WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic instruction factor

  1. LIBRARY SKILL INSTRUCTION IN NIGERIAN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    ISSN 1596-6224 www.globaljournalseries.com; Info@globaljournalseries.com. LIBRARY SKILL INSTRUCTION IN NIGERIAN ACADEMIC. LIBRARIES ... analysis indicate that library skill instruction courses are taught in most tertiary institutions in Nigeria, but this has not attained a ..... Adolescents the information seeking ...

  2. Use of school gardens in academic instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather; Beall, Deborah Lane; Lussier, Mary; McLaughlin, Peggy; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2005-01-01

    To determine the status of gardens in California schools. A self-administered Internet and mailed survey was sent to all California principals (N = 9805). 4194 California school principals. School garden practices, attitudes associated with the use of gardens in schools, and perceptions of barriers to having and using school gardens in academic instruction. Descriptive statistics and chi-square; P garden was for enhancement of academic instruction. Gardens were most commonly used for teaching science, environmental studies, and nutrition. Principals strongly agreed that resources such as curriculum materials linked to academic instruction and lessons on teaching nutrition in the garden would assist in the school garden being used for academic instruction. Principals deemed the garden as being not to slightly effective at enhancing the school meal program. School gardens appear to be predominantly used by most schools to enhance academic instruction. There is a need for curriculum materials and teacher training for gardening and nutrition. The link between the garden and the school meal program is an area that clearly requires attention. School lunch would be a logical setting for provision of edible produce, in addition to taste-testing of fresh produce in the garden or classroom setting.

  3. LIBRARY SKILL INSTRUCTION IN NIGERIAN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    www.globaljournalseries.com; Info@globaljournalseries.com. LIBRARY SKILL INSTRUCTION IN NIGERIAN ACADEMIC. LIBRARIES. P. C. AZIAGBA AND E. H. UZOEZI. (Received 10, September 2009; Revision Accepted 8, February 2010). ABSTRACT. This survey was undertaken to portray the level of library involvement ...

  4. Instructional Television Programmes and Academic Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated instructional Television (ITV) programmes and Academic performance of Senior Secondary School students in Anambra state-Nigeria. The need for the study arose from the problem of the declining nature of West African school certificate examination results of senior secondary school students in ...

  5. Factors of academic procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Kranjec, Eva; Košir, Katja; Komidar, Luka

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed ...

  6. Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Firssova, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Firssova, O. (2011, January 19). Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction. Presentation at the ICO Course Domain specific research on learning and instruction: theories, methodology and curricular innovations, Utrecht, The Netherlands: Interuniversitair Centrum voor Onderwijswetenschappen.

  7. Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Firssova, O. (2012, 19 January). Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction. Presentation given at the ICO Masterclass, Theme Domain-Specific Instruction, January 19-February 10, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  8. Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Firssova, O. (2011, January 19). Academic writing performance measured for research and instruction. Presentation at the ICO Course Domain specific research on learning and instruction: theories, methodology and curricular innovations, Utrecht, The Netherlands: Interuniversitair Centrum voor

  9. The postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM questionnaire identifies quality of instruction as a key factor predicting academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the reliability of the PHEEM questionnaire translated into Portuguese. We present the results of PHEEM following distribution to doctors in three different medical residency programs at a university hospital in Brazil. INTRODUCTION: Efforts to understand environmental factors that foster effective learning resulted in the development of a questionnaire to measure medical residents' perceptions of the level of autonomy, teaching quality and social support in their programs. METHODS: The questionnaire was translated using the modified Brislin back-translation technique. Cronbach's alpha test was used to ensure good reliability and ANOVA was used to compare PHEEM results among residents from the Surgery, Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine departments. The Kappa coefficient was used as a measure of agreement, and factor analysis was employed to evaluate the construct strength of the three domains suggested by the original PHEEM questionnaire. RESULTS: The PHEEM survey was completed by 306 medical residents and the resulting Cronbach's alpha was 0.899. The weighted Kappa was showed excellent reliability. Autonomy was rated most highly by Internal Medicine residents (63.7% ± 13.6%. Teaching was rated highest in Anesthesiology (66.7% ± 15.4%. Residents across the three areas had similar perceptions of social support (59.0% ± 13.3% for Surgery; 60.5% ± 13.6% for Internal Medicine; 61.4% ± 14.4% for Anesthesiology. Factor analysis suggested that nine factors explained 58.9% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that PHEEM is a reliable instrument for measuring the quality of medical residency programs at a Brazilian teaching hospital. The results suggest that quality of teaching was the best indicator of overall response to the questionnaire.

  10. The Effect of Systematic Academic Instruction on Behavioural and Academic Outcomes of Students with EBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Post, Wendy J.; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of systematic academic instruction on academic progress and behavioural problems of students with emotional and/or behavioural disorders (EBD) in special education. Earlier studies have noted the importance of a systematic approach as well as the significance of focusing on academic instruction instead of on…

  11. Library Instruction and Academic Success: A Mixed-Methods Assessment of a Library Instruction Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bowles-Terry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – This study examines the connection between student academic success and information literacy instruction. Locally, it allowed librarians to ascertain the institution’s saturation rate for information literacy instruction and identify academic programs not utilizing library instruction services. In a broader application, it provides an argument for a tiered program of information literacy instruction and offers student perspectives on improving a library instruction program.Methods – Focus groups with 15 graduating seniors, all of whom had attended at least one library instruction session, discussed student experiences and preferences regarding library instruction. An analysis of 4,489 academic transcripts of graduating seniors identified differences in grade point average (GPA between students with different levels of library instruction.Results – Students value library instruction for orientation purposes as beginning students, and specialized, discipline-specific library instruction in upper-level courses. There is a statistically significant difference in GPA between graduating seniors who had library instruction in upper-level courses (defined in this study as post-freshman-level and those who did not.Conclusions – Library instruction seems to make the most difference to student success when it is repeated at different levels in the university curriculum, especially when it is offered in upper-level courses. Instruction librarians should differentiate between lower-division and upper-division learning objectives for students in order to create a more cohesive and non-repetitive information literacy curriculum.

  12. the influence of instructional materials on academic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    students' academic performance in senior secondary school Chemistry in Cross River State. A two group pre-test post test ... chemistry students by encouraging the use of instructional materials in teaching-learning chemistry. KEY WORDS: Instructional ... classroom with many misconceptions to correct for proper scientific ...

  13. Academic Peer Instruction: Reference and Training Manual (with Answers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Joyce; Toce, Andi

    2013-01-01

    This manual consists of an introduction to our Academic Peer Instruction (API) program at LaGuardia Community College, a compilation of the materials we have developed and use for training of our tutors (with answers), and a bibliography. API is based on an internationally recognized peer tutoring program, Supplemental Instruction. (Contains 6…

  14. Instructional Note: On Keeping an Academic Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how keeping an academic journal has helped him to become a more insightful and relentless evaluator of his teaching expertise, and to acquire an academic conscience. The keeping of such an journal can inspire teachers to continually evaluate unrehearsed events and can help them get down to the true heart of…

  15. The Effectiveness of Time Management Strategies Instruction on Students' Academic Time Management and Academic Self Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Fathi Abdul Hamid Abdul; Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using time management strategies instruction on improving first year learning disabled students' academic time management and academic self efficacy. A total of 60 students identified with LD participated. The sample was divided into two groups; experimental (n = 30 boys) and control (n = 30 boys). ANCOVA and…

  16. Cognitive Factors in Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuasay, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This review explores the factors of cognitive processing, style, and metacognitive organization as they contribute to academic success. Specific discussions consider aspects of short- and long-term memory, including how these affect learning and academic performance, and the keys to attaining long-term memory capability by involving redundancy,…

  17. The Influence of Instructional Materials on Academic Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work investigated the influence of instructional materials (teaching aids) on students' academic performance in senior secondary school Chemistry in Cross River State. A two group pre-test post test quasi-experimental design was adopted for the study. One research question and one hypothesis were ...

  18. Academic Reference and Instruction Librarians and Dweck's Theories of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces psychologist Carol S. Dweck's entity and incremental theories of intelligence and explores the prevalence of these theories in academic librarians who participate in reference and instruction activities. Based on existing research, it is possible that implicit theories of intelligence could affect the ways in which…

  19. the influence of instructional materials on academic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    students' academic performance in senior secondary school Chemistry in Cross River State. A two group pre-test post test ... students (Experimental group) were taught with instructional materials and another forty (Control group) were taught without ... It is use to get the attention of the students and eliminate boredom.

  20. Systematic academic instruction for students with EBD : The construction and use of a tool for teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sipke; Post, Wendy J.; Bijstra, Jan O.; Bosch , van den Els J.

    2017-01-01

    Educating students with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties requires a thorough systematic approach with the focus on academic instruction. This study addresses the development of a tool, consisting of two questionnaires, for measuring systematic academic instruction. The questionnaires

  1. A Comparison of Student Academic Performance with Traditional, Online, And Flipped Instructional Approaches in a C# Programming Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H. Sharp

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Compared student academic performance on specific course requirements in a C# programming course across three instructional approaches: traditional, online, and flipped. Background: Addressed the following research question: When compared to the online and traditional instructional approaches, does the flipped instructional approach have a greater impact on student academic performance with specific course requirements in a C# programming course? Methodology: Quantitative research design conducted over eight 16-week semesters among a total of 271 participants who were undergraduate students en-rolled in a C# programming course. Data collected were grades earned from specific course requirements and were analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal Wallis H-Test using IBM SPSS Statistics, Version 23. Contribution: Provides empirical findings related to the impact that different instructional approaches have on student academic performance in a C# programming course. Also describes implications and recommendations for instructors of programming courses regarding instructional approaches that facilitate active learning, student engagement, and self-regulation. Findings: Resulted in four statistically significant findings, indicating that the online and flipped instructional approaches had a greater impact on student academic performance than the traditional approach. Recommendations for Practitioners: Implement instructional approaches such as online, flipped, or blended which foster active learning, student engagement, and self-regulation to increase student academic performance. Recommendation for Researchers: Build upon this study and others similar to it to include factors such as gender, age, ethnicity, and previous academic history. Impact on Society: Acknowledge the growing influence of technology on society as a whole. Higher education coursework and programs are evolving to encompass more digitally-based learning contexts, thus

  2. The Impact of Academic Freedom Policies on Critical Thinking Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Fessel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking enjoys almost universal support, except when applied to controversial topics. Yet it is these topics that are often the most effective initiators of critical thinking exercises that improve students’ rational approaches to challenging problems. The use of controversial issues to promote critical thinking requires an institutional commitment to academic freedom in order to survive. In some institutional contexts, the most crucial need for critical thinking is the very condition under which it is least likely to be applied. Instead, avoidance of controversy seems to be the predominant policy of institutions fearful of expensive lawsuits or damaging public relations. Several trends are decreasing the likelihood that critical thinking is applied in the classroom to challenging topics: demands for increased accountability from legislatures; scrutiny of adopted content standards; oversight of Internet and other intellectual work of professors affiliated with the universities; student challenges to faculty instruction; and attempts to curtail ideological diversity. This paper describes these current dynamics which erode academic freedom and thus the ability to apply critical thinking to controversial topics. The paper also recommends that institutions and faculty adopt clearly delineated policies related to academic freedom in order to ensure faculty freedom to promote critical thinking. Awareness of how these trends impact the instructional climate enables teachers to design instruction and be more proactive in guaranteeing that critical thinking about controversial topics is able to flourish under academic freedom.

  3. The Impact of Academic Freedom Policies on Critical Thinking Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Fessel, MA, MEd

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking enjoys almost universal support, except when applied to controversial topics. Yet it is these topics that are often the most effective initiators of critical thinking exercises that improve students’ rational approaches to challenging problems. The use of controversial issues to promote critical thinking requires an institutional commitment to academic freedom in order to survive. In some institutional contexts, the most crucial need for critical thinking is the very condition under which it is least likely to be applied. Instead, avoidance of controversy seems to be the predominant policy of institutions fearful of expensive lawsuits or damaging public relations. Several trends are decreasing the likelihood that critical thinking is applied in the classroom to challenging topics: demands for increased accountability from legislatures; scrutiny of adopted content standards; oversight of Internet and other intellectual work of professors affiliated with the universities; student challenges to faculty instruction; and attempts to curtail ideological diversity. This paper describes these current dynamics which erode academic freedom and thus the ability to apply critical thinking to controversial topics. The paper also recommends that institutions and faculty adopt clearly delineated policies related to academic freedom in order to ensure faculty freedom to promote critical thinking. Awareness of how these trends impact the instructional climate enables teachers to design instruction and be more proactive in guaranteeing that critical thinking about controversial topics is able to flourish under academic freedom.

  4. Academic Literacy Instruction for Adolescents: A Guidance Document from the Center on Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgesen, Joseph K.; Houston, Debra D.; Rissman, Lila M.; Decker, Susan M.; Roberts, Greg; Vaughn, Sharon; Wexler, Jade; Francis, David J.; Rivera, Mabel O.; Lesaux, Nonie

    2017-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist literacy specialists in the national Regional Comprehensive Center network as they work with states to improve educational policy and practice in the area of adolescent literacy. It comprises three major parts: Part One: "Improving academic literacy instruction for students in grades 4-12." Based on…

  5. Academic Librarians' Practices and Perceptions on Web-Based Instruction for Academic Library Patrons as Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Deborah Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Academic librarians are encouraged to provide library services, resources, and instruction to all patrons, including the adult learner. Statistics reported that worldwide, adults are a growing student population in colleges and universities; however, the adult learner as an academic library patron is often neglected. Academic libraries can…

  6. The Common Core Learning Standards and Elementary Teachers' Math Instructional Practices, Receptivity to Change, Instructional Leadership and Academic Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify the relationships among elementary teachers instructional practices in mathematics pre- and post-CCLS implementation in relation to technological and pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK), formative assessment, reflective practice, receptivity to change, academic optimism, and instructional leadership across age,…

  7. Academic Responding during Instruction and Reading Outcomes for Kindergarten Students At-Risk for Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Roberts, Greg; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the academic responding of students at-risk for reading difficulties in beginning reading instruction. Opportunities for kindergarten students at-risk for reading difficulties to respond academically during teacher-facilitated reading instruction in the general education classroom were examined in…

  8. Factors responsible for accidents in instructional mechanic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Study investigated the factors responsible for accidents in instructional mechanic workshops in Rivers State. Four technical colleges were selected for the study. Properly validated questionnaire were developed and used for the study. In addition, two research questions were posed for the study. Data gathered were ...

  9. Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The consistent poor academic performance of students in public secondary schools can be regarded as a serious social problem because a number of scholars, stakeholders in education, school administrator, and public commentators have concluded that students' academic performance in public secondary schools falls ...

  10. Academic Responding During Instruction and Reading Outcomes for Kindergarten Students At-risk for Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Roberts, Greg; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the academic responding of students at-risk for reading difficulties in beginning reading instruction. Opportunities for kindergarten students at-risk for reading difficulties to respond academically during teacher-facilitated reading instruction in the general education classroom were examined in relation to student reading achievement as well as social behaviors. Student academic responding during teacher-facilitated instruction significantly predicted end of year reading achievement. Teacher perceptions of students’ social skills (positive correlation) and problem behaviors (negative correlation) were significantly correlated with academic responding. When academic responding and teacher perceptions of social behaviors were examined together, only teacher perceptions of academic competence and problem behaviors predicted spring outcomes. PMID:24665162

  11. Attitude of Academic Staff in Nigerian Tertiary Educational Institutions to Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEI): A Case Study of Cross River State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaka, Idaka I.; Joshua, Monday T.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the attitude of academic staff in Nigerian tertiary educational institutions to student evaluation of instruction (SEI) and to find out the variable factors that influenced the expressed attitude of members of the academic staff, using Cross River State University as a case study. The study was a survey and so a…

  12. Relationships between the Perceived Value of Instructional Techniques and Academic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarraju, Meera; Karau, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite a large volume of research examining instructional strategies and student learning, very little research has examined relationships between students' perceptions of the value of specific instructional techniques and academic motivation. In the current research, college students (172 undergraduates) completed scales assessing the perceived…

  13. Long-Term Effects of Metacognitive Strategy Instruction on Student Academic Performance: A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Hester; Donker, Anouk; Kostons, Danny; van der Werf, Greetje

    2018-01-01

    Meta-analyses have shown the positive effects of strategy instruction on student performance; however, little meta-analytical research has been conducted on its long-term effects. We examined the long-term effects of 48 metacognitive strategy instruction interventions on student academic

  14. Academic Instruction and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagaman, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are known to experience academic deficits across core subject areas such as reading and mathematics. Until recently, less attention had been paid to the academic deficits of students with EBD. This was due, in part, to a common belief that academic deficits could not be addressed until problem…

  15. Effect of Captioned Film Instructional Package (CFIP) on Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study revealed that the hearing disabled students exposed to Captioned Film Instructional Package (CFIP) performed better than the group treated with conventional sign method. This implies that, the application of Captioned Film Instructional Package (CFIP) in learning environment has significant influence on the ...

  16. The effect of video supplemental instruction on the academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the effect of Video-based Supplemental Instruction on the performance in Mathematics of students whose matric marks did not enable them to be directly admitted to the Science Faculty at the University of Port Elizabeth. Fifteen students who received Video-based Supplemental Instruction in ...

  17. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  18. The effect of self-regulated learning strategy instruction on strategy use and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekolin, Catherine Helen

    This study investigated the effects of self-regulated learning strategy instruction on strategy use and academic achievement in middle school science classes. Gender differences in strategy use and academic achievement were evaluated. The research questions focused on the development of instructional strategies to help students become self-regulated learners. Groups of students were given the opportunity to use self-regulated learning strategies with and without prompting. Gender differences within instructional group and strategy use were evaluated. According to these research findings, prompting appears to be a critical component of self-regulated learning strategy instruction with all groups. Selected groups showed greater increases in both academic achievement and self-regulated learning strategy use when prompting was a component of self-regulated learning strategy instruction. Students who demonstrated either below average self-regulated learning strategy skills, or lower GPAs showed the greatest gain from prompting plus instruction. Gender differences were demonstrated, with females showing greater self-regulated learning strategy use compared to males. The findings from this study emphasize the importance of self-regulated learning strategy instruction, especially for middle school students.

  19. The effect of high school chemistry instruction on students' academic self-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter Wallace

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extended instruction in high school chemistry on the academic self-concept of students and determine what parts of the learning experience need to be addressed to make the interaction a more positive one. Fifty-seven students from three metropolitan public schools, who were enrolled in college preparatory chemistry classes, were asked to complete a written instrument, before and after extended chemistry instruction, that measures academic self-concept. Twenty-one of the students who took part in the written task volunteered to answer some in-depth interview questions concerning their academic self-concept and its relationship to chemistry instruction. Student responses, instrument scores, and student chemistry grades were analyzed for a variety of chemistry learning--academic self-concept connections and interactions. Results showed that there was a positive interaction for less than half of the students involved in the interview sessions. The results from the written instrument showed similar findings. Comparing chemistry grades and academic self-concept revealed an uncertain connection between the two, especially for students with strong academic self-concepts. Students felt that the laboratory experience was often disconnected from the remainder of chemistry instruction and recommended that the laboratory experience be integrated with classroom work. Students also expressed concerns regarding the volume of algorithmic mathematical calculations associated with college preparatory chemistry instruction. Results of this study suggest that secondary chemistry instruction must become more aware of the affective domain of learning and develop a mindful awareness of its connection to the cognitive domain if chemistry teaching and learning is going to better facilitate the intellectual growth of secondary students.

  20. Student-Centered Instruction and Academic Achievement: Linking Mechanisms of Educational Inequality to Schools’ Instructional Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Andersen, Simon Calmar

    2017-01-01

    inequality. Using combined survey and register data for more than 56,000 students in 825 schools, this article conducts the first empirical test of the argument that instructional strategies which emphasize student responsibility and activity, also referred to as student-centered instruction, increase...

  1. Embedding Academic Writing Instruction into Subject Teaching: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Ursula; Andon, Nick; Cogo, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of embedding the teaching of writing into the curriculum have been advocated by educators and researchers. However, there is currently little evidence of embedded writing instruction in the UK's higher education context. In this article, we present a case study in which we report the design, implementation and evaluation of an…

  2. Library skill instruction in Nigerian academic libraries. | Aziagba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This survey was undertaken to portray the level of library involvement in library skill instruction courses taught in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Survey instrument used involved construction and distribution of questionnaires. These were distributed to professional librarians. The result of the data analysis indicate that library ...

  3. Chemical Information Instruction in Academe: Who Is Leading the Charge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garritano, Jeremy R.; Culp, F. Bartow; Twiss-Brooks, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Chemical information instruction (CII) has been recommended by the ACS Committee on Professional Training as a necessary component of the chemistry curriculum for both undergraduate and graduate students. Surveys conducted by the ACS Chemical Information Division (CINF) Education Committee in 1984 and 1993 showed the extent that CII had become…

  4. The Relationship between Music Instruction and Academic Achievement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Nechelle Nipper

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between music instruction and mathematics achievement scores for 6th grade students at an Atlanta public school. Guided by Gardner's multiple intelligences model, neurological research, and National Consortium of Arts Education research, this study used a quasi-experimental…

  5. Experiences of Turkish University Students on Academic Mobility: Before and after Academic Mobility Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Hale

    2016-01-01

    Student academic mobility is described as the movement of students from one country to another for studying undergraduate and/or graduate degrees. Students' academic mobility involves two factors: before academic mobility factors and after academic mobility factors. The current study aims at identifying the perceptions of Turkish university…

  6. Factors affecting academic leadership in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn J; Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-02-01

    Although prior studies have examined methods by which to recruit and retain academic dermatologists, few have examined factors that are important for developing academic leaders in dermatology. This study sought to examine characteristics of dermatology residency programs that affect the odds of producing department or division chairs/chiefs and program directors (PDs). Data regarding program size, faculty, grants, alumni residency program attended, lectures, and publications for all accredited US dermatology residency programs were collected. Of the 103 programs examined, 46% had graduated at least 1 chair/chief, and 53% had graduated at least 1 PD. Results emphasize that faculty guidance and research may represent modifiable factors by which a dermatology residency program can increase its graduation of academic leaders.

  7. The effects of modeling instruction on high school physics academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tiffanie L.

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether Modeling Instruction, compared to traditional lecturing, is an effective instructional method to promote academic achievement in selected high school physics classes at a rural middle Tennessee high school. This study used an ex post facto , quasi-experimental research methodology. The independent variables in this study were the instructional methods of teaching. The treatment variable was Modeling Instruction and the control variable was traditional lecture instruction. The Treatment Group consisted of participants in Physical World Concepts who received Modeling Instruction. The Control Group consisted of participants in Physical Science who received traditional lecture instruction. The dependent variable was gains scores on the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI). The participants for this study were 133 students each in both the Treatment and Control Groups (n = 266), who attended a public, high school in rural middle Tennessee. The participants were administered the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI) prior to being taught the mechanics of physics. The FCI data were entered into the computer-based Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS). Two independent samples t-tests were conducted to answer the research questions. There was a statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups concerning the instructional method. Modeling Instructional methods were found to be effective in increasing the academic achievement of students in high school physics. There was no statistically significant difference between FCI gains scores for gender. Gender was found to have no effect on the academic achievement of students in high school physics classes. However, even though there was not a statistically significant difference, female students' gains scores were higher than male students' gains scores when Modeling Instructional methods of teaching were used. Based on these findings, it is recommended

  8. Spanish Instruction in Head Start and Dual Language Learners' Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B

    2017-09-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( N = 1,141) and the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey, 2009 Cohort ( N = 825) were used to investigate whether Spanish instruction in Head Start differentially increased Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners' (DLLs) academic achievement. Although hypothesized that Spanish instruction would be beneficial for DLLs' early literacy and math skills, results from residualized growth models showed there were no such positive associations. Somewhat surprisingly, DLL children instructed in Spanish had higher English receptive vocabulary skills at the end of the Head Start year than those not instructed, with children randomly assigned to Head Start and instructed in Spanish having the highest scores. Policy implications for Head Start-eligible Spanish-speaking DLLs are discussed.

  9. Revitalizing Traditional Information Literacy Instruction: Exploring Games in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margino, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The Future Voices in Public Services column is a forum for students in graduate library and information science programs to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to tell of their visions for the profession, or to tell of research that is…

  10. Use of WebQuests in Mathematics Instruction: Academic Achievement, Teacher and Student Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenmez, Arzu Aydogan; Özpinar, Ilknur; Gökçe, Semirhan

    2017-01-01

    WebQuests are designed to ensure meaningful learning by combining technology with a constructivist approach in the classroom setting. This study aims to examine the effect of WebQuests used in instruction on students' academic achievements and the student and teacher opinions on WebQuests. The participants of this study using the…

  11. Beyond First-Year Composition: Academic English Instructional Support for International Transfer Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodesen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    While many US colleges and universities offer specialized writing courses for multilingual students entering as freshmen, including international students, there is typically little instructional support for the academic English needs of international transfer students. This article describes the development and implementation of a writing course…

  12. Enhancing Academic Instruction for Adolescent English Language Learners with or at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haager, Diane; Osipova, Anna V.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of children worldwide attend schools where the language of instruction does not match their native language, presenting significant challenges with learning the content and vocabulary of academic content areas (e.g., social studies, science). In the U.S., these students are designated as English language learners…

  13. Student Ratings of Instruction: Examining the Role of Academic Field, Course Level, and Class Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigated the relationship between course characteristics and student ratings of instruction at a large research intensive university. Specifically, it examined the extent to which academic field, course level, and class size were associated with variation in mean class ratings. Past research consistently identifies…

  14. Virtual Classroom Instruction and Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Sylvester J.; Etim, Paulinus J.; Udom, Stella Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    The virtual classroom and distance education have created new teaching pedagogy. This study was carried out to investigate Virtual Classroom Instruction on Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State. The population for this study was limited to the Students in National Open University, Enugu study…

  15. Self-Regulated Strategic Writing for Academic Studies in an English-Medium-Instruction Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Gao, Xuesong

    2018-01-01

    This study explored the processes of utilization of resources in secondary students' self-regulated strategic writing for academic studies in an English as medium of instruction context in Hong Kong. Drawing on multiple data sources collected through the observation of lessons, stimulated recall and semi-structured interviews, the study examined…

  16. Collecting and Documenting Evidence: Methods for Helping Teachers Improve Instruction and Promote Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Laurice M.; Kastein, Laura A.; Konrad, Moira; Chan, Paula E.; Peters, Mary T.; Ressa, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing collection and documentation of evidence of students' performance in the classroom is a fundamental component of formative instructional practices, essential for ensuring student success. Multiple methods of collecting and documenting evidence of students' academic performance in the classroom are described. These methods include…

  17. A Comparison of Student Academic Performance with Traditional, Online, and Flipped Instructional Approaches in a C# Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jason H.; Sharp, Laurie A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: Compared student academic performance on specific course requirements in a C# programming course across three instructional approaches: traditional, online, and flipped. Background: Addressed the following research question--When compared to the online and traditional instructional approaches, does the flipped instructional approach…

  18. Technology Mediated Instruction and its Effect on Cognitive Scaffolding, motivation and Academic Performance in EFL Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Berenji

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology mediated learning brings together the users with shared interests. This method makes learners informally engaged in language learning. This study intended to investigate the effect of technology mediated instruction on cognitive scaffolding, academic performance and motivation. Employing a quasi-experimental research, 80 learners from two intact classes at Islamic Azad University, Osku Branch were selected as the experimental and control groups. Telegram as a tool was used in the experimental group, while the control group received traditional way of instruction. Critical ethnography approach was implemented to consider the amount of cognitive scaffolding. To measure the students’ motivational level in both groups, Course Interest Survey (CIS was administered at the end of the semester. The total average score for each group was calculated. To compare students’ academic achievement, their average scores in the final academic test were considered. An Independent samples t-test in was used to compare the mean scores. The results indicated that technology mediated learning brought about cognitive scaffolding and the students in the experimental group outperformed the control group in terms of motivation and academic achievement. The results of the study suggest that to bring about academically successful students, practitioners should use technology mediated instruction.

  19. Associated factors to academic performance in adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawency Vergel-Ortega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article has the objective identify the associated factors to academic performance of adult students in mathematics and statistics modules. Was realized a study quantitative correlational in a sample of 80 students with age over 30 years old. A group of institutional aspects, social-demographics, psychosocials and pedagogic factors were used as independent variable. Results indicate that style of learning associated with type of intelligence, deficit conscience associated to abstraction capability and family motivation predicts the higher levels of performance, constituting explicative variables. Conclusion: type and style of learning, type of intelligence, motivation, conscience of deficit are associated factors to performance in adults.

  20. Instructional Strategies and Students' Academic Performance in Electrical Installation in Technical Colleges in Akwa Ibom State: Instructional Skills for Structuring Appropriate Learning Experiences for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onweh, Vincent E.; Akpan, Udeme Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of instructional strategies on students' academic performance in Electrical Installation in Technical Colleges in Akwa Ibom State. Instructional skills are the most specific category of teaching behaviours. A non-equivalent control group quasi experimental design was adopted for the study. Four intact classes…

  1. Addressing Reading Instruction to the Issue of Essential Academic Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina Mufrihah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oral presentation and reading skill were the academic success indicators of undergraduate students; however, the majority of students in their first semester encountered the reading-related problem and presentation-related problem. Thereby, aims of this study were to increase the reading skill of college students, involving them in constructing of new knowledge and improving their oral presentation skill. Classroom action research was the method of this study and Ebbut Cycle Model as the research design. Nineteen undergraduate students who were enrolled in the first semester participated as respondent and a variety of data were collected through observation, anecdotal record, interview, and the mark of assignment. In the last cycle, it could be asserted that nearly all of respondents could deliver the classroom presentation properly which was prepared from new knowledge construction and group discussion.

  2. Academic Instruction with the Visible V-8 Engine. The Coordinated Correlated Instructional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. J.

    The book presents three 93-day lesson plans to motivate and teach handicapped secondary students basic academic skills in reading and language arts, English, and mathematics in conjunction with learning about automobile engines from Revell's Visible V8 Engine Kit. Each lesson plan is correlated with the Visible V8 Engine Kit and includes daily…

  3. Effects of Thematic-Based Instruction on Students’ Academic Achievement and Attitudes Towards English Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Baş

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of thematic-based instruction on elementary students’ academic achievement and attitudes towards English course. The research was carried out in 2011–2012 education-instruction year in an elementary school in Niğde province. Totally 60 students in two different classes in the 6th grade of this school participated in the study. The pre/post-test control group quasi-experimental research model was used in this study. In order to test the significance between the groups, the independent samples t test was adopted in the study. The results of the research showed a significant difference amongst academic achievement and attitudes towards course in favor of the experimental group.

  4. Academic Librarians in Data Information Literacy Instruction: A Case Study in Meteorology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Emily P.; Pharo, Nils

    2016-01-01

    E-science has reshaped meteorology due to the rate data is generated, collected, analyzed, and stored and brought data skills to a new prominence. Data information literacy—the skills needed to understand, use, manage, share, work with, and produce data—reflects the confluence of data skills with information literacy competencies. This research assessed perceptions of data information literacy and attitudes on its instruction for graduate students in meteorology. As academ...

  5. Supplemental Instruction: The Effect of Demographic and Academic Preparation Variables on Community College Student Academic Achievement in STEM-Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitoy, Eric R.; Hoffman, John L.; Person, Dawn R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated variables associated with academic preparation and student demographics as predictors of academic achievement through participation in supplemental instruction (SI) programs for community college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. The findings suggest a differential impact of SI outcome for…

  6. Academic language in elementary school mathematics : Academicness of teacher input during whole class instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Nanke; Aarts, Rian; Kurvers, Jeanne; Ros, Anje; Kroon, Sjaak

    2017-01-01

    Students who are proficient academic language (AL) users, achieve better in school. To develop students’ AL register teachers’ AL input is necessary. The goal of this study was to investigate the extent of AL features in the language input first and second grade teachers give their students in whole

  7. Identifying the relationship between feedback provided in computer-assisted instructional modules, science self-efficacy, and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazingo, Diann Etsuko

    Feedback has been identified as a key variable in developing academic self-efficacy. The types of feedback can vary from a traditional, objectivist approach that focuses on minimizing learner errors to a more constructivist approach, focusing on facilitating understanding. The influx of computer-based courses, whether online or through a series of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) modules require that the current research of effective feedback techniques in the classroom be extended to computer environments in order to impact their instructional design. In this study, exposure to different types of feedback during a chemistry CAI module was studied in relation to science self-efficacy (SSE) and performance on an objective-driven assessment (ODA) of the chemistry concepts covered in the unit. The quantitative analysis consisted of two separate ANCOVAs on the dependent variables, using pretest as the covariate and group as the fixed factor. No significant differences were found for either variable between the three groups on adjusted posttest means for the ODA and SSE measures (.95F(2, 106) = 1.311, p = 0.274 and .95F(2, 106) = 1.080, p = 0.344, respectively). However, a mixed methods approach yielded valuable qualitative insights into why only one overall quantitative effect was observed. These findings are discussed in relation to the need to further refine the instruments and methods used in order to more fully explore the possibility that type of feedback might play a role in developing SSE, and consequently, improve academic performance in science. Future research building on this study may reveal significance that could impact instructional design practices for developing online and computer-based instruction.

  8. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction…

  9. Conceptions of Scientific Knowledge Influence Learning of Academic Skills: Epistemic Beliefs and the Efficacy of Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Peter, Johannes; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2018-01-01

    The present article investigates the effects of epistemic beliefs (i.e. beliefs about the nature of knowledge and knowing) on the effectiveness of information literacy instruction (i.e. instruction on how to search for scholarly information in academic settings). We expected psychology students with less sophisticated beliefs (especially…

  10. Teachers' instructional behaviors as important predictors of academic motivation : Changes and links across the school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Bosker, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments play an important role for students' learning and outcomes. Research indicates that many students show poor academic motivation. Teachers' behavior can function as a protective factor for sustaining students' interest and active engagement in schools. However, the knowledge

  11. Comparative-Descriptive Study of Academic Vocabulary Specific Instruction on 3rd Grade English Language Learner Reading Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Language must be taught with academic vocabulary that is meaningful and that can be transferred between content and context. This comparative-descriptive research study examines how academic specific instruction increases students' learning of a second language acquisition (i.e., English). The conceptual framework of the study drew research…

  12. The Effectiveness of Computerized Instructional Packages on Concept Acquisition and Improving Academic Achievement among Female Deaf Students in KSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagabas, Hanan Ali

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of computerized instructional packages on concept acquisition and improving academic achievement among deaf students in Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of (16) third-grade female deaf students in prep stage for the first semester of the academic year 2013/2014, randomly selected from…

  13. Academic Vocabulary Learning in First through Third Grade in Low-Income Schools: Effects of Automated Supplemental Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Howard; Ziolkowski, Robyn A.; Bojczyk, Kathryn E.; Marty, Ana; Schneider, Naomi; Harpring, Jayme; Haring, Christa D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated cumulative effects of language learning, specifically whether prior vocabulary knowledge or special education status moderated the effects of academic vocabulary instruction in high-poverty schools. Method: Effects of a supplemental intervention targeting academic vocabulary in first through third grades were…

  14. Secondary Math Instructional Practices, Academic Optimism, Instructional Leadership, and Receptivity to Curricular Change in Schools with High and Low Mathematics Mastery and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how high school mathematics teachers' descriptions of academic optimism, responsive teaching, technological pedagogical content knowledge, formative assessment, reflective practice, supervisor instructional leadership, and receptivity to change are related to student mastery on a NYS Regents exam in…

  15. Student Academic Optimism: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan; Bankole, Regina A.; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Moore, Dennis M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to add to the literature on Academic Optimism, a composite measure composed of teacher perceptions of trust in students, academic press, and collective efficacy by exploring a similar set of constructs from the student perceptive. The relationships between student trust in teachers, student perceptions of academic…

  16. A Case for Improved Reading Instruction for Academic English Reading Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Ole Hellekjær

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the academic reading proficiency in English of 217 senior level Norwegian upper secondary school students who upon graduation are considered qualified for higher education. Testing with an International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic Reading Module revealed that two thirds of the 178 respondents with ordinary EFL courses did not achieve the equivalent of the IELTS Band 6 score minimum that is usually required for admission to British and Australian universities. In comparison, two thirds of a sample of 39 respondents with a single, sheltered Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL subject achieved a Band 6 score or better. Closer analysis indicates that the poor test scores can be attributed to weaknesses in current English as a Foreign Language (EFL instruction where reading is neglected, where students do not learn to adjust how they read to reading purpose, and where they do not learn how to handle unfamiliar words to avoid disrupting the reading process. The article ends with suggestions on how to improve EFL instruction, in Norway and elsewhere.

  17. Factors that influence effective evidence-based medicine instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a health care practice is being incorporated into education programs across the spectrum of medical education to develop lifelong learning skills and to enhance the practice of evidence-based health care. Since improving the quality of patient care is the ultimate goal of EBM, EBM learning must be integrated with clinical application, and resulted outcomes must be reflected in learning transfer (or EBM practice) within the context of solving patient problems. Different factors may constitute the context or environment in which EBM is learned, practiced, and sustained. However, these contextual factors are seldom considered and examined in the development, implementation, and evaluation of EBM instruction for learners at different levels. This article will introduce several contextual factors as tips and strategies that affect EBM learning and transfer. Also included in the article are recommended practices for designing effective EBM instruction that would contribute to a sustainable change in learner behavior.

  18. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction with traditional science classroom instruction as compared to when instructed using solely traditional science classroom instruction. The targeted sample population consisted of fourth-grade students enrolled in a public elementary school located in the southeastern region of the United States. The convenience sample size consisted of 115 fourth-grade students enrolled in science classes. The pretest and posttest academic achievement data collected consisted of the science segment from the Spring 2015, and Spring 2016 state standardized assessments. Pretest and posttest academic achievement data were analyzed using an ANCOVA statistical procedure to test for differences, and the researcher reported the results of the statistical analysis. The results of the study show no significant difference in science academic achievement between treatment and control groups. An interpretation of the results and recommendations for future research were provided by the researcher upon completion of the statistical analysis.

  19. Overcoming Obstacles and Academic Hope: An Examination of Factors Promoting Effective Academic Success Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michele Joann; Trujillo, Daniel J.; Boland, Donna L.; MacKinnon, Joyce L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the underlying non-cognitive processes and institutional factors that allowed first-year students to enact effective strategies for attaining academic success and persisting despite obstacles. The varying levels of academic preparation and unique obstacles faced by the student participants…

  20. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic faculty members: do instructional and clinical staff differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Song, Jae W; Kim, H Myra; Woolliscroft, James O; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Gyetko, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between instructional and clinical faculty members. A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1898 academic faculty members at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organisation, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between faculty members on the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Response rates for the instructional and clinical faculty groups were 43.1% and 46.7%, respectively. Clinical faculty members reported being less satisfied with how they were mentored and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between the two faculty groups. Surprisingly, clinical faculty members with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were mentored and with career advancement, and were significantly less likely to choose an academic career if they had to do it all over again compared with instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty members were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty members compared with senior-level instructional faculty staff. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both groups included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. In the clinical track only, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Greater emphasis must be placed on faculty members' well-being at both the institutional level and the level of departmental leadership. Efforts to enhance job satisfaction and improve retention are more likely to succeed if they are directed by locally designed

  1. Processes and Instructions Encouraging Thai Students Consistently Pass the First Round of The National Physics Academics Olympiads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teevasuthornsakul, Chalongchai; Manosuttirit, Artnarong; Suwanno, Chirasak; Sutsaguan, Lanchakorn

    2010-07-01

    This research focused on the processes and physics instruction of 25 schools located in Bangkok and up-country in Thailand in order to explain why many of their students have passed the first round of the National Physics Academic Olympiads consistently. The high schools in Thailand can apply and support their students and develop their potential in physics. The development of physics professional is the cornerstone of a developing country and increase physics quality base on sciences development in the future in Thailand. The duration of collecting all data was from May 2007 to May 2009. The methodology for this research was the qualitative research method. The researchers interviewed managers, teachers and students at each school location or used semi-structured interview forms. The researchers used the Investigator Triangulation approach to check the qualitative data and the Cause and Effect Analysis approach to analyze situation factors. The results showed that in processes were include 1) enhanced the students with the Academic Olympiads to develop the capacities of students; 2) motivated the students with processes such as good instruction in physics and special privilege in continuing studies in university; and 3) tutorial systems and drill and practice systems support students into subsequent rounds. 4) Admiration activities accommodated the students continually and suitably. Most of the teaching styles used in their lectures, in both basic contents and practice, encouraged students to analyze entrance examination papers, little laboratory. While students say that" They just know that a physics laboratory is very important to study physics after they passed Olympic camp."

  2. Factors that Influence Research Output of Academic Librarians in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survey was carried out to determine the factors that influence research output of academic librarians in Niger state. It was aimed at providing the reality of the opinion on research output of academic librarians who are working in Niger state. Questionnaire were designed and distributed to (65) sixty five of the (85) eighty ...

  3. Theoretical perspectives on factors affecting the academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... academic development practitioners, researchers etc. recognize that there is an increasing number and diversity of students accessing higher education, do the stakeholders really know who these students are before even thinking of enhancing their learning and teaching? Certain student retention theories like those of ...

  4. Factors Influencing Academic Failure of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yousaf Ali; Ahamad, Zahoor; Kousar, Sadia

    2013-01-01

    There was a close link between education and development. Education played a vital role in human capital formation. Academic failure from university was a problem that had became a serious concern for higher education institutions. This study presented the result of a recent investigation at the University of Gujrat that attempted to identify the…

  5. The effects of academic literacy instruction on engagement and conceptual understanding of biology of ninth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Susan C.

    Academic language, discourse, vocabulary, motivation, and comprehension of complex texts and concepts are keys to learning subject-area content. The need for a disciplinary literacy approach in high school classrooms accelerates as students become increasing disengaged in school and as content complexity increases. In the present quasi-experimental mixed-method study, a ninth-grade biology unit was designed with an emphasis on promoting academic literacy skills, discourse, meaningful constructivist learning, interest development, and positive learning experiences in order to learn science content. Quantitative and qualitative analyses on a variety of measures completed by 222 students in two high schools revealed that those who received academic literacy instruction in science class performed at significantly higher levels of conceptual understanding of biology content, academic language and vocabulary use, reasoned thought, engagement, and quality of learning experience than control-group students receiving traditionally-organized instruction. Academic literacy was embedded into biology instruction to engage students in meaning-making discourses of science to promote learning. Academic literacy activities were organized according the phases of interest development to trigger and sustain interest and goal-oriented engagement throughout the unit. Specific methods included the Generative Vocabulary Matrix (GVM), scenario-based writing, and involvement in a variety of strategically-placed discourse activities to sustain or "boost" engagement for learning. Traditional instruction for the control group included teacher lecture, whole-group discussion, a conceptual organizer, and textbook reading. Theoretical foundations include flow theory, sociocultural learning theory, and interest theory. Qualitative data were obtained from field notes and participants' journals. Quantitative survey data were collected and analyzed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to

  6. The Effect of Strategy Instruction Based on the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach over Reading Comprehension and Strategy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, Meral Ozkan; Adiguzel, Oktay Cem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of reading strategies instruction based on the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach over students' skill to comprehend what they read in French and their use of reading strategies. It has an action research design. Eighteen students studying at French Preparatory Program at Eskisehir Osmangazi…

  7. The Effect of Instructing Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies on the Academic Progress of Ilam Medical University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Amir; Keikhavani, Sattar; Hasel, Kourosh Mohammadi

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the effect of instructing cognitive and metacognitive strategies on the academic progress of Medical Sciences of Ilam University students. The research is quasi-experimental including a pre-test and a post-test. The population of the research includes the students of Medical Sciences of Ilam University. The sample includes 120…

  8. Learning How to Write an Academic Text: The Effect of Instructional Method and Reflection on Text Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loo, Janneke; Krahmer, Emiel; van Amelsvoort, Marije

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results on a study on the effect of instructional method (observational learning and learning by doing) and reflection (yes or no) on academic text quality and self-efficacy beliefs. 56 undergraduate students were assigned to either an observational learning or learning-by-doing condition, with or without…

  9. A Model of Research Paper Writing Instructional Materials for Academic Writing Course: "Needs & Documents Analysis and Model Design"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghufron, M. Ali; Saleh, Mursid; Warsono; Sofwan, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a model of instructional materials for Academic Writing Course focusing on research paper writing. The model was designed based on the Curriculum at the English Education Study Program, Faculty of Language and Art Education of IKIP PGRI Bojonegoro, East Java, Indonesia. This model was developed in order to improve…

  10. Increasing Instructional Efficiency When Using Simultaneous Prompting Procedure in Teaching Academic Skills to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin-Iftar, Elif; Olcay-Gul, Seray

    2016-01-01

    A multiple probe design across behaviors replicated across participants was used to examine the effects of a simultaneous prompting procedure delivered along with instructive feedback and observational learning stimuli when teaching academic skills to a small group of students with ASD. Different target skills were taught to each student in the…

  11. Effects of Academic Language Instruction on Relational and Syntactic Aspects of Morphological Awareness for Sixth Graders from Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2012-01-01

    One dimension of language proficiency considered important for reading and writing academic texts is morphological awareness--the understanding of how complex words are formed from meaningful smaller units (i.e., affixes, roots) that contribute to words' meanings and functions. This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effects of instruction on…

  12. How Do Linguistically Diverse Students Fare in Full- and Half-Day Kindergarten? Examining Academic Achievement, Instructional Quality, and Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Kenyon, Kendra M.; Bingham, Gary E.; Korth, Byran B.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated the effects of full- and half-day kindergarten programs on classroom instructional quality and children's academic achievement. Considerations were given for how the length of the school day, language status (English language learner [ELL] and non-ELL), and children's attendance patterns influenced…

  13. Managing the academic talent void: Investigating factors in academic turnover and retention in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Theron

    2014-04-01

    Research purpose: This study aimed to investigate the factors that influence turnover and retention of academic and to validate the developed talent retention diagnostic tool for use in South African higher education institutions. Motivation for the study: Limited research currently exists on the retention factors of academic staff in the South African context. Research approach, design and method: Using an investigative quantitative research approach, the tool was administered to a convenience sample of academics (n = 153 in 13 higher education institutions. Main findings: The results showed an array of distinguishing turnover and retention factors and proved the tool to be a valid and reliable measure. Over half the respondents indicated slight to strong dissatisfaction with compensation and performance management practices. Significantly, 34% indicated that they considered exiting their academic institution, citing unhappiness about compensation, as the most likely reason, whilst 74.5% have previously looked for another job. Practical/managerial implications: The research highlights key areas (i.e. compensation, emotional recognition, a bonus structure that reflects employee contribution, performance management systems, mentorship and career development opportunities that higher education should attend to if they want to retain their key and talented academic staff. Contribution/value-add: The results contribute to new knowledge on the factors that contribute to turnover and retention of academic staff and present a valid and reliable measure to assess these retention factors.

  14. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  15. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  16. Critical Factors in Reading Comprehension Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Research Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woori; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Misquitta, Radhika

    2012-01-01

    This review examined the effectiveness of critical factors in instruction for improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with learning disabilities. Five critical factors were identified: (i) type of instructional methods, (ii) self-monitoring, (iii) components of reading incorporated, (iv) fidelity of instruction (scripted vs.…

  17. Analysis of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol Model on Academic Performance of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Sandra W.

    This quantitative comparative descriptive study involved analyzing archival data from end-of-course (EOC) test scores in biology of English language learners (ELLs) taught or not taught using the sheltered instruction observation protocol (SIOP) model. The study includes descriptions and explanations of the benefits of the SIOP model to ELLs, especially in content area subjects such as biology. Researchers have shown that ELLs in high school lag behind their peers in academic achievement in content area subjects. Much of the research on the SIOP model took place in elementary and middle school, and more research was necessary at the high school level. This study involved analyzing student records from archival data to describe and explain if the SIOP model had an effect on the EOC test scores of ELLs taught or not taught using it. The sample consisted of 527 Hispanic students (283 females and 244 males) from Grades 9-12. An independent sample t-test determined if a significant difference existed in the mean EOC test scores of ELLs taught using the SIOP model as opposed to ELLs not taught using the SIOP model. The results indicated that a significant difference existed between EOC test scores of ELLs taught using the SIOP model and ELLs not taught using the SIOP model (p = .02). A regression analysis indicated a significant difference existed in the academic performance of ELLs taught using the SIOP model in high school science, controlling for free and reduced-price lunch (p = .001) in predicting passing scores on the EOC test in biology at the school level. The data analyzed for free and reduced-price lunch together with SIOP data indicated that both together were not significant (p = .175) for predicting passing scores on the EOC test in high school biology. Future researchers should repeat the study with student-level data as opposed to school-level data, and data should span at least three years.

  18. Factors Influencing Seminar Learning and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Annemarie; Leppink, Jimmie; Wolfhagen, Ineke; Bok, Harold; Mainhard, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Many veterinary curricula use seminars, interactive educational group formats in which some 25 students discuss questions and issues relating to course themes. To get indications on how to optimize the seminar learning process for students, we aimed to investigate relationships between factors that seem to be important for the seminar learning process, and to determine how these seminar factors account for differences in students' achievement scores. A 57-item seminar evaluation (USEME) questionnaire was administered to students right after they attended a seminar. In total, 80 seminars distributed over years 1, 2, and 3 of an undergraduate veterinary medicine curriculum were sampled and 988 questionnaires were handed in. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was conducted on 410 questionnaires to examine which items could be grouped together as indicators of the same factor, and to determine correlations between the derived factors. Multilevel regression analysis was performed to explore the effects of these seminar factors and students' prior achievement scores on students' achievement scores. Within the questionnaire, four factors were identified that influence the seminar learning process: teacher performance, seminar content, student preparation, and opportunities for interaction within seminars. Strong correlations were found between teacher performance, seminar content, and group interaction. Prior achievement scores and, to a much lesser extent, the seminar factor group interaction appeared to account for differences in students' achievement scores. The factors resulting from the present study and their relation to the method of assessment should be examined further, for example, in an experimental setup.

  19. The relationship between affective factors and the academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between affective factors and the academic achievement of students at the University of Venda. To this end, self-concept, motivation and attitude are the affective factors selected for the study. The general aim of the study is to determine the role of self-concept, ...

  20. The Effect of Individualized Instruction System on the Academic Achievement Scores of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bahçeci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A web-based learning portal offering individualized learning was developed by utilizing rule-based knowledge representation and artificial intelligence techniques of expert systems in order to reduce the uncertainties of learning to minimum and to construct an intelligent tutoring system. This portal offers individualized learning content based on the individual’s level of cognitive knowledge. In order to determine the effects of the developed system on the student achievement, the system was tested in an 8-week-long study on the students of Software Engineering Department of Technology Faculty. The pretest-posttest control group experimental design was used in the study. The experimental group received education with Individualized Instruction Portal while the control group received education in traditional learning environment. Academic achievement test was used as the data collection tool. In order to test the research hypotheses, data obtained from the data collection tools were analysed in terms of frequency, percentages, and dependent-independent t-test with statistical software program. Based on the results, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of the pretest. On the other hand, significant differences were found between experimental and control group in terms of the posttest. It was concluded that individualized learning portal had positive effect on the students’ learning when used in combination with traditional learning environment.

  1. Big Five Factors and academic achievement in Russian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova I.A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality traits is one of the most comprehensive personality models in modern psychology. The traits, or domains, of the model, provide an extensive framework, which allows researchers to analyse the correlation between the aspects of personality and various aspects of social behaviour. Academic achievement is a key factor in a subject’s success, and a more comprehensive understanding of its potential factors could improve educational programs and teaching strategies. Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to consider the correlations between the FFM (Big Five personality traits and the academic achievement of university students in various fields of study. Design: This study has adopted a descriptive analytic approach by exploring previous research data. In the present empirical research, the Big Five factors were measured with the Russian NEO Five-Factor Inventory adaptation by S. Biryukov and M. Bodunov. Academic achievement was defined as the average value of the semester final grades. The Spearman correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The sample includes 207 first- and second-year university students in the Linguistics Department. Results: The analysis of the published data revealed that Western psychological studies show that consciousness and openness, two values in the model, are more closely connected with the peculiarities of the students’ academic achievement in different fields of study, but similar studies conducted in Russian universities do not fully confirm this data. Findings of our research proved that consciousness is more associated with greater academic achievement of Russian linguistics students in most fields of study compared to the other FFM traits, while other traits showed more specific correlations with particular fields of study. Conclusions: The data suggests that both environmental and internal psychological factors, such as motivation

  2. Factors influencing seminar learning and academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, Annemarie; Leppink, Jimmie; Wolfhagen, Ineke; Bok, Harold; Mainhard, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert; Van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Many veterinary curricula use seminars, interactive educational group formats in which some 25 students discuss questions and issues relating to course themes. To get indications on how to optimize the seminar learning process for students, we aimed to investigate relationships between factors that

  3. Factors Influencing Seminar Learning and Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, Annemarie; Leppink, Jimmie; Wolfhagen, Ineke; Bok, Harold; Mainhard, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Many veterinary curricula use seminars, interactive educational group formats in which some 25 students discuss questions and issues relating to course themes. To get indications on how to optimize the seminar learning process for students, we aimed to investigate relationships between factors that

  4. Academic Vocabulary Learning in First Through Third Grade in Low-Income Schools: Effects of Automated Supplemental Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Howard; Ziolkowski, Robyn A; Bojczyk, Kathryn E; Marty, Ana; Schneider, Naomi; Harpring, Jayme; Haring, Christa D

    2017-11-09

    This study investigated cumulative effects of language learning, specifically whether prior vocabulary knowledge or special education status moderated the effects of academic vocabulary instruction in high-poverty schools. Effects of a supplemental intervention targeting academic vocabulary in first through third grades were evaluated with 241 students (6-9 years old) from low-income families, 48% of whom were retained for the 3-year study duration. Students were randomly assigned to vocabulary instruction or comparison groups. Curriculum-based measures of word recognition, receptive identification, expressive labeling, and decontextualized definitions showed large effects for multiple levels of word learning. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that students with higher initial Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Fourth Edition scores (Dunn & Dunn, 2007) demonstrated greater word learning, whereas students with special needs demonstrated less growth in vocabulary. This model of vocabulary instruction can be applied efficiently in high-poverty schools through an automated, easily implemented adjunct to reading instruction in the early grades and holds promise for reducing gaps in vocabulary development.

  5. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Ana C.

    This study examined differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on levels of student participation in Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions in two introductory undergraduate biology and chemistry courses offered at University of Central Florida in the Spring 2006 semester. The sample consisted of 282 students enrolled in the biology class and 451 students enrolled in chemistry. Academic performance was measured using students' final course grades and rates of withdrawal from the courses. The self-regulated learning constructs of motivation, cognition, metacognition, and resource management were measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Relationships between students' gender and ethnic background and levels of SI participation were also analyzed in this research. Findings in both biology and chemistry courses revealed a statistically significant decrease in student motivation from beginning to end of semester. In chemistry, frequent SI participants also showed statistically significantly higher levels of motivation at the end of the semester than occasional and non-SI participants. There were no statistically significant gains in cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management strategies from beginning to end of semester. However, statistically significant differences in resource management were observed at the end of the semester among SI attendance groups in both courses. Students in the high SI attendance group were more likely to use learning resources than those who did not participate regularly or did not participate at all. Statistically significant differences in academic performance based on students' SI participation were found in both biology and chemistry courses. Frequent SI participants had significantly higher final percentage grades and were more likely to receive grades of A, B, or C, than those who either did not attend SI regularly of did not participate at all. They were also less

  6. Factors Influencing Junior High School Teachers' Computer-Based Instructional Practices Regarding Their Instructional Evolution Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2007-01-01

    Sandholtz, Ringstaff, & Dwyer (1996) list five stages in the "evolution" of a teacher's capacity for computer-based instruction--entry, adoption, adaptation, appropriation and invention--which hereafter will be called the teacher's computer-based instructional evolution. In this study of approximately six hundred junior high school…

  7. Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Sara; Eintrei, Christina; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

  8. Determinants of User Intention toward IT Instruction: an Examination of Internal and External Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Show-Hui S. Huang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the internal and external factors that affect user intention to apply IT instruction. The internal factors were examined from the standpoint of user attitudes toward IT instruction, which included computer knowledge, perceived usefulness, and interest in applying IT instruction, while external factors included climate, school policy, facility, and training in IT instruction. The effects of participant demographics were also investigated. As an empirical study, 141 valid science and technology university teachers in Taiwan were surveyed for their experiences with teaching websites. The results indicate that all of the internal factors significantly affect teacher intention to apply IT instruction, but none of the external factors do, except for the climate variable. The results may help school administrators in promoting IT instruction.

  9. Contextual Determinants of Mathematics Achievement: A Closer Look at the Influence of Principals' Instructional Leadership, Teachers' Preferred Instructional Approaches, and Academic Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Tremayne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether certain contextual factors pertaining to principals and teachers influenced U.S. eighth grade students' math achievement. More specifically, the study comparatively examined the direct and mediating predictive influence of teacher instructional approaches (i.e., teacher-directed; constructivism),…

  10. Factors Affecting Academic Achievement of Students in Senior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the factors affecting academic achievement ofstudents in Senior School Certificate Examination (SSCE) in ChristianReligious Knowledge. A total of three hundred students in SS III from five secondary schools were randomly selected and used as sample for the study. Five hypotheses were tested, ...

  11. Factors Underlying Technology Adoption in Academic Libraries in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fadhli, Meshal; Corrall, Sheila; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzed factors shaping adoption of technology in academic libraries in Kuwait. The research was based on interviews conducted with library directors, staff, and users, combined with observation and document analysis. A major aspect of the Kuwaiti context was a relative lack of financial restraints and an enthusiasm for technology…

  12. Learning Approaches, Demographic Factors to Predict Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan Minh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to predict academic outcome in math and math-related subjects using learning approaches and demographic factors. Design/Methodology/Approach: ASSIST was used as the instrumentation to measure learning approaches. The study was conducted in the International University of Vietnam with 616 participants. An…

  13. Factors influencing academic performance of real estate students in Nigeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayodele, Timothy Oluwafemi; Oladokun, Timothy Tunde; Gbadegesin, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting academic performance of real estate students in a developing country like Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach: Data for the study were collected with the aid of questionnaire served on 152 final year real estate students of

  14. Weight Perception, Academic Performance, and Psychological Factors in Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Chou, Chih-Ping; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Reynolds, Kim; Clark, Florence; Palmer, Paula H.; Gallaher, Peggy; Sun, Ping; Guo, Qian; Johnson, C. Anderson

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate weight perception and related psychological factors in Chinese adolescents. Methods: A questionnaire on weight perception, academic performance, stress, hostility, and depression was completed by 6863 middle and high school students. Weight and height were measured. Results: Overweight perception was related to…

  15. Sociological Factors as Predictors of Academic Emotion among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the sociological factors as predictors of academic emotion among Nigeria University students. The study adopted a survey research design. The participants in the study were 345 undergraduates in South-West, Nigeria. Their age ranged between 17 years and 24 years with mean age of 21.69 years.

  16. Factors affecting academic performance of Pharmacy students in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A three-sectioned 37-item questionnaire was designed using previously validated constructs. Student's t-test and ANOVA was carried out to evaluate the effect of the factors on academic performance. Results showed that students who were less anxious had significantly higher cumulative grade point average M±SD (CGPA ...

  17. The Unintended Consequences of an Algebra-for-All Policy on High-Skill Students: The Effects on Instructional Organization and Students' Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomi, Takako

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how a policy that provided college-prep coursework for low-skill students may affect instructional organization within schools, and how such effects on instructional organization may have unintended consequences on academic outcomes of high-skill students who were not targeted by the policy. The author…

  18. Z factor: a new index for measuring academic research output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With rapid progress in scientific research activities and growing competition for funding resources, it becomes critical to effectively evaluate an individual researcher's annual academic performance, or their cumulative performance within the last 3–5 years. It is particularly important for young independent investigators, and is also useful for funding agencies when determining the productivity and quality of grant awardees. As the funding becomes increasingly limited, having an unbiased method of measuring recent performance of an individual scientist is clearly needed. Here I propose the Z factor, a new and useful way to measure recent academic performance.

  19. Academic Support as a Predictor of Retention to Graduation: New Insights on the Role of Tutoring, Learning Assistance, and Supplemental Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Michael C.; Leist, Cathy W.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the relationship between the long-term use of academic support services such as tutoring, learning assistance, and supplemental instruction and retention to graduation. Little research has been devoted to the relationship between academic support and retention to graduation in both the literatures on retention and…

  20. The Relation of Home Language and Literacy to Three-Year-Old Children's Emergent Academic Language in Narrative and Instruction Genres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Anna F.; Leseman, Paul P. M.; Mayo, Aziza Y.; Elbers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations between the home language and literacy environment and emergent skill to use academic language in a sample of 58 3-year-old Dutch children, focusing on production and comprehension in 3 genres: personal narrative, impersonal narrative, and instruction in play. Regarding production, children used academic language…

  1. An expert performance approach to examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Kiruthiga

    Successful completion of the introductory course in organic chemistry is a prerequisite for many graduate and professional science programs, yet the failure rate for this course is notoriously high. To date, there have been few studies examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry. This study demonstrates that the online, longitudinal methods used by investigations of expert performance can examine and successfully identify factors contributing to academic success at the college level. Sixty-four students enrolled in introductory organic chemistry during the Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters completed motivation questionnaires, interviews, diaries, and think-aloud reading and problem-solving tasks at three different points across a semester. Measures of spatial ability, general ability, and background preparation were also collected. Each measure was analyzed to determine significant differences between groups differing in grade-point average (GPA) prior to the start of the course and to identify predictors of organic chemistry grade. Variables measuring background preparation, problem-solving strategies and studying strategies were found to be the best predictors of academic success in organic chemistry. Implications for instruction in organic chemistry and effective studying behaviors are discussed.

  2. Teachers' Initial and Sustained Use of an Instructional Assistive Technology Tool: Exploring the Mitigating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Flanagan, Sara; Heutsche, Anne; Okolo, Cynthia M.; Englert, Carol Sue

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative research project explored factors that mitigated teachers implementing an instructional assistive technology and factors that mitigated its sustained use. Specifically, it explored these issues in relation to a social studies based instructional assistive technology (Virtual History Museum [VHM]), which was originally implemented…

  3. Design Heuristics in Academic, Corporate, and Military Instruction: More Similar than Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cindy S.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the practice of instructional design (ID) began in the U. S. military (Branson et al., 1975; Jeffrey & Bratton-Jeffrey, 2004; Reiser, 2102), there is little known regarding which design and development heuristics military instructional designers deem important to the ID process. The study reported in this article was…

  4. Instructional Methods Within the Elementary-School Science Classroom Related to Improved Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Lisa

    There is gap in passing rates on the standardized science assessment between European American and Hispanic American students. The purpose of this study was to examine student performance in science and the closing of the achievement gap between European American and Hispanic American students based upon receipt of an inquiry or noninquiry instruction method. Guided by the theoretical framework of constructive learning, this quantitative ex post facto research design gathered data from 8 teachers who had already implemented 1 of the 2 methods of instruction. The teachers were chosen through purposive sampling based on previous observations of instructional method and were placed into 2 groups depending upon the type of instruction: inquiry or noninquiry. Descriptive statistics were used to determine mean differences and a 2-way analysis of variance was used to determine mean differences in science test scores between European American and Hispanic American students and between the instructional methods to which they had been exposed. Results found that the inquiry instructional method was related to a significant increase in mean scores for both ethnic groups, but the achievement gap between the two groups was not closed by the inquiry instruction method. This study can promote positive social change for students by informing the efforts of educational leaders and teachers to create professional development using inquiry instruction. Students may perform higher on standardized tests when they are allowed to explore science by asking questions and answering their own questions through the collection and analysis of data.

  5. EFFECTS OF METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY INSTRUCTION ON THE READING COMPREHENSION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS THROUGH COGNITIVE ACADEMIC LANGUAGE LEARNING APPROACH (CALLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batul Shamsi Nejad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the reading needs of English as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL learners, educators are urged to develop effective instructional means for teaching reading comprehension and reading strategy use. Although studies on foreign language reading strategies are burgeoning in the realm of language acquisition research, recent interest has spotlighted learners’ metacognitive awareness of strategies. This study investigated the effect of metacognitive strategy training on the reading comprehension of 111 intermediate EFL learners. The participants received five sessions of instruction on metacognitive strategies guided by the blueprints of Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA. The results of t-test, and two-ways analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed that there was a significant positive relationship between the students' metacognitive reading strategy use and their reading comprehension performance. There was also a significant positive relationship between the use of CALLA and the students' reading comprehension performance.

  6. Effects of metacognitive instruction on the academic achievement of students in the secondary sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Gregory A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of reflective assessment in the form of situated metacognitive prompts on student achievement in the secondary sciences. A second goal was to determine whether specific gender differences existed in terms of student responsiveness to the metacognitive interventions. Participants in the study consisted of a convenience sample from a population of ninth-grade honors biology students in a large suburban school district located near Seattle, Washington. Beyond answering the specific research questions raised in this study, an additional aim was to broaden the growing body of research pertaining to the effect of metacognition on student achievement. A quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group design was employed in this study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were computed to address the specific research questions raised. Specifically, a three-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. For this purpose, a single within-subjects factor, termed Testing, was defined. Three levels were allocated to this factor, and quantitative data from the Pretest, Posttest, and Retention Test were assigned to the levels, respectively. Group and Gender were defined as between-subjects factors, and both were allocated two levels; the two Group levels were Reflective and Non-Reflective. The effects of Group and Gender on each of the three quantitative measures were examined singly and in interaction with each other. Tests of statistical significance were analyzed at the .05 level. There was a statistically significant effect for Group (Reflective, Non-Reflective) by Testing (Pretest, Posttest, Retention Test). A three-way repeated-measures ANOVA procedure revealed that students in the Reflective group outperformed students in the Non-Reflective group (F = 10.258, p = .002, Partial eta 2 = .088). According to the effect size estimate, almost 9% of variance in the Testing variable was attributable to the Group variable

  7. The supplemental instruction program: Student perceptions of the learning environment and impact on student academic achievement in college science at California State University, San Marcos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizer, Suzanne Elizabeth

    Higher education in science has been criticized and calls to increase student learning and persistence to degree has been recognized as a national problem by the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the National Research Council, and the National Academy of Sciences. One mode of academic assistance that may directly address this issue is the implementation of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in science courses. SI is a specific model of academic assistance designed to help students in historically difficult science classes master course content, thus increasing their academic achievement and retention. This study assessed the SI program at California State University, San Marcos, in supported science courses. Specifically, academic achievement based on final course grades were compared between SI participating and nonparticipating students, multiple affective factors were measured at the beginning and end of the semester, and students' perceptions of the classroom and SI session learning environments recorded. Overall, students who attended five or more SI sessions achieved higher final course grades. Students who chose to participate in SI had higher initial levels of responsibility and anxiety. Additionally, SI participants experienced a reduction in anxiety over the semester whereas nonparticipants experienced an increase in anxiety from beginning to the end of the semester. The learning environment of SI embodies higher levels of constructivist principles of active learning such as cooperation, cohesiveness, innovation, and personalization---with one exception for the physics course, which is a based on problem-based learning. Structural equation modeling of variables indicates that high self-efficacy at the end of the semester is directly related to high final course grades; this is mediated by cohesion in the classroom and the cooperation evidenced in SI sessions. These findings are elaborated by student descriptions of what happened in SI

  8. Knowledge Based Artificial Augmentation Intelligence Technology: Next Step in Academic Instructional Tools for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Dale; LaPierre, Martin; Kebritchi, Mansureh

    2017-01-01

    With augmented intelligence/knowledge based system (KBS) it is now possible to develop distance learning applications to support both curriculum and administrative tasks. Instructional designers and information technology (IT) professionals are now moving from the programmable systems era that started in the 1950s to the cognitive computing era.…

  9. Supplemental Instruction and Academic Success and Retention in Science Courses at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meling, Vanessa B.; Mundy, Marie-Anne; Kupczynski, Lori; Green, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the effectiveness of Supplemental Instruction (SI) at a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI), particularly with Hispanic students. The United States Department of Education (2010) defines an HSI as having a 25% or greater full-time, Hispanic student enrollment and 50% or more of all students are eligible for…

  10. Observational Learning of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that small-group direct instruction is effective and efficient for teaching students with and without disabilities, although relatively few studies have been conducted with heterogeneous groups of preschool participants. In addition, previous studies have primarily assessed whether observational learning occurred for…

  11. Literacy Coaching: Middle School Academic Achievement and Teacher Perceptions Regarding Content Area Literacy Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anjell H.; Neill, Patricia; Faust, Phyllis B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined differences in perceptions of content area teachers receiving literacy coaching and teachers receiving no literacy coaching regarding implementation of literacy instruction. It also examined student achievement on standardized tests relative to literacy coaching. A survey measured teachers' perceptions regarding their…

  12. Reading Instruction for Elementary-Age Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton-Arwood, Sally M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Falk, Katherine B.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a reading intervention on the reading achievement and social behaviors of 6 third-grade students with emotional/behavioral disorders. Reading instruction occurred 4 days a week using the Horizons Fast Track reading program and Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies. Analyses indicated variable improvements in basic…

  13. A Path Analysis Model Pertinent to Undergraduates' Academic Success: Examining Academic Confidence, Psychological Capital and Academic Coping Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirikkanat, Berke; Soyer, Makbule Kali

    2018-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to create a path analysis model of academic success in a group of university students, which included the variables of academic confidence and psychological capital with a mediator variable--academic coping. 400 undergraduates from Marmara University and Istanbul Commerce University who were in sophomore, junior…

  14. An exploration of the impact of reform-based science instruction on second graders' academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Valeisha Michelle

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether possible relationships might exist between the quality of reform-based science instruction and science and reading achievement in second grade. The study also examined separately possible interactions between quality of instruction and gender and race. The study involved an analysis of data previously collected in a larger one-group pre/post test study of a science instructional intervention (ISI Science) (Connor et al., 2010). In the original study, six teachers and two graduate assistants taught two science units designed based upon constructivist principles and reform-based practices. Using the 5-E Learning Cycle (Bybee, 1997), reading and science were integrated into each lesson. Videotapes were made of all lessons and science and reading achievement data were collected. For the current study, dependent achievement variables were science achievement measured by the Iowa Science Test; reading comprehension, by the Woodcock Passage Comprehension; and vocabulary, by the Iowa Vocabulary. Pre- and post-tests scores on the dependent measures were available for 96 children from the original study. Quality of instruction was measured using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) (Sawanda & Piburn, 2000). Videotapes of 24 science lessons from the larger study were analyzed using the RTOP. Reliability of ratings for the RTOP in the study was determined to be .96. No significant results were found for relations between instructional quality (RTOP) and any of the achievement variables although significant pre to post increases on all three measures were observed. No differences by race or gender were found. This latter finding was noteworthy given the research in science identifying both gender and race differences in science achievement. Recommendations for future research and teacher education are discussed.

  15. Web Consulting for Non-Academic Educational Missions: How Instructional Design Offers a Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Ward Mitchell; Mattke, Paige Hawkins

    2013-01-01

    Based on a recently completed study of education directors at science museums, this article addresses how design-and-development consultants might use those findings to enhance the way in which they propose and deliver Website services to non-academic organizations with either primary or complementary educational missions. After a very brief…

  16. Supporting Instructional Improvement in Low-Performing Schools to Increase Students' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellei, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    This is an impact evaluation of the Technical Support to Failing Schools Program, a Chilean compensatory program that provided 4-year in-school technical assistance to low-performing schools to improve students' academic achievement. The author implemented a quasi-experimental design by using difference-in-differences estimation combined with…

  17. Model texts in an advanced academic writing curriculum: Unravelling an instructional strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of learning from models in the context of post-graduate academic writing. Two questions were pursued: whether studying model writings supports mature students in writing in a new genre and whether integrating additional scaffolds in such models has added

  18. The Effects of Technology Instruction on the Academic Achievement of Fifth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Karen Cortina

    2012-01-01

    A digital native is an individual born between 1981 and 2001, and children born after 2001 are called millennials. Educators are expected to meet the needs of today's technologically savvy students. Some researchers assert that an academic "moral panic" is taking place that lacks the empirical and theoretical knowledge to support…

  19. FORUM: Instructional Communication and Millennial Students: Millennial Students in the College Classroom: Adjusting to Academic Entitlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Zachary W.; Martin, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    Academic entitlement (AE) refers to the expectation of educational success despite the input of personal effort needed to earn it (Boswell, 2012). Entitled students feel that learning should require minimal work and that difficulties encountered during the learning process should be attributed to instructors, rather than themselves. AE has become…

  20. Effects of Multicomponent Academic Vocabulary Instruction for English Learners with Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, Sara L.; Douglas, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    We provided a multicomponent academic vocabulary intervention to six English learners with learning difficulties in a fifth-grade general education setting. A multiple probe design across word sets and replicated across students evaluated the effects of the intervention on students' use of expressive language to read and define content-specific…

  1. Correlation and Predictive Relationship between Self-Determination Instruction and Academic Performance of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pen-Chiang; Chou, Yu-Chi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation and probable predictive relationship between self-determination skills taught by special education teachers and the academic performance of students with disabilities from junior high schools in Taiwan. The subjects included teachers from resource rooms and self-contained classrooms (n =…

  2. Stimulating students’ academic language : Opportunities in instructional methods in elementary school mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Nanke; Aarts, Rian; Kurvers, J.J.H.; Ros, Anje; Kroon, Sjaak

    2017-01-01

    Mastering academic language (AL) by elementary school students is important for achieving school success. The extent to which teachers play a role in stimulating students’ AL development may differ. Two types of AL stimulating behavior are distinguished: aimed at students’ understanding and at

  3. Stimulating students’ academic language : opportunities in instructional methods in elementary school mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rian Aarts; Jeanne Kurvers; Sjaak Kroon; Anje Ros; Nanke Dokter

    2017-01-01

    Mastering academic language (AL) by elementary school students is important for achieving school success. The extent to which teachers play a role in stimulating students’ AL development may differ. Two types of AL stimulating behavior are distinguished: aimed at students’ understanding and at

  4. Writing Strategy Instruction: Its Impact on Writing in a Second Language for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Writing for academic purposes in a second/foreign language is a major challenge faced by many students at both secondary and tertiary levels. This suggests that displaying content knowledge and understanding of a subject through a second language is a very complex process. This article discusses the findings of a longitudinal intervention study…

  5. Academic Music: Music Instruction to Engage Third-Grade Students in Learning Basic Fraction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courey, Susan Joan; Balogh, Endre; Siker, Jody Rebecca; Paik, Jae

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an academic music intervention on conceptual understanding of music notation, fraction symbols, fraction size, and equivalency of third graders from a multicultural, mixed socio-economic public school setting. Students (N = 67) were assigned by class to their general education mathematics program or to receive…

  6. The Implications of Adolescents' Academic Word Knowledge for Achievement and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Dianna; Bear, Donald; Templeton, Shane; Burton, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine relationships between orthographic and morphological awareness of academic words and achievement across content areas. Participants (n = 256), diverse seventh and eighth graders, took three word knowledge measures; two standardized achievement measures were used as outcomes. Orthographic awareness…

  7. Academic Achievement Performance of University Students with Disability: Exploring the Influence of Non-Academic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, Rachel; Henning, Marcus A.; Tyson, Graham A.; Shaw, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether: (1) the non-academic constructs of psychological well-being, motivation to learn and quality of life (QOL) explained the variance in the academic achievement of students with disability; and (2) students with a mental health disability (MHD) differed from students with other disability on academic achievement and on…

  8. Factors affecting the scholastic achievement of Prince of Songkla University students from private schools with Islam instruction in the three southern border provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidchanok Churngchow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the factors affecting the scholastic achievement of Prince of Songkla University (PSU students who came from private schools with Islam instruction in the three southern border provinces as well as an approach for quality development for the students of the above-mentioned schools toward a higher level of university scholastic achievement. The sample consisted of 918 students who had completed upper secondary education from the private schools with Islam instruction and six administrators of the schools as stated who rendered data by interview. From the discriminant analysis, only one discriminant variate best capable of discriminating university scholastic achievement was labeled as “reinforcement teaching”, which bore a high level of correlation to remedial-teaching and O-Net scores variables. From interviews with school administrators, the schools needed the government to render more support in the matter of scholarships and to provide for academic development in the form of academic coaching or participation in academic workshops under the care of teachers with area expertise. The research suggested: the government should subsidize all secular fields as well as the field of religion, and the Ministry of Education should render additional academic support by the provision of expert teachers for extra teaching in the form of reinforcement teaching or academic coaching, particularly for small schools.

  9. Effect of Instruction in Emotional Intelligence Skills on Locus of Control and Academic Self-Efficacy among Junior Secondary School Students in Niger State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaru, Yunusa; Umma, Abdulwahid

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of instruction in emotional intelligence Skills on locus of control and academic self-efficacy among junior secondary school students in Niger state, Nigeria. This study employed a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group, pre-test - post-test design. The population of this study was 105,034 secondary…

  10. A Comprehensive Look into the Instruction of Listening Skill in Academic English Programs: A Case Study of Two State Universities in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    The study reported here thoroughly investigated the instruction of listening skill in academic English programs. This was researched through a semi-structured interview. In this regard, in order to obtain a picture of listening requirements across the academy, data were collected from two different state universities of Iran. To compile the data,…

  11. Relationship between Instructional Leadership of Headmaster and Work Discipline and Work Motivation and Academic Achievement in Primary School at Special Areas of Central Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriadi, Eddi; Yusof, Hj. Abdul Raheem Bin Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the relationship between the instructional leadership of the headmaster and the work discipline of teachers and the work motivation and the academic achievement of primary school students from Special Province of Central Jakarta. The research method will be done with quantitative research methods. The study uses data…

  12. Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (Project CALLA), Community School District 2 Special Alternative Instruction Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Joanne

    Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (Project CALLA) was a federally funded program serving 960 limited-English-proficient students in 10 Manhattan (New York) elementary schools in 1992-93 its third year of operation. The project provided instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), mathematics, science, and social studies in…

  13. Motivational Factors of Student Nurse Athletes Attributing to Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Kimberly A

    Student nurse athletes experience difficulties achieving academic success in nursing programs. The purpose of this study was to identify facilitators, barriers, and motivators of student nurse athletes that attribute to their academic success. Athletes ranked time management and prioritization as critical skills to success in the nursing program. This study reinforced the importance of academic support services for student nurse athletes to assist in their academic success.

  14. Computer‐Assisted Library Instruction and Face‐to‐Face Library Instruction Prove Equally Effective for Teaching Basic Library Skills in Academic Libraries. A review of: Zhang, Li, Watson, Erin M. and Banfield, Laura. ʺThe Efficacy of Computer‐Assisted Instruction Versus Face‐to‐Face Instruction in Academic Libraries: A Systematic Review.ʺ The Journal of Academic Librarianship 33.4 (July 2007: 478‐484.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Walker

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To conduct a systematic review of several studies comparing the efficacy of face‐to‐face versus computer‐assisted instruction (CAI for teaching basic library skills to patrons of academic libraries. Design – Systematic review of existing studies (randomised controlled trials and controlled trials.Setting ‐ College and university librariesSubjects – The subjects studied were patrons of any type of academic library, whether university, college, or other postsecondary institution, receiving instruction in basic library skills. Ten studies were included in the review, of which seven were done in the United States, two in Australia, and one in Canada. The total number of subjects in all of the studies under review was 1283. Nine of the studies focused on undergraduates enrolled in specific courses(undergraduate courses ranging widely in subject area, or in one case a first year experience program; the other study focused on library instruction methods taught to students in a graduate research methods course, yet the study was still intended to measure the efficacy of library instruction methods, yet the study was still intended to measure the efficacy of library instruction methods.Methods – One included study was a randomised controlled trial; the other nine were controlled trials. The date range under consideration was for studies done between 1990 and 2005. All original studies were required to compare the efficacy of face-to-face versus CAI instruction. Both information skills and students’ reactions to receiving the instruction were considered. To identify appropriate studies, searches were done across the following library and education‐related databases: LISA, ERIC, and Library Literature. The authors screened the 728 unique studies’ bibliographic information for relevance against four criteria: studies had to be of a particular type of design (randomised controlled trials,controlled trials, cohort studies

  15. How to make the fourth revolution: Human factors in the adoption of electronic instructional aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, N. J.; Daniels, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The prospects and problems of getting higher education in the United States (high school and above) to more fully utilize electronic technologies are examined. Sociological, psychological, and political factors are analyzed to determine the feasibility of adopting electronic instructional techniques. Differences in organizations, attitudes, and customs of different kinds of students, teachers, administrators, and publics are crucial factors in innovation.

  16. The Attitudes of Medical School Administrators Toward Cost Factors Relating to Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary Carter; Milner, Stuart D.

    The attitudes of medical school administrators toward six cost factors relevant to the production of sophisticated clinical programs in schools which offer, expect to offer, or do not expect to offer CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) were identified and compared. The six cost factors were: (1) authorship, (2) incentives, (3) distribution, (4)…

  17. Evaluating Effective Teaching in College Level Economics Using Student Ratings of Instruction: A Factor Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbetsiafa, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the factors that affect students' evaluation of economic instruction using a sample of 1300 completed rating instruments at a comprehensive four-year mid-western public university. The study uses factor analysis to determine the validity and reliability of the evaluation instrument in assessing instructor or course…

  18. Passing the NBCOT Examination: Preadmission, Academic, and Fieldwork Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon D. Novalis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available All occupational therapy students are required to successfully complete the certification examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT before they can practice independently. The need to repeat the examination can result in stress, anxiety, and financial hardship. This paper explores the relationship of preadmission factors, academic and fieldwork performance, and demographic variables to successful first-time attempts on the certification examination for occupational therapists. Data were gathered from 144 student files in a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT Program at a single university. Of the sample, 82% passed and 18% failed their first NBCOT test trial. Considered independently, preadmission recommendation letters and writing sample scores, graduate MOT program GPA, lack of MOT program difficulty, fieldwork self-reports, and gender predicted NBCOT certification examination outcomes. When considered together in logistic regression models predicting outcome, this combination of factors correctly predicted 86.2% of student outcomes (or 20% to 32% of the variance in certification examination success, with OT program GPA and preadmission recommendation scores predicting unique outcome variance. This information may be helpful to admissions committees as well as to occupational therapy faculty as they identify strategies and practices to facilitate first-time test taking success on the NBCOT certification examination

  19. Key Design Factors in Durable Instructional Technology Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of any professional development effort to achieve durable change in teacher practice is affected by a host of design factors and their precise alignment with multiple delivery strategies. However, how successful professional development (PD) programs achieve an effective mix of these factors and strategies is not well understood. The…

  20. THE BOOKS FOR AN OPEN SOCIETY AS THE FACTORS OF ACADEMIC SOCIALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poviliunas, Arunas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article combines theoretical analysis with the empirical research and discusses the role of academic book in the process of academic socialization. The interpretation of the role of academic book depends on the conceptualization of the process of socialization. Therefore opposite approaches of academic socialization are discussed. If functionalism treats socialization as an adoptionto the fixed societal roles, constructivism treats socialization as the development of distinct identity. The development of identity is not successive but includes different stages that do not consequentlyfollow one from another. The tropic nature of the discontinuous process of socialization is discussed. The interpretation of academic books by different according the level of academic socialization groups reveals different tropes that shape the different discourses and treatments of academic books. For Bachelor students the acquaintance with academic books is closely related with the building of professional self-identity. Critical and constructive evaluation of the Publishing Programme Books for an Open Society by Master degree and especially by Doctoral degree students, prove the Programme’s books to be an important factor of education of critical thinking, academic and professional socialization. Number of books of one academic discipline supported by the Programme could be considered as an indicator of the academic power of the discipline. The focus group discussions support the hypothesis that studies in the disciplines that have more academic power causes better academic socialization and quicker development of the professional self-identity.

  1. The effect of matching learning styles and instructional strategies on academic achievement and student enjoyment of science lessons in a high school general chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundi, Shaaban Kitindi

    This study explored the matching hypothesis by examining the effect of matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies on students' academic performance and lesson enjoyment in a high school general chemistry course. To achieve the study aims, the researcher utilized a single-participant study design with a baseline phase and four treatment phases. Determination of students' learning style preferences involved using the Visual, Audial, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic (VARK) Learning Style Inventory. During the one-week baseline phase, students received instruction using regular instructional strategies, followed by four treatment phases: visual intervention, audial intervention, read/write intervention, and a kinesthetic intervention. Each intervention phase lasted one week. During each phase, the researcher measured academic achievement using three teacher-created quiz scores. Student enjoyment was measured using the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA). A total of 14 students completed the VARK Questionnaire. Of these, eight students (2 boys and 6 girls) exhibited a multimodal learning style were subsequently excluded from study participation. An additional student was excluded due to excessive absenteeism, leaving five students who completed all phases of the study. Results indicated that matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies did not improve students' academic performance as measured by teacher-created quizzes. However, weekly switching of the instructional strategies did improve student enjoyment of chemistry lessons. Student enjoyment increased for all participants in all intervention phases regardless of whether or not instruction matched students' learning style preferences compared to baseline phase. The results of this study do not support the matching hypothesis. The students in this study, preferred to learn with multiple teaching strategies. Alternating instructional

  2. Academic performance in high school as factor associated to academic performance in college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileidy Salcedo Barragán

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to find the relationship between academic performance in High School and College, focusing on Natural Sciences and Mathematics. It is a descriptive correlational study, and the variables were academic performance in High School, performance indicators and educational history. The correlations between variables were established with Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results suggest that there is a positive relationship between academic performance in High School and Educational History, and a very weak relationship between performance in Science and Mathematics in High School and performance in College.

  3. Motivation in Academic Research as an Important Factor in Increasing International Visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Ursachi (Horodnic) Ioana Alexandra; Ursachi George Marian

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to present the main factors that influence motivation in academic research: extrinsic/ intrinsic factors, motivator/ demotivator factors, personal/ interpersonal/ social factors, individual/ collective factors. Also brought into the discussion and the main theories related to motivation in academic research: self efficacy, self-concept and self-determination theory. As a conclusion it is emphasized the link between motivation and productivity and the need to increase the motiv...

  4. Early Science Instruction and Academic Language Development Can Go Hand in Hand. The Promising Effects of a Low-Intensity Teacher-Focused Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrichs, Lotte F.; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Early science instruction is important in order to lay a firm basis for learning scientific concepts and scientific thinking. In addition, young children enjoy science. However, science plays only a minor role in the kindergarten curriculum. It has been reported that teachers feel they need to prioritize language and literacy practices over science. In this paper, we investigate whether science lessons might be integrated with learning the language functional for school: academic language. The occurrence of scientific reasoning and sophisticated vocabulary in brief science lessons with 5-year-olds is evaluated. The aim of the study was twofold: first, to explore the nature of kindergarten science discourse without any researcher directions (pre-intervention observation). Second, in a randomized control trial, we evaluated the effect on science discourse of a brief teacher training session focused on academic language awareness. The science lessons focussed on air pressure and mirror reflection. Analyses showed that teachers from the intervention group increased their use of scientific reasoning and of domain-specific academic words in their science discourse, compared to the control group. For the use of general academic words and for lexical diversity, the effect was task-specific: these dependent measures only increased during the air pressure task. Implications of the study include the need to increase teachers' awareness of possibilities to combine early science instruction and academic language learning.

  5. Analysis of Academic Administrators' Attitudes: Annual Evaluations and Factors That Improve Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Brian D.; Grasse, Nathan; Kapla, Dale; Hamel, Brad

    2017-01-01

    This article examines academic administrators' attitudes towards the academic evaluation process in the US and those factors that are utilised to improve teaching. We use path regressions to examine satisfaction with evaluation procedures, as well as the direct and indirect effects of these factors on perceptions of whether the evaluation process…

  6. Instructional changes adopted for an engineering course: cluster analysis on academic failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Alvarez Bermejo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As first-year students come from diverse backgrounds, basic skills should be accessible to everyone as soon as possible. Transferring such skills to these students is challenging, especially in highly technical courses. Ensuring that essential knowledge is acquired quickly promotes the student’s self-esteem and may positively influence failure rates. Metaphors can help do this. Metaphors are used to understand the unknown. This paper shows how we made a turn in student learning at the University of Almeria. Our hypothesis assumed that metaphors accelerate the acquisition of basic knowledge so that other skills built on that foundation are easily learned. With these goals in mind, we changed the way we teach by using metaphors and abstract concepts in a computer organisation course, a technical course in the first year of an information technology engineering degree. Cluster analysis of the data on collective student performance after this methodological change clearly identified two distinct groups. These two groups perfectly matched the before and after scenarios of the use of metaphors. The study was conducted during 11 academic years (2002/2003 to 2012/2013. The 475 observations made during this period illustrate the usefulness of this change in teaching and learning, shifting from a propositional teaching/learning model to a more dynamic model based on metaphors and abstractions. Data covering the whole period showed favourable evolution of student achievement and reduced failure rates, not only in this course, but also in many of the following more advanced courses.The paper is structured in five sections. The first gives an introduction, the second describes the methodology. The third section describes the sample and the study carried out. The fourth section presents the results and, finally, the fifth section discusses the main conclusions.

  7. Pedagogical Factors Affecting Integration of Computers in Mathematics Instruction in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjala, Martin M. S.; Aurah, Catherine M.; Symon, Koros C.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports findings of a study which sought to examine the pedagogical factors that affect the integration of computers in mathematics instruction as perceived by teachers in secondary schools in Kenya. This study was based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A descriptive survey design was used for this study. Stratified and simple…

  8. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  9. Understanding Factors Leading to Participation in Supplemental Instruction Programs in Introductory Accounting Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, James; Sauer, Paul; O'Donnell, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although studies have shown that supplemental instruction (SI) programs can have positive effects in introductory accounting courses, these programs experience low participation rates. Thus, our study is the first to examine the factors leading to student participation in SI programs. We do this through a survey instrument based on the Theory of…

  10. STUDY REGARDING STUDENTS- SATISFACTION WITH INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS AS A DIMENSION OF ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chis Alexandru

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic education in Romania has gone through many changes in recent years, in order to modernize and adapt to the requirements of the economy based on knowledge. But, regardless of the stage, students satisfaction is a key criterion for assessing the relevance and the accomplishment of the mission of universities in society. The highest satisfaction should be a constant concern for managers of higher education institutions. In order to achieve this goal, it is very important to periodically determine which are the most significant factors for students, how satisfied are they and which is the performance of the higher education for these attributes. The knowledge transfer process and the degree to which we can speak of a modern university tailored to the needs of the business environment and focused on increasing the relevance of the educational process for the labour market can be appreciated taking into consideration the content of the educational activities. The objective of this research is to identify relationships between the importance, satisfaction and performance of the instructional process in the process of improvement of the university management and the creation of better university programs. Our analysis was based on an empirical research conducted in a major Romanian faculty in the field: Faculty of Economics and Business Administration of Cluj-Napoca. The research was carried out by means of the survey method using quota sampling. Findings have revealed a significant positive contribution of the assessed factors to the increase of the quality of educational process. Also the factors that characterize the instructional process are correlated. The results revealed students concern to acquire practical knowledge. There is also a significant difference between students' expectations and students satisfaction regarding the quality of the content of teaching activity. Unfortunately, in case of all factors the performance of

  11. The Beliefs of Students, Parents and Teachers about Internal Factors of Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Smrtnik Vitulić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper was to determine the beliefs of students, teachers and parents about the internal factors of academic achievement and to verify whether their beliefs vary. In this paper the beliefs about the internal factors of academic achievement: personality traits, intellectual ability, language competence, interest in the subject and locus of control are thematised. The sample included 516 students from grades 5, 7 and 9 of 12 different basic schools in central Slovenia, 408 of their parents and 195 teachers. Amongst the broad range of personality traits in the survey questionnaire, parents selected openness and conscientiousness as the most important traits for academic success, while students selected openness and extroversion, and teachers selected agreeableness and emotional stability. In the opinion of the participants in the research, amongst other internal factors of academic success emphasised, those that have the greatest influence on academic achievement are interest in the subject and internal locus of control, while students’ intellectual ability and language competence are attributed slightly less importance. Beliefs regarding the individual factors of academic achievement vary between the groups of participants. In the future, it would be sensible to encourage students, teachers and parents to reflect on the meaning of the individual factors of academic achievement, and especially to speak with them about the factors on which each respective group can exert an influence in order to improve students’ academic achievement.

  12. Risk factors associated with academic difficulty in an Australian regionally located medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau-Aduli, Bunmi S; O'Connor, Teresa; Ray, Robin A; Kerlen, Yolanda; Bellingan, Michelle; Teague, Peta-Ann

    2017-12-28

    Despite the highly selective admission processes utilised by medical schools, a significant cohort of medical students still face academic difficulties and are at a higher risk of delayed graduation or outright dismissal. This study used survival analysis to identify the non-academic and academic risk factors (and their relative risks) associated with academic difficulty at a regionally located medical school. Retrospective non-academic and academic entry data for all medical students who were enrolled at the time of the study (2009-2014) were collated and analysed. Non-academic variables included age at commencement of studies, gender, Indigenous status, origin, first in family to go to University (FIF), non-English speaking background (NESB), socio-economic status (SES) and rurality expressed as Australian Standard Geographical Classification-Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA). Academic variables included tertiary entrance exam score expressed as overall position (OP) and interview score. In addition, post-entry mid- and end-of-year summative assessment data in the first and second years of study were collated. The results of the survival analysis indicated that FIF, Indigenous and very remote backgrounds, as well as low post-entry Year 1 (final) and Year 2 (mid-year and final) examination scores were strong risk factors associated with academic difficulty. A high proportion of the FIF students who experienced academic difficulty eventually failed and exited the medical program. Further exploratory research will be required to identify the specific needs of this group of students in order to develop appropriate and targeted academic support programs for them. This study has highlighted the need for medical schools to be proactive in establishing support interventions/strategies earlier rather than later, for students experiencing academic difficulty because, the earlier such students can be flagged, the more likely they are able to obtain positive academic outcomes.

  13. Educational Aspiration-Expectation Discrepancies: Relation to Socioeconomic and Academic Risk-Related Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Paul; Goldstein, Sara E.; DeLorenzo, Tahlia; Savoy, Sarah; Mercado, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether disconnection between educational aspirations and expectations is associated with socioeconomic status, academic performance, academic risk-related behaviors and related psychosocial factors in an ethnically and economically diverse sample of early adolescents from a public middle school (N = 761). Results suggest that…

  14. Factors Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated factors that influenced the academic self-efficacy of Caribbean overseas students attending universities in the United States, and the themes that emerged from their perceptions of variables impacting their academic self-efficacy. Seven major themes (educational background, faith in God, finances, age and maturity,…

  15. Personality Factors in Elementary School Children: Contributions to Academic Performance over and above Executive Functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Regula; Cimeli, Patrizia; Rothlisberger, Marianne; Roebers, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Unique contributions of Big Five personality factors to academic performance in young elementary school children were explored. Extraversion and Openness (labeled "Culture" in our study) uniquely contributed to academic performance, over and above the contribution of executive functions in first and second grade children (N = 446). Well…

  16. Motivational Factors in Continuing Education an Academic Achievement of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Ling; Pang, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between motivational factors in continuing education and academic achievement of adult learners. The study is conducted due to a lack of research pertaining to academic achievement among adult learners particularly in Malaysia. Methodology: A random sample of 150 part-time adult…

  17. What factors determine academic achievement in high achieving undergraduate medical students? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Hamza M; Al-Drees, Abdulmajeed A; Khalil, Mahmood S; Ahmad, Farah; Ponnamperuma, Gominda G; Amin, Zubair

    2014-04-01

    Medical students' academic achievement is affected by many factors such as motivational beliefs and emotions. Although students with high intellectual capacity are selected to study medicine, their academic performance varies widely. The aim of this study is to explore the high achieving students' perceptions of factors contributing to academic achievement. Focus group discussions (FGD) were carried out with 10 male and 9 female high achieving (scores more than 85% in all tests) students, from the second, third, fourth and fifth academic years. During the FGDs, the students were encouraged to reflect on their learning strategies and activities. The discussion was audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed qualitatively. Factors influencing high academic achievement include: attendance to lectures, early revision, prioritization of learning needs, deep learning, learning in small groups, mind mapping, learning in skills lab, learning with patients, learning from mistakes, time management, and family support. Internal motivation and expected examination results are important drivers of high academic performance. Management of non-academic issues like sleep deprivation, homesickness, language barriers, and stress is also important for academic success. Addressing these factors, which might be unique for a given student community, in a systematic manner would be helpful to improve students' performance.

  18. Identifying Academic & Social Risk Factors of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Using the College Persistence Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kelly J.; Shirley, Janet A.; Kennedy, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Student success in a baccalaureate nursing program is of utmost importance at a southern College of Nursing (CON).CON faculty wanted to understand better what academic/ social risk factors attributed to attrition in the first year of the nursing program. The purpose of this study was to determine academic and social risk factors…

  19. THE ACADEMIC PERSONNEL MOTIVATION - A FACTOR FOR HIGH QUALITY EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viara Slavianska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper consecutively puts an accent on 1 the quality of higher education as a national priority, 2 the qualification and motivation of the academic staff as factors for offering an educational product of high quality, 3 the strategies, policies and practices for motivating the academic personnel. The necessity of education improvement is adduced, the strategies and politics in the field of academic personnel training are presented, and the possible effects from a wrong approach to employees’ motivation in academic environment are commented.

  20. Contrasting two models of academic self-efficacy--domain-specific versus cross-domain--in children receiving and not receiving special instruction in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungert, Tomas; Hesser, Hugo; Träff, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    In social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is domain-specific. An alternative model, the cross-domain influence model, would predict that self-efficacy beliefs in one domain might influence performance in other domains. Research has also found that children who receive special instruction are not good at estimating their performance. The aim was to test two models of how self-efficacy beliefs influence achievement, and to contrast children receiving special instruction in mathematics with normally-achieving children. The participants were 73 fifth-grade children who receive special instruction and 70 children who do not receive any special instruction. In year four and five, the children's skills in mathematics and reading were assessed by national curriculum tests, and in their fifth year, self-efficacy in mathematics and reading were measured. Structural equation modeling showed that in domains where children do not receive special instruction in mathematics, self-efficacy is a mediating variable between earlier and later achievement in the same domain. Achievement in mathematics was not mediated by self-efficacy in mathematics for children who receive special instruction. For normal achieving children, earlier achievement in the language domain had an influence on later self-efficacy in the mathematics domain, and self-efficacy beliefs in different domains were correlated. Self-efficacy is mostly domain specific, but may play a different role in academic performance depending on whether children receive special instruction. The results of the present study provided some support of the Cross-Domain Influence Model for normal achieving children. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Factors of academic procrastination: The role of perfectionism, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kranjec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed significant positive relationships between maladaptive dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, depression, and academic procrastination. In addition, results showed significant negative associations between adaptive dimensions of perfectionism and academic procrastination. Certain dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression proved to be significant predictors of academic procrastination. The dimensions of perfectionism and academic procrastination were also significantly related to anxiety and depression, which both predicted academic procrastination. The relationship between anxiety levels and academic procrastination was moderated by personal standards (as adaptive dimension of perfectionism, while the relationship between depression levels and academic procrastination was moderated by the maladaptive dimension of parents’ expectations.

  2. Factors Influencing the Job Satisfaction of Academics in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution. A questionnaire focused on teaching,…

  3. Factors influencing the job satisfaction of academics in higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since there has not been much research focus on job satisfaction in Higher Education in South Africa, this article describes the job satisfaction of these academics in times of transformation. A survey design involved 94 respondents from similar departments at a residential and a distance education institution.

  4. Selected engagement factors and academic learning outcomes of undergraduate engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Patricia J.

    The concept of student engagement and its relationship to successful student performance and learning outcomes has a long history in higher education (Kuh, 2007). Attention to faculty and student engagement has only recently become of interest to the engineering education community. This interest can be attributed to long-standing research by George Kuh's, National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) at the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. In addition, research projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Academic Pathway Study (APS) at the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE) and the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE), Measuring Student and Faculty Engagement in Engineering Education, at the National Academy of Engineering. These research studies utilized the framework and data from the Engineering Change study by the Center for the Study of Higher Education, Pennsylvania State, that evaluated the impact of the new Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) EC2000 "3a through k" criteria identify 11 learning outcomes expected of engineering graduates. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent selected engagement factors of 1. institution, 2. social, 3. cognitive, 4. finance, and 5. technology influence undergraduate engineering students and quality student learning outcomes. Through the descriptive statistical analysis indicates that there maybe problems in the engineering program. This researcher would have expected at least 50% of the students to fall in the Strongly Agree and Agree categories. The data indicated that the there maybe problems in the engineering program problems in the data. The problems found ranked in this order: 1). Dissatisfaction with faculty instruction methods and quality of instruction and not a clear understanding of engineering majors , 2). inadequate Engineering faculty and advisors availability especially applicable

  5. Peer Mediated Instruction and Intervention (PMII type Classwide Peer Tutoring (CWPT and Academics Ability of Natural Science-Biology in Vocational High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamsiah Hamsiah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peer Mediated Instruction and Intervention (PMII tipe Classwide Peer Tutoring (CWPTdan Kemampuan Akademik pada Pembelajaran IPA Biologi SMK Abstract: Learning science in SMK 1 Bontang still dominated by conventional learning strategy is a method of learning with lecture. This has an impact on learning outcomes of cognitive science that tends biology is still low because the students have not been trained become independent learners, thus learning innovation PMII CWPT types can be used as a breakthrough to develop the cognitive learning. This study was conducted to determine the application CWPT strategies and academic skills in science teaching vocational Biology. Quasi-experimental research with pretest-posttest design Nonequivalent Control Group. Results of the study, namely: (1 there CWPT effect on the cognitive learning, (2 no influence academic ability to cognitive learning outcomes, and (3 there is no interaction effect between learning strategy and the academic ability toward the cognitive learning. Key Words: peer-mediated instruction and intervention, classwide peer tutoring, academic skills, cognitive learning outcomes Abstrak: Pembelajaran IPA di SMKN 1 Bontang masih didominasi dengan strategi belajar konvensio-nal yaitu metode belajar dengan ceramah. Hal ini berdampak terhadap hasil belajar kognitif IPA biolo-gi yang cendrung masih rendah karena siswa belum terlatih menjadi pebelajar yang mandiri, sehingga inovasi pembelajaran PMII tipe CWPT dapat digunakan sebagai terobosan untuk mengembangkan  hasil belajar kognitif. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui penerapan strategi CWPT dan kemam-puan akademik pada pembelajaran IPA Biologi SMK. Penelitian eksperimen semu dengan rancangan pretest-posttest Nonequivalent Control Group. Hasil penelitian, yaitu: (1 ada pengaruh CWPT ter-hadap hasil belajar kognitif,  (2 ada  pengaruh  kemampuan akademik terhadap hasil belajar kognitif, dan (3 tidak ada  pengaruh interaksi antara

  6. Factors Associated with Academic Performance Among Second-Year Undergraduate Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bonsaksen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research into occupational therapy education and its outcomes for students is growing. More research is needed to determine the factors of importance for occupational therapy students’ academic outcomes. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with academic performance among second-year undergraduate occupational therapy students in Norway. Methods: Occupational therapy students (n = 111 from two education programs completed questionnaires asking for sociodemographic, work-related, and education-related information. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was used to examine factors independently associated with the students’ academic performance. Results: A higher age was associated with better average academic performance among the students, whereas having higher education experience before entering the occupational therapy program was associated with poorer average academic performance. Conclusions: Students of a higher age may have life experience that easily translates into good academic results, and they may represent an under-used resource for improving the academic climate and understanding subsequent exam results among undergraduate occupational therapy students. However, prior higher education experience from disciplines different from occupational therapy, and that hold different expectations toward students, may hinder good academic performance in occupational therapy coursework

  7. Effects of Academic and Non-Academic Instructional Approaches on Preschool English Language Learners' Classroom Engagement and English Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    This research compared the relative impact of different preschool activities on the development of bilingual students' English-language skills. The study investigated whether bilingual preschool children would engage more, and use more of their second language (English), during free-play (non-academic) versus teacher-structured (academic)…

  8. Academic procrastination and related factors in students of Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Chehrzad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the challenges that students faced during their education is academic procrastination. It means “delay in performing a task”. Since academic procrastination could effect on various aspects of students' personal and social life, by identifying related factors it may be limited. This study aimed to determined academic procrastination and related factors in Students of Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods:  In this cross-sectional study, 459 students of all major programs of Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected by stratified random sampling method. Data collection scales included three parts of demographic information, academic information and Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS by Solomon and Rothblum. Data was analyzed with T- Test, ANOVA, multiple regressions by SPSS V. 20.  Result: Most of students were female (72.7%, single (86% and undergraduate (66.6%. Mean score of academic procrastination was 63.3±9.1 and most students (69.5% had moderate procrastination. Academic procrastination had significant difference with gender (p=0.002 and academic level (p=0.03. Also in multiple regression models, gender, program of study  and academic level were main predictors of procrastination.  Females, dental students and postgraduate students had higher level of academic procrastination. Conclusion: There is a moderate academic procrastination in students of Guilan University of Medical Sciences and its relationship with gender, program of study and academic level was observed.  Investigation on causes and appropriate strategies to reduce this behavior is recommended.

  9. Incidence of academic failure and its underlying factors in Lorestan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Ebrahimzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Academic failure, conceived of as lack of success in one’s education, is of paramount importance for students of medical sciences and it might lead to more acute problems. The present study set out to investigate the prevalence and underlying reasons of academic failure in Lorestan University of medical sciences.  Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, academic records of all students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences during the academic years of 2006-2011 were collected from education and student affair center and also, demographic and educational records were entered into a checklist. Inappropriate grade point average, being a provisional student, prolonged graduation, expulsion and dropout were taken into account as academic failure. To model the related effective factors, logistic regression was adopted and significance level was set at 0.05. Results: The cumulative incidence of academic failure was about 25.1%. Factors such as department, being self-funded or government-funded student, academic grade students are pursuing, the elapsed time between academic grades, gender and location of residence were related to academic failure (P<0.05. It is worth mentioning that no relationship was observed between the academic failure and being accepted based on quota system. Conclusion: The most important at risk groups were students of department of medicine and health, associate or medical doctoral students, self-funded students, students with a considerable time elapsed between their academic grades, male students and students living in dormitory. It is suggested that these students refer to consulting centers of university or educational supervisors and receive particular attention.

  10. Instructor's Perceptions towards the Use of an Online Instructional Tool in an Academic English Setting in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguvan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    This study sets out to explore the faculty members' perceptions of a specific web-based instruction tool (Achieve3000) in a private higher education institute in Kuwait. The online tool provides highly differentiated instruction, which is initiated with a level set at the beginning of the term. The program is used in two consecutive courses as…

  11. Instructional practices among science departments with high, moderate, and low gains on the Connecticut Academic Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, Theodora R.

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the instructional practices of performance-based, inquiry-based, and authentic-based learning strategies, and rubric use are related to improvement on the science portion of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test [CAPT], as indicated by CAPT gains from 1995--2001. Data were collected for this study by a survey/interview of 63 Connecticut high schools and their 118 certified biology teachers, who had participated in the science CAPT administration within that same school district during 1995--2001. Results from the analysis of the data indicate a significant relationship between strategy and rubric use and CAPT science score outputs. Those schools having the highest levels of strategy and rubric use also demonstrated high CAPT gains and increasing CAPT scores, over time. It was also determined that a strong relationship exists between the percentage of the ERG's goal for CAPT index and those ERGs, using strategies and/or rubrics proficiently. The major findings of the study reveal that teachers demonstrate a confusion of strategy/rubric meaning, as indicated by the low proficiency levels of their submitted strategy and rubric samples, despite high indicators of use for the three learning strategies and rubrics. In addition, rubrics are rated highly by the sample, but are not employed at the high levels of reported favorability. Further analysis determines that objective forms of assessment are used more frequently than strategy and rubric use, and may be implicated for the decreased use of rubrics. Although survey data indicate that 90% of the sample reported "Satisfactory" to "Excellent" levels of annual score updates within their respective districts, teachers requested a need for increased pre- and in-service professional development in the use of all three strategies and rubrics: particularly non-tenured teachers expressed a need for basic CAPT information and samples of strategy and rubric use, while

  12. Predicting academic and National Board Dental Hygiene Examination performance based on Academic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchmoyer, Susan M; Carr, Michele P; Clutter, Jill E; Hoberty, Phillip D

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have explored reliable variables that predict student success in dental hygiene programs and on the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE). However, no studies were found using data collected since the NBDHE format changed in 1998 to investigate if traditional predictors hold true. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between pre-admission requirements, basic college science requirements, site of academic preparation, cumulative dental hygiene grade point average (CDHYGPA) and the NBDHE score. Data from the academic records of 173 graduates of the dental hygiene program at The Ohio State University from 1998 through 2002 were entered into an Excel spreadsheet using identification numbers. Demographic information for the description of the subjects, course transfer data, course grades in program prerequisites and basic science requirements, CDHYGPA, and NBDHE scores were entered. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social sciences (SPSS-version 10), Pearson's r correlations, regression analysis, and ANOVA with a predetermined level of significance at .05. Of the 173 records entered, 132 had complete data (76.3%). Results indicate the existing prerequisites for the dental hygiene program remain strong predictors for success. A strong correlation was noted between human nutrition courses and the CDHYGPA. Other core science courses completed while in the program-anatomy, physiology and microbiology--also rendered a moderately strong correlation to the CDHYGPA. The greatest predictors for success on the NBDHE were the student's CDHYGPA and the prerequisite three science GPA. Consistency in site of science preparation also revealed a positive correlation to the CDHYGPA. This study confirmed the continued use of the three science GPA pre-requisite and entering GPA for predicting success in this dental hygiene program and on the NBDHE even after the format changed to include case-based items. Other

  13. Factors associated with nursing students' academic success or failure: a retrospective Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, A; Valoppi, G; Saiani, L; Palese, A

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing standardization of nursing education in Europe under the Bologna Process Declaration (1999), there is a growing interest in defining a common concept of academic success and/or failure, measuring associated factors and comparing differences and similarities between different countries. While there is literature available on these issues from other countries, the phenomenon has not been studied in Italy. The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with academic success or failure in an Italian cohort of nursing students on a bachelor's degree course. A retrospective multicenter study design was adopted. All students enrolling in the academic year 2004-05 on two different bachelor's courses in the north of Italy were interviewed. Only 81 of the 117 students considered (69.2%) concluded their course in three years. Multivariate analysis identified two factors determining academic success/failure: good results in the entry examination for the bachelor's degree in nursing sciences were associated with academic success (OR 4.217, IC(95%) 1.501-11.84), while family commitments, e.g. caring for children or elderly people were associated with academic failure (OR 0.120, IC(95%) 0.03-0.471). Academic failure has a strong impact on students, their families, the teaching faculties and the community, and its prevention is a challenge in the countries with a shortage of nurses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlation of Emotional Intelligence and Instructional Leadership Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Myra D.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership is second only to classroom instruction among all school-related factors contributing to student learning (Marzano et al., 2005). Understanding the role of emotional intelligence in instructional leadership behaviors with a focus on establishing expectations for student academic success provides valuable information about practices…

  15. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Academic Motivation Scale with Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) was examined with a sample of 578 Black college students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the AMS was conducted. Results indicated that the hypothesized seven-factor model did not fit the data. Implications for future research with the AMS are discussed.

  16. Exploring factors related to college student expertise in digital games and their relationships to academics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlen Karla R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital game play is a common pastime among college students and monopolizes a great deal of time for many students. Researchers have previously investigated relationships between subject-specific game play and academics, but this study fulfills a need for research focusing on entertainment game strategies and how they relate to strategies and success in other contexts. Utilizing a survey of 191 undergraduate students, the goal was to investigate students’ digital game play habits, strategies, and beliefs that predict gaming expertise, and to determine if these relate to academic success. Factor analysis revealed three latent variables that predict expertise: dedication, solo mastery, and strategic play. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine whether these three components could also predict academic outcome variables. Findings point to the absence of a relationship between these variables and academic GPA, but to the presence of a tentative relationship between confidence in game play and confidence in personal control over academic success.

  17. Prevalence of Academic Burnout and Its Related Factors among Medical Student in Qom, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sharif Shad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Academic burnout negatively affects students and those around them in terms of subjective well-being, psychology, and physiology. This study aims to determine academic burnout and its related factors in students of Qom University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 274 medical students studying in second and higher semesters in Qom University of Medical Sciences, 2015. The samples were selected using stratified sampling method. The Breso et al.'s Academic Burnout Inventory and demographic characteristics questionnaire were completed by students. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and multivariate analysis of variance at significance level of 0.05. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 21.9±3.7 years and the mean score of academic burnout was 1.73±0.64 (range:0-4. According to the results of multivariate analysis of variance, there were statically significant relationships between academic burnout and variables of residence status and interest in the academic discipline (p<0.05. In addition, the results of Pearson correlation coefficient were indicative of an inverse statistical correlation between academic burnout status and the variables of age (r=-166, p<0.0001 and educational status (r=-0.242, p<0.0001. Conclusion: Considering the significant relationship between grade point average and interest in academic discipline with all subscales, planning to create a positive attitude towards academic discipline in students can be a protective factor against academic burnout as well as improvement of educational status.

  18. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-02

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

  19. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  20. The confounding factors leading to plagiarism in academic writing and some suggested remedies: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Guraya, Shaista Salman

    2017-05-01

    There is a staggering upsurge in the incidence of plagiarism of scientific literature. Literature shows divergent views about the factors that make plagiarism reprehensible. This review explores the causes and remedies for the perennial academic problem of plagiarism. Data sources were searched for full text English language articles published from 2000 to 2015. Data selection was done using medical subject headline (MeSH) terms plagiarism, unethical writing, academic theft, retraction, medical field, and plagiarism detection software. Data extraction was undertaken by selecting titles from retrieved references and data synthesis identified key factors leading to plagiarism such as unawareness of research ethics, poor writing skills and pressure or publish mantra. Plagiarism can be managed by a balance among its prevention, detection by plagiarism detection software, and institutional sanctions against proven plagiarists. Educating researchers about ethical principles of academic writing and institutional support in training writers about academic integrity and ethical publications can curtail plagiarism.

  1. Factors related to academic success among nursing students: a descriptive correlational research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Stewart, Julie G; DeNisco, Susan; Beauvais, John E

    2014-06-01

    The current rise in employment is improving forecasts for the future supply of registered nurses; however sizeable shortages are still projected. With the intention of improving academic success in nursing students, related factors need to be better understood. The purpose of the correlational study was to describe the relationship between emotional intelligence, psychological empowerment, resilience, spiritual well-being, and academic success in undergraduate and graduate nursing students. A descriptive correlational design was utilized. The study was set in a private Catholic university. There were 124 participants. There were 59% undergraduate and 41% graduate students. Background data, in addition to the Spreitzer Psychological Empowerment Scale, the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale, and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, was collected from students who met study criteria. In a combined sample, academic success was correlated with overall spiritual well-being, empowerment and resilience. Although academic success was not correlated with overall emotional intelligence, it was correlated with the emotional intelligence branch four (managing emotions) score. When undergraduate and graduate students were considered separately, only one correlation was found to be significantly related to academic success in the undergraduate sample, namely, emotional intelligence branch one (perceiving emotions). When examining the data from just graduate level nurses, significant relationships were found between total emotional intelligence with academic success, resilience with academic success, and psychological empowerment with academic success. The significant relationship between psychological empowerment, resilience, spiritual well-being and academic success in this study supports the statements in the literature that these concepts may play an important role in persistence through the challenges of nursing education

  2. Academic level and student’s faculty as factors of test anxiety among undergraduates in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Oladipo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Test anxiety as a prominent problem among students has been a focus of study for decades now, with studies focusing more on such factors as age, gender and study habit in relation to test anxiety. There is a dearth of literature in respect of such factors as academic level and student’s faculty in relation to test anxiety among undergraduates. The focus of the present study therefore, was to investigate academic level and students’ faculty as factors predicting test anxiety among undergraduates in Nigeria. Using simple random sampling technique, a total of 197(126 males and 71 females undergraduates participated in the study. Their ages ranged from 16 to 30years (M=21.6,SD=2.68.Four hypotheses were tested with Pearson Product moment correlation and Multiple regression analysis. The results revealed that academic level and students’ faculty had no correlation with test anxiety. Moreover, the result of the multiple regression analysis showed that academic level and students’ faculty have no independent and joint influence on test anxiety. It was concluded that irrespective of student’s academic level and faculty, test anxiety is unavoidable. Other factors might be responsible for student test anxiety especially among undergraduates Nigeria. It is therefore recommend that more research should be conducted in this area so as to determine the salient factors that predict test anxiety.

  3. Assessment of Ecological Factors as an Integral Part of Academic and Mental Health Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysseldyke, Jim; Lekwa, Adam J.; Klingbeil, David A.; Cormier, Damien C.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of ecological factors that affect individual mental health or academic functioning is an important component of educational and psychological consultation. Researchers and practitioners have conceptualized such ecological or environmental factors in a variety of ways and from a broad range of perspectives. In this article we…

  4. Intrinsic Motivating Factors for Academic Success of Young At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Tanyia Perry

    2012-01-01

    Motivation as a factor in academic success is well documented in the literature and an important construct in educational planning. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore motivating factors for at-risk students who successfully graduated from high school. The framework for this study was based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs…

  5. Innovation activity of scientists as a factor in the development of academic entrepreneurship in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Babak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of academic entrepreneurship as a way of transfer of innovation is an urgent task. One of the main factors in the development of academic entrepreneurship is innovation-oriented staff of higher education institutions. Insufficient attention of the scientific literature to importance of this factor is thwarting progress of various forms of academic entrepreneurship. In connection with this proposed study is aimed at determining the degree of scientific innovation activity influence on the development of academic entrepreneurship in Russia. Academic entrepreneurship in Russia has been chosen as the object of study. Analysis of the basic research in the field of academic entrepreneurship for the period of 2011-2016 years was used to achieve this goal. Analysis of publications was revealed that the innovative activity of the teaching staff of universities is a critical factor in the development of academic entrepreneurship. However, Russian scientists are characterized by low innovation activity, resulting in academic entrepreneurship in Russia is weak. The researchers suggest the following solutions to eliminate or minimize the effects of this problem: full awareness and moral training of the scientists involved in the innovation process of higher education institutions; profit payment; creating a psychological climate that will affect the scientific process of self-realization; continuous training of employees involved in the innovation process of higher education institutions; the creation of conditions that will contribute to the manifestation of creative activity of scientists; provide greater confidence to young scientists, graduate students and undergraduates; providing moral and material encouragement of initiatives, experimentation and creativity of scientific and pedagogical staff; the allocation of free time for scientists to research and search activities and others. The data obtained can be used by the guidance of

  6. Information Technology Administrator’s Instruction Manual for the Personal Academic Strategies for Success (PASS) Tool, With Subcomponent Academic Class Composite Tool (AC2T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Overtired 28. Prior Medical Training 29. USAR component 30. Negative Thoughts 31. Responsibility 32. Science Orientation 33. Visual -verbal learning...Academics, Life Experiences, and Symptoms of ADHD and ODD. In Advances in Usability Evaluation: Part 1.; Soares, M. M., Rebelo, F. Eds.; CRC: Boca Raton

  7. Treatment-seeking college students with disabilities: Presenting concerns, protective factors, and academic distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Allison R; Edwin, Mary; Hayes, Jeffrey A; Locke, Benjamin D; Lockard, Allison J

    2018-02-01

    Students with disabilities are a growing population on college campuses and have unique challenges that put them at risk for early departure, creating complexity in efforts to address their personal and academic needs. The purpose was to explore academic and other sources of distress among college students with disabilities to identify possible areas where enhanced supports might benefit this population. Research Method and Design: Researchers analyzed cross-sectional data from the Center for Collegiate Mental Health to compare subsamples of students with (n = 1,774) and without disabilities (n = 1,774) on presenting concerns, and to determine significant predictors of academic distress among students with disabilities. Results indicated that students with disabilities have many similar treatment concerns with their peers, but showed greater concerns in depression and self-harm; academic performance; anxiety and obsessions/compulsions; and fewer concerns in relationship problems. Significant predictors of academic distress for students with disabilities included attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression and self-harm, trauma or victimization, stress and academic performance, and social support from family and peers. These results suggest the importance of several factors in understanding the presenting concerns of treatment-seeking students with disabilities and mitigating academic distress for this population. Additional areas for research are presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Academic Achievements Control by Monitoring Behavioral Factors in E-learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kosonogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A control model is one or more functional relationships to tie student’s measureable parameters and test tasks to the assessment of the outcomes achieved. The control models are used to measure the level of academic achievements.The article surveys the academic achievement control models used in e-learning systems. It discusses a G. Rasch technique, which allows tracking the academic progress within the scope of the Item Response Theory. In traditional interpretation the G. Rasch model links the level of academic achievements and the level of the test task difficulties to the probability of their correct execution. This approach has been modified. A modified approach, firstly, takes into account the behavioral factors in measuring the level of achievements; secondly, it enables to include nonmonotonic variables in a mathematical G. Rasch model. Behavioral factors are thought of as acts committed by students when working in the e-learning system, for example, access to prompt messages (or tooltips, preview of browsing fragments of the learning content, skip of test tasks, etc. The article introduces quantitative metrics of these factors based on the fuzzy sets. Experiments are conducted to confirm a non-monotonic nature of the impact some behavioral factors have on the level of academic achievements.The results presented in the article are of practical application to measuring the level of academic achievements during e-learning process. Obtaining the objective quantitative assessments of academic achievements allows proceeding to the adaptive learning organization. The work is fulfilled within the framework of the Project RFMEF157714X0135.

  9. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Herzberg; motivational factors such as recognition, work tasks ... [2] Job satisfaction can lead to better organizational commitment of employees, which in turn can enhance the overall organizational success and its progress and lowers the employees' intentions .... in the fields of salary and benefits, promotion policies and.

  10. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job ...

  11. Instructor Clarity and Student Motivation: Academic Performance as a Product of Students' Ability and Motivation to Process Instructional Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.; Kelsey, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the notion that the effect of instructor clarity on learning is conditioned upon students' motivation. We randomly assigned 128 participants to a video of a clear or an unclear lecture and asked them to report their motivation to deeply process lecture material. Results indicated that even with clear instruction, test scores were…

  12. Motivation, Instructional Design, Flow, and Academic Achievement at a Korean Online University: A Structural Equation Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Ju; Oh, Eunjung; Kim, Su Mi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the structural relationships among self-efficacy, intrinsic value, test anxiety, instructional design, flow, and achievement among students at a Korean online university. To address research questions, the researchers administered online surveys to 963 college students at an online university in Korea…

  13. Effects of Reflective Inquiry Instructional Technique on Students' Academic Achievement and Ability Level in Electronic Work Trade in Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, T. C.; Owodunni, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of reflective inquiry instructional technique on achievement of students in Technical Colleges. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test, non-equivalent control group, quasi-experimental research design which involved groups of students in their intact class assigned to experimental group and control…

  14. Exploring the Relationship between Myers-Briggs Type and Instructional Perspectives among College Faculty across Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehl, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Education has the opportunity to play an integral role in sustaining the health of our economy in an increasingly competitive, global market. A review of the issues and trends impacting higher education reveals growing pressure placed on faculty to advance instructional outcomes among more diverse populations. Imbedded is the challenge to create…

  15. Impact factor and its role in academic promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Russell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Richard Russell,1 Dave Singh21Wrexham Park Hospital, Berkshire, UK; 2Northwest Lung Research Centre, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust, Manchester, UKThis statement was adopted unanimously at the May 17, 2009 meeting of the International Respiratory Journal Editors Roundtable.In our collective experience as editors of international peer-reviewed journals, we propose that the impact factor calculated for individual journals should not be used as a basis for evaluating the significance of an individual scientist’s past performance or scientific potential. There are several reasons not to equate the impact factor of a journal in which the scientist publishes with the quality of the scientist’s research.

  16. Factors contributing to academic achievement: a Bayesian structure equation modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh Najafabadi, Amir T.; Omidi Najafabadi, Maryam; Farid-Rohani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-06-01

    In Iran, high school graduates enter university after taking a very difficult entrance exam called the Konkoor. Therefore, only the top-performing students are admitted by universities to continue their bachelor's education in statistics. Surprisingly, statistically, most of such students fall into the following categories: (1) do not succeed in their education despite their excellent performance on the Konkoor and in high school; (2) graduate with a grade point average (GPA) that is considerably lower than their high school GPA; (3) continue their master's education in majors other than statistics and (4) try to find jobs unrelated to statistics. This article employs the well-known and powerful statistical technique, the Bayesian structural equation modelling (SEM), to study the academic success of recent graduates who have studied statistics at Shahid Beheshti University in Iran. This research: (i) considered academic success as a latent variable, which was measured by GPA and other academic success (see below) of students in the target population; (ii) employed the Bayesian SEM, which works properly for small sample sizes and ordinal variables; (iii), which is taken from the literature, developed five main factors that affected academic success and (iv) considered several standard psychological tests and measured characteristics such as 'self-esteem' and 'anxiety'. We then study the impact of such factors on the academic success of the target population. Six factors that positively impact student academic success were identified in the following order of relative impact (from greatest to least): 'Teaching-Evaluation', 'Learner', 'Environment', 'Family', 'Curriculum' and 'Teaching Knowledge'. Particularly, influential variables within each factor have also been noted.

  17. Sustaining the edge: factors influencing strategy selection in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Szabat, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    Competition within the acute care sector as well as increased penetration by managed care organizations has influenced the structure and role of academic health centers during the past decade. The market factors confronting academic health centers are not dissimilar from conditions that confront other organizations competing in mature industries characterized by declining profitability and intense rivalry for market share. When confronted with intense competition or adverse external events, organizations in other industries have responded to potential threats by forming alliances, developing joint ventures, or merging with another firm to maintain their competitive advantage. Although mergers and acquisitions dominated the strategic landscape in the healthcare industry during the past decade, recent evidence suggests that other types of strategic ventures may offer similar economic and contracting benefits to member organizations. Academic health centers have traditionally been involved in network relationships with multiple partners via their shared technology, collaborative research, and joint educational endeavors. These quasi-organizational relationships appear to have provided a framework for strategic decisions and allowed executives of academic health centers to select strategies that were competitive yet closely aligned with their organizational mission. The analysis of factors that influenced strategy selection by executives of academic health centers suggests a deliberate and methodical approach to achieving market share objectives, expanding managed care contracts, and developing physician networks.

  18. Factors Affecting the Academic and Cultural Adjustment of Saudi International Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahafi, Nisreen; Shin, Seong-Chul

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigate factors affecting Saudi students' educational experiences in Australian universities and their adjustment issues. The data comes from the survey of 100 Saudi international students in Sydney and subsequent interviews. The analysis revealed that language proficiency is the main barrier to Saudi students' academic and social…

  19. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  20. Data-Mining Techniques in Detecting Factors Linked to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Abad, Fernando; Chaparro Caso López, Alicia A.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the emergence of statistical analysis techniques based on data mining in education sciences, and the potential they offer to detect non-trivial information in large databases, this paper presents a procedure used to detect factors linked to academic achievement in large-scale assessments. The study is based on a non-experimental,…

  1. Antecedent Factors Affecting Academic Performance of Graduate Students at the Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogo, Rosemary Wahu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a Master's level thesis work that was done in 1997 to assess the antecedent factors affecting the academic performance of graduate students at the Nairobi Evangelical School of Theology (N.E.G.S.T.), which is currently Africa International University (AIU). The paper reviews the effect of lack of finance on…

  2. Effects of Cumulative Family Risk Factors on American Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between cumulative family risk factors and American students' academic performance were examined in all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Data from the 2007 "American Community Survey" were used to ascertain the percent of birth to 18 year old children in the United States who experienced three or more risk…

  3. A Meta-Analysis of the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poropat, Arthur E.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a meta-analysis of personality-academic performance relationships, based on the 5-factor model, in which cumulative sample sizes ranged to over 70,000. Most analyzed studies came from the tertiary level of education, but there were similar aggregate samples from secondary and tertiary education. There was a comparatively…

  4. Parental Characteristics, Ecological Factors, and the Academic Achievement of African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Erik M.; Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Parental characteristics, ecological factors, and the academic achievement of African American male high school students were examined. One hundred fifty-three 11th and 12th grade African American males completed the Parenting Style Index (Steinberg, Lamborn, Darling, Mounts, & Dornbusch, 1994) and a demographic questionnaire. Results…

  5. Factors influencing nursing students' academic and clinical performance and attrition: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Victoria; Powis, David; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Hunter, Sharyn

    2012-11-01

    Predicted workforce shortages have resulted in government initiatives to increase student numbers in preregistration nursing education. In tandem schools of nursing need to ensure students' progress and complete. The aim of this review was to identify factors that influence preregistration nursing students' academic performance, clinical performance and attrition. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature was conducted using validated appraisal checklists. The review included studies published from 1999 to 2011 in the databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Proquest nursing, Proquest Education (via Proquest 5000), ERIC, Journals@Ovid, PsychINFO and ScienceDirect. Studies were categorised according to their impact on academic progression, clinical progression and attrition. Forty four studies were found; most used quantitative methodologies. The review identified that few studies explored factors that impact on students' clinical performance. The four categories that potentially impact on nursing students' academic performance and attrition were: demographic, academic, cognitive and personality/behavioural factors. The challenge for universities committed to students' success is to develop strategies aimed at addressing these factors that are appropriate to specific contexts and student cohorts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Motivational Factors Influencing the Academic Achievement of Adolescent African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Mary Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated the nuances of understanding motivational factors with respect to the problem of academic underachievement among African American males (AAM). This research is compelling because AAM still under perform as they progress through the educational system despite more than a decade of interventions targeting the…

  7. Bullying and Victimization: Predictive Role of Individual, Parental, and Academic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, Gökhan; Güneri, Oya Yerin

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the roles of individual factors (age, gender, locus of control, self-esteem, and loneliness), parenting style, and academic achievement in discriminating students involved in bullying (as bullies, victims, and bully/victims) from those not involved. Participants comprised 742 middle school students (393 females, 349 males). The…

  8. Contributing Factors to Older Teen Mothers' Academic Success as Very Young Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jennifer; Abu Rabia, Hazza M.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the factors contributed to 13 older teen mothers' academic success as very young mothers. The participants were older teen mothers who were pregnant and gave birth at the age of 16 years old or younger, and who have achieved a college degree from an accredited college or university while they raised their…

  9. Factors associated with the academic success of first year health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christina; Heyworth, Jane; Rosenwax, Lorna; Carr, Sandra; Rosenberg, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The academic success of students is a priority for all universities. This study identifies factors associated with first year academic success (performance and retention) that can be used to improve the quality of the student learning experience. A retrospective cohort study was conducted with a census of all 381 full time students enrolled in the Bachelor of Health Science at The University of Western Australia since the inception of the course in the year 2000. Factors found to be associated with successful academic performance were high matriculation score, female sex, non-Indigenous status, attendance at a government secondary school, upfront payment of university fees and completion of secondary school English Literature. The most influential factor on first year academic performance was a high matriculation score. Retention into second year was found to be influenced by participation in the university mentor scheme, non-Indigenous status and first year university marks. The factor of most influence on student retention was first year university marks. Valuable information about the performance and retention of first year Bachelor of Health Science students is provided in this study which is relevant to the operational priorities of any university.

  10. A Prospective Study of Mexican American Adolescents' Academic Success: Considering Family and Individual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa, Mark W.; O'Donnell, Megan; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Zeiders, Katherine H.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Knight, George P.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Mexican American youth are at greater risk of school failure than their peers. To identify factors that may contribute to academic success in this population, this study examined the prospective relationships from 5th grade to 7th grade of family (i.e., human capital [a parent with at least a high school education], residential stability,…

  11. Physiological Factors in Adult Learning and Instruction. Research to Practice Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Coolie; Davison, Catherine V.

    The physiological condition of the adult learner as related to his learning capability is discussed. The design of the instructional process, the selection of learning tasks, the rate at which instruction occurs, and the nature of the instructional setting may all be modified by the instructor to accomodate the variable physiological conditions of…

  12. Urban Middle School Instructional Special Education: Tenured versus Non-Tenured Teachers and the Impact on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sheryl Marie

    2010-01-01

    The Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) is used in the Cahokia Unit School District No. 187 to give insight on student academic skill level in terms of years and months. Teacher strategies and expertise in the area of education are an integral part of the educational process. Tenure status, or the years of teaching experience, is plagued with the…

  13. Information literacy education and instruction in academic libraries and LIS schools in institutions of higher education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenrose Velile Jiyane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is increasingly becoming one of the core subjects in many LIS schools’ curricula today. It is universally considered one of the effective means through which one’s information skills are developed, and more especially at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs. The aim of this study is to explore the availability and implementation of information literacy programmes in South Africa, with special reference to LIS schools/departments and academic libraries. The study is largely informed by a literature review of scholarly journal articles, books and Internet sources and a survey involving LIS schools/departments and academic libraries in South Africa. Results indicate that most LIS schools and academic libraries provide IL programmes; the IL programmes are known by different titles/names; there are common as well as uncommon topics offered to students; the IL programme is largely offered to first year students by qualified LIS professionals; the purpose of offering IL programmes is generally to enable students to access, select and utilise resources effectively; the challenges of IL provision include lack of resources (e.g. staff, funds and e-laboratories and support; and the library’s and LIS departments’ community engagement as far as IL provision is concerned is minimal. Several recommendations towards the improvement of IL delivery by LIS departments and academic libraries in South Africa are made.

  14. Too Few Articles in the Journal Literature on Instruction in Academic Libraries are Research‐Based. A review of: Crawford, Gregory A., and Jessica Feldt. “An Analysis of the Literature on Instruction in Academic Libraries.” Reference & User Services Quarterly 46.3 (Spr. 2007: 77‐87.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Blythe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To discover which journals publish a preponderance of the literature on instruction in academic libraries, and to further learn what topics are discussed in the literature and what methods of inquiry are used to explore those topics.Design – Comparative analysis.Setting – The ERIC database.Subjects – Journal articles published between 1971 and 2002, found in the ERIC database via the descriptor ‘library instruction.’Methods – Journal articles published between 1971 and 2002 were searched in the ERIC database using the term ‘library instruction,’ because the term has been used by ERIC since the inception of the database. Article characteristics such as year of publication, journal in which a given article was published, and types of articles were identified. After normalizing the identification of article types by comparing individual codifications of a random sample of articles from the results list, the researchers coded all of the articles according to the articles’ main topics. These article topics were then condensed into broader topics (e.g. articles coded initially as addressing the topics of instruction to “graduate students” or “high school students” were condensed under the heading “instruction of specific populations”. Those articles deemed to have a research component were further analyzed in terms of research methodology, scope, and use of statistics. The questions guiding the authorsʹ study consisted of:• In which journals are articles on instruction in academic libraries published?• What are the topics of the articles that have been published?• How has the literature of instruction in academic libraries changed over the years?• What is the nature of research [authorsʹ emphasis] articles on instruction in academic libraries?• For research articles, what are the research methods used and what types of statistics are utilized? (77‐78.Main results – The search found 791

  15. The Effects of Blended Instruction on Oral Reading Performance and their Relationships to a Five-Factor Model of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Miyaji

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, 'Blended Instruction' - an effective method of instructions utilizing e-Learning materials in English education - consists of an individual learning part, a collaborative learning part and a teacher instruction part. In the individual learning, students act out model dialogues in the WBT courseware which incorporated a high quantity of video and sound clips. In the collaborative learning, students perform the dialogues in pairs and assessed each other's performance. Our recent research in a high school showed that the skill of the students' oral reading was improved in most criteria of assessment through blended instruction. However, it is still not clear what kind of relationship exists between the development of the students' oral reading skills and their personalities. With this in mind, the authors have studied the effects of the blended instruction on the junior high school students' oral reading performance and their relationships to the five-factor model of personality. The result of the research shows that the skill of the students' oral reading was improved in most criteria of assessment and the blended instruction was effective for the personality group, 'Introverted unintelligent person' in the most categories of oral reading criteria as well as the personality group, 'Sociable hard-worker'. The important factor for that group in oral reading performance turned out to be 'Sense Reading'.

  16. Investigating the management information needs of academic Heads of Department: a Critical Success Factors approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Green

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a research project in the Department of Information Studies at the University of Sheffield. With funding from the British Library Research and Development Department a critical success factors-based investigation of the management information needs of academic Heads of Department in an number of English universities was undertaken in 1994/1995, following publication of the results of a pilot study byPellow and Wilson (1993. Senior academic staff, university administrators and librarians in sixteen universities were interviewed between December, 1994 and March, 1995. Collation of data and analysis of results have been completed

  17. Factors potentially influencing academic performance among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shawwa L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lana Al Shawwa,1 Ahmad A Abulaban,2 Abdulrhman A Abulaban,3 Anas Merdad,3 Sara Baghlaf,3 Ahmed Algethami,3 Joullanar Abu-shanab,3 Abdulrahman Balkhoyor3 1Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 2Department of Medicine-Neurology, King Fahad National Guard Hospital, King Abdulziz Medical City, Riyadh, 3Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Studies are needed to examine predictors of success in medical school. The aim of this work is to explore factors that potentially influence excellence of medical students. Methods: The study was conducted in the Medical Faculty of King Abdulaziz University during October 2012. A self-administered questionnaire was used. Medical students with a grade point average (GPA ≥4.5 (out of 5 were included and compared to randomly selected medical students with a GPA <4.5, who were available at the time of the study. Results: A total of 359 undergraduate students participated in the study. 50.4% of the sample was students with a GPA ≥4.5. No statistically significant difference regarding the time spent on outings and social events was found. However, 60.7% of high GPA students spend less than 2 hours on social networking per day as compared to 42.6% of the lower GPA students (P<0.01. In addition, 79% of high GPA students prefer to study alone (P=0.02, 68.0% required silence and no interruptions during studying time (P=0.013, and 47% revise their material at least once before an exam (P=0.02. Conclusion: Excellent medical students have many different characteristics. For example, they do not use social networking for prolonged periods of time, and they have strong motivation and study enjoyment. Further studies are needed to examine whether these differences have a real impact on GPA or not. Keyword: King Abdulaziz University KAU, medical school, study habits, exam habits 

  18. Cognitive, Instructional, and Social Presence as Factors in Learners’ Negotiation of Planned Absences from Online Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Conrad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult learners value the flexibility and convenience offered to them as online learners, and many learners are required to absent themselves from their online classes during courses in order to accommodate demanding schedules. What factors and tensions contribute to learners’ decision-making at these times? This qualitative study considered the planned absences of learners engaged in an online graduate course at a large university. Working within the framework provided by cognitive, instructional, and social presences, findings showed the following: (1 learners understood and accommodated the relationship and importance of the affective domain to their cognitive successes in learning, (2 successful learners demonstrated insightful self-knowledge in using metacognitive strategies, and (3 learners’ external support systems were fundamental to their ability to continue to learn when absences occurred. The study’s findings corroborate other recent research that similarly stresses the complexity and interrelated nature of the adult learning process.

  19. The Protective Effects of Social Factors on the Academic Functioning of Adolescents With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorsky, Melissa R; Langberg, Joshua M; Evans, Steven W; Becker, Stephen P

    2016-03-08

    There is considerable evidence that externalizing disorders such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) put youth at risk for a range of adverse academic outcomes. It is importantly to note that some youth avoid these negative outcomes, yet there is a gap in our understanding of these resilient youth. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate social acceptance and social skills as potential protective factors of the associations between inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive, and oppositional defiant behaviors with academic outcomes. Participants included a sample of 93 middle school students comprehensively diagnosed with ADHD. Parents and adolescents completed ratings of social skills and perceived social acceptance. School grades and teacher-rated academic impairment were assessed 18 months later as longitudinal academic functioning outcomes. Inattention and social acceptance were associated with academic outcomes 18 months later. Regression analyses revealed that parent- and adolescent-rated social acceptance demonstrated promotive effects for grades and against teacher-rated academic impairment. Further, social acceptance significantly interacted with inattention in predicting school grades, such that high parent- and adolescent-rated social acceptance significantly attenuated the relationship between inattention and poor grades, even after controlling for baseline grades and intelligence. The presence of social acceptance was especially critical for adolescents with high levels of inattention. Specifically, adolescents with high inattention and high social acceptance had a mean grade point average of 2.5, and adolescents with high inattention and low social acceptance had a mean grade point average of 1.5. These findings demonstrate that social acceptance may be an important intervention target for improving academic outcomes among adolescents with ADHD.

  20. To BYOD or Not to BYOD: Factors Affecting Academic Acceptance of Student Mobile Devices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Christopher Graham Mckercher

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on factors affecting local academic acceptance of bring your own devices (BYOD). A review of the literature revealed a paucity of studies that have explored the complex factors that affect academic use and intention to use mobile devices in the classroom, with even less exploring truly ubiquitous and varied personal devices as…

  1. Factores asociados al rendimiento académico en estudiantes de medicina Factors associated with academic performance in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Vélez van Meerbeke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar y evaluar los factores que estuvieran incidiendo en el desempeño académico de nuestros estudiantes de primer semestre de medicina. Metodología: Se caracterizó la población en búsqueda de factores que se analizaron posteriormente para determinar asociación y predicción, a través de un modelo de regresión logística, del rendimiento académico final. Resultados: Se analizaron 80 estudiantes de edades comprendidas entre 17 y 18, la mayoría mujeres, procedentes de Bogotá, de colegios mixtos, privados y monolingües. El grupo fue homogéneo por factores sociodemográficos, culturales, escolaridad y de motivaciones. Se detectaron rasgos de violencia intrafamiliar, de consumo de alcohol y cigarrillo pero no de drogas psicoactivas. Los resultados obtenidos en la prueba de aptitudes diferenciales y generales (BADyGs del aprendizaje fueron bajos. El análisis mostró que el no leer como pasatiempo, la presencia de violencia intrafamiliar, el haber fumado marihuana, el provenir de un colegio mixto, el no haber realizado estudios profesionales, de quien se depende económicamente, las notas de biología, bioquímica y del promedio trimestral fueron los factores que se asocian con fracaso académico o pérdida de cupo. La variable que predice fracaso académico cuando se controla por los otros factores incluidos en el modelo es el promedio trimestral y la que determina pérdida de cupo es la nota del laboratorio de bioquímica. Conclusiones: Aunque existen factores previos al ingreso que puedan explicar el desempeño académico, es importante evaluar el rendimiento durante el semestre para intervenir rápidamente y evitar el fracaso.Objectives: To determine and evaluate factors that affect academic performance in first semester medicine students. Methodology: The population was characterized in a search for factors that would later be studied in order to determine statistical association and prediction of final academic

  2. A Comprehensive Look into the instruction of Listening Skill in Academic English Programs: A Case Study of two State Universities in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Babaee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study reported here thoroughly investigated the instruction of listening skill in academic English programs. This was researched through a semi-structured interview. In this regard, in order to obtain a picture of listening requirements across the academy, data were collected from two different state universities of Iran. To compile the data, five listening lecturers from these two universities were invited to participate in the study. Topics investigated through the interviews included; the importance and objectives of English as a Foreign Language (EFL listening in university study, the nature of listening in academic English programs, quantity and type of listening prescribed on courses, the integration of listening with other skills, and the evolution of changes in students’ listening requirements and practices. The analysis of the interviews revealed the two types of the courses; academic English-oriented courses and general English-oriented courses, each of them having their own perspectives regarding the various aspects of the listening. Regarding the changes in students’ practices, two types of transformations were found; transformation of the processes from bottom-up to top-down and transformation of the materials from textbook-oriented to more internet-oriented perspectives. The findings of the present study suggest some practical implications for the EFL students and teachers. In this regard, students need to equip and accustom themselves with more interpretive skills of listening and internet-oriented materials in their classes. Teachers are also required to balance between different types of skills and course materials in their classes according to their students’ needs.

  3. Relationship between Academic Performance with Physical, Psychosocial, Lifestyle, and Sociodemographic Factors in Female Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Marie-Maude; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Karelis, Antony D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical, psychosocial, lifestyle and sociodemographic factors with academic performance in female undergraduate students. One hundred undergraduate female students from the Faculty of Science at the University of Quebec at Montreal participated in this study (mean age = 24.4 ± 4.6 years old). All participants provided their university transcript and had to complete at least 45 course credits from their bachelor degree. Body composition (DXA), handgrip strength, estimated maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) (Bruce Protocol) and blood pressure were measured. Participants also completed a questionnaire on their psychosocial, academic motivation, lifestyle and sociodemographic profile. Significant correlations were observed between GPA with estimated VO 2 max ( r = 0.32), intrinsic motivation toward knowledge ( r = 0.23), intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment ( r = 0.27) and external regulation ( r = -0.30, P = 0.002). In addition, eating breakfast every morning and being an atheist was positively associated with academic performance ( P breakfast explained 28.5 % of the variation in the GPA in our cohort. Results of the present study indicate that motivational, physical and lifestyle factors appear to be predictors of academic performance in female undergraduate students.

  4. Relationship between academic performance with physical, psychosocial, lifestyle, and sociodemographic factors in female undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Maude Dubuc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical, psychosocial, lifestyle and sociodemographic factors with academic performance in female undergraduate students. Methods: One hundred undergraduate female students from the Faculty of Science at the University of Quebec at Montreal participated in this study (mean age = 24.4 ± 4.6 years old. All participants provided their university transcript and had to complete at least 45 course credits from their bachelor degree. Body composition (DXA, handgrip strength, estimated maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max (Bruce Protocol and blood pressure were measured. Participants also completed a questionnaire on their psychosocial, academic motivation, lifestyle and sociodemographic profile. Results: Significant correlations were observed between GPA with estimated VO2max (r = 0.32, intrinsic motivation toward knowledge (r = 0.23, intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment (r = 0.27 and external regulation (r = -0.30, P = 0.002. In addition, eating breakfast every morning and being an atheist was positively associated with academic performance (P < 0.05. Finally, a stepwise linear regression analysis showed that external regulation, intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment, VO2max levels and eating a daily breakfast explained 28.5 % of the variation in the GPA in our cohort. Conclusions: Results of the present study indicate that motivational, physical and lifestyle factors appear to be predictors of academic performance in female undergraduate students.

  5. Factors Affecting Academic Resilience in Middle School Students: A Case Study (Factores que Afectan la Resiliencia Académica en Estudiantes de Bachillerato)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Flórez, Luisa Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out with the purpose of identifying how and which risk and protective factors affect academic outcomes. The study explored how different family and individual environmental factors foster academic resilience. The exploratory study took place with a group of six students from a public school in Bogotá, Colombia. The school…

  6. Academic Failure and Child-to-Parent Violence: Family Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibabe, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    A reduction in academic achievement over the course of adolescence has been observed. School failure is characterized by difficulties to teaching school goals. A variety of other behavioral problems are often associated with school failure. Child-to-parent violence has been associated with different school problems. The main objective of current study was to examine the contribution of family variables (parental education level, family cohesion, and positive family discipline) on academic failure and child-to-parent violence of adolescents from a community sample. Moreover, a goal was to explore if academic failure was a valid predictor of child-to-parent violence. To this end, it has been developed a comprehensive statistical model through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Participants were 584 children from eight secondary schools in the Basque Country (Spain) and aged between 12 and 18. Among other scales Conflict Tactics Scale and Family Environment Scale were administrated for measuring child-to-parent violence and family cohesion environment, respectively. The structural model revealed that parental education level is a relevant protective factor against academic failure. Positive family discipline (inductive discipline, supervision, and penalty) show a significant association with child-to-parent violence and academic failure. Disciplinary practices could be more efficient to prevent child-to-parent violence or school failure if children perceive a positive environment in their home. However, these findings could be explained by inverse causality, because some parents respond to child-to-parent violence or academic failure with disciplinary strategies. School failure had indirect effects on child-to-parent violence through family cohesion. For all that, education policies should focus on parental education courses for disadvantaged families in order to generate appropriate learning environments at home and to foster improvement of parent

  7. Examining Factors Affecting College Students' Intention to Use Web-Based Instruction Systems: Towards an Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Chien; Yeh, Ron Chuen; Lou, Shi-Jer

    2013-01-01

    With accelerated progress of information and communication technologies (ICT), web-based instruction (WBI) is becoming a popular method for education resources distributing and delivering. This study was conducted to explore what factors influence college students' behavioral intentions to utilize WBI systems. To achieve this aim, a WBI system was…

  8. The Structural Consistency of a Six-Factor Model of Academic Self-Concept among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.; Abercrombie, Sara

    2013-01-01

    For decades, research has indicated that preadolescents' self-concept is comprised of subject-specific academic factors, a general academic factor, and several nonacademic factors. More recently, there have been some indications that academic self-concept might further be differentiated into competence and affect factors, at least for some…

  9. Bullying and victimization: Predictive role of individual, parental, and academic factors

    OpenAIRE

    Güneri, Oya Yerin; ATİK, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the roles of individual factors (age, gender, locus of control, self- esteem, and loneliness), parenting style, and academic achievement in discriminating students involved in bullying (as bullies, victims, and bully/victims) from those not involved. Participants comprised 742 middle school students (393 females, 349 males). The results of multinomial logisti...

  10. Perceived psychological stress among undergraduate medical students: Role of academic factors

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadip Chowdhury; Abhijit Mukherjee; Kaushik Mitra; Somnath Naskar; Prasanta Ray Karmakar; Saibendu Kumar Lahiri

    2017-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing concern about stress during undergraduate medical training. The objectives of our study were to assess perceived stress among undergraduate medical students and to find out academic factors as determinants. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out among undergraduate medical students of R. G. Kar Medical College, India, during July 2011–June 2012. Perceived stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale-14. A 10-item questionnaire was us...

  11. An Evaluation of Factors That Influence Children's Instruction Following

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Jolene R.; Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Pizarro, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Behavior that resembles instruction following might sometimes be under stimulus control of extraneous variables. We evaluated the effects of some of these variables (i.e., presence of relevant objects, associations between instructions and object sets) with 3 children with intellectual disabilities. In Experiment 1, we assessed whether subjects…

  12. Primary Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of Course Related Factors That Enhance Instructional Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Beverly J.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teachers' instructional self-efficacy, that is, their belief in their own ability to foster learning with instructional tactics, is one predictor of classroom effectiveness. This qualitative investigation used focus groups to gather data from fifty-one preservice teachers enrolled in one Bachelor of Education (Primary) degree in…

  13. Relationship between Academic Performance with Physical, Psychosocial, Lifestyle, and Sociodemographic Factors in Female Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Marie-Maude; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Karelis, Antony D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical, psychosocial, lifestyle and sociodemographic factors with academic performance in female undergraduate students. Methods: One hundred undergraduate female students from the Faculty of Science at the University of Quebec at Montreal participated in this study (mean age = 24.4 ± 4.6 years old). All participants provided their university transcript and had to complete at least 45 course credits from their bachelor degree. Body composition (DXA), handgrip strength, estimated maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) (Bruce Protocol) and blood pressure were measured. Participants also completed a questionnaire on their psychosocial, academic motivation, lifestyle and sociodemographic profile. Results: Significant correlations were observed between GPA with estimated VO2 max (r = 0.32), intrinsic motivation toward knowledge (r = 0.23), intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment (r = 0.27) and external regulation (r = -0.30, P = 0.002). In addition, eating breakfast every morning and being an atheist was positively associated with academic performance (P academic performance in female undergraduate students. PMID:28479964

  14. The impact of selected educational factors on the academic achievement of secondary students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Bernethia Mechelle

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of related educational factors on the mathematics and science achievement of secondary students. The researcher compared the variables of instructional design, economic status and retention against the exit level scores on the mathematics and science Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test of 11th grade students. The technique used for this investigation was a Three-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Three hundred thirty five students from an urban school district in a metropolitan area in southeast Texas participated in this study. Ex-post facto data obtained from the district's student information system was utilized. Based on the results, the following conclusions were drawn. (1) Instructional design does impact mathematics and science achievement of students at the secondary level. (2) Retention during a student's ninth grade year does impact mathematics and science achievement. (3) The interaction of instructional design and retention does impact the mathematics and science achievement of students at the secondary level. (4) Economic status as a main effect or as an interaction effect does not impact mathematics and science achievement of students at the secondary level. For those seeking to explore this topic in greater depth, recommendations for further investigations might consider the study of teacher perceptions and attitudes toward students who attend school in the alternative setting. Additionally, future investigations might look into the level of experience and the reasons teachers choose to teach in the alternative setting.

  15. Empowering Teachers with Low-Intensity Strategies to Support Academic Engagement: Implementation and Effects of Instructional Choice for Elementary Students in Inclusive Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Royer, David J.; Messenger, Mallory L.; Common, Eric Alan; Ennis, Robin Parks; Swogger, Emily D.

    2015-01-01

    Instructional choice is a low-intensity strategy that requires little preparation, is easy to implement, and supports content instruction in the classroom. In this study we explored the effectiveness of two types of instructional choice--across-task and within-task choices--implemented classwide during writing instruction by classroom teachers…

  16. Factors Predicting Academic Success in Second and Third Language among Russian-Speaking Immigrant Students Studying in Israeli Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Orly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors predicting academic proficiency (AP), the specialised domains required for performing academic tasks, among Russian speaking (L1) immigrants currently studying Hebrew as a second language (L2) and English as a third language (L3) in Israeli schools. Specifically, the study examined the…

  17. Connections, Productivity and Funding: An Examination of Factors Influencing Scientists' Perspectives on the Market Orientation of Academic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Emily Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines scientists' perceptions of the environment in which they do their work. Specifically, this study examines how academic and professional factors such as research productivity, funding levels for science, connections to industry, type of academic appointment, and funding sources influence scientists' perceptions of the…

  18. Exploring Factors That Promote Online Learning Experiences and Academic Self-Concept of Minority High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; Dogbey, James; Yuan, Guangji

    2018-01-01

    The rapid growth of online education at the K-12 level in recent years presents the need to explore issues that influence the academic experiences of students choosing this method of learning. In this study, we examined factors that promote/hinder the learning experiences and academic self-concept of minority students attending an online high…

  19. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jayakumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried out to find out the possible relationship between schooling background and academic achievement of agriculture students. The students admitted in Adhiparasakthi Agricultural College, Kalavai, Vellore between 1999 and 2009 formed the subjects of the study. Findings of the study revealed that determinants like gender, type of school and stream of education had a significant role in the academic achievement of the students. Medium of instruction in HSC did influence the academic achievement but not significantly. It was also found that students who performed well in their HSC did perform well in their undergraduate programme also. This confirms that previous educational outcomes are the most important indicators of student’s future achievement and schooling background has a significant role in academic achievement of students.

  20. Factors that influence career progression among postdoctoral clinical academics: a scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi; Rees, Geraint

    2016-10-21

    The future of academic medicine is uncertain. Concerns regarding the future availability of qualified and willing trainee clinical academics have been raised worldwide. Of significant concern is our failure to retain postdoctoral trainee clinical academics, who are likely to be our next generation of leaders in scientific discovery. To review the literature about factors that may influence postdoctoral career progression in early career clinical academics. This study employed a scoping review method. Three reviewers separately assessed whether the articles found fit the inclusion criteria. PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (1991-2015). The review encompassed a broad search of English language studies published anytime up to November 2015. All articles were eligible for inclusion, including research papers employing either quantitative or qualitative methods, as well as editorials and other summary articles. Data extracted from included publications were charted according to author(s), sample population, study design, key findings, country of origin and year of publication. Our review identified 6 key influences: intrinsic motivation, work-life balance, inclusiveness, work environment, mentorship and availability of funding. It also detected significant gaps within the literature about these influences. Three key steps are proposed to help support postdoctoral trainee clinical academics. These focus on ensuring that researchers feel encouraged in their workplace, involved in collaborative dialogue with key stakeholders and able to access reliable information regarding their chosen career pathway. Finally, we highlight recommendations for future research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Impact of supplemental instruction leader on the success of supplemental instruction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Haslam, Jeanne

    Supplemental instruction utilizes peer-assisted study sessions to provide review sessions on course material and an opportunity to discuss and work out problems. The impact of supplemental instruction on student performance is well researched and used in a large number of universities around the world due to its proven success. However, the impact of the student leader who plays a significant role in this model is rarely discussed in the literature. We present a case study on the impact of student leader on the success of supplemental instruction model. This case study was done for an Introductory Physics course correlating student performance and the supplemental instruction sessions they attended. Further analysis revealed that the academic performance and work ethics of the student leader has a significant impact on the success of the supplemental instruction model. Important factors to consider when selecting a student leader, the challenges and possible remedies will also be discussed.

  2. Students’ Housing in Private Universities in Nigeria: Influencing Factors and Effect on Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Ugbede Adama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Student housing plays an essential role in the attainment of quality education. However, there has been significant evidence as regards the inadequacy of this essential facility among public universities in Nigeria. It was further observed that there is a paucity of information as regards this situation within the private institutions in the country. Based on this background this research was conducted to assess the students’ housing in private institutions, by determining the factors influencing students’ choice of residence and its effect on their academic performance. The study adopted a survey approach, with 216 students sampled through a structured questionnaire. Data gathered were analyzed using frequency, mean item score, and Mann-Whitney UTest. Results revealed that although gender has no relationship with students’ choice of residence, age and academic level does. The major factors influencing students’ choice of residence are: accommodation fee, quality of the environment, need for privacy, influence of friends/desire to be close to friends, and number of students within the building. The study also revealed that students’ on-campus rarely miss classes due to distance of their residence from their lecture halls, unlike their mates staying off-campus. However, they tend to miss classes as a result of inadequacy of needed facilities; a situation that is uncommon among those staying off-campus. As regards students Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA as a measure of their performance, the residence of students does not have any statistical relationship with their academic grades.

  3. Factors influencing effective learning in instructional skill training for vocational instructors : learning for change : a case of Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI), Bhaktapur, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neupane, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on Instructional Skills (IS) training module which was imparted by Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI) Nepal to improve the performance of vocational instructors. Instructional skill training is a three months training course split in to three modules; each

  4. The Teen Medical Academy: using academic enhancement and instructional enrichment to address ethnic disparities in the American healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscós-Sánchez, Manuel Angel; Oscós-Flores, L Dolores; Burge, Sandra K

    2008-03-01

    A worsening adolescent health disparity issue in the United States is the significant underrepresentation of ethnic minority youth in higher medical education. The Teen Medical Academy (TMA) was developed to increase the number and quality of underrepresented ethnic minority applicants from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. In this study we examine whether participation in the TMA is associated with greater interest, confidence, belongingness, and achievement motivation as related to health careers. Self-administered surveys were mailed to all of the 361 youth who had applied to the first 3 years of the TMA. One-way analysis of variance and multivariate backward stepwise linear regression models were used to examine program effects on attitudes. Among our sample of economically disadvantaged ethnic minority students (N = 232), greater participation in the TMA independently and significantly predicted the following: greater interest in medical and allied health careers; confidence in the ability to achieve a health career, to learn surgical skills, and to learn other health career-related technical skills; sense of belongingness in a health career and among doctors; and commitment to achieve a health career and meaningful work. Higher grade point average and greater involvement in extracurricular health career programs was also positively associated, whereas increasing age was negatively associated with the outcome variables. The TMA offers a successful model of collaboration between economically disadvantaged ethnic minority communities and academic institutions of higher medical education. The TMA can be easily replicated by family medicine, pediatric, and internal medicine residency programs throughout the U.S.

  5. Efficacy and Academic Emphasis: A Leadership Factor in Elementary School Principals, and Its Relationship to Hope, Resilience, Optimism, and View of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this research was to explore the construct of academic optimism at the principal level and examine possible explanatory variables for the factors that emerged from the principal academic optimism scale. Academic optimism contains efficacy, trust and academic emphasis (Hoy, Tarter & Woolfolk Hoy, 2006). It has been studied at the…

  6. Academic Achievement and Risk Factors for Adolescents with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Middle School and Early High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendarski, Nardia; Sciberras, Emma; Mensah, Fiona; Hiscock, Harriet

    Examine academic achievement of students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during the early high school period and identify potentially modifiable risk factors for low achievement. Data were collected through surveys (adolescent, parent, and teacher) and direct assessment of Australian adolescents (12-15 yr; n = 130) with ADHD in early high school (i.e., US middle and high school grades). Academic achievement outcomes were measured by linking to individual performance on the National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests, direct assessment of reading and math, and teacher report of academic competence. Linear regression models examined associations between adolescent, parent/family, and school factors and NAPLAN domain scores. Students with ADHD had lower NAPLAN scores on all domains and fewer met minimum academic standards in comparison with state benchmarks. The poorest results were for persuasive writing. Poor achievement was associated with lower intelligence quotient across all academic domains. Adolescent inattention, bullying, poor family management, male sex, and attending a low socioeconomic status school were associated with lower achievement on specific domains. Students with ADHD are at increased academic risk during the middle school and early high school period. In addition to academic support, interventions targeting modifiable factors including inattention, bullying, and poor family management may improve academic achievement across this critical period.

  7. Motivation Factors as Indicators of Academic Achievement: A Comparative Study of Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes Academic and Social Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedescleaux, Jonell

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate non-cognitive motivational factors as indicators of academic achievement of male athletes and male non-athletes as measured by a secondary data analysis of the College Student Inventory (CSI) from Fall 2003 to Fall 2005. Deci and Ryan's (2000) self-determination theory provided the conceptual framework…

  8. Individual, premigration and postsettlement factors, and academic achievement in adolescents from refugee backgrounds: A systematic review and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Charissa W S; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2017-01-01

    We have limited understanding of the precursors of academic achievement in resettled adolescents from refugee backgrounds. To date, no clear model has been developed to conceptualise the academic trajectories of adolescents from refugee backgrounds at postsettlement. The current review had two aims. First, to propose an integrated adaptive model to conceptualise the impact of individual, premigration, and postsettlement factors on academic achievement at postsettlement; and second, to critically examine the literature on factors that predict academic achievement in adolescents from refugee backgrounds in relation to the proposed model and highlight issues deserving future exploration. Following the protocol of a systematic literature review, 13 studies were identified for full-text review. Gender, ethnicity, English proficiency, psychological distress, premigration trauma, premigration loss, postsettlement social support, and postsettlement school connectedness, were found to predict academic achievement in adolescents from refugee backgrounds.

  9. Job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in tehran, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; Sahebjamee, M; Kharazi, Mj; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-03-01

    Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties' overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction.

  10. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic Members in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; SahebJamee, M; Kharazi, MJ; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. Subjects and Methods: The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties’ overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Conclusion: Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction. PMID:24761236

  11. Instructional change in academic departments: An analysis from the persepctive of two environment-focused change strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Kathleen M.

    Numerous reports demand changes in college and university teaching practices. This is especially true for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. STEM stakeholders are concerned about student retention within STEM majors, as well as the lack of sufficient graduates with the knowledge to advance these fields. A common conclusion of these reports is that teaching practices must change. Although these calls for change have occurred for decades, STEM fields have yet to experience widespread change. Thus, there is a need for more effective change strategies. Recently, researchers have suggested that effective change strategies should focus on changing the environments of academic departments. This is in contrast to most commonly-used change strategies that focus on individual instructors. Environmentfocused change strategies have two main varieties: those that have a goal of implementing prescribed outcomes, and those that expect the outcomes to emerge from the change process. Yet, little is known about how to enact environment-focused change strategies. The goal of this research is to provide guidance for change agents and researchers by analyzing a large-scale change initiative from the perspective of two environment-focused change strategies: Kotter's eight-stage leadership process (prescribed) and complexity leadership theory (emergent). This analysis was guided by two research questions. 1. Within the context of a higher education change initiative, how is the change process described from the perspectives of two distinct leadership theories? 2. How do these descriptions frame problems and solutions associated with change? Each change strategy identified different activities as contributing to change as well as different missed opportunities. For example, when the change vision was not communicated effectively, the eight-stage leadership process indicated that the involvement of the department chair was needed, while complexity

  12. Introducing the Twitter Impact Factor: An Objective Measure of Urology's Academic Impact on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Grau, Diana; Sorokin, Igor; Leinwand, Gabriel; Welliver, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Social media use in academia and urology is rising. Specifically, individual journals now have Twitter accounts (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, CA, USA) and regularly tweet academic content. To present and evaluate the Twitter impact factor (TIF), a novel means of measuring a journal's academic influence in the realm of social media. Journal Citation Reports (JCR; Thomson Reuters, New York, NY, USA) for 2014 was queried for urologic academic journals. English-language journals with active Twitter accounts since 2013 were included. The total number of followers, tweets, and retweets over a 2-yr period were collected. Each journal's TIF was calculated based on the number of retweets per original relevant tweet. Comparisons between the TIF and the journal impact factor (JIF) as well as the Klout score were made using the Pearson correlation. Of 33 journals listed in the JCR for 2014, 7 (21%) had a Twitter presence as of 2013. The number of JCR-listed journals with a Twitter handle increased by 29% in 2014. There was an increase in the mean number of relevant tweets per journal during the study period and a 130% increase in the number of retweets over 1 yr. European Urology (1.80) and BJU International (1.46) had the highest TIFs. The journals with the highest number of Twitter followers were European Urology (5807) and the Journal of Urology (4402). The journals with the highest numbers of relevant tweets were European Urology (1159) and BJU International (1090). There was a positive but statistically insignificant association between the TIF and the JIF (r=0.64, p=0.12). There was a strongly positive linear correlation between the TIF and the Klout score (r=0.84, p=0.0086). With the increasing use of social media by individuals and academic journals, the TIF can be a useful tool to measure the academic reach and impact of a journal on Twitter. Social media is an increasing part of the way in which practitioners and academicians communicate. The TIF can be used to

  13. Factors related to academic grades as a proxy for educational achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianina Tuñón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After eleven years of the Argentine government implementing different educational engagement policies, it is appropriate to look into the achievements in education. What sociodemographic, socioeconomic and sociocultural factors are linked to academic grades as a proxy for educational achievement in subjects such as Mathematics and Language in primary and secondary education? This study shows relatively well-known inequalities relating to sex and educational paths. Nevertheless, other influential sociocultural factors were explored which are relatively independent from socioeconomic and school administration factors, such as having books at home, reading behavior and storytelling. Moreover, the relationship between social stratification and the type of school management was identified. In order to achieve this, analyses were performed using logistic regression models based on microdata from the Argentine Social Debt Survey for 2011.

  14. Evaluating Individual Students' Perceptions of Instructional Quality: An Investigation of their Factor Structure, Measurement Invariance, and Relations to Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Ronny; Nilsen, Trude; Jansen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceptions of instructional quality are among the most important criteria for evaluating teaching effectiveness. The present study evaluates different latent variable modeling approaches (confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, and bifactor modeling), which are used to describe these individual perceptions with respect to their factor structure, measurement invariance, and the relations to selected educational outcomes (achievement, self-concept, and motivation in mathematics). On the basis of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 large-scale data sets of Australia, Canada, and the USA (N = 26,746 students), we find support for the distinction between three factors of individual students' perceptions and full measurement invariance across countries for all modeling approaches. In this regard, bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling outperformed alternative approaches with respect to model fit. Our findings reveal significant relations to the educational outcomes. This study synthesizes different modeling approaches of individual students' perceptions of instructional quality and provides insights into the nature of these perceptions from an individual differences perspective. Implications for the measurement and modeling of individually perceived instructional quality are discussed. PMID:26903917

  15. Evaluating individual students’ perceptions of instructional quality: An investigation of their factor structure, measurement invariance, and relations to educational outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny eScherer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Students’ perceptions of instructional quality are among the most important criteria for evaluating teaching effectiveness. The present study evaluates different latent variable modeling approaches (confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, and bifactor modeling, which are used to describe these individual perceptions with respect to their factor structure, measurement invariance, and the relations to selected educational outcomes (achievement, self-concept, and motivation in mathematics. On the basis of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA 2012 large-scale data sets of Australia, Canada, and the USA (N = 26,746 students, we find support for the distinction between three factors of individual students’ perceptions and full measurement invariance across countries for all modeling approaches. In this regard, bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling outperformed alternative approaches with respect to model fit. Our findings reveal significant relations to the educational outcomes. This study synthesizes different modeling approaches of individual students’ perceptions of instructional quality and provides insights into the nature of these perceptions from an individual differences perspective. Implications for the measurement and modeling of individually perceived instructional quality are discussed.

  16. The Examining Effect of Gender Factor on Learning Mathematical Concepts via Instructional Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahab Fatemi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia electronic instructional environments are widely recognized to hold great potential for improving the way that students learn. In these instructional environments, learners are exposed to material in verbal and pictorial forms. Then in present era, instruction in particular teaching mathematics can use for students. In this study, it is used of Geo Gebra software and its effects are studied for students and in particular among the performances of girl and boys. The effects of this software are studied on 54 girl and students. The results of Leven and T-tests are indicated that the use of software and electronic context has positive efficiency on learning mathematical concepts for students. In addition, it is proved that the use of software and electronic context in mathematics education has positive efficiency for boy students rather girl students. Therefore it seems that electronic contents or software can be as tutor for these students and help them in mathematics education.

  17. Exploratory Factor Analysis: The Significance of Trust in a Revised Principal Academic Optimism Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Sartin, Marcus Clifton

    2016-01-01

    Principal Academic Optimism is an hypothesized latent construct that has strong theoretical foundations in both educational research and educational psychology. Academic Optimism derives from research on school academic optimism and teacher academic optimism, which originated via Hoys, Tarters, and Woolfolk Hoys (2006a; 2006b) merger of school climate research with research on learned optimism, stemming from Martin Seligmans (1998, 2006) research on positive psychology. Principal Academic...

  18. Attitudes of Academic Library Managers towards Factors Affecting Information Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Davarpanah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A periodic information needs assessment in libraries and information centers will allow libraries to focus on providing access to the most appropriate resources for specific groups and increase users satisfaction and library effectiveness. The present research paper, which is an applied survey, focuses on the subjects’ attitude towards factors affecting information needs assessment in academic libraries. Research population included 190 subjects from 29 medical and non-medical academic libraries who were asked to fill-in a research-made questionnaire. The results showed that 70 percent of the surveyed libraries had never undertaken a systematic information needs assessment. Some of the significant factors affecting information needs assessment were: managerial commitment to identifying users’ information needs, postulation of user needs, managing s resistance to change, paying no attention to reality and policy. The tests showed meaningful differences among the subjects attitudes relating to their demographic variables; also the test indicated no significant differences between the attitudes towards the barriers of information needs assessment.

  19. Marijuana smoking among secondary school students in Zaria, Nigeria: factors responsible and effects on academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehu, A U; Idris, S H

    2008-12-01

    The use of Marijuana is on the increase worldwide especially among adolescents and youths. Marijuana smoking has gained a foothold in our environment because of peer group influence, accessibility and availability. Its medico-social effects could ruin the life and future of our youths. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and the factors that influence secondary school students in Zaria LGA to smoke and the effects on academic performance. A cross-sectional descriptive study was employed to generate data among secondary school students. A multi-stage sampling technique was used. Data was collected with the use of a structured, pre tested self-administered questionnaire. F2 test was used to test for significance of association between categorical variables. Of the 350 respondents, 262 (74.9%) were males, while 88 (25.1%) were females. The study shows that 33 of the students smoke marijuana giving a prevalence of 9.4%. There were more smokers in the age group 15-19 years (54.6%). Other factors that influence marijuana smoking include family background, peer pressure and attendance of social functions. There was better academic performance (51.1%) among non smokers as compared to smokers (27.2%), and this was found to be statistically significant (chi2 = 11.73, df = 5, P attendance of social function influence marijuana smoking. A comprehensive school health education program should be instituted to curtail this menace.

  20. Factors Influencing the Academic Performance of Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia in Ekiti, South West Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunya, Oladele Simeon; Oke, Oluwasola Julius; Kuti, Bankole Peter; Ajayi, Iyiade Adeseye; Olajuyin, Oyebanji; Omotosho-Olagoke, Olubunmi; Taiwo, Adekunle Bamidele; Faboya, Opeyemi Ayodeji; Ajibola, Ayodeji

    2018-02-01

    There is a paucity of information on factors that influence the school performance of children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) in Nigeria, despite her huge burden of the disease. In total, 101 children with SCA were recruited at a paediatric clinic in Nigeria. Their socio-demographic-matched classmates were the controls. Academic performance and cognitive functioning were obtained from school reports and Ziler's Draw-a-Person Test, respectively. Factors influencing the academic performance were determined. Children with SCA had higher rates of school absence and lower haemoglobin concentration (p  1 week independently predicts poor school performance among the study participants (odds ratio = 15.71; 95% confidence interval = 5.93-41.66; p =0.000). Most SCA children with poor performance were absent from school for > 1 week. There is need to address causes of school absenteeism among children with SCA. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Applying Effective Instruction Research Findings in Teacher Education: Six Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Elsie W.

    This preliminary report provides an overview of the Applying Research to Teacher Education (ARTE) Research Utilization in Elementary Teacher Education (RUETE) study which began in 1982 and will continue through 1985. ARTE: RUETE explores specific processes for incorporating recent research findings of effective instruction into preservice…

  2. Factors Contributing to a School's Decision to Apply for the California Instructional School Garden Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Eric L.; Moreno, Elizabeth; Beall, Deborah L.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the applicant schools (AS) to non-applicant schools (NAS) residing in the same school districts for the California Instructional School Garden Program and identify barriers to the application process. Methods: A case-control, cross-sectional study design was used to compare resources and school environments. Pearson…

  3. Success Factors and Strategic Planning: Rebuilding an Academic Library Digitization Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Lampert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a dual approach of case study and research survey to investigate the complex factors in sustaining academic library digitization programs. The case study involves the background of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV Libraries’ digitization program and elaborates on the authors’ efforts to gain staff support for this program. A related survey was administered to all Association of Research Libraries (ARL members, seeking to collect baseline data on their digital collections, understand their respective administrative frameworks, and to gather feedback on both negative obstacles and positive inputs affecting their success. Results from the survey, combined with the authors’ local experience, point to several potential success factors including staff skill sets, funding, and strategic planning.

  4. Surgical site infection after cesarean delivery: incidence and risk factors at a US academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Laura J; Munoz, Jessian L; Lachiewicz, Mark; Liu, Xiaobo; Goje, Oluwatosin

    2017-06-08

    To identify the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) after Cesarean delivery (CD) and determine risk factors predictive for infection at a large academic institution. This was a retrospective cohort study in women undergoing CD during 2013. SSIs were defined by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria. Chi square and t-tests were used for bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify SSI risk factors. In 2419 patients, the rate of SSI was 5.5% (n = 133) with cellulitis in 4.9% (n = 118), deep incisional infection in 0.6% (n = 15) and intra-abdominal infection in 0.3% (n = 7). On multivariate analysis, SSI was higher among CD for labor arrest (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.6-3.5; p infection control interventions.

  5. Factors associated with patient no-show rates in an academic otolaryngology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorillo, Caitlin E; Hughes, Allyson L; I-Chen, Chen; Westgate, Philip M; Gal, Thomas J; Bush, Matthew L; Comer, Brett T

    2018-03-01

    Factors affecting access to healthcare is an expanding area of research. This study seeks to identify factors associated with no-show rates in an academic otolaryngology practice to improve clinical efficiency and patient access to care. Retrospective review. A retrospective review of scheduled clinical appointments from February 1, 2015 to January 30, 2016 at a single academic otolaryngology department was performed. Statistical analysis was completed to examine the association of no-show rates with the following: otolaryngology subspecialty, clinic location (e.g., main campus vs. satellite), patient demographic factors, attending seniority, temporal factors, insurance types, rurality, and visit type. There was an overall no-show rate of 20% for 22,759 scheduled clinic visits. Satellite clinics had the highest no-show rates at 25% (P < .001). New patient visits had the highest no-show rate at 24% (P < .001). Among subspecialties, facial plastic surgery had the lowest no-show rate (12.6%), whereas Pediatrics had the highest (23%) (P < .001). No significant association between gender and no-show rates was observed (P = .29), but patients over 60 years old had the lowest no-show rate (12.7%, P < .0001). Patients with Medicaid (28%), Medicare (15.3%), and commercial insurance (12.9%) had significantly different overall no-show rates (P < .0001). Increased clinic no-show rates are associated with satellite clinics, new patient visits, younger age, and insurance type. No-show rates varied among subspecialties. Further investigation is warranted to assess barriers to appointment compliance and to develop interventions to improve access to care. 4. Laryngoscope, 128:626-631, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Extracurricular Activity as Factor Forming Interest in Educationally-Cognitive Activity in Students with Poor Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Kazarenkov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the problem of forming an interest in learning in students through the extracurricular activity is considered; the importance of the extracurricular activity as a factor of the development of the interest in educationally-cognitive activity in the college students with poor academic performance is revealed; the conditions providing the efficiency of using the extracurricular activity for the stimulation of the interest in learning in students with poor academic performance are accentuated.

  7. A study of factors influencing surgical cesarean delivery times in an academic tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Fiol, A; Meng, M-L; Danhakl, V; Kim, M; Miller, R; Smiley, R

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of hospital-specific average cesarean delivery operative times, and factors influencing length of surgery, can serve as a guide for anesthesiologists when choosing the optimal anesthetic technique. The aim of this study was to determine operative times and the factors influencing those times for cesarean delivery. We conducted a retrospective review of all 1348 cesarean deliveries performed at an academic hospital in 2011. The primary outcome was mean operative time for first, second, third and fourth or more cesarean deliveries. The secondary goal was to identify factors influencing operative time. Variables included age, body mass index, previous surgery, gestational age, urgency of cesarean delivery, anesthesia type, surgeon's seniority, layers closed, and performance of tubal ligation. Mean (standard deviation) operative times for first (n=857), second (n=353), third (n=108) and fourth or more (n=30) cesarean deliveries were 56 (19), 60 (19), 69 (28) and 82 (31) minutes, respectively (P cesarean delivery or the presence of other factors that could increase operative time may warrant catheter-based anesthetic techniques or the addition of adjunctive medications to prolong spinal anesthetic block. Institutional and individual surgeon factors may play an even more important role in determining surgical time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. To BYOD or not to BYOD: factors affecting academic acceptance of student mobile devices in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Graham Mckercher Gillies

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on factors affecting local academic acceptance of bring your own devices (BYOD. A review of the literature revealed a paucity of studies that have explored the complex factors that affect academic use and intention to use mobile devices in the classroom, with even less exploring truly ubiquitous and varied personal devices as opposed to supplied institutional or research study sets.A detailed qualitative investigation with 14 academics was undertaken, drawing upon and aiming to compliment mature acceptance research. Firstly by employing a focus group to identify initial psychological factors and the relevance of acceptance theories to the local context. Then, secondly by using in-depth semi-structured interviews, shaped by acceptance categories, to identify a breadth of psychological factors affecting faculty use and intention to use BYOD.This small-scale study found clear distinctions in local academic perceptions of BYOD compared with faculty devices and reported a range of factors that appeared to distinctly affect local academic acceptance of BYOD.

  9. Instructional Technology Must Contribute to Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Those involved in instructional technology in higher education are urged to view instructional technology as a means of improving academic productivity. Instructional technology has been used for over forty years to analyze instructional problems and design solutions that reduce costs and improve learning outcomes. The Pew Program in Course…

  10. Predicting the Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students from Individual, Household, Communication, and Educational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Shaver, Debra M.; Nagle, Katherine M.; Newman, Lynn A.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that the academic achievement of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students is the result of a complex interplay of many factors. These factors include characteristics of the students (e.g., hearing thresholds, language fluencies, mode of communication, and communication functioning), characteristics of their family environments…

  11. Higher Education Marketing Strategies Based on Factors Impacting the Enrollees' Choice of a University and an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Dobrotvorskaya, Svetlana G.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of studying the stated problem is due to the fact that for increasing the efficiency of higher education marketing it is necessary to take into account several factors, namely, factors that impact the choice of a university and an academic program by enrollees, as well as socio-psychological characteristics of the latter, while…

  12. Impact factor and study design: the Academic Value of Published Research (AVaRes) score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dennis M; Williamson, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    To compare the citation indices of original articles and case reports in otolaryngology journals and thereby determine whether case reports are of less interest and possibly of academically inferior value to original articles. All articles in two reputable UK otolaryngology journals (Clinical Otolaryngology and Journal of Laryngology and Otology) for 2000 and 2001 were identified. Citation indices were obtained from ISI Web of Knowledge and compared. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Review articles were cited most frequently with a mean of 5.21 followed by original articles with 4.28 citations and case reports with 2.40 citations. The difference in citing between original articles and case reports was statistically significant (P articles and original articles. As case reports are clearly of lesser academic value than original and review articles, we suggest a scoring system incorporating journal impact factor and a scoring multiple taking into account study design. This facilitates easier comparison and recognition of publications in curricula vitae during job application.

  13. Perceptions of intragroup rejection and coping strategies: malleable factors affecting Hispanic adolescents’ emotional and academic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basáñez, Tatiana; Warren, Michael T; Crano, William D; Unger, Jennifer B

    2014-08-01

    Understanding psychosocial factors that affect the academic achievement of Hispanic adolescents remains a nationwide priority in the United States. Extending previous studies of the stressful effects of perceived discrimination, this year-long longitudinal study examined the correlates of perceived ethnic in-group rejection, coping strategies and fatalistic beliefs, on depressive symptoms, grades, and college aspirations of 2,214 Hispanic adolescents (54% female) in Southern California. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping and on self-perception theory, structural equation models revealed that high perceived intragroup rejection (10th grade) and low levels of active coping (11th grade) were associated with depressive symptoms in 11th grade. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between intragroup rejection and both academic outcomes. Avoidant coping strategies (e.g., watching TV) also predicted depressive symptoms and were positively related to fatalism. In addition, fatalism was negatively related to grades and aspiration to attend college. The findings suggest the need to help adolescents find adequate outlets for communication and to create awareness about the potential effects of intragroup rejection.

  14. Impact Factor and Study Design: The Academic Value of Published Research (AVaRes) Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dennis M; Williamson, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To compare the citation indices of original articles and case reports in otolaryngology journals and thereby determine whether case reports are of less interest and possibly of academically inferior value to original articles. METIERIALS AND METHODS All articles in two reputable UK otolaryngology journals (Clinical Otolaryngology and Journal of Laryngology and Otology) for 2000 and 2001 were identified. Citation indices were obtained from ISI Web of Knowledge and compared. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft® Office Excel 2003. RESULTS Review articles were cited most frequently with a mean of 5.21 followed by original articles with 4.28 citations and case reports with 2.40 citations. The difference in citing between original articles and case reports was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in citations between review articles and original articles. CONCLUSIONS As case reports are clearly of lesser academic value than original and review articles, we suggest a scoring system incorporating journal impact factor and a scoring multiple taking into account study design. This facilitates easier comparison and recognition of publications in curricula vitae during job application. PMID:18990264

  15. Perceptions of Intragroup Rejection and Coping Strategies: Malleable Factors Affecting Hispanic Adolescents’ Emotional and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michael T.; Crano, William D.; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding psychosocial factors that affect the academic achievement of Hispanic adolescents remains a nationwide priority in the United States. Extending previous studies of the stressful effects of perceived discrimination, this year-long longitudinal study examined the correlates of perceived ethnic in-group rejection, coping strategies and fatalistic beliefs, on depressive symptoms, grades, and college aspirations of 2,214 Hispanic adolescents (54 % female) in Southern California. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping and on self-perception theory, structural equation models revealed that high perceived intragroup rejection (10th grade) and low levels of active coping (11th grade) were associated with depressive symptoms in 11th grade. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between intragroup rejection and both academic outcomes. Avoidant coping strategies (e.g., watching TV) also predicted depressive symptoms and were positively related to fatalism. In addition, fatalism was negatively related to grades and aspiration to attend college. The findings suggest the need to help adolescents find adequate outlets for communication and to create awareness about the potential effects of intragroup rejection. PMID:24234042

  16. Factors affecting academic achievement among sexual minority and gender-variant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V Paul; Scheer, Jillian R; Mereish, Ethan H

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of victimization among sexual minority youth (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender; LGBT) and gender-variant youth remain pronounced in many schools. Although much work has shown the connection between homophobic bullying and mental and physical health, there has been limited attention to how victimization impedes learning, academic achievement, and other school-related outcomes for these youth. In this chapter, we propose several pathways through which victimization leads to academic disparities among sexual minority and gender-variant youth, with attention to its effects on individual learning processes (e.g., motivation, concentration, self efficacy, and other cognitive stressors) as well as broader psychological and social processes (e.g., mental health, school avoidance, harmful coping strategies, exclusionary discipline). We also consider protective factors (e.g., social support, Gay-Straight Alliances, extracurricular involvement, nondiscrimination policies, inclusive curriculum) that could promote resilience and suggest potential mechanisms by which they may operate. In doing so, we aim to stimulate ideas for an advancement of research in this area.

  17. Examining Academic Writing Motivation of Prospective Indonesian Language Teachers Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surastina; Dedi, Fransisca S. O.

    2018-01-01

    Motivation determines students' success in academic writing. The current study adopted 28 items of the academic writing motivation questionnaire by Payne (2012) translated into Indonesian language to explore students' motivation in academic writing. This study involved 120 prospective Indonesian language teachers at STKIP PGRI Bandar Lampung that…

  18. Pluralistic Ignorance among Student-Athlete Populations: A Factor in Academic Underperformance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua; Etchison, Sara; Oppenheimer, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that student-athletes underperform academically. Some researchers have suggested that this underperformance is because student-athletes lack motivation in academic endeavors. In contrast, we find that most student-athletes hold positive private attitudes towards academic achievement, but also believe that their peers do not.…

  19. Update on the endorsement of CONSORT by high impact factor journals: a survey of journal "Instructions to Authors" in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseer, Larissa; Hopewell, Sally; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2016-06-24

    The CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement provides a minimum standard set of items to be reported in published clinical trials; it has received widespread recognition within the biomedical publishing community. This research aims to provide an update on the endorsement of CONSORT by high impact medical journals. We performed a cross-sectional examination of the online "Instructions to Authors" of 168 high impact factor (2012) biomedical journals between July and December 2014. We assessed whether the text of the "Instructions to Authors" mentioned the CONSORT Statement and any CONSORT extensions, and we quantified the extent and nature of the journals' endorsements of these. These data were described by frequencies. We also determined whether journals mentioned trial registration and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE; other than in regards to trial registration) and whether either of these was associated with CONSORT endorsement (relative risk and 95 % confidence interval). We compared our findings to the two previous iterations of this survey (in 2003 and 2007). We also identified the publishers of the included journals. Sixty-three percent (106/168) of the included journals mentioned CONSORT in their "Instructions to Authors." Forty-four endorsers (42 %) explicitly stated that authors "must" use CONSORT to prepare their trial manuscript, 38 % required an accompanying completed CONSORT checklist as a condition of submission, and 39 % explicitly requested the inclusion of a flow diagram with the submission. CONSORT extensions were endorsed by very few journals. One hundred and thirty journals (77 %) mentioned ICMJE, and 106 (63 %) mentioned trial registration. The endorsement of CONSORT by high impact journals has increased over time; however, specific instructions on how CONSORT should be used by authors are inconsistent across journals and publishers. Publishers and journals should encourage authors to

  20. The Impact of Home Environment Factors on Academic Performance of Senior Secondary School Students in Garki Area District, Abuja - Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Dzever

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the impact of home environment factors on the academic performance of public secondary school students in Garki Area District, Abuja, Nigeria. The stratified sampling technique was used to select 300 students from six public schools, while the simple random sampling technique was used to administer the questionnaire. The study utilized a descriptive survey research design for the study. Also, data on student’s academic performance was obtained from student’s scores in four selected school subjects. Data obtained was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques; Pearson Product Moment Correlation and Multiple regression analysis (ANOVA. The results result revealed a positive and significant relationship between permissive patenting style with academic performance (p0.05. Also, the result from the study identified income, educational background and occupational level as well as permissive parenting style as the main predictive variables influencing students’ academic performance.

  1. [Socio-economic and psycho-affective factors and their influence on academic performance of residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola Álvarez, David

    2015-03-01

    Academic performance is the mean objective of the teaching-learning process, but there are many other variables or factors outside the OB/GYN resident involved in this process, such as those related to the environment in which they operate, teachers, interaction with their peers, family, society, and many other factors contained individually, such as learning styles, motivation, study habits, personality traits, among others. Identify which are the main socio-economic and psycho-affective factors that influence on academic performance of residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Observational, cross-sectional quantitative, correlational and non-experimental study in Obstetrics and Gynecology residents of a public general hospital tertiary care. A type survey to obtain data and deepen personal and socioeconomic status of each resident instrument was designed. Females predominated with 15 cases and only 5 were male. Sixteen of medical residents claimed that having a good habit of sleep helps improve their academic performance and their performance in academic and healthcare activities. Fifteen felt that work much better with peers of the opposite sex. Ten felt that developing a type of self-directed learning contributes greatly to improve their performance and 19 felt that having a mentor during residency contributes to improve their academic performance. Fifteen reported being victim of abuse or discrimination from their peers. Sixteen claimed to have been very sad or depressed at some point during residency. Eight consumed alcohol and seven used tobacco to relax.

  2. Impact of Predisposing Factors on Academic Stress among Pre-Service Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pershaanbala Balakrishnan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been done on stress among educators. Teachers, lecturers, and tutors all over the world has been brought into attention when it comes to stress related issues. Our purpose was to investigate the level of academic stress among pre-service teachers in a teaching education institution in Perak, Malaysia. Methods: In this study a cross-sectional comparative survey study was conducted on pre-service teachers from a teacher education institution. The variables that was tested and correlated throughout the study are age, gender, and marital status, and medical history, influence of medications, exercise and social lifestyle. Data was collected through questionnaires to find out the outcome. Descriptive data analysis was used to describe the socio-demographic data. Correlation analysis was used to determine the significant relation between the variables. P<0.05 was considered as significant of the study. Results: Majority of the students, 78.4% represent the severe category of distress according to the Kessler scale. The remaining 13.6% were recorded as being under mild and 7.6% (n=19 under moderate category of distress. Regrettably, less than 1% (n=1 of the pre-service teachers were from the well category. Exercise was found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of severe psychological distress. Simple logistic regressions showed that pre-service teachers who exercised had a significant 91% reduced risk for psychological distress (OR=0.09; 95% CI=0.02, 0.35 compared to those who doesn’t exercise. Conclusion: At the end of this study, a better understanding on the predisposing factors of academic stress among pre-service teachers was determined and therefore interventions on coping with stress can be made simple. Various physiotherapy interventions on preventive and corrective measures were suggested with reference to the results.

  3. Assessment of academic/non-academic factors and extracurricular activities influencing performance of medical students of faculty of medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Haque

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical and mental comfort is known to have a crucial influence on health and performance amongst medical students. Very often, medical students suffer from poor quality of life (QOL related to the work-life balance due to the lack of sleep, nutritional and dietary disorders and low physical activity, resulting in a negative impact on their academic performance. This study aims to determine the potential academic/non-academic factors and extra-curricular activities influencing the performance of medical students in Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, UniSZA, Terengganu, Malaysia. A sample size of 300 respondents were recruited from Year I to V medical students. The questionnaire was adopted, modified and validated from a similar study in Saudi Arabia. Results: Majority of the students enjoy medical education are self-motivated, have a good command of English, non-smokers and have a sufficient sleep. Conclusion: University medical students possess good QOL within the optimum educational environment.

  4. What factors of satisfaction and motivation are affecting the development of the academic career in Portuguese higher education institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Machado-Taylor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An important constituent group and a key resource of higher education institutions (HEIs is the faculty or academic staff. The centrality of the faculty role makes it a primary sculptor of institutional culture and has implications for the quality of the institution and therefore has a major role in achieving the objectives of the institution. Demand for academic staff in higher education has been increasing and may be expected to continue to increase. Moreover the performance of academic staff as teachers and researchers determines much of the student satisfaction and has an impact on student learning. There are many factors that serve to undermine the commitment of academics to their institutions and careers. Job satisfaction is important in revitalizing staff motivation and in keeping their enthusiasm alive. Well motivated academic staff can, with appropriate support, build a national and international reputation for themselves and the institution in the professional areas, in research and in publishing. This paper aims to identify the issues and their impacts on academic staff job satisfaction and motivation within Portuguese higher education institutions reporting an ongoing study financed by the European Union through the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology.

  5. Influences on Academic Achievement of Primary School Pupils in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Sopheak Song

    2012-01-01

    Employing education production function approach, this article investigates the influences of school and pupil background factors on academic achievement of primary school pupils in Cambodia. Based on achievement data of 1,080 Grade 6 pupils from one rural and one semi-urban area, the study reveals that school and teacher quality exerts a considerable effect on pupils’ performance. Teachers’ experience and teacher guides are positively correlated with academic achievement, while instructional...

  6. Internal Factors of Academic Entrepreneurship: the Case of Four Malaysian Public Research Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohar Yusof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available His paper focused on academic entrepreneurship, an emerging phenomenon in Malaysian public research universities. The research demonstrated that academic entrepreneurship produced positive impact on research commercialization and university technology transfer for these public research universities. Academic entrepreneurship was also found to be one of the missing gaps in fulfilling the complete process of research and development up to commercialization. This study provided evidence of the appropriateness of using an organizational framework of academic entrepreneurship to measure the influence of the internal environment in stimulating the level of academic entrepreneurship. The results demonstrated that control systems, organizational culture, human resource management systems and entrepreneurial leadership behaviour were key predictors of academic entrepreneurship in these universities.

  7. Testing a Model of Environmental Risk and Protective Factors to Predict Middle and High School Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S. Colby; Woolley, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the School Success Profile generated by 19,228 middle and high school students were organized into three broad categories of risk and protective factors--control, support, and challenge--to examine the relative and combined power of aggregate scale scores in each category so as to predict academic success. It was hypothesized that higher…

  8. A SURVEY ON STUDENT\\'S OPINION ABOUT EFFECTIVE FACTORS FOR ACADEMIC DROPOUT IN SHAHID SADOUGHI UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Salimi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: University's students are faced with a lot of problems such as dropout. There are many factors to happen and by destroyed. Aim of this study was to determine the student's opinions about most effective factors for academic dropout in Shahid Sadoughi University. Methods: This is a descriptive – analytic study. In total 40 students who had dropped out and 60 students who had not dropout, in their academic curriculum, were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire contains questions related to the demographic & effective features, which completed by each student. Results: There was a significant difference between two groups for age, marriage status, condition level at the entry time (p=0.000 from statically point of view in the age , The marriage status , quota ( p=0.000 , who the students live with ( p=0.004 ,and crisis in family ( p=0.04 . The students that dropout were often older, married, with specific quota, live with roommates, and with crisis in family. These students were often boys and dropped out in special courses. The opinions of dropped out students about the importance effective factors for academic dropout were faraway from family, lack of program, be employed, inappropriate questions of examinations, shortage of time examinations, diseases, and less motivation. Conclusion: According to the results of this study and other related studies, it is recommended that the heads of educational units increase their attention to importance effective factors for academic dropout, including married students with specific quota and the roommates situation.

  9. Protective Factors and Processes Contributing to the Academic Success of Students Living in Poverty: Implications for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph M.; Bryan, Julia; Morrison, Stephaney; Scott, Tracey R.

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological qualitative study examined a national sample of high-achieving, low-income middle school students' (N = 24) perspectives of protective factors and processes that contribute to their academic success in school. Four main themes and 12 subthemes were identified. The main themes are peer social capital, teachers who care, family…

  10. Teachers on Perceived Traits and Academic Achievements of Regular Pupils and Pupils with Special Needs in Mainstream Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Irena; Cuk, Ivan; Pecek, Mojca

    2014-01-01

    When looking for answers to the question of academic (non)achievement of regular pupils and pupils with special needs, it is necessary to take into account the extraordinary complexity of factors, ranging from psychological across instructional to home environment variables. The academic achievement is not only a reflection of the pupil's…

  11. Factors Related to Taiwanese Adolescents' Academic Procrastination, Time Management, and Perfectionism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Shen

    2017-01-01

    There is a shortage of studies that explore adolescents' academic procrastination. The author hence attempted to examine the mechanisms determining Taiwanese adolescent students' perfectionistic tendencies, time management, and academic procrastination. A total of 405 eighth-grade Taiwanese students completed a self-reported survey assessing their…

  12. Relations between Student Learning Patterns and Personal and Contextual Factors and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, Jan D.

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at clarifying relations between the way students learn and personal, contextual and performance variables. Students from seven different academic disciplines completed the Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS). Besides, data about their age, gender, academic discipline, prior education and exam performance were gathered.…

  13. Demographic and Academic Factors Affecting Research Productivity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, D.; Zewotir, T.; Murray, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research output affects both the strength and funding of universities. Accordingly university academic staff members are under pressure to be active and productive in research. Though all academics have research interest, all are not producing research output which is accredited by the Department of Education (DOE). We analyzed the demographic and…

  14. Correlation among academic performance, recurrent abdominal pain and other factors in Year-6 urban primary-school children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C C M; Omar, A; Arul Phillips, J

    2003-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the extent to which recurrent abdominal pain and other factors were associated with academic achievement among Year-6 (12 years of age) schoolchildren. The present study was a cross-sectional survey conducted from September to November 2001. Schoolchildren were recruited from primary schools that were selected randomly from a list of all primary schools in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, using random sampling numbers. Information concerning recurrent abdominal pain, socio-economic status, life events, demographic and other details was obtained using a combination of questionnaires and interviews. Academic achievement was assessed using a score based on the Malaysian Primary School Achievement Examination. An overall score at or above the mean was taken to indicate high academic achievement while a score below the mean indicated poor academic achievement. A total of 1971 children were studied (958 boys and 1013 girls: 1047 Malays, 513 Chinese and 411 Indians). Of these children, 456 (23.1%) fulfilled the criteria for recurrent abdominal pain. Using the method of binary logistic regression analysis, the following factors were found to be independently associated with poor academic performance: a low socio-economic status (odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.35); male sex (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.26-2.05); the death of a close relative (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.73-2.85); the divorce or separation of parents (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.73-5.40); the commencement of work by the mother (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02-1.76); hospitalization of the child in the 12 months prior to the study (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.12-3.01); lack of health-care consultation (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.36-2.36); missing breakfast (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.07-2.02); and lack of kindergarten education (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Many factors, such as socio-economic status and recent life events, were associated with poor academic performance. Recurrent abdominal pain did not correlate

  15. Examining the relationship of ethnicity, gender and social cognitive factors with the academic achievement of first-year engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bruce Henry

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships of social cognitive factors and their influence on the academic performance of first-year engineering students. The nine social cognitive variables identified were under the groupings of personal support, occupational self-efficacy, academic self-efficacy, vocational interests, coping, encouragement, discouragement, outcome expectations, and perceived stress. The primary student participants in this study were first-year engineering students from underrepresented groups which include African American, Hispanic American students and women. With this in mind, the researcher sought to examine the interactive influence of race/ethnicity and gender based on the aforementioned social cognitive factors. Differences in academic performance (university GPA of first-year undergraduate engineering students) were analyzed by ethnicity and gender. There was a main effect for ethnicity only. Gender was found not to be significant. Hispanics were not found to be significantly different in their GPAs than Whites but Blacks were found to have lower GPAs than Whites. Also, Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between and among the nine identified social cognitive variables. The data from the analysis uncovered ten significant correlations which were as follows: occupational self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy, occupational self-efficacy and vocational interest, occupational self-efficacy and perceived stress, academic self-efficacy and encouragement, academic self-efficacy and outcome expectations, academic self-efficacy and perceived stress, vocational interest and outcome expectations, discouragement and encouragement, coping and perceived stress, outcome expectations and perceived stress. Next, a Pearson correlation coefficient was utilized to examine the relationship between academic performance (college GPA) of first-year undergraduate engineering students and the nine identified

  16. Differences Between Library Instruction Conference Attendees and their Institutional Affiliations in the United States and Canada are Discernible. A review of: Willingham, Patricia, Linda Carder, and Christopher Millson‐Martula. “Does a Border Make a Difference? Library Instruction in the United States and Canada.” Journal of Academic Librarianship 32.1 (Jan. 2006: 23-34.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Perryman

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The primary intent of this study was to identify differences among library instruction conference attendees and their institutions between the United States and Canada. The overall hypothesis was that there would be areas of measurable distinction between the two countries. The authors tested nine hypotheses: #1, that the largest number of survey respondents would be employed at large institutions; #2, that statistically, the majority of well developed instructional programs are found at universities rather than colleges; #3, that beginning programs are more often found at four-year institutions; #4, that program development and technological issues predominate among instructional foci in the early twenty-first century; #5, that more experienced librarians are more likely to attend library instruction conferences; #6, that LOEX (originally an acronym for Library Orientation Exchange is perceived as the most valuable conference in library instruction; #7, that the impact of conference attendance upon library program development is only moderate; #8, that conference theme and reputation are the two greatest factors contributing to attendance; and #9, that the majority of conference attendees are from the United States. Design – Historical research, and an emailed survey. Setting – Libraries and library instruction conferences in the United States and Canada. Subjects – One hundred thirty-two librarians who were attendees at one of three library user instruction conferences: LOEX, LOEX of the West, and WILU (Workshop on Instruction in Library Use. Methods – First, a brief historical review was conducted on the influence of social, economic, and political events on the development of library user instruction, the creation of conferences focused on library instruction in from the United States and Canada, and national surveys looking at institutional support for instructional development. Next, a survey instrument consisting of

  17. Relating psychological and social factors to academic performance: A longitudinal investigation of high-poverty middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaoran; Allen, Jeff; Casillas, Alex

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the relations between middle school students' psychological factors (academic commitment and emotional control), social perceptions (family involvement and school climate), and academic performance over time. Gender differences in these relations were also examined. Based on a two-year longitudinal data set of 942 middle-school students from a high-poverty district in the United States, we found that all four factors measured in 6th grade were predictive of GPA at the end of the 7th grade above and beyond gender, race, and home intellectual materials. Among these factors, emotional control had the strongest relation with GPA, and the importance of family involvement increased over time, especially for female students. The results also revealed the indirect effects of the social factors on GPA through the psychological factors, and mostly through emotional control. These findings highlight the complex relation between the social-emotional factors and academic outcomes in early adolescence. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship between Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Cognitive/Academic Performance among Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Kuang Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study examines the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors (blood pressure, waist circumference, BMI, and total cholesterol and cognitive/academic performance. In this study, 1297 Taiwanese tenth-grade volunteers are recruited. Scores from the Basic Competency Test, an annual national competitive entrance examination, are used to evaluate academic performance. Cognitive abilities are accessed via the Multiple Aptitude Test Battery. The results indicate that systolic blood pressure is significantly, negatively associated with academic performance, both in male and female subjects. BMI and waist circumference are associated with verbal reasoning performance with an inverse U-shaped pattern, suggesting that both low and high BMI/waist circumference may be associated with lower verbal reasoning performance.

  19. 1. Spirituality of Music as a Factor of (Self Instruction and of (Self Education of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagim Ion

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impetus for writing this article was the desire to “get to the bottom”, to “disentangle the essence” of what music education in terms of exploring the depth, the sacred sense of the relationship “man-music”, of the aspiration to examine this issue with the teacher's eyes - for all questions and all answers received contribute to the improvement of so-called education through music. In this article, the author expresses his position that, music education, by its essence, is far from the design made before, but in fact - far from the goal officially proclaimed. The music itself, as one of the most mysterious phenomena of this world. Its knowledge, its understanding, the assimilation and absorption of the cosmic and divine substance at the level of personal experience - this is music education in its highest sense. We consider them universal by nature and extent of aspects and levels of the spiritual, existential life of man in its deep forms. The author examines the experience acquired as a self-instruction (professionally and self-education (personally practice throughout life, in one of the highest areas of the human mind - in music. He had the chance to work especially in the field of music. He had the chance to experience music especially and he was able to devote his “self” to it.

  20. Perinatal origins of first-grade academic failure: role of prematurity and maternal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan L; Dunlop, Anne Lang; Kramer, Michael; Dever, Bridget V; Hogue, Carol; Jain, Lucky

    2013-04-01

    We examined the relationships among gestational age at birth, maternal characteristics, and standardized test performance in Georgia first-grade students. Live births to Georgia-resident mothers aged 11 to 53 years from 1998 through 2003 were deterministically linked with standardized test results for first-grade attendees of Georgia public schools from 2005 through 2009. Logistic models were used to estimate the odds of failure of the 3 components of the first-grade Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). The strongest risk factor for failure of each of the 3 components of the first-grade CRCT was level of maternal education. Child race/ethnicity and maternal age at birth were also associated with first-grade CRCT failure irrespective of the severity of preterm birth, but these factors were more important among children born moderately preterm than for those born on the margins of the prematurity distribution. Adjusting for maternal and child characteristics, there was an increased odds of failure of each component of the CRCT for children born late preterm versus term, including for math (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-1.22), reading (aOR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08-1.18), and English/language arts, for which there was an important interaction with being born small for gestational age (aOR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07-1.29). Preterm birth and low maternal education increase children's risk of failure of first-grade standardized tests. Promoting women's academic achievement and reduce rates of preterm birth may be important to achieving gains in elementary school performance.

  1. Principals as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    At some level, principals always have been instructional leaders--but never before has their role been more prominent. First, the accountability movement--No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in particular--thrust principals into the spotlight on academic achievement. Then budget cuts peeled away capacity at both the district and school levels, thinning…

  2. Academic achievement among immigrant and U.S.-born Latino adolescents: Associations with cultural, family, and acculturation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Gudiño, Omar G; Baweja, Shilpa; Nadeem, Erum

    2014-08-01

    This study examined proximal risk and protective factors that contribute to academic achievement among 130 Latino students. Participating students were 56.2% female and 35.3% foreign-born (mean age = 11.38, SD = .59). Acculturative stress, immigrant status, child gender, parental monitoring, traditional cultural values, mainstream values, and English language proficiency were explored in relation to academic achievement. Higher levels of parental monitoring, English language proficiency, and female gender were associated with higher grades, while mainstream values were associated with lower grades. In addition, a significant interaction between acculturative stress and immigrant status was found, such that higher acculturative stress was related to poorer grades for U.S.-born students in particular. Thus, parental monitoring and female gender are potential protective factors, while identification with mainstream values and low English language proficiency are risk factors for poor grades. U.S.-born students may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of acculturative stress.

  3. Online, Instructional Television and Traditional Delivery: Student Characteristics and Success Factors in Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterweich, Douglas P.; Rochelle, Carolyn F.

    2012-01-01

    Distance education has surged in recent years while research on student characteristics and factors leading to successful outcomes has not kept pace. This study examined characteristics of regional university students in undergraduate Business Statistics and factors linked to their success based on three modes of delivery - Online, Instructional…

  4. College instruction is not so stress free after all: A qualitative and quantitative study of academic entitlement, uncivil behaviors, and instructor strain and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lixin; Tripp, Thomas M; Hong, Phan Y

    2017-12-01

    The vast majority of today's college students are millennials, who have traits of confidence, tolerance, but also of entitlement and narcissism (Twenge, 2006). Therefore, college instructors face a unique challenge: dealing with the requests from academically entitled students, who have unreasonable expectations of receiving academic success, regardless of performance (Chowning & Campbell, 2009). We conducted two studies to examine whether student academic entitlement would increase instructors' strain and burnout via uncivil behaviors. A qualitative inquiry asked 136 instructors with college-teaching experience to describe types of behaviors entitled students display, their responses to entitled students, and the influence of these interactions on instructors' well-being. Next, a quantitative study with data from 857 college students nested in 34 instructors tested a multilevel mediation model where students' academic entitlement was related to instructor-reported uncivil behaviors, which in turn related to instructors' strain and burnout. Both studies largely support our hypothesis that uncivil behaviors fully mediate the relationship between students' academic entitlement and instructors' strain and burnout. We recommend employing behavioral modification strategies to decrease uncivil behaviors (e.g., class rules regarding uncivil behaviors might be specified in the course syllabus and consistently enforced) because academic entitlement attitudes are largely stable beliefs and thus may be less amenable to modification. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Pacific students undertaking the first year of health sciences at the University of Otago, and factors associated with academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopoaga, Faafetai; Zaharic, Tony; Kokaua, Jesse; Ekeroma, Alec J; Murray, Greg; van der Meer, Jacques

    2013-10-18

    To describe Pacific students in the first year of health sciences at tertiary level, their academic performance, and factors associated with academic outcomes. Routinely collected data for students who enrolled in the Health Sciences First Year (HSFY) programme at the University of Otago between 2007 and 2011, including their school National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) results were obtained in anonymous form. Descriptive statistics were calculated and regression analyses were undertaken using SAS v9.2 software. A small but increasing number of Pacific students are enrolling in health sciences at tertiary level. Pacific students had poorer performance compared to non-Pacific students in both NCEA and the HSFY programme. Factors associated with academic performance were gender, NCEA results, school decile, accommodation type, ethnicity, international status and disability. Pacific students are under-represented in health sciences and would benefit from better preparation from school. Pacific solutions are required to improve academic outcomes over and above mainstream policy solutions. Tertiary institutions need to engage prospective students earlier to ensure they are well informed of requirements, and are appropriately prepared for study at the tertiary level.

  6. Factors Influencing Academic Performance Of Standard Eight Girls In National Examinations In Public Primary Schools A Case Of Matungu Division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oparanya Wamukoya Windrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTARCT This study is designed to establish the factors influencing academic of standard eight girls in public primary schools in National exams in Matungu division. The researcher aimed at finding out why there is increased low performance of girls in public schools despite the fact that they are assessed through periodic performance tests do continuous assessment tests CATS midterm carry out tuition and the provision of free primary education which is aimed at improving academic performance. This study adapted a descriptive survey design as a major method of research where data was collected by the researcher members of a population under study. The target population comprised of Head teachers teachers pupils parents and parent schools representatives. Purposive sampling and simple random technique were used. Data was collected by use of questionnaires and interview guides. Data was analyzed by use of descriptive statistics constituting frequencies and percentages.The study established that girls were exposed to harsh school environmental conditions they walked long distances to school schools lacked facilities like toilets libraries and were exposed to male pest teachers. There were also teacher factors like training teacher shortage and motivation that affected girls performance.The study came up with recommendations for improvement of girls academic performance. More public schools should be build to reduce on distance and also overpopulation. The ministry of Education should monitor and evaluate the academic performance of girls in rural areas. The government should put up strict rules on pest teachers. The ministry should hire more teachers.

  7. The effect of psychological factors and parental education on adolescents' academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to check the assumed path model of causal relationships between adolescent's psychological characteristics (language competence, intellectual ability, and personality dimensions, parental education, and adolescent's academic achievement. Adolescents (N = 427; among them 225 girls and 202 boys, who were attending the ninth grade of elementary school in the school year 2005/2006, and their parents participated in the study. Adolescent's academic achievement was assessed by the results of national examinations in Slovene and mathematics, teachers' marks in Slovene and mathematics, and adolescent's general school success. The results of structural equation modelling showed a good fit of the assumed path model if it included the direct effect of adolescent's psychological characteristics and parental education on adolescent's academic achievement and also the indirect effect of parental education and three personality dimensions (Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Openness/Intellect through the adolescent's language competence and general intelligence. The fit of the adopted path model was acceptable regardless of the way in which academic achievement was assessed and regardless of the sex of the participants. The most important predictors of the academic achievement were language competence, general intelligence, and personality dimensions Conscientiousness and Openness/Intellect. With the assumed path model of casual relationships we could explain between 53% and 63% of differences in adolescents' academic achievement.

  8. Incidence and risk factors of injuries and their impact on academic success: A prospective study in PETE students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliekendaal, S; Goossens, L; Stubbe, J H

    2017-12-01

    Injuries can have a major impact on the physical performance and academic career of physical education teacher education (PETE) students. To investigate the injury problem, risk factors, and the impact of injuries on academic success, 252 PETE students were followed during their first semester. Risk factor analysis was conducted by means of logistic regression analysis with a differentiation for upper body, lower body, acute, overuse, and severe injuries. An incidence of 1.26 injuries/student/semester was found. Most injuries involved the lower body (61%), were new injuries (76%), occurred acutely (66%), and were sustained during curricular gymnastics (25%) or extracurricular soccer (28%). Significant risk factors for lower body acute injuries were age (OR=2.14; P=.01), previous injury (OR=2.23; P=.01), and an injury at the start of the year (OR=2.56; P=.02). For lower body overuse injuries, gender (OR=2.85; P=.02) and the interval shuttle run test score (OR=2.44; P=.04) were significant risk factors. Previous injury (OR=2.59; P=.04) and injury at the start of the year (upper body: OR=4.57; P=.02; lower body: OR=3.75; Pacademic success (r=.20; P=.02) and success in theoretical courses (r=.24; P=academic success for sport courses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Early Science Instruction and Academic Language Development Can Go Hand in Hand. The Promising Effects of a Low-Intensity Teacher-Focused Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrichs, Lotte F.; Leseman, Paul P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Early science instruction is important in order to lay a firm basis for learning scientific concepts and scientific thinking. In addition, young children enjoy science. However, science plays only a minor role in the kindergarten curriculum. It has been reported that teachers feel they need to

  10. Influences on Academic Achievement of Primary School Pupils in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheak Song

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing education production function approach, this article investigates the influences of school and pupil background factors on academic achievement of primary school pupils in Cambodia. Based on achievement data of 1,080 Grade 6 pupils from one rural and one semi-urban area, the study reveals that school and teacher quality exerts a considerable effect on pupils’ performance. Teachers’ experience and teacher guides are positively correlated with academic achievement, while instructional time loss is significantly associated with poor performance. In light of these results, policies to boost academic achievement of primary school pupils in Cambodia are discussed.

  11. Cognitive and Instructional Factors in the Acquisition and Maintenance of Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-26

    performance on " change ," "combine," and "compare" addition and subtraction word problems showed consistent patterns of performance. Emphasizes the...factors that differentiate skilled from low-skill performers include manangement of memory load, organization of an appropriate declarative knowledge

  12. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  13. Factors Contributing to Student Engagement in an Instructional Facebook Group for Undergraduate Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L.; Gregory, Karen M.; Eddy, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates factors contributing to student engagement in an educational Facebook group. The study is based on survey results of 138 undergraduate mathematics students at a highly diverse urban public university. Survey measures included engagement in the Facebook group, access to Facebook, comfort using technology, and interest in the…

  14. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  15. Impact factor of medical education journals and recently developed indices: Can any of them support academic promotion criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, SA; Holen, A; Wilson, I; Skokauskas, N

    2016-01-01

    Journal Impact Factor (JIF) has been used in assessing scientific journals. Other indices, h- and g-indices and Article Influence Score (AIS), have been developed to overcome some limitations of JIF. The aims of this study were, first, to critically assess the use of JIF and other parameters related to medical education research, and second, to discuss the capacity of these indices in assessing research productivity as well as their utility in academic promotion. The JIF of 16 medical education journals from 2000 to 2011 was examined together with the research evidence about JIF in assessing research outcomes of medical educators. The findings were discussed in light of the nonnumerical criteria often used in academic promotion. In conclusion, JIF was not designed for assessing individual or group research performance, and it seems unsuitable for such purposes. Although the g- and h-indices have demonstrated promising outcomes, further developments are needed for their use as academic promotion criteria. For top academic positions, additional criteria could include leadership, evidence of international impact, and contributions to the advancement of knowledge with regard to medical education. PMID:26732194

  16. Impact factor of medical education journals and recently developed indices: Can any of them support academic promotion criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, S A; Holen, A; Wilson, I; Skokauskas, N

    2016-01-01

    Journal Impact Factor (JIF) has been used in assessing scientific journals. Other indices, h- and g-indices and Article Influence Score (AIS), have been developed to overcome some limitations of JIF. The aims of this study were, first, to critically assess the use of JIF and other parameters related to medical education research, and second, to discuss the capacity of these indices in assessing research productivity as well as their utility in academic promotion. The JIF of 16 medical education journals from 2000 to 2011 was examined together with the research evidence about JIF in assessing research outcomes of medical educators. The findings were discussed in light of the nonnumerical criteria often used in academic promotion. In conclusion, JIF was not designed for assessing individual or group research performance, and it seems unsuitable for such purposes. Although the g- and h-indices have demonstrated promising outcomes, further developments are needed for their use as academic promotion criteria. For top academic positions, additional criteria could include leadership, evidence of international impact, and contributions to the advancement of knowledge with regard to medical education.

  17. Effective instruction for English learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Margarita; Slavin, Robert; Sánchez, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-growing student population in U.S. schools today is children of immigrants, half of whom do not speak English fluently and are thus labeled English learners. Although the federal government requires school districts to provide services to English learners, it offers states no policies to follow in identifying, assessing, placing, or instructing them. Margarita Calderón, Robert Slavin, and Marta Sánchez identify the elements of effective instruction and review a variety of successful program models. During 2007-08, more than 5.3 million English learners made up 10.6 percent of the nation's K-12 public school enrollment. Wide and persistent achievement disparities between these English learners and English-proficient students show clearly, say the authors, that schools must address the language, literacy, and academic needs of English learners more effectively. Researchers have fiercely debated the merits of bilingual and English-only reading instruction. In elementary schools, English learners commonly receive thirty minutes of English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction but attend general education classes for the rest of the day, usually with teachers who are unprepared to teach them. Though English learners have strikingly diverse levels of skills, in high school they are typically lumped together, with one teacher to address their widely varying needs. These in-school factors contribute to the achievement disparities. Based on the studies presented here, Calderón, Slavin, and Sánchez assert that the quality of instruction is what matters most in educating English learners. They highlight comprehensive reform models, as well as individual components of these models: school structures and leadership; language and literacy instruction; integration of language, literacy, and content instruction in secondary schools; cooperative learning; professional development; parent and family support teams; tutoring; and monitoring implementation and outcomes

  18. The Emotional Impact Nursing Faculty Experience in Relationship to Student Academic Dishonesty and the Social and Political Factors That Influence Their Decision to Report Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scebold, Jody L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the emotional impact nursing faculty experience in relationship to nursing student academic dishonesty and the social and political factors that influence their decision to report suspected acts of academic dishonesty. The study was based on Fontana's 2009 study titled "Nursing Faculty Experiences of…

  19. The Effect of the 5E Instructional Model Enriched with Cooperative Learning and Animations on Seventh-Grade Students' Academic Achievement and Scientific Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasdemir, Ikramettin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the different teaching methods, on seventh-grade students' academic achievement and scientific attitudes. The research was carried out using quasi-experimental methods. The research sample consisted of 84 seventh grade students studying in three different classes. One of these classes an…

  20. The Internal/External Frame of Reference of Academic Self-Concept: Extension to a Foreign Language and the Role of Language of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man K.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Hau, Kit-Tai; Ho, Irene T.; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Abduljabbar, Adel S.

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model (Marsh, 1986) posits that the effects of contrasting math and verbal domains of achievement are positive for matching academic self-concepts (ASCs) but negative for nonmatching ASCs (i.e., math achievement on verbal ASC; verbal achievement on math ASC). We extend the classic I/E model by…

  1. The implementation and evaluation of therapeutic touch in burn patients: An instructive experience of conducting a scientific study within a non-academic nursing setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, Martine; Visser, Adriaan; Eybrechts, Maggie; van Komen, Rob; Oen, Irma; Olff, Miranda; Dokter, Jan; Boxma, Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of therapeutic touch (TT) in the nursing of burn patients; post hoc evaluation of the research process in a non-academic nursing setting. Methods: 38 burn patients received either TT or nursing presence. On admission, days 2, 5 and 10 of hospitalization, data were collected on

  2. The Effectiveness of Peer Instruction Using Personal Response Systems on the Academic Performance and Attitudes of Students in an Introductory Psychology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dawn Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a personal response system (PRS) in conjunction with a form of cooperative learning in an introductory, undergraduate psychology class to determine if the combination produced a beneficial impact on student academic achievement. Student attitudes toward use of a PRS with cooperative learning…

  3. Becoming Part of the Academy: Factors Affecting the Academic Career Success of Foreign-Born Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Teri R.

    2012-01-01

    The entire diversity landscape of our university campuses is changing. As American colleges and universities address their need for more globally aware campuses, academic institutions are hiring well-qualified foreign-born scholars to teach in their programs. Both non-resident alien faculty as well as those who are foreign-born but are classified…

  4. Social-Emotional Factors and Academic Outcomes among Elementary-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKown, Clark; Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Allen, Adelaide; Johnson, Jason K.; Warren-Khot, Heather K.

    2016-01-01

    Social-emotional comprehension involves encoding, interpreting, and reasoning about social-emotional information, and self-regulating. This study examined the mediating pathways through which social-emotional comprehension and social behaviour are related to academic outcomes in two ethnically and socioeconomically heterogeneous samples totaling…

  5. Factors Influencing Academic Self-Concept of High-Ability Girls in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Melissa Mui Mei; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of entering high-ability classes on the academic self-concept of high-ability primary girls in Singapore. Participants in this study are 91 Primary 4 girls, 30 high-ability pupils, and 61 pupils from classes that include high-, middle-, and low-ability pupils. This study utilized a mixed-method…

  6. Cost of Initial Development of PLATO Instruction in Veterinary Medicine. CERL Report X-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, George M.

    An academic program instituting the PLATO system of computer-assisted instruction at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine is discussed. Procedures involved setting up an organization, establishing an administrative system, studying capabilities of the system, studying factors making a lesson suitable for programming, and…

  7. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@.com.

  8. Using narratives to understand the motivational factors and experience of being a self-initiated academic expatriate in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe T. Harry

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A growing movement of foreign nationals is settling in South Africa. Given this, there is a need to understand not only those factors influencing foreign nationals to settle in South Africa but also their lived experiences as a basis for individual career development. Research purpose: To investigate the expatriation motivational factors and experiences of selfinitiated academic expatriates in South Africa. Motivation for the study: Calls have been made within the careers literature for more empirical focus on understanding career development using some of the neglected sample groups. Research approach, design and method: The interpretive paradigm was adopted to understand the main purpose of the study. Guided by study objectives, unstructured interviews were conducted using a sample of foreign academics working in South Africa (n = 25. Main findings: Individual stories and narratives highlighted that academics relocated for the following reasons: (1 individual preference, (2 economic meltdown and (3 political conditions. Furthermore, the lived experiences of the expatriates reflected discrimination within the workplace and the community of residences in South Africa. Practical and managerial implications: Research findings indicate that the human resources (HR function can come up with interventions that positively influence the lived experience and career development of foreign academics working in South Africa. Contribution: The expatriate experience framed in this study provides a picture of the career development processes of neglected sample groups in the extant literature. Such an understanding is key in advancing literature and proposing interventions. All this is important given the global trend on labour and skills movement added to the role South Africa plays in the international arena.

  9. The Relationship between Multiple Substance Use, Perceived Academic Achievements, and Selected Socio-Demographic Factors in a Polish Adolescent Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mazur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Predictors of high-risk patterns of substance use are often analysed in relation to demographic and school-related factors. The interaction between these factors and the additional impact of family wealth are still new areas of research. The aim of this study was to find determinants of the most common patterns of psychoactive substance use in mid-adolescence, compared to non-users. A sample of 1202 Polish students (46.1% boys, mean age of 15.6 years was surveyed in 2013/2014. Four patterns of psychoactive substance use were defined using cluster analysis: non-users—71.9%, mainly tobacco and alcohol users—13.7%, high alcohol and cannabis users—7.2%, poly-users—7.2%. The final model contained the main effects of gender and age, and one three-way (perceived academic achievement × gender × family affluence interaction. Girls with poor perception of school performance (as compared to girls with better achievements were at significantly higher risk of being poly-users, in both less and more affluent families (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 5.55 and OR = 3.60, respectively. The impact of family affluence was revealed only in interaction with other factors. Patterns of substance use in mid-adolescence are strongly related to perceived academic achievements, and these interact with selected socio-demographic factors.

  10. Family factors associated with academic achievement deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ach, Emily; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Barrera, Maru; Kupst, Mary Jo; Meyer, Eugene A; Patenaude, Andrea F; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether parental education, socioeconomic status, or family environment moderate the extent of academic achievement deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors (PBTS) relative to classmate case-controls. PBTS are known to be at risk for cognitive and academic impairment; however, the degree of impairment varies. Prior research has focused on treatment risk, and efforts to examine the protective role of family resources and relationships have been lacking. Pediatric brain tumor survivors (N = 164), ages 8-15 and 1-5 years posttreatment, were recruited at five treatment centers in the United States and Canada. A case-control classmate, matched for age, gender, and race, was recruited for each survivor. The Wide Range Achievement Test, a demographic form, and the Family Environment Scale were administered in families' homes. Treatment data were abstracted from medical charts. Pediatric brain tumor survivors demonstrated lower achievement than classmate-controls in reading, spelling, and arithmetic. Parental education and socioeconomic status were associated with levels of achievement demonstrated by PBTS but did not account for discrepancies between PBTS and classmate-controls. Deficits in achievement relative to classmate-controls, across all academic domains, were greater for survivors in families lower in support and higher in conflict. These associations remained after controlling for age at diagnosis, time since treatment, and whether treatment had involved chemotherapy, focal, or whole brain radiation. These results support the development of interventions to enhance family functioning as well as educational resources as part of intervention and rehabilitation services to optimize academic progress in children who have been treated for brain tumors. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Racial-ethnic Identity in Context: Examining Mediation of Neighborhood Factors on Children's Academic Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Dawn P; Daniels, Lisa L; Mason, Amber E; Smith, Emilie Phillips

    2016-03-01

    Research consistently shows that neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and residents' neighborhood perceptions matter for youth well-being, including a positive sense of racial-ethnic identity. Although elementary-school children are likely in the earlier phases of identity formation, the authors examined whether objective and subjective neighborhood characteristics are related to their racial-ethnic identity and, in turn, their academic adjustment. A diverse sample (30.4% African American, 35.2% White, 12.3% Latino, & 22.0% Other) of 227 children in Grades 2 through 5 were surveyed in afterschool programs. Bivariate correlations showed that youth living in disadvantaged neighborhoods reported more barriers due to their race-ethnicity, but these barriers were not related to their sense of academic efficacy. Residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood was unrelated to youth's academic self-efficacy. However, path analyses showed that positive neighborhood perceptions were associated with a stronger sense of race-ethnicity (i.e., affirmation and belonging), which was in turn related to greater academic efficacy. These results suggest that neighborhood connection provides a source of affirmation and value for young children, helping them to understand who they are as part of a racial-ethnic group and helping to foster a sense of future achievement opportunities. This study provides additional evidence that along with other important proximal contexts (e.g., family, school), young children's neighborhood context is important for development. Results are discussed to highlight environmental influences on young children's awareness of race-ethnicity and the implications of the combined impact of neighborhood and racial-ethnic identity on psychosocial adjustment. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  12. IMMIGRATION AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: THE EFFECTS OF SOCIO CULTURAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağdaş Şirin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic engagement during the high school years, a period in which young people go through tremendous change, is one of the key predictors of success for college entrance and later developmental periods. This study aims to evaluate the effect of immigration on the academic achievement of high school students. Participants were 1016 students (545 male, 567 female attending high schools from four provinces in Istanbul that have the highest rates of immigration (Zeytinburnu, Gaziosmanpasa, Büyükçekmece and Esenyurt Regions. The sample was drawn from students in all four years of High School. This study provides a snapshot of migrant students’ academic achievement profiles as well as the demographic determinants that might have an influence on their performance such as gender, number of siblings, generation, working status and selected majors variables. Results demonstrated that third generation have higher English score but lower Turkish language score than the first generation, gender plays a significant role on English and Turkish Language score but not on Math score.

  13. THE COMPARISON OF STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION IN RECOUNT TEXT INSTRUCTION BETWEEN USING STAD AND JIGSAW TECHNIQUE AT DIFFERENT READING FREQUENCY AT THE FIRST GRADE OF SMA N 1 RUMBIA ACADEMIC YEAR 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Firnadi -

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reading as one of the four skills has always been as a part of the syllabus in English instruction. Based on the Pra survey, reading comprehension of the students of the first grade of SMA N 1 Rumbia is still low, most of them still lack structure knowledge and vocabulary, and their reading frequency in reading is still low. There are two techniques presented as a solution in this research. They are STAD Technique and Jigsaw technique. The objective of this research is to find out the difference result of using STAD and Jigsaw technique toward students’ reading comprehension in recount text at different high and low reading frequency and to find out there is significant interaction and comparison of reading comprehension in recount text, learning technique, and different reading frequency at the first grade students of SMA N 1 Rumbia academic year 2012/2013. The method of investigation is held through quantitative research. The researcher uses true experimental research. In this experiment, the the researcher applies factorials design. The research is conducted at the first grade of SMA N 1 Rumbia in academic year 2012/2013. The population in this research is 180 students. It consisted 6 classes and each class consist 30 students. The researcher takes 52 students from total population as the sample, 26 students as experiment class and 26 as control class that match based on classification of student level. The researcher uses cluster random sampling as technique sampling. To analyze data, the researcher uses ANOVA TWO WAYS formula. The researcher got the result of Fhit is 18, 2 and Ftable  is 7, 14. It means that Fhit > Ftable. And the criterion of Ftest is Ha accepted if Fhit  > Ftable. So, there is any difference result of students’ Reading comprehension in recount text using STAD and Jigsaw, and STAD technique is more effective technique than Jigsaw technique toward students Reading comprehension at different reading frequency at the

  14. The Role of Social-Emotional and Social Network Factors in the Relationship Between Academic Achievement and Risky Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mitchell D; Strom, Danielle; Guerrero, Lourdes R; Chung, Paul J; Lopez, Desiree; Arellano, Katherine; Dudovitz, Rebecca N

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether standardized test scores and grades are related to risky behaviors among low-income minority adolescents and whether social networks and social-emotional factors explained those relationships. We analyzed data from 929 high school students exposed by natural experiment to high- or low-performing academic environments in Los Angeles. We collected information on grade point average (GPA), substance use, sexual behaviors, participation in fights, and carrying a weapon from face-to-face interviews and obtained California math and English standardized test results. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were used to examine the relationship between achievement and risky behaviors. Better GPA and California standardized test scores were strongly associated with lower rates of substance use, high-risk sexual behaviors, and fighting. The unadjusted relative odds of monthly binge drinking was 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.93) for 1 SD increase in standardized test scores and 0.46 (95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.74) for GPA of B- or higher compared with C+ or lower. Most associations disappeared after controlling for social-emotional and social network factors. Averaged across the risky behaviors, mediation analysis revealed social-emotional factors accounted for 33% of the relationship between test scores and risky behaviors and 43% of the relationship between GPA with risky behaviors. Social network characteristics accounted for 31% and 38% of the relationship between behaviors with test scores and GPA, respectively. Demographic factors, parenting, and school characteristics were less important explanatory factors. Social-emotional factors and social network characteristics were the strongest explanatory factors of the achievement-risky behavior relationship and might be important to understanding the relationship between academic achievement and risky behaviors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Correlations among socioeconomic and family factors and academic, behavioral, and emotional difficulties in Filipino adolescents in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Anthony P S; Hishinuma, Earl S; Andrade, Naleen N; Nishimura, Stephanie T; Cunanan, Vanessa L

    2006-07-01

    Because of socioeconomic and acculturative challenges faced by immigrant families, Filipino adolescents in Hawai'i may be at risk for academic, behavioral and emotional difficulties. To determine, among Filipino adolescents in Hawai'i, whether measures of economic hardship and lower socioeconomic status (SES) correlate positively with poor school performance, aggressive behavior, substance use, anxiety, and depression; and whether family support and cultural identification correlate negatively with these difficulties. 216 Filipino adolescents from four public high schools in Hawai'i (1993-1994) were given surveys that assessed basic demographic information, measures of family support and other social variables, and measures of school performance, depression, anxiety, aggression and substance use. In the total sample, low SES seemed to correlate with poor school performance and behavioral and emotional difficulties. In both the total sample and the sub-sample of adolescents with lower SES, family support was a universally strong protective factor. Learning genealogy was positively correlated with school performance, and speaking a language other than English was inversely correlated with substance use (in the whole sample) and depression (in the lower SES sub-sample). For Filipino adolescents (in both the whole and lower-SES samples), family support was an important protective factor against academic, behavioral and emotional difficulties. The role of cultural identification as a risk or protective factor among Filipino adolescents deserves further investigation.

  16. Factors that contribute to Hispanic English Language Learners' high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas: A multicase study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Antonio

    The purpose of this multicase study was to discover factors that contribute to Hispanic English language learners' (ELL) high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Participants were high school seniors enrolled in college-level classes who had scored commended on the science exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and ranked toward the top of their class. One student from each of four different high schools in south Texas were selected to participate. Schools identified students meeting the participant criteria and provided consent documents. In this qualitative research study, students were interviewed on three different dates. Administrators and science teachers were also interviewed for triangulation. Significant findings showed that intrinsic qualities were mainly responsible for factors contributing to high academic performance. Hispanic ELL students need meaningful responsibilities to internalize self-esteem and self-efficacy to realize high academic performance. Self-motivation, a contributing factor, provides students with a positive outlook on high academic performance and the ability to defer more immediate undermining rewards. Students expect to contribute to society by helping others. This helps their self-esteem as well as their self-worth and supports high academic performance. Parental and teacher support are critical for high academic performance. Low socioeconomic status alone is not a causal factor for poor academic performance. School administrations should assign willing and enthusiastic teachers as mentors to target students and provide skills to parents that promote, inspire, and motivate students' intrinsic qualities. Future studies should examine different leadership styles that maximize teachers' ability to influence students' high academic performance. Finally, students should be given guidance in setting career goals and demonstrating that high academic achievement is attainable and

  17. The implementation and evaluation of therapeutic touch in burn patients: an instructive experience of conducting a scientific study within a non-academic nursing setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martine; Visser, Adriaan; Eybrechts, Maggie; van Komen, Rob; Oen, Irma; Olff, Miranda; Dokter, Jan; Boxma, Han

    2012-12-01

    Evaluation of therapeutic touch (TT) in the nursing of burn patients; post hoc evaluation of the research process in a non-academic nursing setting. 38 burn patients received either TT or nursing presence. On admission, days 2, 5 and 10 of hospitalization, data were collected on anxiety for pain, salivary cortisol, and pain medication. Interviews with nurses were held concerning research in a non-academic setting. Anxiety for pain was more reduced on day 10 in the TT-group. The TT-group was prescribed less morphine on day 1 and 2. On day 2 cortisol level before dressing changes was higher in the TT-group. The situational challenges of this study led to inconsistencies in data collection and a high patient attrition rate, weakening its statistical power. Conducting an effect study within daily nursing practice should not be done with a nursing staff inexperienced in research. Analysis of the remaining data justifies further research on TT for burn patients with pain, anxiety for pain, and cortisol levels as outcomes. Administering and evaluating TT during daily care requires nurses experienced both in TT and research, thus leading to less attrition and missing data, increasing the power of future studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary dysmenorrhea magnitude, associated risk factors, and its effect on academic performance: evidence from female university students in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemeskel, Solomon; Demissie, Asrate; Assefa, Nigussie

    2016-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is the most common gynecologic compliant among adolescent females. There is a wide variation in the estimate of PD, which ranges from 50% to 90%, and the disorder is the most common cause of work and school absenteeism in adolescent females. To assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of PD among female university students and understand its effects on students' academic performance. A cross-sectional study was employed in 440 research participants. A multistage stratified sampling technique was employed to select the study units. Structured and pretested self-administered questionnaires were used and weight and height measurements were conducted. The severity of dysmenorrheal pain was assessed by using a verbal multidimensional scoring system and visual analog scale. The data were double entered in Epi Info version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis were performed. A total of 440 students participated in this study. The prevalence of PD was 368 (85.4%). Of these, 123 (28.5%) had mild, 164 (38.1%) moderate, and 81 (18.8%) severe primary dysmenorrheal pain. Among students with PD, 88.3% reported that PD had a negative effect on their academic performance. Of these, 80% reported school absence, 66.8% reported loss of class concentration, 56.3% reported class absence, 47.4% reported loss of class participation, 37.8% reported limited sport participation, 31.7% reported limitation in going out with friends, and 21% reported inability to do homework. Based on the multivariate logistic regression, PD was statistically significant with those who had lower monthly stipends, a history of attempt to lose weight, a history of depression or anxiety, disruption of social network of family, friends or people they love, who consumed more than four glasses of tea per day, who drunk one or more Coca-Cola or Pepsi per day, in nullipara, and students with a family history

  19. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  20. A cumulative risk factor model for early identification of academic difficulties in premature and low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G; Bellinger, D; McCormick, M C

    2007-03-01

    Premature and low birth weight children have a high prevalence of academic difficulties. This study examines a model comprised of cumulative risk factors that allows early identification of these difficulties. This is a secondary analysis of data from a large cohort of premature (mathematics. Potential predictor variables were categorized into 4 domains: sociodemographic, neonatal, maternal mental health and early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Regression analysis was used to create a model to predict reading and mathematics scores. Variables from all domains were significant in the model, predicting low achievement scores in reading (R (2) of 0.49, model p-value mathematics (R (2) of 0.44, model p-value education and income, and Black or Hispanic race (sociodemographic); lower birth weight and male gender (neonatal); lower maternal responsivity (maternal mental health); lower intelligence, visual-motor skill and higher behavioral disturbance scores (early childhood). Lower mathematics scores were predicted by lower maternal education, income and age and Black or Hispanic race (sociodemographic); lower birth weight and higher head circumference (neonatal); lower maternal responsivity (maternal mental health); lower intelligence, visual-motor skill and higher behavioral disturbance scores (early childhood). Sequential early childhood risk factors in premature and LBW children lead to a cumulative risk for academic difficulties and can be used for early identification.

  1. Are we allowing impact factor to have too much impact: The need to reassess the process of academic advancement in pediatric cardiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Anderson, Robert H

    2018-03-01

    Impact factor has been used as a metric by which to gauge scientific journals for several years. A metric meant to describe the performance of a journal overall, impact factor has also become a metric used to gauge individual performance as well. This has held true in the field of pediatric cardiology where many divisions utilize impact factor of journals that an individual has published in to help determine the individual's academic achievement. This subsequently can impact the individual's promotion through the academic ranks. We review the purpose of impact factor, its strengths and weaknesses, discuss why impact factor is not a fair metric to apply to individuals, and offer alternative means by which to gauge individual performance for academic promotion. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Best of Both Worlds? Towards an English for Academic Purposes/Academic Literacies Writing Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Ursula; Tribble, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This article is a review of two dominant approaches to academic writing instruction in higher education, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), which is used internationally, and Academic Literacies, which has become an influential model in the UK. The review was driven by a concern that Academic Literacies has been mainly focused on the situations…

  3. Kansas Academic Librarian Perceptions of Information Literacy Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Alysia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the professional development needs of academic instruction librarians required to improve information literacy instructional effectiveness in higher education institutions within the state of Kansas. The population in this correlational study was the 84 academic librarians with instruction duties at Kansas's…

  4. Food Safety Instruction Improves Knowledge and Behavior Risk and Protection Factors for Foodborne Illnesses in Pregnant Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Patricia; Scharff, Robert; Baker, Susan; LeJeune, Jeffrey; Sofos, John; Medeiros, Lydia

    2017-08-01

    Objective This study compared knowledge and food-handling behavior after pathogen-specific (experimental treatment) versus basic food safety instruction (active control) presented during nutrition education classes for low-income English- and Spanish-language pregnant women. Methods Subjects (n = 550) were randomly assigned to treatment groups in two different locations in the United States. Food safety instruction was part of an 8-lesson curriculum. Food safety knowledge and behavior were measured pre/post intervention. Descriptive data were analyzed by Chi-Square or ANOVA; changes after intervention were analyzed by regression analysis. Results Knowledge improved after intervention in the pathogen-specific treatment group compared to active control, especially among Spanish-language women. Behavior change after intervention for the pathogen-specific treatment group improved for thermometer usage, refrigeration and consumption of foods at high risk for safety; however, all other improvements in behavior were accounted for by intervention regardless of treatment group. As expected, higher pre-instruction behavioral competency limited potential gain in behavior post-instruction due to a ceiling effect. This effect was more dominant among English-language women. Improvements were also linked to formal education completed, a partner at home, and other children in the home. Conclusions for Practice This study demonstrated that pathogen-specific food safety instruction leads to enhance knowledge and food handling behaviors that may improve the public health of pregnant women and their unborn children, especially among Spanish-language women. More importantly, food safety instruction, even at the most basic level, benefited pregnant women's food safety knowledge and food-handling behavior after intervention.

  5. [Young Academics in Neuropsychological Disciplines: Factors Affecting Career Aspiration in Psychiatry, Neurology and Psychosomatic Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Kasch, Susanne; Wirkner, Janine; Kasch, Richard; Freyberger, Harald J; Fleßa, Steffen; Merk, Harry; Klauer, Thomas

    2017-12-13

    Objective Students with specialization preferences in psychiatry, neurology, or psychosomatic medicine were retrospectively compared with regard to aspects of motivation to choose medicine as their field of study. Methods To identify early predictors of specialization preferences, a nationwide online survey was conducted with 9079 medical students. The statements of those with a preference for neurology, psychiatry, or psychosomatic medicine were evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Prospective neurologists were motivated by scientific interest variables and less by the aspects of life management. On the other hand, students with preferences for one of the psychological disciplines reported comparatively higher degrees of desire to actively provide help and of the importance of their own medical history. There were no significant differences between future psychiatrists and psychosomatic professionals. Conclusion The reported motives point to thematic orientations that might be useful in the subject-specific acquisition of young academics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Pattern of reference types and impact factors of journals in the Korea Citation Index according to academic discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyeong Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Korea Citation Index (KCI is a citation database for scholarly journals from Korea, the number of journals of which is 2,168 in January, 2015. This article aims to analyze the pattern of reference types and impact factors of journals in the KCI according to academic discipline. Journals of the KCI were classified according to academic discipline: humanities, arts and sports, social science, science, and multi-disciplinary science. Science journals were sub-classified as natural science, engineering, agriculture & fisheries, and medical health. The pattern of reference types was classified as journal article, book, report/thesis/internet, and others. Changing patterns of the two-year impact factor were described according to the publication year of journals in each discipline. The reference type of each discipline in 2010 showed different patterns. In humanities, the portion of books out of cited literatures was 51.1%, while the portion of books in natural science, engineering, medical health, and agriculture & fisheries fields were 11.0%, 10.0%, 7.0%, and 11.0%, respectively. In social science, the portion of journal articles was 53.1% and books 27.3%. In medical health, the portion of journal article was 87.6%. Journals’ average impact factors in 2011 were 0.9 for social science, 0.8 for arts and sports, 0.55 for interdisciplinary, 0.5 for agriculture and fisheries and humanities, 0.45 for natural science, 0.32 for engineering, and 0.3 for medical health. Researchers in humanities in Korea use books as a primary source of references, while those in other disciplines use journals as a major source of references. Higher impact factors in social science journals and lower ones in science journals mean that social scientists in Korea deal with mainly domestic topics, while scientist deal with global topics.

  7. A comparative analysis of the effects of instructional design factors on student success in e-learning: multiple-regression versus neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Ibrahim Cebeci

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the student performance and instructional design. The research was conducted at the E-Learning School at a university in Turkey. A list of design factors that had potential influence on student success was created through a review of the literature and interviews with relevant experts. From this, the five most import design factors were chosen. The experts scored 25 university courses on the extent to which they demonstrated the chosen design factors. Multiple-regression and supervised artificial neural network (ANN models were used to examine the relationship between student grade point averages and the scores on the five design factors. The results indicated that there is no statistical difference between the two models. Both models identified the use of examples and applications as the most influential factor. The ANN model provided more information and was used to predict the course-specific factor values required for a desired level of success.

  8. Primary dysmenorrhea magnitude, associated risk factors, and its effect on academic performance: evidence from female university students in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailemeskel S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Solomon Hailemeskel,1 Asrate Demissie,2 Nigussie Assefa3 1Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Institute of Medicine and Health Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia; 2Department of Nursing and Midwifery, School of Allied Health Science, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 3Department of Reproductive Health and Health Service Management, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Primary dysmenorrhea (PD is the most common gynecologic compliant among adolescent females. There is a wide variation in the estimate of PD, which ranges from 50% to 90%, and the disorder is the most common cause of work and school absenteeism in adolescent females.Objective: To assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of PD among female university students and understand its effects on students’ academic performance.Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed in 440 research participants. A multistage stratified sampling technique was employed to select the study units. Structured and pretested self-administered questionnaires were used and weight and height measurements were conducted. The severity of dysmenorrheal pain was assessed by using a verbal multidimensional scoring system and visual analog scale. The data were double entered in Epi Info version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis were performed.Results: A total of 440 students participated in this study. The prevalence of PD was 368 (85.4%. Of these, 123 (28.5% had mild, 164 (38.1% moderate, and 81 (18.8% severe primary dysmenorrheal pain. Among students with PD, 88.3% reported that PD had a negative effect on their academic performance. Of these, 80% reported school absence, 66.8% reported loss of class concentration, 56.3% reported class absence, 47.4% reported loss of class

  9. A Study of the Motivational Patterns of Learners of English for Academic and Professional Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrar-ul-Hassan, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Learner motivation is considered a vital factor in second language instruction. An analysis of motivation types and degrees can reveal learners' expectations and learning objectives. The present study analyzes the motivational patterns of a group of English for academic and professional purposes (EAPP) learners while focusing on types and degrees…

  10. "STEMulating" success factors: An investigation of the academic talents of successful Black male college graduates from STEM programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jill T.

    This phenomenological research study explored the contributing factors experienced by Black males that epitomized their academic success in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) area of study. During this investigative project, eleven Black male students were interviewed to determine how they were able to successfully navigate and complete a STEM degree. The data was collected through a qualitative inquiry, which involved interviewing students and collecting the data and organizing their perspectives into common themes. The principal findings in this study suggest that Black males can excel when primary influential people establish high expectations and believe and encourage Black males to succeed by providing the essential educational support models requisite to warrant success; the Black male maintains and affirms a self-assured self-worth in himself; the Black male is exposed to these fields and professions early on in their educational quest to enable them to witness first hand powerful and productive opportunities and pathways to academic success; exposure to other Black successful male role models who can mentor and show positive proof that with effort, these fields can become a reality; increase in academic motivation and recommendations from educators and counselors who direct and guide students into and away from these rigorous career fields. An analysis of the students' individual stories gave a revealing look into the pathways of their consciousness, emotional growth, and perspectives about being a successful STEM major. This kind of insight can be a constructive diagnostic tool for students, educators, counselors, and administrators who want to motivate and influence future students to major in STEM fields of study.

  11. MEDIUL ACADEMIC CA FACTOR DE ASIGURARE A CONTINUITĂŢII ŞI INTERCONEXIUNII DINTRE CICLURILE ÎNVĂŢĂMÂNTULUI SUPERIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia ŞEVCIUC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available În articol este abordată problema privind mediul academic ca factor de asigurare a continuităţii şi interconexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior. În acest sens sunt analizate diferite concepte cu referire la mediul academic, sunt deduse principiile de concepere a unui mediu academic eficient, dar şi modalităţi de realizare a continuităţii şi inter­conexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior. Sunt propuse sugestii de asigurare a continuităţii şi interconexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior.ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT AS A FACTOR IN ENSURING CONTINUITY AND INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN CYCLES OF HIGHER EDUCATIONThe article addressed academics as a factor of continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education. In this sense analyzed different concepts with reference to academia, they are deducted design principles of an academic environment effectively, but also ways of continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education, are proposed suggestions to ensure continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education.

  12. Beef customer satisfaction: factors affecting consumer evaluations of calcium chloride-injected top sirloin steaks when given instructions for preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, J M; Goodson, K J; Koohmaraie, M; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Morgan, W W; Reagan, J O; Gwartney, B L; Wise, J W; Savell, J W

    2005-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether instructions can help consumers properly prepare top sirloin steaks and to evaluate the use of calcium chloride injection to decrease the sensitivity of top sirloin steaks to degree of doneness, thereby improving customer satisfaction ratings. An in-home study evaluated top sirloin steaks (gluteus medius) as influenced by calcium chloride injection (injected vs. noninjected), consumer segment (beef loyalists = heavy consumers of beef, budget rotators = cost-driven and split meat consumption between beef and chicken, and variety rotators = higher incomes and education and split meat consumption among beef, poultry, and other foods), degree of doneness, cooking method, and instructions (given vs. not given). Consumers evaluated overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount using 10-point scales. Beef loyalists consistently rated steaks higher for overall like, juiciness, and flavor when instructions were provided (P consumers' likes or dislikes or on tenderness (P consumer satisfaction, and beef loyalists benefited the most from providing cooking instructions.

  13. The Effect of the 5E Instructional Model Enriched With Cooperative Learning and Animations on Seventh-Grade Students’ Academic Achievement and Scientific Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İkramettin DAŞDEMİR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the different teaching methods, on seventh-grade students’ academic achievement and scientific attitudes. The research was carried out using quasi-experimental methods. The research sample consisted of 84 seventh grade students studying in three different classes. One of these classes an animation group, the second class was a cooperative group, the third was a control group. The data collection tools used were the Science Achievement Test (SAT and the Scientific Attitude Scale (SAS.When each group’s SAT and SAS pre-test ANOVA scores were compared, no significant differences were found between them. SAT post-test results showed a significant difference in favour of the animation group. In addition, the findings of the study revealed that the cooperative group’s mean post-test were not statistically significant. When SAS post-test scores of the animation and control groups were compared, there was a significant difference in favour of the animation group. When the SAS post-test scores of the cooperative and control groups were compared, there was a significant difference in favour of the cooperative group. When the SAS post-test scores of the cooperative and animation group were compared, there were no statistically significant differences in students’ attitudes.

  14. Donde Estan los Estudiantes Puertorriquenos/os Exitosos? [Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students?]: Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the 4 success factors that 10 working class Puerto Rican urban high school students attributed to their high academic achievement. These success factors were (a) the acquisition of social capital through religiosity and participation in school and community-based extracurricular activities, (b) having a strong Puerto Rican…

  15. A Major Decision: Identifying Factors that Influence Agriculture Students’ Choice of Academic Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Stair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colleges of Agriculture (CoAs are estimated to supply only slightly more than half of the number of graduates needed to fill job openings through 2015. The purpose of this research study was to describe the factors influencing agriculture students’ choice of major. The population for this descriptive research study consisted of full-time CoA freshmen enrolled in AGRI 1001: Introduction to Agriculture at Louisiana State University. A total of 259 students were asked to participate in the electronic survey. All students completed the survey for a 100% response rate. Consistent with the model proposed by Hodges and Karpova (2010, the factors identified in this study included personal characteristics, interpersonal factors, and environmental factors. Moreover, contextual factors unique to agriculture were identified.

  16. Aggressive behavior, protective factors and academic achievement at students inside and outside the system of institutional care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maretić Edita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the differences between the aspects of aggressive behavior, their strengths (protective factors in the prevention of behavioral disorders and academic achievement, in children within and out of institutional forms of education. The study was conducted on a sample of 264 students in seventh and eighth class of elementary school, of whom 134 were in institutional care, while 130 were outside the institutional forms of education. Data were collected by a questionnaire, which included two measuring instruments: Check-list of advantages and Buss & Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ. The children who live in institutional care showed a higher incidence of aggressive behavior, compared with children who are out of institutional care. Children placed in institutional care have less protective factors for the prevention of behavioral disorders, worse general school success, as well as poorer success in Nature/ Biology, compared to non-institutional children. A negative and statistically significant relationship was found between the incidence of aggressive behaviors and protective factors in the prevention of conduct disorder, as well as between the incidence of aggressive behavior and overall school success. A significant positive correlation was found between the protective factors and success in the English language. The results indicate the necessity to consider alternative forms of care for children without parental care, in close cooperation of all relevant institutions and individuals who take care for children.

  17. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest

  18. The Habitat Factor in ELF(A)--English as a Lingua Franca (In Academic Settings)--And English for Plurilingual Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller-Schwaner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article considers a case of local language socialization and accommodation in a multilingual community of practice: the use of English as an additional academic language for specific purposes at a bilingual Swiss university and its implications for teaching. The acronym ELF(A) is used throughout as short for English as a Lingua Franca (in…

  19. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  20. Current practices in library/informatics instruction in academic libraries serving medical schools in the Western United States: a three-phase action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan D; Heskett, Karen M; Henner, Terry; Tan, Josephine P

    2013-09-04

    To conduct a systematic assessment of library and informatics training at accredited Western U.S. medical schools. To provide a structured description of core practices, detect trends through comparisons across institutions, and to identify innovative training approaches at the medical schools. Action research study pursued through three phases. The first phase used inductive analysis on reported library and informatics skills training via publicly-facing websites at accredited medical schools and the academic health sciences libraries serving those medical schools. Phase Two consisted of a survey of the librarians who provide this training to undergraduate medical education students at the Western U.S. medical schools. The survey revealed gaps in forming a complete picture of current practices, thereby generating additional questions that were answered through the Phase Three in-depth interviews. Publicly-facing websites reviewed in Phase One offered uneven information about library and informatics training at Western U.S. medical schools. The Phase Two survey resulted in a 77% response rate. The survey produced a clearer picture of current practices of library and informatics training. The survey also determined the readiness of medical students to pass certain aspects of the United States Medical Licensure Exam. Most librarians interacted with medical school curricular leaders through either curricula committees or through individual contacts. Librarians averaged three (3) interventions for training within the four-year curricula with greatest emphasis upon the first and third years. Library/informatics training was integrated fully into the respective curricula in almost all cases. Most training involved active learning approaches, specifically within Problem-Based Learning or Evidence-Based Medicine contexts. The Phase Three interviews revealed that librarians are engaged with the medical schools' curricular leaders, they are respected for their knowledge and

  1. Implementation of confirmatory factor analysis: a measuring model of reading academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Fernández Aráuz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the differences between exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The results obtained with confirmatory factor analysis show that both education and socioeconomic status of the parents of students, as well as material possessions at home are good indicators to measure the latent variable called Socioeconomic Extraction. Moreover, the enjoyment of reading and diversity of reading are good indicators of measurement for the latent variable Personal Attitude of the student, while the student's attitude towards school, which measure attitudes to educational process as a whole and not specifically to the reading is not a good measure for the latent variable of personal attitude. These results suggest that unobservable factors Socioeconomic Extraction, Reading Strategies and personal attitude could be used to assess the causal hypothesis of the effect of these variables on the educational performance of students in the reading test.

  2. Factors Contributing to Research Team Effectiveness: Testing a Model of Team Effectiveness in an Academic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Zoharah; Ahmad, Aminah

    2014-01-01

    Following the classic systems model of inputs, processes, and outputs, this study examined the influence of three input factors, team climate, work overload, and team leadership, on research project team effectiveness as measured by publication productivity, team member satisfaction, and job frustration. This study also examined the mediating…

  3. Contemporary Constructivist Practices in Higher Education Settings and Academic Motivational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the relationships between college students' pre-entry factors, self-efficacy and motivation for learning, and the perceived constructivist learning in traditional lecture-based courses and seminars (SM). The study included 411 undergraduate third-year college students. Several scales were administered to the…

  4. Factors That Influences Students Academic Performance: A Case of Rift Valley University, Jimma, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akessa, Geremew Muleta; Dhufera, Abdissa Gurmesa

    2015-01-01

    University is one of the places where a systematically organized and scientifically oriented education is offered. It is through such an organized manner that the knowledge, skill and desired attitude of the learner develop, but in a given class it is sometimes seen that there is a difference in achievement as a result of different factors that…

  5. Development of an Instrument to Measure Student Use of Academic Success Skills: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Harrington, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills instrument including item development and exploratory factor analysis. The instrument was developed to measure student use of the skills and strategies identified as most critical for long-term school success that are typically taught by school counselors.

  6. Evaluación de las condiciones iniciales de alumnos de la Diplomatura en Fisioterapia y su relación con el rendimiento académico Evaluation of prior factors potentially related to academic progress in Physiotherapy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Larrán López

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available La importancia de realizar un diagnóstico sobre la situación inicial de los alumnos que comienzan un nuevo curso es de sobras conocida. Los resultados del proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje dependen en gran medida del estado inicial de preparación y motivaciones de los alumnos. Por tanto, la identificación de factores que se relacionen con el rendimiento académico es un tema a tener en cuenta en el proceso de mejora de la calidad de la enseñanza universitaria. En el presente trabajo presentamos datos obtenidos a partir de la evaluación inicial realizada a los alumnos de la asignatura troncal Biología Celular y Tisular Humana de primer curso de la Diplomatura en Fisioterapia. Como instrumento utilizamos un cuestionario de respuesta abierta que nos proporciona información sobre distintas variables como: sexo, modalidad de acceso a la Universidad, motivaciones, aspiraciones, conocimientos previos relacionados con la asignatura, etc. Presentamos, igualmente, la calificación final obtenida por los alumnos (evaluación sumativa. Realizamos un análisis descriptivo de las variables iniciales, relacionándolas entre sí y con las calificaciones finales con objeto de identificar factores indicadores del rendimiento académico. Entre los resultados obtenidos observamos que los conocimientos previos relacionados con la asignatura son, en general, insuficientes y/o confusos, observándose una mejor preparación previa en los alumnos procedentes de COU/Bachillerato con respecto a los de Formación Profesional. Entre las variables analizadas son estos conocimientos previos los que muestran una relación estadísticamente significativa y directamente proporcional con las calificaciones finales.The importance of evaluating prior academic knowledge possessed by students beginning a new course is well known. The results of the teaching-learning process depend to a large extent on students’ previous level of instruction and motivation. Therefore

  7. More academics in regular schools? The effect of regular versus special school placement on academic skills in Dutch primary school students with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, G; van Hove, G; Haveman, M

    2013-01-01

    Studies from the UK have shown that children with Down syndrome acquire more academic skills in regular education. Does this likewise hold true for the Dutch situation, even after the effect of selective placement has been taken into account? In 2006, an extensive questionnaire was sent to 160 parents of (specially and regularly placed) children with Down syndrome (born 1993-2000) in primary education in the Netherlands with a response rate of 76%. Questions were related to the child's school history, academic and non-academic skills, intelligence quotient, parental educational level, the extent to which parents worked on academics with their child at home, and the amount of academic instructional time at school. Academic skills were predicted with the other variables as independents. For the children in regular schools much more time proved to be spent on academics. Academic performance appeared to be predicted reasonably well on the basis of age, non-academic skills, parental educational level and the extent to which parents worked at home on academics. However, more variance could be predicted when the total amount of years that the child spent in regular education was added, especially regarding reading and to a lesser extent regarding writing and math. In addition, we could prove that this finding could not be accounted for by endogenity. Regularly placed children with Down syndrome learn more academics. However, this is not a straight consequence of inclusive placement and age alone, but is also determined by factors such as cognitive functioning, non-academic skills, parental educational level and the extent to which parents worked at home on academics. Nevertheless, it could be proven that the more advanced academic skills of the regularly placed children are not only due to selective placement. The positive effect of regular school on academics appeared to be most pronounced for reading skills. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability

  8. [Factors associated with the risk of eating disorders among academics in the area of health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Jeudi Aguiar; Júnior, Carlos Reeves Rodrigues Silva; de Pinho, Lucinéia

    2014-06-01

    The object of this study was aimed at identifying factors associated with the risk of eating disorders in undergraduate students in the area of Health Sciences. It is a cross-sectional, quantitative and descriptive study carried out in Montes Clams, MG (Brazil), from August to October 2012. The profile of the university students was identified and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) applied. 200, students aged 23.4 +/- 6.13 years participated in the study, 76.5% of them females. A frequency of 4.0% of the students were at high risk of developing eating disorders, 21.0% at low risk and 75.0% had no risk factors. Various inadequate self-perceptions of the body, dietary practice, missed breakfasts and snacking during intervals were associated with factors for eating disorder risk (p risk of an eating disorder (p=0,004). The high risk of developing eating disorders among students in a nutritionally deficient condition indicates that they should receive preventive dietary advice.

  9. Factors associated with the risk of eating disorders among academics in the area of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeudi Aguiar dos Reis

    Full Text Available The object of this study was aimed at identifying factors associated with the risk of eating disorders in undergraduate students in the area of Health Sciences. It is a cross-sectional, quantitative and descriptive study carried out in Montes Claros, MG (Brazil, from August to October 2012. The profile of the university students was identified and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 applied. 200, students aged 23.4 ± 6.13 years participated in the study, 76.5% of them females. A frequency of 4.0% of the students were at high risk of developing eating disorders, 21.0% at low risk and 75.0% had no risk factors. Various inadequate self-perceptions of the body, dietary practice, missed breakfasts and snacking during intervals were associated with factors for eating disorder risk (p<0.05. For students with inadequate nutritional status, 34.4% were at risk of an eating disorder (p=0,004. The high risk of developing eating disorders among students in a nutritionally deficient condition indicates that they should receive preventive dietary advice.

  10. Mathematical learning instruction and teacher motivation factors affecting science technology engineering and math (STEM) major choices in 4-year colleges and universities: Multilevel structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahlam

    2011-12-01

    Using the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002/06, this study examined the effects of the selected mathematical learning and teacher motivation factors on graduates' science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) related major choices in 4-year colleges and universities, as mediated by math performance and math self-efficacy. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, I analyzed: (1) the association between mathematical learning instruction factors (i.e., computer, individual, and lecture-based learning activities in mathematics) and students' STEM major choices in 4-year colleges and universities as mediated by math performance and math self-efficacy and (2) the association between school factor, teacher motivation and students' STEM major choices in 4-year colleges and universities via mediators of math performance and math self-efficacy. The results revealed that among the selected learning experience factors, computer-based learning activities in math classrooms yielded the most positive effects on math self-efficacy, which significantly predicted the increase in the proportion of students' STEM major choice as mediated by math self-efficacy. Further, when controlling for base-year math Item Response Theory (IRT) scores, a positive relationship between individual-based learning activities in math classrooms and the first follow-up math IRT scores emerged, which related to the high proportion of students' STEM major choices. The results also indicated that individual and lecture-based learning activities in math yielded positive effects on math self-efficacy, which related to STEM major choice. Concerning between-school levels, teacher motivation yielded positive effects on the first follow up math IRT score, when controlling for base year IRT score. The results from this study inform educators, parents, and policy makers on how mathematics instruction can improve student math performance and encourage more students to prepare for STEM careers. Students

  11. Assessment of Clinical Stressful Factors Among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Raji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nursing students are exposed to clinical environmental stresses in addition to educational environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical stressful factors among Academic Students of Nursing and Operating Room of Dezful University of Medical Sciences in 2015.Materials and Methods: This study was a description-analytical study with 234 students of nursing and operation room up to two semesters for enrolled. Data was using a self-made researcher Questionnaire consisted of demographic information and clinical stressful factors. Data analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS-PC (v.20.Results: The findings showed that the main stressors in students of nursing and operation room were unpleasant emotions and least stressful areas were interpersonal communication in a clinical environment. The results showed that the average score of the field of education and humiliating experiences using Spearman correlation test (P=0/045 (r=0/16.Conclusion: Study showed, the mean stress is the moderate level. Stressful areas obtained in the four areas of personal communication, clinical practice stressful, unpleasant feelings and humiliating experience that fortunately, in many cases reform and change.

  12. Enrolling in Science and Engineering Academic Programs—Motivating and Deterring Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomazan, Valentina; Mihalaşcu, Doina; Petcu, Lucian C.; Gîrtu, Mihai A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of the student responses to a survey aiming to determine the factors influencing the young generation in choosing a career in science and technology. The goal of the study is twofold: to identify the motives that determine students to enroll in university programs in science and technology and to engage in applied science and engineering careers and to discover the barriers that manifest at different age levels, preventing students from making such choices. The study was conducted at the Ovidius University and the "Energetic" Technical High School, both in Constanta, Romania, with samples of 257 and 106 students respectively, based on a 38 item online questionnaire. The samples selected from the student population allow for a wide range of analyses with respect to gender, family and educational background, field of study, etc. We discuss the role of the raw models, parents, educators, and we comment on ways to increase student enrollment in science and engineering.

  13. Factors that impact turnaround time of surgical pathology specimens in an academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samip; Smith, Jennifer B; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Guarner, Jeannette

    2012-09-01

    Turnaround time of laboratory results is important for customer satisfaction. The College of American Pathologists' checklist requires an analytic turnaround time of 2 days or less for most routine cases and lets every hospital define what a routine specimen is. The objective of this study was to analyze which factors impact turnaround time of nonbiopsy surgical pathology specimens. We calculated the turnaround time from receipt to verification of results (adjusted for weekends and holidays) for all nonbiopsy surgical specimens during a 2-week period. Factors studied included tissue type, number of slides per case, decalcification, immunohistochemistry, consultations with other pathologists, and diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 713 specimens were analyzed, 551 (77%) were verified within 2 days and 162 (23%) in 3 days or more. Lung, gastrointestinal, breast, and genitourinary specimens showed the highest percentage of cases being signed out in over 3 days. Diagnosis of malignancy (including staging of the neoplasia), consultation with other pathologists, having had a frozen section, and use of immunohistochemical stains were significantly associated with increased turnaround time in univariate analysis. Decalcification was not associated with increased turnaround time. In multivariate analysis, consultation with other pathologists, use of immunohistochemistry, diagnosis of malignancy, and the number of slides studied continued to be significantly associated with prolonged turnaround time. Our findings suggest that diagnosis of malignancy is central to significantly prolonging the turnaround time for surgical pathology specimens, thus institutions that serve cancer centers will have longer turnaround time than those that do not. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors Affecting Examination Attrition: Does Academic Support Help? A Survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) Students at Unisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tladi, Lerato Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the attributing and contributing factors to examination absence as well as whether the academic and social support available to students had a role to play in discouraging or reducing absence from examinations using results from a quantitative survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) students who were admitted…

  15. The Five-Factor Model of Personality and Its Relationship to Cognitive Style (Rush and Prudence) and Academic Achievement among a Sample of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Asia; Othman, Afaf

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to identify the relationship between the five-factor model of personality and its relationship to cognitive style (rush and prudence) and academic achievement among a sample of students. The study is based on descriptive approach for studying the relationship between the variables of the study, results and analysis. The…

  16. Does Geographic Setting Alter the Roles of Academically Supportive Factors? African American Adolescents' Friendships, Math Self-Concept, and Math Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin H.; Irvin, Matthew J.; Kibe, Grace W.

    2012-01-01

    The study is one of few to examine how living in rural, suburban, or urban settings may alter factors supporting African Americans adolescents' math performance. The study examines the relationship of math self-concept and perceptions of friends' academic behaviors to African American students' math performance. Participants (N = 1,049) are…

  17. Investigation of Factors Affecting Information Literacy Student Learning Outcomes Fails to Undercover Significant Findings. A Review of: Detlor, B., Julien, H., Willson, R., Serenko, A., & Lavallee, M. (2011. Learning outcomes of information literacy instruction at business schools. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(3, 572-585.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To ascertain the factors influencing student learning during information literacy instruction (ILI and create a theoretical model based on those factors.Design – Mixed methodology consisting of interviews and an assessment test.Setting – Three Canadian business schools.Subjects – Seven librarians, 4 library administrators, 16 business faculty, and 52 undergraduate business students were interviewed, and the Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS test was administered to 1,087 undergraduate business students across three different business schools.Methods – The authors used an interview script to conduct interviews with librarians, library administrators, business school faculty, and undergraduate business school students at three business schools in Canada. The authors also administered the SAILS test to undergraduate business students at the same three Canadian business schools.Main Results – ILI works best when it is related to an assignment, part of the curriculum, periodically evaluated, adequatelyfunded, timely, mandatory, interactive, uses handouts, provides the proper amount of information, and favourably viewed within the school. ILI student learning outcomes are affected by whether the students find the ILI beneficial and relevant, their year in the program, gender, status as international or domestic student, and overall academic achievement.Conclusion – Creation of theoretical model consisting of the three main factors influencing student learning outcomes in information literacy instruction: learning environment, information literacy components, and student demographics.

  18. HEALTH CONDITIONS AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SATISFACTION WITH LIFE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY OF ACADEMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cerqueira Reis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Describe health conditions and self-reported factors associated with life satisfaction of Physiotherapy course students. cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study, the type census, where 167 students were enrolled. The data collection instrument used was Isaq-A and had the outcome variable "satisfaction with life". The independent variables correspond sociodemographic and self-reported health status characteristics. Of the 167 students interviewed, 128 (76.65% autorrelataram have a good general state of health, 123 (73.65% a lot of stress, 146 (87.43% good sleep quality and 94 (56.30% they were satisfied with life. In the inferential analysis, a statistically significant association between life satisfaction and the variables gender (PR = 1.20; CI = 1.009 to 1.445, work (PR = 0.20; CI = 0.044 to 0.978, state of self-report health (OR = 1.21, CI = 1.011 to 1.466 and sleep quality (PR = 1.17; CI = 1.031 to 1.337. The highest proportion of students autorrelataram present a good general state of health, too much stress, good sleep quality and life satisfaction. Sex, work, health and quality of sleep are associated with life satisfaction.

  19. Factors underlying students’ appropriate or inappropriate use of scholarly sources in academic writing, and instructors’ responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sivell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available At first glance it is surprising that – in remarkable contrast to grammatical or lexical failings which, while certainly not viewed as insignificant, are rarely greeted with outright anger or hostility – inappropriate documentation of scholarly sources so frequently provokes very harsh penalties. Rather than the constructively pedagogical approach that one would expect with regard to other defects in writing, why do we so often witness a rush to negative evaluation of what may, after all, be evidence of nothing more culpable than misinformation, confusion, or oversight? Much has of course been written about possible remedies for ineffective use of scholarly sources and, on the other hand, about available monitoring and punishment for deliberate plagiarism; so, in a sense, the alternatives appear quite simple. However, decisions about when to adopt a more pedagogical or a more disciplinary viewpoint are complicated by difficult and potentially emotional factors that can disrupt calm, confident and well-reasoned judgment. Thus, this paper will focus not on pedagogical or disciplinary strategies, whichever may be considered suitable in a given case, but on a framework for thorough reflection earlier in the thinking process. It will explore multiple perspectives on possible origins for the innocent if maladroit mishandling of scholarly sources, with a view to highlighting a number of informative but potentially neglected reference points – a cognitive psychological perspective on human error and error management, plausible ambiguities in determining what actually constitutes plagiarism, and communication challenges – that may enter into the instructor’s final determination.

  20. Female Academics' Research Capacities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Socio-Cultural Issues, Personal Factors and Institutional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Rachel; Wisker, Gina; Dabbagh, Lanja; Akreyi, Kawther Jameel; Golmohamad, Hediyeh; Bendixen, Lone; Crawford, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    In October 2010, an interdisciplinary group of female academics from a university in the Kurdistan region of Iraq initiated a collaborative research project with a UK university to investigate opportunities and challenges for female academics' research leadership in universities in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The project aimed to develop female…

  1. Academic achievement and smoking: is self-efficacy an important factor in understanding social inequalities in Finnish adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennanen, Marjaana; Haukkala, Ari; De Vries, Hein; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2011-11-01

    Poor academic achievement is strongly related to smoking but studies that examine the mechanism between academic achievement and smoking are lacking. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the smoking-related cognitions (i.e. attitude, social influence, self-efficacy and intention to smoke) in relation to academic achievement and determine whether these cognitions explain different patterns of smoking. The study uses the data of a longitudinal study that was carried out in Finland, and the sample comprised 1,096 students in grades seven to nine. During the seventh-grade students with poor academic achievement reported more positive attitudes to smoking and a greater social influence of their peers regarding smoking, weaker self-efficacy to refuse smoking and more intentions to smoke in the future compared to students with high academic achievement. Moreover, the follow-up analyses after a 24-month interval revealed that self-efficacy to refuse smoking of students with poor grades had become weaker compared to students with high grades. Furthermore, the influence of seventh-grade academic achievement predicting ninth-grade weekly smoking was partially mediated through the self-efficacy beliefs and the intention to smoke. Differences in academic achievement may have an impact on adolescents' self-efficacy beliefs and the intention to smoke in the future. To reduce health inequalities a strong input on continuing research to improve smoking prevention methods, especially for students with low academic achievement, is needed.

  2. Anxiety and Depression in Academic Performance: An Exploration of the Mediating Factors of Worry and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Matthew; Stevenson, Jim; Hadwin, Julie A.; Norgate, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are linked to lower academic performance. It is proposed that academic performance is reduced in young people with high levels of anxiety or depression as a function of increased test-specific worry that impinges on working memory central executive processes. Participants were typically developing children (12 to…

  3. Interaction between Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Factors: The Influences of Academic Goal Orientation and Working Memory on Mathematical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry; Ning, Flora; Goh, Hui Chin

    2014-01-01

    Although the effects of achievement goals and working memory on academic performance are well established, it is not clear whether they jointly affect academic performance. Children from Primary 4 and 6 (N = 608) were administered (a) measures of working memory and updating from the automated working memory battery and a running span task, (b)…

  4. Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of Computerized Adaptive Testing: Application to Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; McCall, Marty; Jiao, Hong; Harris, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are twofold. First, to investigate the construct or factorial structure of a set of Reading and Mathematics computerized adaptive tests (CAT), "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP), given in different states at different grades and academic terms. The second purpose is to investigate the invariance of test…

  5. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology research grant program: factors associated with publication and advancement in academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D; Dellon, Evan S; Bright, Stephanie D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2009-05-01

    The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Demographic data, the year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient's institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. A similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred with 255 of the 368 awards (69%) for 1983-2006 [corrected]. Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of the 313 awardees over the same period, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions [corrected]. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (P academics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publication, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology.

  6. Clinical holistic medicine: factors influencing the therapeutic decision-making. From academic knowledge to emotional intelligence and spiritual "crazy" wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-12-10

    Scientific holistic medicine is built on holistic medical theory, on therapeutic and ethical principles. The rationale is that the therapist can take the patient into a state of salutogenesis, or existential healing, using his skills and knowledge. But how ever much we want to make therapy a science it remains partly an art, and the more developed the therapist becomes, the more of his/her decisions will be based on intuition, feeling and even inspiration that is more based on love and human concern and other spiritual motivations than on mental reason and rationality in a simple sense of the word. The provocative and paradoxal medieval western concept of the "truth telling clown", or the eastern concepts of "crazy wisdom" and "holy madness" seems highly relevant here. The problem is how we can ethically justify this kind of highly "irrational" therapeutic behavior in the rational setting of a medical institution. We argue here that holistic therapy has a very high success rate and is doing no harm to the patient, and encourage therapists, psychiatrists, psychologist and other academically trained "helpers" to constantly measure their own success-rate. This paper discusses many of the important factors that influence clinical holistic decision-making. Sexuality could, as many psychoanalysts from Freud to Reich and Searles have believed, be the most healing power that exists and also the most difficult for the mind to comprehend, and thus the most "crazy-wise" tool of therapy.

  7. Teenage Pregnancies: Risk Factors and Associated Neonatal Outcomes in an Eastern-European Academic Perinatal Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Laura Mihaela; Pasc, Andrada Larisa; Cucerea, Manuela; Bell, Edward F

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare women with early (13-16 years), late teenage (17-19 years), and adult (25-29 years) pregnancies regarding pregnancy risk factors and reproductive outcomes. An observational study, utilizing medical charts and direct interview, conducted in an academic hospital during January 2011 and December 2012. Our sample comprised 395 teenage and 736 adult pregnancies. Pregnant teenagers were more likely than adults to be single (41.7 vs. 33.2%; odds ratio [OR]: 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.84), to live in a rural area (70.9 vs. 53.9%; OR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.60-2.69), and to live with extended family (74.2 vs. 16.0%; OR: 15.04, 95% CI: 11.15-20.29). Adolescent mothers were more likely than adult mothers to give birth by vaginal delivery (78.5 vs. 69.6%; OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.17-2.84), and rate of operative delivery was lower amongst this group (8.6 vs. 9.8%; OR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.5-1.3). The newborns of adolescent mothers were more likely to be low birth weight (14.9 vs. 9.1%; OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.20-2.54) and more likely to successfully breastfeed (91.9 vs. 82.2%; OR: 2.45; 95% CI: 1.63-3.69) but the length of hospital stay was similar with adult mothers' newborns. The distinct risk factors and behaviors associated with pregnancy, among teenagers may help address the health needs of this unique and vulnerable group and their offspring. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Candidemia: incidence rates, type of species, and risk factors at a tertiary care academic hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zengbin; Liu, Yingbin; Feng, Xiaobo; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shuyun; Zhu, Xiaodong; Chen, Qiqi; Pan, Shuming

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the incidence rates of candidemia in hospitalized patients and to identify differences in risk factors of patients with Candida albicans and non-C. albicans and with Candida guilliermondii and non-C. guilliermondii candidemia. Non-immunosuppressed, non-neutropenic inpatients with candidemia diagnosed after admission were included in this retrospective observational study at a tertiary academic hospital in China. During the study period (January 2009 to December 2011), 238 eligible patients had candidemia episodes with an incidence rate 5.4%. Of these patients, 29.8% had candidemia due to C. albicans, 27.7% due to C. parapsilosis, and 16.4% due to C. guilliermondii. Diabetes was a significant risk factor for patients with candidemia due to C. albicans (35.2%, 25/71) compared to candidemia due to non-C. albicans spp (13.2%, 22/167) (odds ratio (OR) 0.2792, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.144-0.5412; p candidemia due to non-C. guilliermondii spp, preterm birth with low birth weight (OR 0.0887, 95% CI 0.0398-0.1977; p candidemia due to C. guilliermondii. Furthermore, compared to patients with candidemia due to C. albicans, patients with candidemia due to C. guilliermondii had markedly higher rates of central venous catheterization (85.9%, 61/71 vs. C. guilliermondii: 100%, 39/39; p = 0.013) and intravenous nutrition (89.7%, 35/39 vs. C. albicans: 42.2%, 30/71; p Candidemia due to C. albicans ranks first in incidence, and candidemia due to C. guilliermondii occurs in a significant proportion of our hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Editorial - Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Grinsted, Annelise

    2007-01-01

    Why you may wonder - have we chosen a topic which at first glance may seem trivial, and even a bit dull? Well, looks can be deceiving, and in this case they are! There are many good reasons for taking a closer look at instructions.......Why you may wonder - have we chosen a topic which at first glance may seem trivial, and even a bit dull? Well, looks can be deceiving, and in this case they are! There are many good reasons for taking a closer look at instructions....

  10. Endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high impact factor medical journals: a survey of journal editors and journal 'Instructions to Authors'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Sally; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2008-04-18

    The CONSORT Statement provides recommendations for reporting randomized controlled trials. We assessed the extent to which leading medical journals that publish reports of randomized trials incorporate the CONSORT recommendations into their journal and editorial processes. This article reports on two observational studies. Study 1: We examined the online version of 'Instructions to Authors' for 165 high impact factor medical journals and extracted all text mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers. Any mention of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) or clinical trial registration were also sought and extracted. Study 2: We surveyed the editor-in-chief, or editorial office, for each of the 165 journals about their journal's endorsement of CONSORT recommendations and its incorporation into their editorial and peer-review processes. Study 1: Thirty-eight percent (62/165) of journals mentioned the CONSORT Statement in their online 'Instructions to Authors'; of these 37% (23/62) stated this was a requirement, 63% (39/62) were less clear in their recommendations. Very few journals mentioned the CONSORT extension papers. Journals that referred to CONSORT were more likely to refer to ICMJE guidelines (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.51 to 3.08) and clinical trial registration (RR 3.67; 95% CI 2.36 to 5.71) than those journals which did not.Study 2: Thirty-nine percent (64/165) of journals responded to the on-line survey, the majority were journal editors. Eighty-eight percent (50/57) of journals recommended authors comply with the CONSORT Statement; 62% (35/56) said they would require this. Forty-one percent (22/53) reported incorporating CONSORT into their peer-review process and 47% (25/53) into their editorial process. Eighty-one percent (47/58) reported including CONSORT in their 'Instructions to Authors' although there was some inconsistency when cross checking information on the journal's website. Sixty-nine percent (31/45) of journals

  11. Endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high impact factor medical journals: a survey of journal editors and journal 'Instructions to Authors'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moher David

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CONSORT Statement provides recommendations for reporting randomized controlled trials. We assessed the extent to which leading medical journals that publish reports of randomized trials incorporate the CONSORT recommendations into their journal and editorial processes. Methods This article reports on two observational studies. Study 1: We examined the online version of 'Instructions to Authors' for 165 high impact factor medical journals and extracted all text mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers. Any mention of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE or clinical trial registration were also sought and extracted. Study 2: We surveyed the editor-in-chief, or editorial office, for each of the 165 journals about their journal's endorsement of CONSORT recommendations and its incorporation into their editorial and peer-review processes. Results Study 1: Thirty-eight percent (62/165 of journals mentioned the CONSORT Statement in their online 'Instructions to Authors'; of these 37% (23/62 stated this was a requirement, 63% (39/62 were less clear in their recommendations. Very few journals mentioned the CONSORT extension papers. Journals that referred to CONSORT were more likely to refer to ICMJE guidelines (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.51 to 3.08 and clinical trial registration (RR 3.67; 95% CI 2.36 to 5.71 than those journals which did not. Study 2: Thirty-nine percent (64/165 of journals responded to the on-line survey, the majority were journal editors. Eighty-eight percent (50/57 of journals recommended authors comply with the CONSORT Statement; 62% (35/56 said they would require this. Forty-one percent (22/53 reported incorporating CONSORT into their peer-review process and 47% (25/53 into their editorial process. Eighty-one percent (47/58 reported including CONSORT in their 'Instructions to Authors' although there was some inconsistency when cross checking information on the journal

  12. [Two-and-a-half year follow-up study of strategy factors in successful learning to predict academic achievements in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Ok; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Baek, Sunyong; Woo, Jae Seok; Im, Sun Ju; Yune, So Jung; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung

    2015-06-01

    We performed a two-and-a-half year follow-up study of strategy factors in successful learning to predict academic achievements in medical education. Strategy factors in successful learning were identified using a content analysis of open-ended responses from 30 medical students who were ranked in the top 10 of their class. Core words were selected among their responses in each category and the frequency of the words were counted. Then, a factors survey was conducted among year 2 students, before the second semester. Finally, we performed an analysis to assess the association between the factors score and academic achievement for the same students 2.5 years later. The core words were "planning and execution," "daily reviews" in the study schedule category; "focusing in class" and "taking notes" among class-related category; and "lecture notes," "previous exams or papers," and "textbooks" in the primary self-learning resources category. There were associations between the factors scores for study planning and execution, focusing in class, and taking notes and academic achievement, representing the second year second semester credit score, third year written exam scores and fourth year written and skill exam scores. Study planning was only one independent variable to predict fourth year summative written exam scores. In a two-and-a-half year follow-up study, associations were founded between academic achievement and the factors scores for study planning and execution, focusing in class, and taking notes. Study planning as only one independent variable is useful for predicting fourth year summative written exam score.

  13. Curriculum-based library instruction from cultivating faculty relationships to assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Blevins, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

  14. The correlation between tonsil size and academic performance is not a direct one, but the results of various factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kargoshaie, AA; Najafi, M; Akhlaghi, M; Khazraie, HR; Hekmatdoost, A

    2009-01-01

    Chronic upper airway obstruction most often occurs when both tonsils and adenoid are enlarged but may occur when either is enlarged. Obstructive sleep syndrome in young children has been reported to be associated with an adverse effect on learning and academic performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative size of the tonsil on academic performance in 4th grade school children. In 320 children, physical examination to determine the size of tonsils was performed by t...

  15. The Impact of Data-Based Science Instruction on Standardized Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Tia W.

    Increased teacher accountability efforts have resulted in the use of data to improve student achievement. This study addressed teachers' inconsistent use of data-driven instruction in middle school science. Evidence of the impact of data-based instruction on student achievement and school and district practices has been well documented by researchers. In science, less information has been available on teachers' use of data for classroom instruction. Drawing on data-driven decision making theory, the purpose of this study was to examine whether data-based instruction impacted performance on the science Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) and to explore the factors that impeded its use by a purposeful sample of 12 science teachers at a data-driven school. The research questions addressed in this study included understanding: (a) the association between student performance on the science portion of the CRCT and data-driven instruction professional development, (b) middle school science teachers' perception of the usefulness of data, and (c) the factors that hindered the use of data for science instruction. This study employed a mixed methods sequential explanatory design. Data collected included 8th grade CRCT data, survey responses, and individual teacher interviews. A chi-square test revealed no improvement in the CRCT scores following the implementation of professional development on data-driven instruction (chi 2 (1) = .183, p = .67). Results from surveys and interviews revealed that teachers used data to inform their instruction, indicating time as the major hindrance to their use. Implications for social change include the development of lesson plans that will empower science teachers to deliver data-based instruction and students to achieve identified academic goals.

  16. Event-related potentials to tones show differences between children with multiple risk factors for dyslexia and control children before the onset of formal reading instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Lohvansuu, Kaisa; Ervast, Leena; Leppänen, Paavo H T

    2015-02-01

    Multiple risk factors can affect the development of specific reading problems or dyslexia. In addition to the most prevalent and studied risk factor, phonological processing, auditory discrimination problems have also been found in children and adults with reading difficulties. The present study examined 37 children between the ages of 5 and 6, 11 of which had multiple risk factors for developing reading problems. The children participated in a passive oddball EEG experiment with sinusoidal sounds with changes in sound frequency, duration, or intensity. The responses to the standard stimuli showed a negative voltage shift in children at risk for reading problems compared to control children at 107-215 ms in frontocentral areas corresponding to P1 offset and N250 onset. Source analyses showed that the difference originated from the left and right auditory cortices. Additionally, the children at risk for reading problems had a larger late discriminative negativity (LDN) response in amplitude for sound frequency change than the control children. The amplitudes at the P1-N250 time window showed correlations to letter knowledge and phonological identification whereas the amplitudes at the LDN time window correlated with verbal short-term memory and rapid naming. These results support the view that problems in basic auditory processing abilities precede the onset of reading instruction and can act as one of the risk factors for dyslexia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. English-Language Writing Instruction in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Melinda

    2005-01-01

    Second language writing scholars have undertaken descriptions of English-language writing instruction in a variety of international settings, describing the role of various contextual factors in shaping English-language writing instruction. This article describes English-language writing instruction at various levels in Poland, noting how it is…

  18. Academic Literacy and Student Diversity: The Case for Inclusive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of approaches to academic literacy instruction and their underpinning theories, as well as a synthesis of the debate on academic literacy over the past 20 years. The author argues that the main existing instructional models are inadequate to cater for diverse student populations, and proposes an…

  19. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  20. Children's Productive Use of Academic Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shufeng; Zhang, Jie; Anderson, Richard C.; Morris, Joshua; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim Thi; Miller, Brian; Jadallah, May; Sun, Jingjing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Scott, Theresa; Hsu, Yu-Li; Zhang, Xin; Latawiec, Beata; Grabow, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Instructional influences on productive use of academic vocabulary were investigated among 460 mostly African American and Latina/o fifth graders from 36 classrooms in eight public schools serving low-income families. Students received a 6-week unit on wolf management involving collaborative group work (CG) or direct instruction (DI). The big…

  1. EXTENT PARENTAL AND STUDENT-RELATED FACTORS AFFECT STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN BUSINESS SUBJECTS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN AWKA EDUCATION ZONE

    OpenAIRE

    Ezenwafor, J. I.; Amobi, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Poor students’ results in business subjects in Awka Education Zone in internal and external examinations informed the need for this on parental and student-related factors that affect students’ academic performance in secondary schools in the area. Two research questions guided the study with two hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance. Survey research design was adopted. The population was 316 principals and business teachers from the 61 secondary schools in the zone. A structured qu...

  2. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  3. The correlation between tonsil size and academic performance is not a direct one, but the results of various factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargoshaie, A A; Najafi, M; Akhlaghi, M; Khazraie, H R; Hekmatdoost, A

    2009-10-01

    Chronic upper airway obstruction most often occurs when both tonsils and adenoid are enlarged but may occur when either is enlarged. Obstructive sleep syndrome in young children has been reported to be associated with an adverse effect on learning and academic performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative size of the tonsil on academic performance in 4th grade school children. In 320 children, physical examination to determine the size of tonsils was performed by the otorhinolaryngologist. A questionnaire was developed to assess sleep patterns and problems, and socio-demographic data for the student participants. Furthermore, their school performance was assessed using their grade in mathematics, science, reading, spelling, and handwriting. No association between tonsil size and academic performance was found. Snoring frequency, body mass index and body weight showed a positive relation with tonsil size. There was no association between tonsil size and sleepiness during the day, sleeping habits, hyperactivity, enuresis, history of tonsillectomy in children and parental cigarette smoking and education. In conclusion, this study did not show any significant relationship between tonsil size and academic performance in 4th grade students. Further studies are recommended with a larger sample size, cognitive exams for evaluation of attention, and follow-up of the students until high school, when the discrepancy of the students' academic performance is more obvious.

  4. The correlation between tonsil size and academic performance is not a direct one, but the results of various factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargoshaie, AA; Najafi, M; Akhlaghi, M; Khazraie, HR; Hekmatdoost, A

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic upper airway obstruction most often occurs when both tonsils and adenoid are enlarged but may occur when either is enlarged. Obstructive sleep syndrome in young children has been reported to be associated with an adverse effect on learning and academic performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative size of the tonsil on academic performance in 4th grade school children. In 320 children, physical examination to determine the size of tonsils was performed by the otorhinolaryngologist. A questionnaire was developed to assess sleep patterns and problems, and socio-demographic data for the student participants. Furthermore, their school performance was assessed using their grade in mathematics, science, reading, spelling, and handwriting. No association between tonsil size and academic performance was found. Snoring frequency, body mass index and body weight showed a positive relation with tonsil size. There was no association between tonsil size and sleepiness during the day, sleeping habits, hyperactivity, enuresis, history of tonsillectomy in children and parental cigarette smoking and education. In conclusion, this study did not show any significant relationship between tonsil size and academic performance in 4th grade students. Further studies are recommended with a larger sample size, cognitive exams for evaluation of attention, and follow-up of the students until high school, when the discrepancy of the students’ academic performance is more obvious. PMID:20162026

  5. Fostering the Intellectual and Tribal Spirit: The Role of the Chief Academic Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    His Horse Is Thunder, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and describes the academic leadership role of the chief academic officer (CAO), also referred to as the academic vice-president, academic dean, or the provost. The CAO is responsible for the development and implementation of all academic programs, including the curriculum content, assessment, instruction quality,…

  6. Academic Leadership in America's Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervay, Stu

    2006-01-01

    Academic leadership directly helps faculty members, administrative leaders, and professional support persons improve the quantity and quality of student learning. Those who regularly lead decision-making and action-taking processes in curriculum, instruction, and assessment of student learning can be called academic leaders. This article focuses…

  7. Academic Productivity: Institutional-Level Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counelis, James Steve

    Academic productivity is a generalized notion of measurement in terms of an output/input model. For this writer, this concept of academic productivity is a type of institutional-level theory concerned with monitoring one aspect of the university. Be it in financial indicators, the measurement of instructional effort, the calculation of FTE…

  8. 7 CFR 15b.32 - Academic adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... impairments, and other similar services and actions. Recipients need not provide attendants, individually...) Academic requirements. A recipient to which this subpart applies shall make such modifications to its.... Academic requirements that the recipient can demonstrate are essential to the instruction being pursued by...

  9. Academic Success: Tapping the Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Barry S.

    1983-01-01

    A program designed to combine academic instruction with the emotions was implemented in a resource room for elementary learning and/or behavior problem children. Activities focused on the senses and included contributing to a class poem and writing individual poems about emotions. (CL)

  10. A Model Midshipman: Factors Related to Academic and Military Success of Prior Enlisted Midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wyrick, Jared

    2005-01-01

    ... to be successful at the Naval Academy. Linear and Bi-Linear regression models are used to analyze the influence of prior-enlisted experience on academic and military performance at the Naval Academy on the classes from 1999 through 2004...

  11. The Influence of Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors on Academic Performance in General Chemistry Course: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alci, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the predictive and explanatory model in terms of university students' academic performance in "General Chemistry" course and their motivational features. The participants were 169 university students in the 1st grade at university. Of the participants, 132 were female and 37 were male students. Regarding…

  12. Exploring Socio-Demographics, Mobility, and Living Arrangement as Risk Factors for Academic Performance among Children Experiencing Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Allison; Chen, Li-Ting; Chen, Ming-E; Min, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Homeless children usually experience high mobility. Yet, it is not clear if the degree of mobility among homeless children is associated with their academic performance. Furthermore, an emerging body of literature is beginning to examine the impact of specific living arrangements (e.g., living with families or friends) on homeless family and child…

  13. Factors Affecting Burnout and School Engagement among High School Students: Study Habits, Self- Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Filiz; Tuzgol Dost, Meliha; Cetin, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' levels of burnout and school engagement with respect to academic success, study habits, and self-efficacy beliefs. The data were gathered during the 2011-2012 school year from 633 students attending six high schools located in Ankara, Turkey. The analyses were conducted on responses from 605 students. The…

  14. Sociological Factors to Drug Abuse and the Effects on Secondary School Students' Academic Performance in Ekiti and Ondo States, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu-Raheem, B. O.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of drug abuse on secondary school students in relation to their family background, family cohesion, peer group influence, and students' academic performance. Descriptive research design of the survey type and an inventory were used for the study. The population comprised all secondary school students in Ekiti and…

  15. Factors Influencing Academic Performance in Quantitative Courses among Undergraduate Business Students of a Public Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Darwish Abdulrahamn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the impacts of teaching style, English language and communication and assessment methods on the academic performance of undergraduate business students in introductory quantitative courses such as Statistics for Business 1 and 2, Quantitative Methods for Business, Operations and Production Management and…

  16. Factors Related to the Academic Success and Failure of College Football Players: The Case of the Mental Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gale; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines variables used to predict the academic success or failure of college football players. Valid predictors include the following: (1) high school grades; (2) repeating a year in school; (3) feelings towards school; (4) discipline history; (5) mother's education; and (6) high school background. (FMW)

  17. The Relationship Among Sex, Sociometric, Self, and Test Anxiety Factors and the Academic Achievement of Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotler, Sheldon; Palmer, Richard J.

    1970-01-01

    The following were points studies: (1) the differential relationships between aptitude, achievement, sociometric, self, and test anxiety data of boys and girls; (2) the relationship between less sociometric populatiry and a poorer self image and poorer academic performance and higher susceptibility to anxiety and stress in the classroom; and (4)…

  18. Lecture Attendance Is a Pivotal Factor for Improving Prospective Teachers' Academic Performance in Teaching and Learning Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzhanova-Ericsson, Alla T.; Bergman, Christina; Dinnétz, Patrik

    2017-01-01

    The value and importance of lectures in higher education is part of a modern education discourse worldwide. This study aims to estimate the importance of lectures for prospective teachers of kindergarten, preschool and early primary school. We analysed academic achievements of prospective teachers who had either mandatorily or voluntarily attended…

  19. The Influence of Academic and Social Factors of School Principals on the Success of Middle School Students in Urban Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tonya Yvette

    2012-01-01

    One thing is certain, accountability is here to stay; accountability exposes the good, the bad, and the ugly. The academic achievement gap between non-White and White students continues to exist in the disaggregated data in individual campuses, within school districts, and within comparison studies across the nation. Thus, school leadership is…

  20. The Role of Arts Participation in Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of School, Home, and Community Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Mansour, Marianne; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory A. D.; Sudmalis, David

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study draws on positive youth development frameworks and ecological models to examine the role of school-, home- and community-based arts participation in students' academic (e.g., motivation, engagement) and nonacademic (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction) outcomes. The study is based on 643 elementary and high school students…

  1. Study of the Academic Members Attitude about Main Factors of Not Approaching to Scientific Writing in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koorki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: one of the important indicators of scientific study and science production in the universities is original research and its scientific article. The aim of this study was to determine the academic members’ attitude about main factors of not approaching to scientific writing in Hamadan Uni. Med. Sci.Material & Methods: The current survey was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Statistical population was all of the academic members of this university in 2006 (N=260. The data collected through a questionnaire consists of 2 parts: I. the demographic characteristics, II. the questions related to their attitude. After distribution of the questionnaires we received 228 completed ones. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS software.Results: Outcomes showed that the main factors of not approaching to write the scientific articles were: education, teaching and treatment engagement mean with 3.891.16 of 5, the barriers of doing original research and writing the articles (3.880.93, long duration of sending and acceptation of articles in Persian scientific journals (3.841.07 and weakness of English language skill (3.831.05.Conclusion: The barriers of scientific writing were in 3 parts: organizational, personal and personal-organizational problems. The academic members’ activities and university managers’ supports are needed to remove these barriers.

  2. Reliability and validity of the student stress inventory-stress manifestations questionnaire and its association with personal and academic factors in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli-Muñoz, Agustín J; Balanza, Serafín; Rivera-Caravaca, José Miguel; Vera-Catalán, Tomás; Lorente, Ana María; Gallego-Gómez, Juana I

    2018-05-01

    Stress affects us in every environment and it is also present in the educational sphere. Previous studies have reported a high prevalence of stress in university students. The Student Stress Inventory-Stress Manifestations (SSI-SM), identify stressors and evaluate stress manifestations in adolescents but its validity in university students remains uncertain. We aimed to determine the internal consistency and validity of an adapted version of the Student Stress Inventory-Stress Manifestations (SSI-SM) for university students and to investigate if high stress levels are associated with personal and academic factors. In this quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study, we included 115 university students of the Nursing Degree during the second semester of the 2014/2015 academic year. Information about personal issues, lifestyle and academic performance was recorded and the stress was evaluated with the SSI-SM questionnaire. The internal consistency and homogeneity of the SSI-SM questionnaire was tested and a factorial analysis was performed. After the homogeneity analysis, the final version of the SSI-SM questionnaire included 19 items, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.924. In the factorial analysis, 4 factors were found ('Self-concept', 'Sociability', 'Uncertainty' and 'Somatization'; all Cronbach's alpha >0.700). Students with higher values on the SSI-SM were, in overall, women (41.0 ± 12.7 vs. 33.2 ± 9.5; p = 0.001) and had significantly more family conflicts (47.6 ± 13.8 vs. 35.2 ± 9.6; p students of the Nursing Degree. Family conflicts, female gender, absence of alcohol consumption, few sleep hours and poor academic performance are associated with higher stress levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Economic Status of Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Robert; Young, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines some of the factors affecting the current economic status of academic librarians, as well as the history of changes in that economic picture. Issues discussed include the ranking of beginning academic librarian salaries in comparison to others in the profession, historical differences between academic librarian salaries and…

  4. Academic Dishonesty in Medical Schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drive academic dishonesty among aspiring doctors. Objective: To establish the factors driving academic dishonesty ... academic dishonesty in the Medical School made it. 86.3% likely that a student would participate. Having .... on Plagiarism and Cheating, in Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in the.

  5. Investigating the Relationship of Sociodemographic and Personality Factors to Faculty Perceptions and Motivations Regarding the Use of Online Instruction in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to investigate the relationship of sociodemographic and personality traits to faculty perceptions and motivations regarding the use of online instruction in radiologic and imaging sciences. A faculty perception and motivations survey of online instruction was administered online in order to…

  6. USING GOOGLE+ FOR INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    Full Text Available Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+ quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011 blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011. Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget, the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007. Selwyn (2009 found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

  7. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    avoidance and mastery orientation, Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), awareness of academic rules and regulations, assessment practices, faculty, and university attended predicted the different types of academic dishonesty with varying levels of significance. INTRODUCTION. Today's undergraduate students are ...

  8. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  9. Using estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis to examine the unique effects of the latent variables measured by the WAIS-IV on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, John H; Benson, Nicholas; Floyd, Randy G

    2015-12-01

    This study used estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) to examine the unique effects of its latent variables on academic achievement. In doing so, we addressed the potential limitation of multicollinearity in previous studies of the incremental validity of the WAIS-IV. First, factor scores representing psychometric g and 4 group factors representing the WAIS-IV index scales were computed from a bifactor model. Subtest and composite scores for the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Third Edition (WIAT-II) were then predicted from these estimated factor scores in simultaneous multiple regression. Results of this study only partially replicated the findings of previous research on the incremental validity of scores that can be derived from performance on the WAIS-IV. Although we found that psychometric g is the most important underlying construct measured by the WAIS-IV for the prediction of academic achievement in general, results indicated that the unique effect of Verbal Comprehension is also important for predicting achievement in reading, spelling, and oral communication skills. Based on these results, measures of both psychometric g and Verbal Comprehension could be cautiously interpreted when considering high school students' performance in these areas of achievement. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Pupils' gender and age as factors of differences in teacher's liking, perceived teacher's support and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Košir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present research was to examine how teachers report their liking of girls and boys in different periods of schooling and how students perceive the potential differences in their teachers' preferences. Also, the differences between girls and boys in the relationship between teacher's liking and perceived teacher's support on one side and students' academic achievement on the other side were examined. 1155 students (fifth and eighth grade of elementary school and second grade of secondary school and 50 teachers – their classteachers – participated in the study. The results show that teachers prefer girls to boys in all periods of schooling. This trend is especially evident in eight-graders. Compared to boys, girls have better academic achievement. However, there are no significant differences in the perceived teacher's support between girls and boys.

  11. Racial-ethnic Identity in Context: Examining Mediation of Neighborhood Factors on Children’s Academic Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Dawn P.; Daniels, Lisa L.; Mason, Amber E.; Smith, Emilie Phillips

    2016-01-01

    Research consistently shows that neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and residents’ neighborhood perceptions matter for youth well-being, including a positive sense of racial-ethnic identity. Although elementary-school children are likely in the earlier phases of identity formation, the authors examined whether objective and subjective neighborhood characteristics are related to their racial-ethnic identity and, in turn, their academic adjustment. A diverse sample (30.4% AA, 35.2% White, 12.3% Latino, & 22.0% Other) of 227 children in Grades 2 through 5 were surveyed in afterschool programs. Bivariate correlations showed that youth living in disadvantaged neighborhoods reported more barriers due to their race-ethnicity, but these barriers were not related to their sense of academic efficacy. Residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood was unrelated to youth’s academic self-efficacy. However, path analyses showed that positive neighborhood perceptions were associated with a stronger sense of race-ethnicity (i.e., affirmation and belonging), which was in turn related to greater academic efficacy. These results suggest that neighborhood connection provides a source of affirmation and value for young children, helping them to understand who they are as part of a racial-ethnic group and helping to foster a sense of future achievement opportunities. This study provides additional evidence that along with other important proximal contexts (e.g., family, school), young children’s neighborhood context is important for development. Results are discussed to highlight environmental influences on young children’s awareness of race-ethnicity and the implications of the combined impact of neighborhood and racial-ethnic identity on psychosocial adjustment. PMID:27217314

  12. Instructive role of the transcription factor E2A in early B lymphopoiesis and germinal center B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyongrim; Hutter, Caroline; Sun, Qiong; Bilic, Ivan; Cobaleda, César; Malin, Stephen; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2008-06-01

    The transcription factor E2A controls the initiation of B lymphopoiesis, which is arrested at the pre-pro-B cell stage in E2A-deficient mice. Here, we demonstrate by conditional mutagenesis that E2A is essential for the development of pro-B, pre-B, and immature B cells in the bone marrow. E2A is, however, dispensable for the generation of mature B cells and plasma cells in peripheral lymphoid organs. In contrast, germinal center B cell development is impaired in the absence of E2A despite normal AID expression and class-switch recombination. Molecular analysis revealed that E2A is required not only for initiating but also for maintaining the expression of Ebf1, Pax5, and the B cell gene program in pro-B cells. Notably, precocious Pax5 transcription from the Ikzf1 locus promotes pro-B cell development in E2A-deficient mice, demonstrating that ectopic Pax5 expression is sufficient to activate the B lymphoid transcription program in vivo in the absence of E2A.

  13. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Enhancing research visibility of academics: the role of academic libraries. Information Impact: Journal of Information and. Knowledge Management. 2017, Vol. .... Social media platforms allow users to connect, create, promote, share and follow interest groups. With these capabilities, academic libraries can make use of ...

  14. Instructional constraints faced by learners with duchenne muscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is about the instructional constraints facing learners with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) at Salvation Army (SA) Joy Town special primary school, Thika, Kenya. Instructional constraints in this study are the academic challenges encountered by the learners that include: poor teaching methods, inappropriate ...

  15. Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP). WWC Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) is a framework for planning and delivering instruction in content areas such as science, history, and mathematics to limited-English proficient students. The goal of SIOP is to help teachers integrate academic language development into their lessons, allowing students to learn and practice…

  16. Mediated Instruction and Redundancy Remediation in Sciences in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data were analyzed using t-test statistics. Data analysis revealed that use of mediated instruction significantly removed redundancy for science students also the use of mediated instruction influenced academic achievement of science students in secondary schools. Some of the recommendations include that science ...

  17. Measuring Association between Library Instruction and Graduation GPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shun Han Rebekah; Cmor, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Academic libraries devote considerable human resources in delivering library instruction programs. This study attempts to determine if these instructional efforts have any measurable effect on student performance in terms of overall grades. Library workshop attendance and graduation GPA of over 8,000 students was analyzed at Hong Kong Baptist…

  18. A Criterion-Referenced Approach to Student Ratings of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J. Patrick; Doromal, Justin B.; Wei, Xiaoxin; Zhu, Shi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a criterion-referenced student rating of instruction (SRI) to facilitate formative assessment of teaching. It involves four dimensions of teaching quality that are grounded in current instructional design principles: Organization and structure, Assessment and feedback, Personal interactions, and Academic rigor. Using item response…

  19. Stand Up Comics: Instructional Humor and Student Engagment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, Amy; Dotson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the use of instructional humor in higher education settings and makes connections between the levels of student achievement in academics and the influence of appropriate instructional humor. The work of prominent researchers such as Wanzer, Frymier, and Irwin (2010), and Segrist & Hupp (2015), who postulate that…

  20. The Effects of Inquiry-Based Integrated Information Literacy Instruction: Four-Year Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ching Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of four-year integrated information literacy instruction via a framework of inquiry-based learning on elementary students’ memory and comprehension. Moderating factors of students’ academic achievement was another focus of this study. The subjects were 72 students who have participated in this study since they entered an elementary school in Chiayi district. This elementary school adopted the integrated information literacy instruction, designed by the researchers and elementary school teachers, and integrated it into various subject matters via a framework of inquiry-based learning, such as Super 3 and Big6 models. A series of inquiry-based integrated information literacy instruction has been implemented since the second semester of the subjects’ first grade. A total of seven inquiry learning projects has been implemented from grade one through grade four. Fourteen instruments were used as pretests and posttests to assess students’ factual recall and conceptual understanding of subject contents in different projects. The results showed that inquiry-based integrated information literacy instruction couldhelp students memorize facts and comprehend concepts of subject contents. Regardless ofacademic achievements, if students would like to devote their efforts to inquiry processes, their memory and comprehension of subject contents improvedeffectively. However, students of low-academic achievement might need more time to be familiar with the inquiry-based learning strategy.

  1. Biographic Characteristics and Factors Perceived as Affecting Female and Male Careers in Academic Surgery: The Tenured Gender Battle to Make It to the Top.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Laura; Sippel, Sonia; Entwistle, Andrew; Hell, Anna Kathrin; Koenig, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Given the high attrition rate in the field of academic surgery, we aimed to characterise the professional and personal situations of female and male academic surgeons as well as to gather data on their respective perceptions of career advancement and work satisfaction. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Germany, inviting all identifiable academically highly qualified female surgeons and their male counterparts in a 1:2 ratio to participate. An anonymous 103-item online questionnaire was designed and the data collected between July and September 2014. The questionnaire was sent to 93 female and 200 male surgeons, of whom 63 women (67.7%) and 70 men (35.0%) replied. The average age was 47.5 and 47.1 years, respectively. Respondents identified 'high degree of expertise', 'ambition', and 'clarity of one's professional aims' as important factors affecting professional career development. Both groups felt 'workload', 'working hours/shifts', and 'gender' to be a hindrance, the latter of significantly greater importance to female surgeons. The mean work satisfaction scores were high in both female (69.5%) and male (75.7%) surgeons. The predictors 'support from superiors' (standardised β coefficient = 0.41) and 'manual aptitude' (β = 0.41) contributed incrementally to the variance in 'high degree of work satisfaction' (90-100%) observed for female surgeons. However, childcare provided by 'kindergarten/crèche/after-school care' had the greatest negative predictive value (β = -1.33). Although there are many parallels, female faculty members experience the culture of academic surgery to some extent differently from their male counterparts, especially when impacted by parenthood and childcare. Faculty development programmes need to develop strategies to improve perceived equality in career opportunities by respecting individuals' requirements as well as offering gender-appropriate career guidance. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains innovative…

  3. Librarians and Instructional Designers: Collaboration and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Joe; Moniz, Richard; Mann, Karen; Eshleman, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    With online education options more ubiquitous and sophisticated than ever, the need for academic librarians to be conversant with digital resources and design thinking has become increasingly important. The way forward is through collaboration with instructional designers, which allows librarians to gain a better understanding of digital resource…

  4. Computer Managed Instruction: Toward Individualized Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kent; And Others

    The authors describe the functions of an integrated systems approach in solving the administrative, academic, and logistical problems of a large university department. They discuss the roles of a computer managed instruction system for the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communication. First, the system can record student and…

  5. The Effect of Academic Instruction upon the Memory Strategies of College Students Engaged in Problem-Solving in the Study of Selected Topics in Nuclear Physics and Space Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhady, Abdelhady Kassim

    This investigation explored the effect of sequential and structured instruction on the memory strategies and recall capabilities of college students. The content used consisted of a complex learning task related to Cosmic Ray Physics. The investigation is believed to be important educationally because it is an attempt to study the effect of active mediation through instruction between materials and learners to enhance complex learning by providing mnemonic models to the learner. The rationale for the research is that effective recall and understanding of complex structures require that the learner build a cognitive basis for the facilitation of retrieval. Experts in an area of study usually achieve effective recall by accommodating new materials within their existing stores of knowledge. This study investigated the extent to which novices can achieve this goal when assisted by appropriate instruction. The sample consisted of two groups of learners of which 10 participants were professors in nuclear and particle physics who studied the subject matter without instruction, and 16 college students who were nonscience majors. Students were provided with mnemonic structures characterized by strategies and representations applied directly to the target subject matter. Half of the participants took an immediate recall achievement test. All participants took a delayed recall test one week later. Findings showed a significant difference between the mean scores of novices and experts on an immediate and delayed recall test at the 0.001 level of significance. However, novices' performance in both tests ranged from 73% to 93% items answered correctly. This reveals that novices gained much of the information possessed by experts in this domain of knowledge along with a framework which ties this information together through the effect of mnemonic structures given to them in the instructional materials. Novices were thus able to encode information in a form which enhanced the

  6. Students' Appraisal of the Quality of Instruction in Clothing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    level of satisfaction varied with their academic levels and school ... value of the quality of instruction in the teaching of Clothing and Textiles in .... Material and Method. The design of this research work was ex-post facto and descriptive in nature. Academic level and school background served as the independent variables.

  7. A Framework for Explicit Vocabulary Instruction with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.; Tindall, Evie R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic vocabulary development is critical to the success of all learners--particularly English language learners (ELLs). This article presents a framework for integrating explicit academic vocabulary instruction for ELLs into middle school classrooms. The framework embodies five research-based principles and serves as a vehicle for structuring…

  8. Mediating effects of motor performance, cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity, and sedentary behaviour on the associations of adiposity and other cardiometabolic risk factors with academic achievement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Eero A; Lintu, Niina; Eloranta, Aino-Maija; Venäläinen, Taisa; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Ahonen, Timo; Lindi, Virpi; Lakka, Timo A

    2018-03-09

    We investigated the associations of cardiometabolic risk factors with academic achievement and whether motor performance, cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity, or sedentary behaviour mediated these associations. Altogether 175 children 6-8 years-of-age participated in the study. We assessed body fat percentage (BF%), waist circumference, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, leptin, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Reading fluency, reading comprehension, and arithmetic skills were assessed using standardized tests. Speed/agility, balance, and manual dexterity test results were used to calculate motor performance score and physical activity was assessed by combined heart rate and movement sensor and cardiorespiratory fitness by maximal cycle ergometer test. In boys, BF% was inversely associated with reading fluency (β = -0.262, P = 0.007) and reading comprehension (β = -0.216, P = 0.025). Motor performance mediated these associations. Leptin was inversely related to reading fluency (β = -0.272, P = 0.006) and reading comprehension (β = -0.287, P = 0.003). The inverse association of leptin with reading fluency was mediated by motor performance. In girls, GGT was inversely associated with reading fluency independent of confounders (β = -0.325, P = 0.007). The inverse association of BF% with academic achievement among boys was largely explained by motor performance. Leptin in boys and GGT in girls were inversely associated with academic achievement independent of confounding factors.

  9. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    OpenAIRE

    N. Jayakumar; M. Surudhi

    2016-01-01

    In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried o...

  10. Instructional Leadership and Schools Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Daisy Kee Mui; Ponnusamy, Premavathy

    With the influx of information technology through the Internet and the use of ICT in our daily lives, our future generation has traversed from a mere change of era to a dynamic era of change. Thus, the role of school leaders is becoming more challenging than ever. They need to make greater strides to ensure that they are able to make adjustments and readjustments in instructional practices to cater for the changing elements in their organization. In brief, the school leaders have to be creative, innovative with entrepreneurial drive in order to steer their subordinates (teachers) towards school excellence. Leadership of principal is therefore considered as a main criterion to create successful schools in country's educational advancement. Besides, the school effectiveness plays a crucial role in country's academic advancement. This paper focuses on a comprehensive review of literature on the relationship between instructional leadership and school effectiveness.

  11. Developing Teacher Capacity for Serving ELLs' Writing Instructional Needs: A Case for Systemic Functional Linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Munoz, Zenaida; Park, Jae-Eun; Amabisca, Anastasia; Boscardin, Christy Kim

    2008-01-01

    Although explicit grammar instruction has been a source of considerable debate in second-language teaching, increasingly educational linguists assert instruction in academic language is critical, given the current assessment reform in K-12 contexts. Of particular concern is that contemporary English-Language-Learner (ELL) instruction focuses on…

  12. Effective Multicultural Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin T. Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reason why the Trayvon Martin murder trial and similar court cases create a philosophical rift in our nation is due in part to flaws in the delivery of multicultural education. Traditional multicultural instruction does not prepare citizens for the subtleties and complexities of race relations. This study investigates critical strategies and practices that address multicultural missing gaps. I also seek to fill a void in the literature created by a lack of student input regarding teaching strategies that encourage lifelong learning. Students (N = 337 enrolled at a Midwestern university were asked to rate the efficacy of selected instructional strategies. Utilizing a 9-point Likert-type scale, students gave themselves a personal growth rating of 7.15 (SD = 1.47. Variables important to predicting that growth (R2 = .56, p < .0005 were a six-factor variable known as a non-color-blind instructional approach (t = 10.509, p ≤ .0005, allowing students an opportunity to form their own opinions apart from the instructor (t = 4.797, p ≤ .0005, and a state law that mandated multicultural training (t = 3.234, p = .001. Results demonstrated that utilizing a 35% traditional and 65% critical pedagogy mixture when teaching multicultural education helped promote win/win scenarios for education candidates hoping to become difference makers.

  13. Instructional control of sleep reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noles, K O; Epstein, L H; Jones, H T

    1976-10-01

    Nightly sleep of 8 college students was gradually reduced from baseline levels by instructions implemented in a multiple baseline, changing criterion design. The reduction phases were 5%, 15%, and 30% decreases. Performance, academic, and sleepiness measures were collected. Consistent reductions occurred for all subjects from mean daily sleep times of 7.71 to 6.20 hr. per night, a 20% decrease. No negative side-effects were observed and subjects reported they enjoyed the additional free time afforded by reducing their sleep.

  14. Digital Academic Revolution Mentorship Competency: #2 The Conversation--Viewing Instructional Design & Pedagogy as a Holistic Unit Transformative Teamwork in a Learn by Doing Approach--Student Turned Mentor & Mentor Turned Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Martin; Fose, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    The following is the second article in the "Digital Academic Revolution: Mentorship Competency Series" by Martin Mehl and Luanne Fose. It is a "transcribed" conversation between Luanne and Martin about their experience collaborating as a research team and the conceptualization, implementation, and assessment of the Digital…

  15. Kamu Üniversiteleri Öğretim Elemanlarının İş Tatmini Düzeyini Etkileyen Faktörler(The Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction Level of Public Universities’ Academics)

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz KARAMAN; Ali Ender ALTUNOĞLU

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most discussed subjects in the management pschology field. However, there are not sufficient research concerning with job satisfaction level of academics. The aims of this research are to fill this gap to some extent and to point out the factors affecting job satisfaction. For this reason, the data were collected from 138 academics working in eight different public universities. According to the research, job satisfacton is affected by freedom to give decis...

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING STUDENTS UNREST IN INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF STUDENTS IN UNIVERSITY OF UYO, AKWA IBOM STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies K.U

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nigerians have for some time been disturbed by the alarming rate at which students' unrest in Nigerian institutions of higher learning have led to destruction of lives and property and untimely interruption of the planned academic programmes. On the basis of the above exposition, the project examined the concept of students’ unrest, factors that influence students’ unrest and its implication on the academic performance of students. A survey research design was adopted and a fifteen items questionnaire entitled "Factors Influencing Students’ Unrest in Institution of Higher Learning Questionnaire" (FISUIHLQ, was used to collect the data needed for analysis. Percentage, frequency count, and mean model were used to analyze the data collected. Items that fall between 0.50-1.49 mean score were considered Very Low, items that fall between 1.50-2.49 mean score were considered Low, items that fall between 2.50-3.49 mean score were considered Moderate, Items that fall between 3.50-4.49 mean score were considered High, while items that fall between mean scores of 4.50-5.00 were considered Very High. The study, therefore, discovered that breaking of rules and regulations, lack of social amenities and students involvement in cultism were seen as 'high' with mean scores of 2.60, 3.71 and 4.16 respectively, that is, they are serious factors that can influence students unrest in institutions of higher learning. While effective students’ union body and periodic strike by staff of the institution were seen as 'Low' with mean score of 2.21 and 1.96 respectively, that is, they are less serious factors that can influence students’ unrest. Also, it was discovered that disrupts of academic programmes, closure of schools, lecturers not unable to cover syllabus, and brain drain syndrome are the implications of students unrest with mean scores of 3.70,2.84,4.06,2.96 respectively were seen as ‘High’, that is, they are serious implication of students

  17. User instructions for the CIDER Dose Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides user instructions for the CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides) computer code. The CIDER code computes estimates of annual doses estimated for both reference individuals with a known residence and food consumption history. This document also provides user instructions for four utility codes used to build input data libraries for CIDER. These utility codes are ENVFAC (environmental factors), FOOFAC (food factors), LIFFAC (lifestyle factors), and ORGFAC (organ factors). Finally, this document provides user instructions for the EXPAND utility code. The EXPAND code processes a result file from CIDER and extracts a summary of the dose information for reporting or plotting purposes.

  18. Academic Satisfaction Level and Academic Achievement among Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Academic Year 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Khadijeh Jamshidi; Babak Mohammadi; Zahra Mohammadi; Mohammad Karimi Parviz; Roghayeh Poursaberi; Mohammad Mehdi Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Academic satisfaction is considered one of the most important factors affecting academic achievement among students. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between academic satisfaction and academic achievement among students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with 346 student participants using stratified random sampling. The research instrument included the Student Academic Sa...

  19. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fil...

  20. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  1. Linking Strengths: Identifying and Exploring Protective Factor Clusters in Academically Resilient Low-Socioeconomic Urban Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Erik E.

    2010-01-01

    Based on data from qualitative interviews with 50 high-achieving low-socioeconomic students of color, two "clusters" of important and symbiotic protective factors are identified and explored. Each cluster consists of a series of interrelated protective factors identified by the participants as crucial to their statistically exceptional academic…

  2. Embedded and Direct Metacognitive Strategy Instruction and its Effects on the Metacognitive Awareness of Tertiary Level Malaysian ESL Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ean Lye

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This small-scale quasi-experimental study compared the effects of metacognitive strategy instruction using two pedagogical approaches on the metacognitive awareness of Malaysian ESL listeners. Embedded and direct strategy instruction was delivered using the Metacognitive Pedagogical Sequence and Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach instructional models respectively. 45 tertiary level students were randomly selected and assigned to two treatment groups to receive metacognitive instruction over a training period of five weeks. Paired-samples t-test results on participants‟ metacognitive awareness, as measured using the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ were inclusive despite significant improvements in their IELTS listening scores. No significant development was recorded in the overall MALQ scores but there were significant changes in three out of the five metacognitive awareness factors. Results further layered according to participants‟ listening proficiency levels (low, intermediate and high to examine if differences existed among the listening levels similarly showed no significant difference. These results suggest that ESL listeners‟ metacognitive awareness may not be easily developed with strategy instruction, regardless of the instructional approaches.

  3. [Prevalence and factors associated with psychoactives substances consumption for academics of nursing of the University of Passo Fundo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picolotto, Eduardo; Libardoni, Luis Fernando Casarin; Migott, Ana Maria Belani; Geib, Lorena Teresinha Consalter

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this epidemiologic transversal cut study was to investigate the consumption of psychoactive substances and their determinants between the nursery academics of the University of Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul State. 266 students, aging more than eighteen years old answered a questionnaire of the Brazilian Center of Information about Psychoactive Drugs. A descriptive statistics, qui-square and multiple logistics regression were carried out for the data analysis. Of the sample, 94% had consumed alcohol in the life, 90% in that year and 79% in that month, 14% were characterized as heavy users. The girls had consumed benzodiazepines and stimulants more than the boys. The ones aging 20 year and more and females had evidenced minor possibility of alcohol consumption in the month and those with a monthly family income lower than ten salaries presented a greater possibility of marijuana (OR: 1.92), cocaine (OR:4.63) and inhalants (OR:7.02) consumption. The standard of psychoactive substance consumption is similar than the one found in other groups of colleges student, except for the benzodiazepines and stimulants, suggesting itself a deeper evaluation of this consumption.

  4. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  5. The STEM Lecture Hall: A Study of Effective Instructional Practices for Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Lynn Christine

    First-generation, low-income, underrepresented minority (URM) and female undergraduates are matriculating into science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors at unprecedented levels. However, a disproportionate number of these students end up graduating in non-STEM disciplines. Attrition rates have been observed to spike in conjunction with introductory STEM courses in chemistry, biology, and physics. These "gateway" courses tend to be housed in large, impersonal lecture halls. First-generation and URM students struggle in this environment, possibly because of instructors' reliance on lecture-based content delivery and rote memorization. Recent social psychological studies suggest the problem may be related to cultural mismatch, or misalignment between independent learning norms typical of American universities and interdependent learning expectancies for first-generation and URM students. Value-affirming and utility-value interventions yield impressive academic achievement gains for these students. These findings overlap with a second body of literature on culturally responsive instruction. Active gateway learning practices that emphasize interactive instruction, frequent assessment, and epistemological instruction can be successful because of their propensity to incorporate values affirming and utility-value techniques. The present study observed instruction for gateway STEM courses over a three-year period at the University of California, Irvine (N = 13,856 undergraduates in 168 courses). Exploratory polychoric factor analysis was used to identify latent variables for observational data on gateway STEM instructional practices. Variables were regressed on institutional student data. Practices implemented in large lecture halls fall into three general categories: Faculty-Student Interaction, Epistemological Instruction, and Peer Interaction . The present study found that Faculty-Student Interaction was negatively associated with student outcomes for

  6. Entering and navigating academic medicine: academic clinician-educators' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Koshila; Roberts, Chris; Thistlethwaite, Jill

    2011-05-01

    Despite a recognised need for richer narratives about academic medicine, much of the literature is limited to an analysis of the enablers and barriers associated with recruitment and retention, and focuses on analysing the development of research career pathways. We explored academic clinician-educators' experiences of entering into and navigating academic medicine, with a particular focus on those who privilege teaching above research. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups conducted across a medical school at one Australian university. We used socio-cognitive career theory to provide theoretical insight into the factors that influence academic clinician-educators' interests, choice and motivations regarding entering and pursuing a teaching pathway within academic medicine. Framework analysis was used to illustrate key themes in the data. We identified a number of themes related to academic clinician-educators' engagement and performance within an academic medicine career focused on teaching. These include contextual factors associated with how academic medicine is structured as a discipline, cultural perceptions regarding what constitutes legitimate practice in academia, experiential factors associated with the opportunity to develop a professional identity commensurate with being an educator, and socialisation practices. The emphasis on research in academia can engender feelings of marginalisation and lack of credibility for those clinicians who favour teaching over research. The prevailing focus on supporting and socialising clinicians in research will need to change substantially to facilitate the rise of the academic clinician-educator. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  7. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so...

  8. Data-Driven Identification of Risk Factors of Patient Satisfaction at a Large Urban Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Lee, Nathan J; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Radbill, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is the first publicly reported nationwide survey to evaluate and compare hospitals. Increasing patient satisfaction is an important goal as it aims to achieve a more effective and efficient healthcare delivery system. In this study, we develop and apply an integrative, data-driven approach to identify clinical risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. We included 1,771 unique adult patients who completed the HCAHPS survey and were discharged from the inpatient Medicine service from 2010 to 2012. We collected 266 clinical features including patient demographics, lab measurements, medications, disease categories, and procedures. We developed and applied a data-driven approach to identify risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. We identify 102 significant risk factors associating with 18 surveyed questions. The most significantly recurrent clinical risk factors were: self-evaluation of health, education level, Asian, White, treatment in BMT oncology division, being prescribed a new medication. Patients who were prescribed pregabalin were less satisfied particularly in relation to communication with nurses and pain management. Explanation of medication usage was associated with communication with nurses (q = 0.001); however, explanation of medication side effects was associated with communication with doctors (q = 0.003). Overall hospital rating was associated with hospital environment, communication with doctors, and communication about medicines. However, patient likelihood to recommend hospital was associated with hospital environment, communication about medicines, pain management, and communication with nurse. Our study identified a number of putatively novel clinical risk factors for patient satisfaction that suggest new opportunities to better understand and manage patient satisfaction. Hospitals can use a data-driven approach to

  9. Socio-emotional factors related to the academic difficulties of “star” children of the psychomotricity and intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Herrera González

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the main socio- affective factors related to school difficulties of a group of three girls and three boys identified as "star" in the Programa Psicomotricidad e Intervención (Psychomotor and Intervention Program. The study was developed through a mixed methodology, in which the Human Figure Test, the Kinetic Family Drawing and an interview with the mother of each student were applied. The most important results revealed the existence of family conflicting factors that affect the emotional state of children, generating negative feelings about themselves that affect their social interactions and their school performance.

  10. Kamu Üniversiteleri Öğretim Elemanlarının İş Tatmini Düzeyini Etkileyen Faktörler(The Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction Level of Public Universities’ Academics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz KARAMAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction is one of the most discussed subjects in the management pschology field. However, there are not sufficient research concerning with job satisfaction level of academics. The aims of this research are to fill this gap to some extent and to point out the factors affecting job satisfaction. For this reason, the data were collected from 138 academics working in eight different public universities. According to the research, job satisfacton is affected by freedom to give decisions, good conditions for implementing new programs, cooperation with colleagues and wage factors.

  11. The impact of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary school transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Vaz

    Full Text Available Students negotiate the transition to secondary school in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence (AC and mental health functioning (MHF of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in primary and secondary school, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized primary schools had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent primary schools had the lowest MHF. The primary school organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten--Year 7 schools reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten--Year 12 structure without middle school having the highest scores. Attending a school which used the Kindergarten--Year 12 with middle school structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of school contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for schools to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary school, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition.

  12. The impact of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary school transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sharmila; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Passmore, Anne Elizabeth; Falkmer, Marita

    2014-01-01

    Students negotiate the transition to secondary school in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence (AC) and mental health functioning (MHF) of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in primary and secondary school, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized primary schools had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent primary schools had the lowest MHF. The primary school organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten--Year 7 schools reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten--Year 12 structure without middle school having the highest scores. Attending a school which used the Kindergarten--Year 12 with middle school structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of school contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for schools to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary school, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition.

  13. The Use Frequency of 10 Different Methods for Preventing and Detecting Academic Dishonesty and the Factors Influencing Their Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Sebastian; Wiegel, Constantin; van Veen, Floris

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the use frequency by German faculty of 10 different methods for preventing and detecting cheating on exams, plagiarism, and falsification and/or fabrication of data. It also investigates the factors influencing their use. In total, 3,655 faculty members from 55 randomly chosen disciplines at 4 German universities were contacted…

  14. Using confirmatory factor analysis to validate the Chamberlin affective instrument for mathematical problem solving with academically advanced students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Scott A; Moore, Alan D; Parks, Kelly

    2017-09-01

    Student affect plays a considerable role in mathematical problem solving performance, yet is rarely formally assessed. In this manuscript, an instrument and its properties are discussed to enable educational psychologists the opportunity to assess student affect. The study was conducted to norm the CAIMPS (instrument) with gifted students. In so doing, educational psychologists are informed of the process and the instrument's properties. The sample was comprised of 160 middle-grade (7 and 8) students, identified as gifted, in the United States. After completing one of four model-eliciting activities (MEAs), all participants completed the CAIMPS (Chamberlin Affective Instrument for Mathematical Problem Solving). Data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis to ascertain the number of factors in the instrument. The normed fit index (0.6939), non-normed fit index (0.8072), and root mean square error approximation (.076) were at or near the acceptable levels. Alpha levels for factors were also robust (.637-.923). Data suggest that the instrument was a good fit for use with mathematics students in middle grades when solving problems. Perhaps the most impressive characteristic of the instrument was that the four factors (AVI: anxiety, value, and interest), SS (self-efficacy and self-esteem), ASP (aspiration), and ANX (anxiety) did not correlate highly with one another, which defies previous hypotheses in educational psychology. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  15. A Systematic Review of Factors Linked to Poor Academic Performance of Disadvantaged Students in Science and Maths in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pallavi Amitava

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic hardships put children in an underprivileged position. This systematic review was conducted to identify factors linked to underachievement of disadvantaged pupils in school science and maths. What could be done as evidence-based practice to make the lives of these young people better? The protocol from preferred reporting items for…

  16. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  17. Using Academic Word Lists to Support Disciplinary Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Picot, Christine

    2017-01-01

    An elementary mathematics coach describes her process and instructional strategies for using academic word lists to support students' disciplinary literacy development. Using teacher coaching, the author explores methods for classroom teachers to embed and authentically integrate best practices in vocabulary instruction to support disciplinary…

  18. Concept-Based Grammar Teaching: An Academic Responds to Azar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kent

    2007-01-01

    This response to Azar (this volume) intends to discuss from an academic's perspective the main points raised in her paper (i.e., grammar-based instruction and its relation to focus on form and error correction) and, to encourage a more concept-based approach to grammar instruction (CBT). A CBT approach to language development argues that the…

  19. The representation of women academics in higher education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is devoted to a discussion of women academics (more specifically instructional/research staff) in higher education in South Africa. It disaggregates the sex-specific data by sector, race, age, rank, qualification and scientific field. The proportion of female instructional/research staff substantially increased from 30

  20. Understanding the factors that influence high science achievers' academic choices and intent to pursue or opt out of the hard sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quihuis, Gisell

    Drawing on Eccles and her colleagues' Expectancy-Value model of academic behavior and choice, this dissertation study set out to serve three purposes: (1) to understand how high achieving high school students who aspire to science college degrees compare, in terms of motivational beliefs and social experiences, with other high achievers who do not aspire to science college degrees; (2) to understand why some high school students who excel in the hard sciences are unsure about pursuing a science degree in college; and (3) to examine whether gender differences in motivational beliefs and social experiences found in previous research on math (see Eccles 1984) exist for science among high achieving high school students. Survey and interview data showed that gender differences previously found in Eccles' research on math exist for science among a select group of high achieving high school students. Yet, these gender differences did not explain students' aspirations for science. Motivation, classroom perceptions, science engagement, as well as other science-related experiences at home and school, including parent and teacher influences, were also important factors associated with students' aspirations for science. Results and implications for this study are encouraging because they suggest that both parents and educators can help more high achievers become interested in science. Parents can expose their children, male and female alike, to science at home early on in their childhood and teachers can help students sustain and further develop an interest in science at school. In this manner, both parents and teachers can work together as a team to encourage more high achievers to aspire to science degrees in their future. Lastly, it is important to note that this study found Eccles' model of motivation and choice helpful in understanding not only gender differences in math and the hard sciences, but also aspiration differences that cut across gender among students