectors including archives and academic, public and special libraries. It is suitable for those who are involved in promoting their library or information service, whether at an academic, public or special library or in archives or records management.

  14. Job Satisfaction and Job Performance at the Work Place

    OpenAIRE

    Vanden Berghe, Jae Hyung

    2011-01-01

    The topic of the thesis is job satisfaction and job performance at the work place. The aim is to define the determinants for job satisfaction and to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance and the influence of job satisfaction on job performance. First we look into the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Theory of Planned Behaviour to account for the relationship between attitudes and behaviour. Job satisfaction is then explained as a function of job feature...

  15. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professional…

  16. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  17. Effectiveness of social capital in the job search process

    OpenAIRE

    Koßmann, Ralf Werner

    2016-01-01

    The empirical literature has provided ample yet contradictory evidence on the effectiveness of social ties in the job search process in terms of post-hire outcomes, such as wages or job satisfaction. Whereas early research, mainly focussing on the U.S. labour market, found positive correlations between finding a job via social ties and post-hire outcomes, most recent studies reported inconclusive or even negative correlations. Country differences in the effectiveness of social ties could be e...

  18. What Not to Do When Applying for Library Jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This week we decided to do a “collective wisdom” post about job hunting mistakes. This is an issue affecting every librarian, whether you’ve got a job, you’re in the market, or you’ll begin looking five years down the road. We’ve all made errors in selecting jobs to apply for, drafting our cover letters and resumes, [...

  19. Modeling the marketing strategy-performance relationship : towards an hierarchical marketing performance framework

    OpenAIRE

    Huizingh, Eelko K.R.E.; Zengerink, Evelien

    2001-01-01

    Accurate measurement of marketing performance is an important topic for both marketing academics and marketing managers. Many researchers have recognized that marketing performance measurement should go beyond financial measurement. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework that models marketing performance as a sequence of intermediate performance measures ultimately leading to financial performance. This framework, called the Hierarchical Marketing Performance (HMP) framework, starts ...

  20. Underemployment, on-the-job search, and the Beveridge curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper derives the implications of on-the-job search for unemployment dynamics and shows how the initial jump in market tightness is influenced by the search behaviour of employed workers. The model predicts that the vacancy : unemployment ratio can either overshoot or undershoot its steady...... state value in response to a change in the productivity of jobs...

  1. From Franchise to Programming: Jobs in Cable Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael

    1985-01-01

    This article takes a look at some of the key jobs at every level of the cable industry. It discusses winning a franchise, building and running the system, and programing and production. Job descriptions include engineer, market analyst, programers, financial analysts, strand mappers, customer service representatives, access coordinator, and studio…

  2. Help Wanted: Job & Career Information Resources. RUSA Occasional Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gary W., Ed.

    This book highlights techniques that can be implemented to build library collections on jobs and careers. The authors explore demographic and economic changes that influence the job market and the future of the workforce. They also examine how resources have shifted from books to collections incorporating Web pages, CD-ROMs, and audiovisual…

  3. Charter Schools and the Teacher Job Search in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the position of charter schools in prospective elementary teachers' job search decisions. Using a labor market segmentation framework, it explores teacher applicants' decisions to apply to charter schools. The data come from a mixed-methods longitudinal study of prospective teachers looking for their first job. This paper finds…

  4. Certificates, Skills and Job Markets in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Louis; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Research conducted in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom examined distribution of certificate holders throughout the economy and the process of competition for access to employment. Supply had a significant effect on the distribution. Emphasis on initial training as opposed to continuing education may be…

  5. Lessons for the Academic Introvert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Ben

    2005-01-01

    A former vice president for academic affairs at a small college in New England describes his experiences of searching for a job in the nonacademic field, the failure of which led him to seek guidance from a career-counselor. Their assessment revealed that he was an introvert and suggested that his preferred approach to confronting new people and…

  6. Analysis of job opportunities in the tourism industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kudláčková, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to define and describe in detail job opportunities in the tourism industry and to research current employer needs. The first part of the thesis focuses on defining of job opportunities in the tourism industry and on determination of factors and subjects which influence the labour market in the tourism industry. One of the chapters explains the meaning of the education in the tourism and compares the education system with labour market needs. The second par...

  7. Efficiency improvements of offline metrology job creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Victor J.; Carlson, Alan; Podlesny, John C.; Knutrud, Paul C.

    1999-06-01

    Progress of the first lot of a new design through the production line is watched very closely. All performance metrics, cycle-time, in-line measurement results and final electrical performance are critical. Rapid movement of this lot through the line has serious time-to-market implications. Having this material waiting at a metrology operation for an engineer to create a measurement job plan wastes valuable turnaround time. Further, efficient use of a metrology system is compromised by the time required to create and maintain these measurement job plans. Thus, having a method to develop metrology job plans prior to the actual running of the material through the manufacture area can significantly improve both cycle time and overall equipment efficiency. Motorola and Schlumberger have worked together to develop and test such a system. The Remote Job Generator (RJG) created job plans for new device sin a manufacturing process from an NT host or workstation, offline. This increases available system tim effort making production measurements, decreases turnaround time on job plan creation and editing, and improves consistency across job plans. Most importantly this allows job plans for new devices to be available before the first wafers of the device arrive at the tool for measurement. The software also includes a database manager which allows updates of existing job plans to incorporate measurement changes required by process changes or measurement optimization. This paper will review the result of productivity enhancements through the increased metrology utilization and decreased cycle time associated with the use of RJG. Finally, improvements in process control through better control of Job Plans across different devices and layers will be discussed.

  8. Youth expectations in job search in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Youth on the labour market in developing countries such as Serbia, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina are facing numerous difficulties, with almost a half of their population aged between 15 -24 not working or working in informal sector. The reasons may be numerous. The financial crisis and the low economic development of the country have had negative impact on young generations and this resulted in lack of sufficient jobs vacancies. In addition, the reasons for their slow entry into the labour market could be the lack of experience, low education among young people etc. Although employers have certain expectations of young people, once they enter the labour market young people have certain values that are important for them when choosing a job. The paper presents the research on the expectations of young people entering labour market in the Republic of Serbia. According to survey results based on analyses of youth' expectations and preferences in Serbia regarding potential work conditions, authors have by the means of factor analysis identified which groups of factors are the most important for young people ages between 16 and 30 in job finding in Serbia. The results showed that there is a significance of three questions: 1. Job does not affect the private life; 2. Work resources are provided; 3. Work is safe. In conclusion, if a company ensures that these three issues are regulated, it will more likely employ young professionals.

  9. Academic Nightmares: Predatory Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E.; Rogers, Kem A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic researchers who seek to publish their work are confronted daily with a barrage of e-mails from aggressive marketing campaigns that solicit them to publish their research with a specialized, often newly launched, journal. Known as predatory journals, they often promise high editorial and publishing standards, yet their exploitive business…

  10. Marketing B2B: mapeamento dos trabalhos acadêmicos no Brasil de 1998 a 2007 B2B MARKETING: MAPPING ACADEMIC PAPERS IN BRAZIL FROM 1998 TO 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Quaresma Mendonça

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available O Marketing, ao mesmo tempo em que é rico por receber contribuições de áreas diversas, como Economia, Sociologia e Psicologia, dentre outras, ainda busca consolidar uma teoria própria. Nesse sentido, a classificação de trabalhos acadêmicos apresenta-se como importante para o mapeamento dos rumos em que o Marketing vem sendo trabalhado ao longo dos últimos anos no Brasil, assim como para o levantamento de tendências da área. Entender as características da compra organizacional é essencial para a criação de programas eficazes de marketing que atinjam os compradores deste mercado. Isso porque tais compradores não se comportam como os de mercado de consumo, apesar do objetivo na realização da compra ser o mesmo em ambos os casos – satisfazer uma necessidade. Os objetivos e as políticas singulares de uma organização estabelecem restrições especiais na tomada de decisão do comprador organizacional (KERIN et al., 2007. Este estudo buscou identificar os artigos da área de Marketing Business-to-Business (B2B publicados nos EnANPADs, RAE, RAC, READ e RAUSP no período de 1998 a 2007, verificando, apesar da pequena quantidade de trabalhos realizados, o número tem aumentado e, seguindo a tendência da literatura, as pesquisas estão se concentrando na área de marketing de relacionamento entre empresas.The Marketing discipline is influenced by several areas like Economics, Sociology and Psychology. However, it's still looking for an own theory. The scientific classification of papers becomes an important tool to find the way Marketing has been studied on last years in Brazil, as well as to find trends in this area. Understanding the organizational buying characteristics is mandatory in order to create efficient marketing programs that meet industry's buyers. This occurs because those buyers don't have the same behavior as individual consumers, despite the goal of a buying operation be the same - satisfaction of a need. The goals

  11. Job Sharing in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Wilma; Kline, Susan

    1979-01-01

    The author presents the advantages of job sharing for all school personnel, saying that education is particularly adaptable to this new form of employment. Current job sharing programs in Massachusetts, California, and New Jersey schools are briefly discussed. (SJL)

  12. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  13. Hybrid job shop scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the problem of scheduling jobs in a hybrid job shop. We use the term 'hybrid' to indicate that we consider a lot of extensions of the classic job shop, such as transportation times, multiple resources, and setup times. The Shifting Bottleneck procedure can be generalized to deal with

  14. Practical job shop scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Shifting Bottleneck procedure is an intuitive and reasonably good approximation algorithm for the notoriously difficult classical job shop scheduling problem. The principle of decomposing a classical job shop problem into a series of single-machine problems can also easily be applied to job shop

  15. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    We use a detailed employer-employee data set matched with detailed crime information (timing of crime, fines, convictions, crime type) to estimate the impact of job loss on an individual's probability to commit crime. We focus on job losses due to displacement, i.e. job losses in firms losing...

  16. Research Productivity by Career Stage among Korean Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores Korean academics' changes in research productivity by career stage. Career stage in this study is defined as a specific cohort based on one's length of job experience, with those in the same stage sharing similar interests, values, needs, and tasks; it is categorized into fledglings, maturing academics, established academics,…

  17. Entrepreneurial Skills and Education-job Matching of Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucel, Aleksander; Róbert, Péter; Buil, Màrian; Masferrer, Núria

    2016-01-01

    This article studies entrepreneurial education and its impact on job-skills matches for higher education graduates. Those who possess entrepreneurial skills are assumed to be more market aware and creative in their job search. They are also expected to foresee which job offers would and would not, match their skills. Using a large comparative…

  18. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Multifamily Job Task Analyses Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirr, N.; Hepinstall, D.; Douglas, M.; Buck, S.; Larney, C.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the efforts carried out to determine whether there is a need to develop separate, multifamily-specific JTAs for the four proposed job categories. The multifamily SWS market committee considered these job designations to be the best candidates for developing JTAs and certification blueprints, as well as having the greatest potential for promoting job growth in the multifamily home performance industry.

  19. The Marketing Mix Revisited: Towards the 21st Century Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2006-01-01

    The paper assesses the current standing of the 4Ps Marketing Mix framework as the dominant marketing management paradigm and identifies market developments, environmental changes, and trends, as well as changing academic attitudes likely to affect the future of the Mix as theoretical concept and

  20. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  1. An Internship May Not Be Enough: Enhancing Bioscience Industry Job Readiness through Practicum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Cramer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the narrowing of options in academic careers, the bioscience industry offers robust employment opportunities for STEM-trained workers, especially those who display both scientific and business talent. Unfortunately, traditional science programs typically lack curricular features that develop this type of worker. The North Carolina State University Master of Microbial Biotechnology (MMB program facilitates industry-specific experiential learning to fill this training gap. Similar programs often rely on a single industry internship to provide students relevant work experience, but completion of one internship might not suffice to position students for employment in a highly competitive job market. The MMB program requires students to complete an internship and three practicum projects in an industry setting, to promote development of key skills in a variety of areas, to build confidence in the ability to perform initial job duties, and to establish a more extensive work history in industry. In this Perspective we discuss an unmet need in undergraduate and graduate STEM education that can be filled by incorporating a similar set of industry-specific work experiences for students who desire to transition from academe into the life science industry.

  2. Different Research Markets: A Disciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylijoki, Oili-Helena; Lyytinen, Anu; Marttila, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the notions of academic capitalism and the transformation of academic research from traditional academic orientation into market orientation, the paper sets out to empirically scrutinize the changing nature of academic research, focusing especially on disciplinary differences. The paper is based on a survey of heads of departments and…

  3. The skill-divide in job quality: a cross-national analysis of 28 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Haya

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the skill divide in job quality and the role of social institutions in structuring the relation of workers' qualifications to the attributes of their jobs. Four measures of job quality are examined: job security, job achievement, job content and work schedule flexibility. The study is based on the 2005 ISSP module on work orientations and encompasses 28 countries. Obtained through multilevel modeling, the findings show that low-skilled workers are disadvantaged in all aspects of job quality. However, skill inequality in the quality of employment depends on countries' characteristics, with declining inequality in countries at higher levels of technological development and to some extent also in times of technological growth. At times of high unemployment, skill disparities in job security widen while on other measures of job quality they decline. Under high market regulation, the low skilled enjoy better job security but on other measures, skill inequalities increase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. IMpact of international accreditation in the recognition of academic degrees in the domestic and foreign labor market. Case study: Civil engineering program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Barragan Codina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized era it is not enough to have a professional qualification to ensure economic and professional success. The academic background of professionals must be adequate to face challenges and solve problems of a globalized and dynamic world. Civil engineers face many complications when seeking an international career. There are many differences within the profession globally such as: resources, workforce, climate, language, culture, philosophies, regulations, etc. which raise the entry barriers to fully practice as a civil engineer. The International accreditations play a major role as the first evidence of the civil engineer technical proficiency. These assure the quality of the higher education curricula and add value to the human capital on an international context. Despite the fact that many Mexican Universities have academic programs which have international accreditations, civil engineer graduates cannot easily work across borders. This paper describes the impact that international accreditation has for civil engineers when seeking an international career.

  5. Impact of external job mobility and occupational job mobility on earnings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Cheng, M.Y.; Lau, T.C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between external job mobility and occupational job mobility on earnings among engineers in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: Using curricular vitae data from a job agency, this paper tracks job mobility through job histories and examine how it affects earnings. Findings: Results obtained from regression analysis indicate that higher external job mobility will contribute to higher earnings, but occupational mobility will have adverse effect on earnings. Research limitations/implications: Limitation of the study is that the results are extrapolated from a self-report dataset. Practical implications: Nonetheless, the results give important implications to the Malaysian job market on how firm-specific skills and occupational specific skills are rewarded among engineers who actively seek for alternative employment online, and a guide to job applicants in career planning. Originality/value: The findings has also revealed important variables to be included in explaining high skill labor earnings in the context of Malaysian engineers, it serves as an important reference for future in modeling earnings.

  6. Impact of external job mobility and occupational job mobility on earnings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.; Cheng, M.Y.; Lau, T.C.

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between external job mobility and occupational job mobility on earnings among engineers in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: Using curricular vitae data from a job agency, this paper tracks job mobility through job histories and examine how it affects earnings. Findings: Results obtained from regression analysis indicate that higher external job mobility will contribute to higher earnings, but occupational mobility will have adverse effect on earnings. Research limitations/implications: Limitation of the study is that the results are extrapolated from a self-report dataset. Practical implications: Nonetheless, the results give important implications to the Malaysian job market on how firm-specific skills and occupational specific skills are rewarded among engineers who actively seek for alternative employment online, and a guide to job applicants in career planning. Originality/value: The findings has also revealed important variables to be included in explaining high skill labor earnings in the context of Malaysian engineers, it serves as an important reference for future in modeling earnings.

  7. Different Types of Liberalization and Jobs in South Korean Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Hwang Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effects of several factors indicating economic openness- imported intermediate goods, total imports, IFDI (inward foreign direct investment, and foreign ownership-on regular, irregular jobs and the ratio of irregular employment to regular employment. Findings revealed that imported intermediate inputs and IFDI affected neither regular nor irregular job figures. However, an increase in total imports led to a decrease in the number of irregular jobs without affecting regular full time jobs, leading to a decrease in the ratio of irregular jobs to regular jobs. On the other hand, changes in foreign ownership structure had a contrary effect, that is, a decrease in the number of regular jobs and an increase in irregular ones, and, thus, an increase in the ratio of irregular jobs to regular jobs. Overall results showed that a rise in imports results in depressed overall employment, irregular employment in particular, while more IFDI results in more irregular jobs replacing regular ones, effectively exacerbating job insecurity. The implication of this analysis is that greater economic openness may have a negative impact on the South Korean labor market overall.

  8. An Investigation of Technology Avoidance Effect into Higher Education Environments: Some Empirical Evidence of Marketing Students' Background and Their Use of Personal Computers Outside the Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spais, George S.; Vasileiou, Konstantinos Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test a research hypothesis in order to explain the technology avoidance effect in higher educational environments. We addressed the core research themes of our study using a survey. Our intention was to test marketing students' perceptions in order to investigate the potent influence of a climate of…

  9. Sustainable development - Liberalization of land markets and new processes of land grabbing : report of the academic panel organized by IDS on 7 July 2009, Utrecht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westen, G. van; Zoomers, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that opportunities to buy land through the market and the use of internet have resulted in new processes of land grabbing, and an upward trend in the ownership of land by foreign and other non-local buyers. In addition to ‘traditional’ large land holders, new actors are

  10. How and Why Does Two-Year College Entry Influence Baccalaureate Aspirants' Academic and Labor Market Outcomes? A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Fletcher, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Using detailed administrative data from Virginia, this paper examines how and why the community college pathway to a baccalaureate influences students' degree attainment and short-term labor market performance. We find that the community college pathway sharply reduces the likelihood of earning a bachelor's degree but does not have a significant…

  11. PENGARUH PENGALAMAN ON THE JOB TRAINING DAN MOTIVASI MEMASUKI DUNIA KERJA TERHADAP KESIAPAN KERJA SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujianto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vocational High School is form of formal education at secondary level which the implementation is to prepare professional employees appropriate their field. Based on the results of preliminary observations indicate that the level of job readiness of students in class XII Accounting at SMK Negeri 1 Batang in Academic Year 2015/2016 still low. This study aimed to determine whether job training experience and motivation to enter the workforce effect towards job readiness of students in class XII Accounting at SMK Negeri 1 Batang in Academic Year 2015/2016 on simultaneously or partially. The population was all students of class XII Accounting in SMK Negeri 1 Batang in Academic Year 2015/2016 which amounts to 70 students, all serve as research respondent. This study uses questionnaire to collect the data. The data of variables is analyzed with multiple regression analysis. The results show that job training experience and motivation to enter the workforce simultaneous positively and significantly effect towards job readiness (61,8%, job training experience partial positively and significantly effect towards job readiness (59,91%, and motivation to enter the workforce partial positively and significantly effect towards job readiness (6,92%. Based on the result of this study, we can conclude that job training experience and motivation to enter the workforce positively and significantly effect towards job readiness students in class XII Accounting at SMK Negeri 1 Batang in Academic Year 2015/2016 on simultaneously or partially.

  12. Inter- and intraindustrial Job-to-Job Flows. A Linkage Analysis of Regional Vacancy Chains in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Christine M. Aumayr

    2010-01-01

    Nine Austrian NUTS 2 inter- and intraindustrial job-to-job worker flows for 33 indus- tries are analysed by means of input-output techniques, with these job-to-job flows being an intermediate input in the production of filled vacancies. A new dataset on individual labour market episodes allows for the tracing of individual careers. A linkage analysis of the Leontief multiplier shows that business services, wholesale&retail and the metal- industry are 'key' industries in for- and backwarding e...

  13. Changes in medicine: job security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A Medscape article entitled the “Six Biggest Gripes of Employed Doctors” listed job security as a major concern of hospital employed physicians (1. When I left fellowship, most junior physicians joined an established, group practice either as a salaried associate or with a guaranteed income. Few ventured into solo practice, especially in pulmonary and critical care where night calls are frequent and days off are rare. Usually after a few years, the associate became a partner. Partners were entitled to share in profits that they generated, and usually profits of the group. Now that many physicians are employees of hospitals or corporations rather than physician-controlled practices, marked changes in physicians’ business hiring and business practices are occurring.Some observers don't think job security is a problem for physicians. I would agree. Doctors are in demand and nearly every physician can find a job. Matt Robbins, Senior Director of Marketing for …

  14. Estimating job runtime for CMS analysis jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Sfiligoi, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The basic premise of pilot systems is to create an overlay scheduling system on top of leased resources. And by definition, leases have a limited lifetime, so any job that is scheduled on such resources must finish before the lease is over, or it will be killed and all the computation wasted. In order to effectively schedule jobs to resources, the pilot system thus requires the expected runtime of the users jobs. Past studies have shown that relying on user provided estimates is not a valid strategy, so the system should try to make an estimate by itself. This paper provides a study of the historical data obtained from the CMS Analysis Operations submission system. Clear patterns are observed, suggesting that making prediction of an expected job lifetime range is achievable with high confidence level in this environment.

  15. Strategic affiliate marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Simon; Junghagen, Sven; Harris, Uri

    resources once fully active in this area. This book focuses on how to build long term relationships with online partners, while gaining value and optimizing resources. As such, it should be of special interest to academics and students of management, marketing and business. Online advertisers and online......In this guide for both practitioners and academics on how to approach affiliate marketing, the authors explain the core values as well as challenging and combining established marketing theories in the light of new online marketing activities, taking into account the characteristics of the Internet...... and interactions among various participants and agents. Rather than arguing the rights and wrongs in absolute terms, this book presents a strategy for engaging in affiliate marketing. The authors also examine what considerations should be taken into account before doing so, as well as investigating how to optimize...

  16. Labor Market Reforms in Europe: Towards More Flexicure Labor Markets?

    OpenAIRE

    Eichhorst, Werner; Marx, Paul; Wehner, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Labor market segmentation refers to a salient divide between secure and insecure jobs and is related to problems in important areas, including macro‐economic efficiency, workers' wellbeing and repercussions for social cohesion. European countries have started a new wave of labor market reforms in the aftermath of the 2008/09 crisis to tackle a number of issues, including labor market segmentation. This particularly concerns reforms in: (1) employment protection, i.e. dismissal protection and ...

  17. Are healthcare middle management jobs extreme jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A; Parry, Emma; Gascoigne, Charlotte; Moore, Cíara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence of "extreme jobs" among middle managers in acute hospitals, and to identify individual and organizational implications. The paper is based on interviews and focus groups with managers at six hospitals, a "proof of concept" pilot with an operations management team, and a survey administered at five hospitals. Six of the original dimensions of extreme jobs, identified in commercial settings, apply to hospital management: long hours, unpredictable work patterns, tight deadlines with fast pace, broad responsibility, "24/7 availability", mentoring and coaching. Six healthcare-specific dimensions were identified: making life or death decisions, conflicting priorities, being required to do more with fewer resources, responding to regulatory bodies, the need to involve many people before introducing improvements, fighting a negative climate. Around 75 per cent of hospital middle managers have extreme jobs. This extreme healthcare management job model was derived inductively from a qualitative study involving a small number of respondents. While the evidence suggests that extreme jobs are common, further research is required to assess the antecedents, incidence, and implications of these working practices. A varied, intense, fast-paced role with responsibility and long hours can be rewarding, for some. However, multi-tasking across complex roles can lead to fatigue, burnout, and mistakes, patient care may be compromised, and family life may be adversely affected. As far as the authors can ascertain, there are no other studies exploring acute sector management roles through an extreme jobs lens.

  18. Implementation of analyses based on social media data for marketing purposes in academic and scientific organizations in practice – opportunities and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Grabarczyk-Tokaj

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the issue of practice use of analyses, based on data collected in social media, for institutions’ communication and marketing purposes. The subject is being discussed from the perspective of Digital Darwinism — situation, when development of technologies and new means of communication is significantly faster than growth in the knowledge and digital skills among organizations eager to implement those solutions. To diminish negative consequences of Digital Darwinism institutions can broaden their knowledge with analyses of data from cyber space to optimize operations, and make use of running dialog and cooperation with prosuments to face dynamic changes in trends, technologies and society. Information acquired from social media user generated content can be employed as guidelines in planning, running and evaluating communication and marketing activities. The article presents examples of tools and solutions, that can be implement in practice as a support for actions taken by institutions.

  19. Marketing in entrepreneurship : the importance of an entrepreneurial marketing in new ventures

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Cristiano Manuel de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Mestrado em Marketing New Ventures, Start-ups, marketing, Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial Marketing, firm performance; marketing performance This research evidences the contribution of Entrepreneurial Marketing to firm performance and identifies relevant capabilities and orientations that can contribute to this relationship. Regarding the academic level, this study contributes to better understand the antecedents and performance implications of an orientation to Entrepreneurial Mar...

  20. Job-related motivational factors among Malaysian employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshor, Amat Taap; Abdullah, Adilah

    2002-12-01

    This study identified job-related motivational factors among Malaysian employees in several telecommunication companies. Responses were obtained from 1,179 employees at all levels up to senior managers and six different functional divisions, sales and marketing, human resources, finance, technical, information, technology, and support division. All employees were asked to rate the importance of Kovach's 10 job-motivational factors. These factors were good wages, job security, opportunity for career growth in the organization, good working conditions, interesting work, company loyalty to employees, tactful discipline, full appreciation of work done, sympathetic help with personal problems, and feeling of being involved in the organization. The top five factors employees identified as motivating them in their jobs were good wages, job security, company loyalty to employees, good working conditions, and full appreciation for work done. Findings were in accordance with Kovach for U.S. employees, in which the top motivational factors were good wages and job security.

  1. Earnings and Job Satisfaction of Employed Spanish Doctoral Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Canal Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for highly qualifi ed workers in developed countries has raised a new interest in analysing whether doctoral training meets the needs of the European labour market. Job satisfaction enables an approach to both the relationship between training and job position and to a company?s successful management of its relationship with those workers who are PhD holders. The results indicate that an analysis based on earnings is relevant, as it makes it possible to identify two clear job satisfaction behaviours: on the one hand, as earnings increase, so does job satisfaction, although this is found to a lesser extent in the higher earnings range; on the other hand, when moving up in the salary range, the relative assessment of job satisfaction components changes, as well as their signifi cance in explaining the variations in job satisfaction.

  2. BEYOND JOB POSITIONS. A SOCIAL RESPONSE TO THE CHANGES IN JOB DEMAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Pirog

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an analysis of the recent changes in the job market and discuss the process this triggered in the social politics of the welfare states. We examine the economic reasons for the changes in job demand and furthermore explore the associated changes in the social structures. New forms of employment and gratification demand a restructurization in the social politics in order to elasticise the job supply. The mismatch between the demand and supply on the job market may result in unemployment, work outside the norms of the law and a growing deficit of social security. This in turn leads to the situation where the sale of own work force doesn't always result in a dignified life standard. As a result, new ways to support people outside the regular job market need to be found. These new solution are essential in the modern society where the distribution of work is an important issue shaping the social bonds and individual identities.

  3. Maximizing Labor Market Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Mihai Cristea

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Employment policies are a set of measures developed by the state to intervene in the labor market in order to stimulate job creation, improvement of human resources to adapt to the needs of the economy, to ensure fluid and efficient labor market flexibility, decreasing the imbalances and dysfunctions.This article attempts to link the maintenance and increase of employment rate through direct or indirect actions to ensure jobs for young people entering the labor market, for the unemployed and others who want to hire as employees. Goal of ensuring full employment of labor on the one hand seeks a decent living, and on the other hand a high level of product supply

  4. OCCUPATIONAL STRESS FEATURES, EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND JOB SATISFACTION: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY IN PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2010-07-01

    intelligence and psychological stress insignificantly correlated with job satisfaction. This result demonstrates that the capability of academic employees to manage their emotions and other employee emotions has increased their abilities to control psychological stress in implementing job. As a result, it could lead to higher job satisfaction. Conversely, the incapability of academic employees to manage their emotions and other employee emotions has decreased their abilities to control psychological stress in implementing job. Consequently, it could lead to lower job satisfaction. Further, this study confirms that emotional intelligence does act as a partial moderating variable in the occupational stress models of the organizational sector sample. In addition, implications and discussion are elaborated.

  5. Wedded to the job: moderating effects of job involvement on the consequences of job insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, T M

    2000-01-01

    Two hundred eighty-three public-sector employees experiencing a workplace reorganization completed surveys assessing the relationships between job involvement and job insecurity on self-report measures of psychological, behavioral, and physical outcomes. Using C. L. Hulin's (1991) job adaptation theory, differential predictions were made regarding the specific outcomes of job insecurity for high job involvement versus low job involvement employees. Results indicate that employees who were highly invested in their jobs were most adversely affected by job insecurity. Specifically, they reported more negative job attitudes, more health problems, and a higher level of psychological distress than their less involved counterparts when they perceived their jobs to be threatened.

  6. Stock Market Liquidity: Comparative Analysis of Croatian and Regional Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Benić; Ivna Franić

    2008-01-01

    On the Croatian stock market liquidity has never been in the focus of academic research, thus we find it necessary to observe liquidity at the aggregate level. This paper observes multi-dimensional liquidity through the impact of turnover on price change together with several one-dimensional measures. In our empirical research we applythe illiquidity measureto seven different stock markets. We focus on the Croatian stock market as compared to other markets in the Central and Eastern Europe an...

  7. A Study of Relationship Marketing in Chinese Retail market

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Qiusha

    2007-01-01

    Relationship Marketing, as a new marketing paradigm, has stimulated considerable interests in both the business and the academic world in recent years. It has been believed that companies can achieve success in the long run by maintaining relationships with their customers and business associates. However, the most of the research on relationship marketing focuses on the Western perspectives, and the current literature on relationship marketing in the Asian retail sector is relatively under-r...

  8. Do Job Security Guarantees Work?

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Bryson; Lorenzo Cappellari; Claudio Lucifora

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the effect of employer job security guarantees on employee perceptions of job security. Using linked employer-employee data from the 1998 British Workplace Employee Relations Survey, we find job security guarantees reduce employee perceptions of job insecurity. This finding is robust to endogenous selection of job security guarantees by employers engaging in organisational change and workforce reductions. Furthermore, there is no evidence that increased job security through job...

  9. E-Commerce Marketing State Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Tech Prep Curriculum Services.

    This profile provides the curricular framework for Ohio Tech Prep programs in e-commerce marketing beginning in high school and continuing through the end of the associate degree. It includes a comprehensive set of e-commerce marketing competencies that reflect job opportunities and skills required for e-commerce marketing professionals today and…

  10. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    avoidance and mastery orientation, Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), awareness of academic rules and regulations, assessment practices, faculty, and university attended predicted the different types of academic dishonesty with varying levels of significance. INTRODUCTION. Today's undergraduate students are ...

  11. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  12. Imports, Exports, and Jobs: What Does Trade Mean for Employment and Job Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzer, Lori G.

    The impact of international trade on employment and job loss in the Unites States was analyzed. Evidence from earlier studies was reviewed, and the following topics were examined: changes in the U.S. manufacturing industry in 1975-1995; labor market responses to changes in trade and import competition; methods of measuring the link between changes…

  13. Get That Job! A Project on the German Job Application Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magedera-Hofhansl, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    With decreasing numbers of students studying German at Higher Education Institutions in the United Kingdom, there is an increasing demand for graduate Germanists. This project, designed for C1/C2 level students according to the Common European Framework of Reference for languages, prepares finalist students for a job market in which UK and German…

  14. Job security and job satisfaction among Greek fitness instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustelios, Athanasios; Kouli, Olga; Theodorakis, Nicholas

    2003-08-01

    In analyzing the relation between job satisfaction and job security, a sample of 97 Greek fitness instructors, 18 to 42 years of age, showed statistically significant positive correlations between job security and job satisfaction (pjob security was correlated with pay .54, promotion .43, job itself .41, and the organization as a whole .43.

  15. Does Technology Create Jobs?

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, David R.; Krugman, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Two leading economists, MIT's Paul Krugman and the Hoover Institution's David R. Henderson, debate whether jobs lost to technology are met by a net increase in jobs elsewhere in a more productive economy. Krugman, a noted liberal, says maybe in the long run, but for now ordinary workers see their wages falling. Henderson, a conservative, says that the problem is not the elimination of jobs through technology but a workforce with inadequate skills.

  16. The paradox of falling job satisfaction with rising job stickiness in the German nursing workforce between 1990 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Bauer, Jan Michael; Richter, Martin; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2017-08-29

    Literature reports a direct relation between nurses' job satisfaction and their job retention (stickiness). The proper planning and management of the nursing labor market necessitates the understanding of job satisfaction and retention trends. The objectives of the study are to identify trends in, and the interrelation between, the job satisfaction and job stickiness of German nurses in the 1990-2013 period using a flexible specification for job satisfaction that includes different time periods and to also identify the main determinants of nurse job stickiness in Germany and test whether these determinants have changed over the last two decades. The development of job stickiness in Germany is depicted by a subset of data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1990-2013), with each survey respondent assigned a unique identifier used to calculate the year-to-year transition probability of remaining in the current position. The changing association between job satisfaction and job stickiness is measured using job satisfaction data and multivariate regressions assessing whether certain job stickiness determinants have changed over the study period. Between 1990 and 2013, the job stickiness of German nurses increased from 83 to 91%, while their job satisfaction underwent a steady and gradual decline, dropping by 7.5%. We attribute this paradoxical result to the changing association between job satisfaction and job stickiness; that is, for a given level of job (dis)satisfaction, nurses show a higher stickiness rate in more recent years than in the past, which might be partially explained by the rise in part-time employment during this period. The main determinants of stickiness, whose importance has not changed in the past two decades, are wages, tenure, personal health, and household structure. The paradoxical relation between job satisfaction and job stickiness in the German nursing context could be explained by historical downsizing trends in hospitals, an East

  17. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Enhancing research visibility of academics: the role of academic libraries. Information Impact: Journal of Information and. Knowledge Management. 2017, Vol. .... Social media platforms allow users to connect, create, promote, share and follow interest groups. With these capabilities, academic libraries can make use of ...

  18. Professionalism of Employees Regional Market Company of Tomohon City

    OpenAIRE

    Simbala, Cinthya

    2015-01-01

    Regional Market Company of Tomohon City is an institute that has a rule and aresponsibility in field of public service especially for marketer who works in the market of Tomohon.Regional Market Company of Tomohon city have their own job to revitalization traditional market inTomohon city so that they can be able to compete with modern market, with expectation will be give areal benefit for acceleration of the economics growth of the people through the Economicempowerment, making the market of...

  19. Self-initiated expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we examine self-initiated expatriate academics. Universities are to an increasing extent looking for talent beyond national boundaries. Accordingly, self-initiated expatriate academics represent a fast growing group of highly educated professionals who gain employment abroad....... Nonetheless, little research has focused on this group. We investigate if personal characteristics such as age, gender, marital status and seniority affect work outcomes such as work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction and time to proficiency. This is done by using data which...... were collected from 428 self-initiated expatriate academics from 60 countries employed in 35 universities in five northern European countries. Results confirm that there are differences in terms of work outcomes among the different types of self-initiated expatriate academics, especially regarding...

  20. The Relationship between Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction and Organizational Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, A. Ben

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between job involvement and satisfaction in white collar employees of an industrial organization in Israel was studied. Job involvement was related significantly to job satisfaction; however, the relationship was mediated by organizational factors. (Author/BEF)

  1. Life and Job Satisfaction: Is the Job Central?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Neal; Mellon, Phyllis M.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of the causal relationship between life and job satisfaction in males and females working in a variety of jobs was investigated. Results suggest that the life satisfaction causes job satisfaction hypothesis is more tenable than the reverse. (Author)

  2. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention. PMID:27199817

  3. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M; Roberts, Lynne D

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention.

  4. Labor Market Prospects, Search Intensity and the Transition from College to Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Klaauw (Bas); A.P. van Vuuren (Aico); P. Berkhout (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we develop a structural model for job search behavior of students entering the labor market. The model includes endogenous search effort and on-the-job search. Since students usually do not start a regular job before graduation but start job search earlier, our model is non

  5. Labor Market Prospects, Search Intensity and the Transition from College to Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, van der Bas; Vuuren, van Aico; Berkhout, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we develop a structural model for job search behavior of students entering the labor market. The model includes endogenous search effort and on-the-job search. Since students usually do not start a regular job before graduation but start job search earlier, our model is non stationary

  6. Transcreation in Marketing and Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniel

    Within marketing and advertising, transcreation constitutes a fairly new domain, which has experienced extensive growth during the last decade or so. More and more companies provide transcreation alongside other services like translation and localisation. In academic circles, the term transcreation...

  7. Marketing malpractice: the cause and the cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M; Cook, Scott; Hall, Taddy

    2005-12-01

    Ted Levitt used to tell his Harvard Business School students, "People don't want a quarter-inch drill--they want a quarter-inch hole." But 35 years later, marketers are still thinking in terms of products and ever-finer demographic segments. The structure of a market, as seen from customers' point of view, is very simple. When people need to get a job done, they hire a product or service to do it for them. The marketer's task is to understand what jobs periodically arise in customers' lives for which they might hire products the company could make. One job, the "I-need-to-send-this-from-here-to-there-with-perfect-certainty-as-fast-as-possible"job, has existed practically forever. Federal Express designed a service to do precisely that--and do it wonderfully again and again. The FedEx brand began popping into people's minds whenever they needed to get that job done. Most of today's great brands--Crest, Starbucks, Kleenex, eBay, and Kodak, to name a few-started out as just this kind of purpose brand. When a purpose brand is extended to products that target different jobs, it becomes an endorser brand. But, over time, the power of an endorser brand will surely erode unless the company creates a new purpose brand for each new job, even as it leverages the endorser brand as an overall marker of quality. Different jobs demand different purpose brands. New growth markets are created when an innovating company designs a product and then positions its brand on a job for which no optimal product yet exists. In fact, companies that historically have segmented and measured markets by product categories generally find that when they instead segment by job, their market is much larger (and their current share much smaller) than they had thought. This is great news for smart companies hungry for growth.

  8. The Resilience of Recently Graduated and Unemployed Dutch Academics in Coping with the Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Jeroen J. H.; Amsing, Hilda T. A.; Hahurij, Lisa; Wichgers, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Some years after the world-wide crisis starting in 2008, also many recently graduated Dutch academics were confronted with the problem of how to cope with getting a job. This article focuses on the coping strategies they use when searching after a job, spending the day, and coping with limited financial means. 91 graduated academics completed a…

  9. Contemporary Development of Academic Reference Librarianship in the United States: A 44-Year Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanrong; Tang, Yingqi; Knight, Carley

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes job advertisements to identify the contemporary development of academic reference librarianship in the United States. Results show that more job openings, higher educational backgrounds, more duties & responsibilities, and variety of titles were assigned to academic reference librarian positions from 1966 through 2009.…

  10. Job characteristics as determinants of job satisfaction and labour mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelißen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of detailed job characteristics on job satisfaction, job search and quits using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) in a fixed effects framework. Using a factor analysis, seventeen job characteristics are reduced to seven factors that describe different aspects of a job, which are qualified as status, physical strain, autonomy, advancement opportunities, social relations at the work place, work time and job security. The effects of these facto...

  11. Job characteristics: their relationship to job satisfaction, stress and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Steyn, Renier; Vawda, Naseema

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of job characteristics on job satisfaction, stress and depression among South African white collar workers. Participants were managers in full-time employment with large organisations. They completed the Job Diagnostic Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. A regression approach was used to predict job satisfaction, stress and depression from job characteristics. Job characteristics (skill variety, task identity, task signi...

  12. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  13. Stress Management: Job Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and know when ... effects of stress at work. Effectively coping with job stress can benefit both your professional and personal ...

  14. Branding McJobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noppeney, Claus; Endrissat, Nada; Kärreman, Dan

    Traditionally, employer branding has been considered relevant for knowledge intensive firms that compete in a ‘war for talent’. However, the continuous rise in service sector jobs and the negative image of these so-called McJobs has motivated a trend in rebranding service work. Building on critical...

  15. Intrinsic antecedents of academic research productivity of a large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kirstam

    Intrinsic antecedents of academic research productivity of a large South African university. 175 influences as given, certain theory predicts that individual intrinsic differences can be associated with differences in individual job performance. Positive affectivity, or affect, can contribute to job satisfaction, as a result of the fit.

  16. Higher education academics' satisfaction with their terms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    show that only 43 per cent academics had `Above average' or better job satisfaction. The students being not serious or not working hard enough to succeed in their courses was identified as the major cause of job-dissatisfaction. Six factors were identified as those reducing both satisfaction with the conditions of service and ...

  17. Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Among Younger Baby Boomers: Results from More Than Two Decades of a Longitudinal Survey. Bureau of Labor Statistics News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 is a survey of 9,964 young men and women who were ages 14-22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 35-43 when interviewed most recently in 2000. (Respondents were born in 1957-64, the later years of the "baby boom.") Findings indicate the average person held nearly 10 jobs from ages 18-36; more than…

  18. Assessment of job-related educational qualifications for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, L.M.; Melber, B.D.; White, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    This report identifies job-related educational qualifications for the nuclear power plant licensed operator positions of reactor operator (RO), senior reactor operator (SRO), and shift supervisor (SS). The extent to which college engineering curriculum covers job-related academic knowledge was assessed. The approach used was to have subject matter experts in the field of general and nuclear engineering curriculum systematically compare college engineering program content to specific academic knowledge identified by a job analysis as necessary for licensed operators. In addition, these experts made judgments concerning levels of formal engineering education necessary for application of knowledge on the job, based on job samples from a job analysis of activities under selected normal and emergency operating sequences

  19. LABOUR MARKET INTEGRATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ORADEA STUDENTS. EXPLORATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatos Roxana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the life of any young person, entering the labour market is one of the most important events. It can be an easy process or, on the contrary, it may be marked by many constraints and opportunities. The labour market for young graduates is different depending on the country in which he lives. Young labour market insertion can occur both after and during school graduation. He or she becomes, in the latter situation, an insider in the labour market. Many countries are reforming their education systems to provide their citizens with knowledge and skills that enable them to meet social and economic challenges of the society. Countries vary significantly from each other in their economic, socio-demographic and institutional characteristics. Our study focuses on the analysis of the University of Oradea graduates in the last four years. The sample includes 529 respondents from different academic specializations both BA and MA level. In this context, in our analysis we have 38% MA graduates and 62% BA graduates, of which 39% married and the remaining 61% unmarried. Of the total sample 78% have a job. More than half of the subjects (53,5% considered as good or very good the professional training provided by the UO. Validating our hypotheses, the correlation of field of study with the domain of the current job is higher in the case of MA level graduates and, moreover, it predicts the level of satisfaction of our subjects with the development opportunities (personal and professional provided by the educational programs of the University. It is clear, therefore, that MA graduates are more grateful to the University performance than BA degrees holders. It is proven, that the assessment of the academic programs on behalf of graduates depends heavily on their successful integration in the labor market. The limits of the study are

  20. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  1. Job demands-resources model

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Arnold; Demerouti, Eva

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract* The question of what causes job stress and what motivates people has received a lot of research attention during the past five decades. In this paper, we discuss Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) theory, which represents an extension of the Job Demands-Resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007; Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001) and is inspired by job design and job stress theories. JD-R theory explains how job demands and resources have unique and multiplicative e...

  2. Job Security as an Endogenous Job Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke; Wagner, Thomas

    This paper develops a hedonic model of job security (JS). Workers with hetero-geneous JS-preferences pay the hedonic price for JS to employers, who incur labor-hoarding costs from supplying JS. In contrast to the Wage-Bill Argument, equilibrium unemployment is strictly positive, as workers with w...

  3. Job Security as an Endogenous Job Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke; Wagner, Thomas

    This paper develops a hedonic model of job security (JS). Workers with heterogeneous JS-preferences pay the hedonic price for JS to employers, who incur labor-hoarding costs from supplying JS. In contrast to the Wage-Bill Argument, equilibrium unemployment is strictly positive, as workers with we...

  4. Job Security as an Endogenous Job Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a hedonic model of job security (JS). Workers with heterogeneous JSpreferences pay the hedonic price for JS to employers, who incur labor-hoarding costs from supplying JS. In contrast to the Wage-Bill Argument, equilibrium unemployment is strictly positive, as workers with wea...

  5. The relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction amongst Westcol FET lecturers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The main objective of any service organisation should be to make a profit. This objective can only be achieved by increasing the employees’ performance, which is subsequently related to Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Job Satisfaction. The studies on the relationship between EI and Job Satisfaction are becoming prevalent in the academic literature. Currently, a debate is on as to determine the extent of the relationship between EI and Job Satisfaction amongst d...

  6. Person-job fit: an exploratory cross-sectional analysis of hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinami, Keiki; Whelan, Chad T; Miller, Joseph A; Wolosin, Robert J; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-02-01

    Person-job fit is an organizational construct shown to impact the entry, performance, and retention of workers. Even as a growing number of physicians work under employed situations, little is known about how physicians select, develop, and perform in organizational settings. Our objective was to validate in the hospitalist physician workforce features of person-job fit observed in workers of other industries. The design was a secondary survey data analysis from a national stratified sample of practicing US hospitalists. The measures were person-job fit; likelihood of leaving practice or reducing workload; organizational climate; relationships with colleagues, staff, and patients; participation in suboptimal patient care activities. Responses to the Hospital Medicine Physician Worklife Survey by 816 (sample response rate 26%) practicing hospitalists were analyzed. Job attrition and reselection improved job fit among hospitalists entering the job market. Better job fit was achieved through hospitalists engaging a variety of personal skills and abilities in their jobs. Job fit increased with time together with socialization and internalization of organizational values. Hospitalists with higher job fit felt they performed better in their jobs. Features of person-job fit for hospitalists conformed to what have been observed in nonphysician workforces. Person-job fit may be a useful complementary survey measure related to job satisfaction but with a greater focus on function. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. Do Informal Workers Queue For Formal Jobs in Brazil ?

    OpenAIRE

    Fábio Veras Soares

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the existence of a job queue for formal (registered) jobs in the Brazilian labour market in an endogenous switching regression framework. This approach aims at correctly specifying the allocation process in the presence of queuing and getting unbiased wage equation estimates in order evaluate the role of wage differential between formal and informal sector in determining sector allocation. We estimate three types of bivariate probit specifications in order to evaluate ...

  8. Predict the emergence - Application to competencies in job offers

    OpenAIRE

    Abboud, Yacine; Boyer, Anne; Brun, Armelle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; —Predicting the emergence of an event enables to anticipate and make decisions upstream. For instance, in the employment sector, it becomes necessary to anticipate the emergence of competencies requirements to help job seekers, education and training organization to better match the needs of the job market. Several approaches address the competencies mining with ontologies, we adopt a different point of view by using pattern mining. We propose a new methodology to pred...

  9. Hospital CEO's viewpoint for future of health care marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, V

    1990-01-01

    In summary, the CEOs have a wide variety of views on what role the marketer will play and what needs the marketer will fill for the CEO. It is important for the marketer to clarify the expected roles as they interview for jobs. Once in the position, it is important to keep communications open with the CEO to know the marketer's expected role.

  10. Analysis of Job Satisfaction of University Professors from Nine Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Research on work life and job satisfaction of university professors is becoming an important research issue in the field of higher education. This study used questionnaires administered to 1 770 teachers from different levels, types, and academic fields of Chinese universities to investigate job satisfaction among university professors and the…

  11. 78 FR 42803 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Job Corps Health Questionnaire (OMB Control No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Columbia, Job Corps assists students across the nation in attaining academic credentials, including a High... procurement process that evaluates potential operators' technical expertise, proposed costs, past performance... operation of Job Corps, and does not serve as a pass-through agency for this program. II. Review Focus The...

  12. Work Life Balance and Job Satisfaction among Faculty at Iowa State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Farah

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized the existing database from the Iowa State University 2009-2010 COACHE Tenure-Track Job Satisfaction Survey Report to explore faculty work life balance and job satisfaction among academic disciplines at Iowa State University. The articulation of work and life, cast as work life balance, has become a key feature of much current…

  13. An analysis of factors affecting job satisfaction of women in paid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the job satisfaction of women in paid employment in Benin City. The purpose of this study was to find out whether women in paid employment are satisfied with their jobs or not and to establish the effects of marital status, experience, academic qualification and relationship with superior officers of the ...

  14. The U.S. Forest Service Job Corps 28 Civilian Conservation Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larry J. Dawson; Alicia D. Bennett

    2011-01-01

    In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson laid out his plan for the Great Society. His vision for America was one in which all segments of society could participate equally. To this end, the Economic Opportunity Act, which created Job Corps, was passed. The Job Corps program provides economically disadvantaged youth, ages 16-24, with the academic, vocational, and social...

  15. The God of Job

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Mare

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available God is often portrayed extremely negatively in the Old Testament. For example, in the Book of Nahum God is pictured as being responsible for the most horrifying violence imaginable. This negative portrayal of God is also found in the Book of Job. God is responsible for the suffering that his righteous servant Job, has to endure. He is even manipulated by the satan to allow him free reign in attacking Job. God even acknowledges that the misery and pain inflicted on Job, was for no reason. Job�s children are killed in order for God to prove a point, and in his response to Job�s suffering, he doesn�t even address the issue of Job�s suffering. This is a picture of a very cruel, vicious God. This article investigates the negative, disturbing images of God in the Book of Job. Are these images of God who God really is, or is the God of Job a literary construct of the author? The focus of this study is on the prologue and epilogue to the book, as well as the speeches of God in Job 38�41.

  16. Personality and Education Mining based Job Advisory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra S. Choudhary

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Every job demands an employee with some specific qualities in addition to the basic educational qualification. For example, an introvert person cannot be a good leader despite of a very good academic qualification. Thinking and logical ability is required for a person to be a successful software engineer. So, the aim of this paper is to present a novel approach for advising an ideal job to the job seeker while considering his personality trait and educational qualification both. Very well-known theories of personality like MBTI indicator and OCEAN theory, are used for personality mining. For education mining, score based system is used. The score based system captures the information from attributes like most scoring subject, dream job etc. After personality mining, the resultant values are coalesced with the information extracted from education mining. And finally, the most suited jobs, in terms of personality and educational qualification are recommended to the job seekers. The experiment is conducted on the students who have earned an engineering degree in the field of computer science, information technology and electronics. Nevertheless, the same architecture can easily be extended to other educational degrees also. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is a first e-job advisory system that recommends the job best suited as per one’s personality using MBTI and OCEAN theory both.

  17. Worker Flows and Job Flows in Danish Manufacturing, 1980-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Sørensen, Bent

    over the business cycle, throwing light on some recent theories of the cyclical behavior of the labor market. The amount of job creation and job destruction is similar in Denmark and the U.S., but job reallocation in Denmark is acyclical contrary to American findings. The probability of plant closure......This paper examines turnover of workers and jobs on the panel of all plants in Danish manufacturing for the years 1980-1991. We relate worker turnover to job turnover with a focus on the share of worker reallocation driven by job reallocation, and we consider the behavior of job and worker flows...... covaries negatively with the business cycle whereas the amount of plant openings varies positively with the business cycle, in particular for small plants. Worker reallocation is strongly procyclical, due to strong procyclicality of replacement hirings (hiring to an existing job). Our findings...

  18. Factors influencing job satisfaction in post-transition economies: the case of the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čábelková, Inna; Abrhám, Josef; Strielkowski, Wadim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of factors influencing job satisfaction in post-transition economies on the example of the Czech Republic. Our research shows that women reported higher levels of job satisfaction compared to men. Education proved to be statistically significant in one of three indicators of job satisfaction. Personal income and workplace relationships proved to be positively and significantly related to all the three indicators of job satisfaction. Most of the occupational dummies were significantly related to two out of three indicators of job satisfaction. In addition, we found that Czech entrepreneurs enjoy and value their job, which indicates strong self-selection for doing business in post-transition economies. However, human capital expressed by the level of education was significant factor for job satisfaction, meaning that well-educated people might not be satisfied with their jobs or feel that their education and experience are wasted in the market economy.

  19. The Job Training and Job Satisfaction Survey Technical Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Job training has become an important aspect of an employee's overall job experience. However, it is not often called out specifically on instruments measuring job satisfaction. This technical manual details the processes used in the development and validation of a survey instrument to measure job training satisfaction and overall job…

  20. Job anxiety, organizational commitment and job satisfaction: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Job anxiety, organizational commitment and job satisfaction: An empirical assessment of supervisors in the state of Eritrea. ... The findings of the present research revealed that (i) recognition and self-esteem facets of job anxiety were found to be significantly related to job satisfaction, (ii) facets of organizational commitment ...