WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic health sciences

  1. A greater voice for academic health sciences libraries: the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Alison

    2003-04-01

    The founders of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) envisioned the development of a professional organization that would provide a greater voice for academic health sciences libraries, facilitate cooperation and communication with the Association of American Medical Colleges, and create a forum for identifying problems and solutions that are common to academic health sciences libraries. This article focuses on the fulfillment of the "greater voice" vision by describing action and leadership by AAHSL and its members on issues that directly influenced the role of academic health sciences libraries. These include AAHSL's participation in the work that led to the publication of the landmark report, Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management; its contributions to the recommendations of the Physicians for the Twenty-first Century: The GPEP Report; and the joint publication with the Medical Library Association of Challenge to Action: Planning and Evaluation Guidelines for Academic Health Sciences Libraries.

  2. Digital reference service: trends in academic health science libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2005-01-01

    Two years after the initial 2002 study, a greater number of academic health science libraries are offering digital reference chat services, and this number appears poised to grow in the coming years. This 2004 follow-up study found that 36 (27%) of the academic health science libraries examined provide digital chat reference services; this was an approximately 6% increase over the 25 libraries (21%) located in 2002. Trends in digital reference services in academic health science libraries were derived from the exploration of academic health science library Web sites and from digital correspondence with academic health science library personnel using e-mail and chat. This article presents an overview of the current state of digital reference service in academic health science libraries.

  3. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative.

  4. Organizational models of emerging academic health science centers in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Davies, Stephen M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2010-08-01

    Recent government policy initiatives to foster medical innovation and high-quality care in England have prompted academic and clinical leaders to develop new organizational models to support the tripartite Flexnerian mission of academic medicine. Medical schools and health care providers have responded by aligning their missions and creating integrated governance structures that strengthen their partnerships. In March 2009, the government officially designated five academic-clinical partnerships as England's first academic health science centers (AHSCs). As academic-clinical integration is likely to continue, future AHSC leaders could benefit from an analysis of models for organizing medical school-clinical enterprise relationships in England's emerging AHSCs. In addition, as the United States ponders health systems reform and universal coverage, U.S. medical leaders may benefit from insight into the workings of academic medicine in England's universal health system. In this article, the authors briefly characterize the organization and financing of the National Health Service and how it supports academic medicine. They review the policy behind the designation of AHSCs. Then, the authors describe contrasting organizational models adopted in two of the newly designated AHSCs and analyze these models using a framework derived from U.S. literature. The authors conclude by outlining the major challenges facing academic medicine in England and offer suggestions for future research collaborations between leaders of AHSCs in the United States and England.

  5. Staff development planning in an academic health sciences library*

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Linda M.; Abromitis, Rebecca A.; Kuller, Alice B.; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A staff development committee (SDC) was convened to implement staff development opportunities for an academic health sciences library system comprised of three separate facilities. The charge for the SDC was to: (1) develop programs to enhance workplace skills and personal growth, (2) communicate the availability of existing programs at the university and medical center, and (3) encourage the staff to participate in these opportunities.

  6. International trends in health science librarianship part 17: a comparison of health science libraries with academic and research libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeannette

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 4 years this Regular Feature has looked at trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. Although there are still a few more regions to be covered in this series, this issue explores general trends in academic and research libraries with a view to discovering whether the trends identified for health science libraries are similar. Are health science libraries unique? Or do their experiences mirror those found in the wider world of academic and research libraries?

  7. External Reporting Lines of Academic Special Libraries: A Health Sciences Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Amy G.; Ferree, Nita; Cataldo, Tara T.; Tennant, Michele R.

    2010-01-01

    Very little literature exists on the nature of external reporting lines and funding structures of academic special libraries. This study focuses on academic health sciences libraries. The authors analyze information gathered from statistics published by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) from 1977 through 2007; an…

  8. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    OpenAIRE

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship.

  9. Measuring information technology investment among Canadian academic health sciences centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Lorraine; Leonard, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Many recent studies have attempted to accurately measure the expenditure by hospitals in the area of new information technology (IT), for example see Leonard 1998 and Pink et al. 2001. This is usually done as an exercise to compare the healthcare sector with other industries that have had much more success in implementing and leveraging their IT investment (Willcocks 1992; Chan 2000). It is normally hoped that such investigation would help explain some of the differences among the various industries and provide insight into where (and how much) future IT spending should occur in healthcare (Leonard 2004). Herein, we present the results from a study of eight Canadian academic health sciences centres that contributed data in order to analyze the amount of information technology spending in their organizations. Specifically, we focus on one specific indicator: the IT spend ratio. This ratio is defined as the percentage of total IT net costs to total hospital net operating costs, and aims to provide a "relative (or percentage) measure of spending" so as to make the comparisons meaningful. One such comparison shows that hospitals spend only 55% of the amount the financial services sector spends.

  10. Academical training of Health Sciences professionals as a resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Mur Villar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic training of Health Sciences professionals is an essential resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research and should be considered as an inherent attribute of professional practice. In present times this issue is still being questioned, because educational practice has not been fully transformed in the clinical setting. This work supports the potentials of academic training in Health Sciences to achieve this integration and is a call for professionals to create scientific basis of educational knowledge production in order to link health care practice to teaching and research. Bibliographic analysis showed that assistance centers should be academic centers for the development of Health Sciences. Academic training of professionals enables the integration we are looking for and establishes a mutual empowerment relationship, where each dimension is favoured in its interface.

  11. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2006-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 65 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2006-2007, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 244,188 volumes, spent a total of $244,188,020, and employed 2,395 FTE…

  12. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 64 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2007-2008, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 240,955 volumes, spent a total of $240,019,298, and employed 2,304…

  13. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Patricia P

    2003-07-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings.

  14. MENTOR TRAINING WITHIN ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTERS WITH CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE AWARDS

    OpenAIRE

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J.; Richards, Boyd F.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only 4 AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent ...

  15. A Survey of the Usability of Digital Reference Services on Academic Health Science Library Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl; Allen, Maryellen

    2006-01-01

    Reference interactions with patrons in a digital library environment using digital reference services (DRS) has become widespread. However, such services in many libraries appear to be underutilized. A study surveying the ease and convenience of such services for patrons in over 100 academic health science library Web sites suggests that…

  16. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' legislative activities and the Joint Medical Library Association/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Legislative Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenan, Joan S

    2003-04-01

    The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' (AAHSL's) involvement in national legislative activities and other advocacy initiatives has evolved and matured over the last twenty-five years. Some activities conducted by the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) Legislative Committee from 1976 to 1984 are highlighted to show the evolution of MLA's and AAHSL's interests in collaborating on national legislative issues, which resulted in an agreement to form a joint legislative task force. The history, work, challenges, and accomplishments of the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force, formed in 1985, are discussed.

  17. Approaching usability: a study of an academic health sciences library web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, Marie T; Lougee-Heimer, Haldor; Cunningham, Diana J

    2007-01-01

    A usability study was conducted at a medium-sized academic health sciences library with the goal of providing data to inform the future redesign of the library's Web page. A two-stage approach was used: (1) A preliminary survey designed to identify common tasks and issues on which to focus, and (2) usability testing. Responses to the survey indicated general satisfaction with the site and suggested areas for testing. Usability testing participants were asked to perform scripted tasks. The results indicate that users do have considerable difficulty navigating the site and recommendations are presented. This method of testing is recommended for health sciences libraries.

  18. Feeding the fledgling repository: starting an institutional repository at an academic health sciences library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Ann; Kipnis, Dan

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Scott Memorial Library at Thomas Jefferson University started an institutional repository (IR), the Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) . Originally intended as a showcase for faculty scholarship, it has evolved to serve also as a university press for original journals and newsletters, and as an institutional archive. Many lessons have been learned about marketing techniques, common IR issues, and advantages of an IR for a library. IR recruitment has come to be viewed as yet another form of collection development and has been integrated into all forms of the Library's outreach. Jefferson's academic health sciences environment has proven similar to other academic environments on issues of acceptance and participation. PMID:19384712

  19. Feeding the fledgling repository: starting an institutional repository at an academic health sciences library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Ann; Kipnis, Dan

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Scott Memorial Library at Thomas Jefferson University started an institutional repository (IR), the Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) . Originally intended as a showcase for faculty scholarship, it has evolved to serve also as a university press for original journals and newsletters, and as an institutional archive. Many lessons have been learned about marketing techniques, common IR issues, and advantages of an IR for a library. IR recruitment has come to be viewed as yet another form of collection development and has been integrated into all forms of the Library's outreach. Jefferson's academic health sciences environment has proven similar to other academic environments on issues of acceptance and participation.

  20. Ten steps to increase library impact on an academic health sciences campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdol, Joseph R

    2010-07-01

    In summer 2009, the Norris Medical Library decided to increase outreach efforts in an attempt to revitalize its role in the USC School of Pharmacy for the upcoming academic year. Active networking in the summer and early fall resulted in an increase in use of both educational and reference services by pharmacy students and faculty; the number of planned instruction sessions for the 2009-2010 academic year increased fivefold. This article identifies ten steps that allowed the Library to expand its role considerably in just a few months. If followed wholly, or in part, these ten steps will help any library become more involved on a health sciences campus.

  1. Alternative funding for academic medicine: experience at a Canadian Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Paul; Shortt, S E D; Walker, D M C

    2004-03-01

    In 1994 the School of Medicine of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, its clinical teachers, and the three principal teaching hospitals initiated a new approach to funding, the Alternative Funding Plan, a pragmatic response to the inability of fee-for-service billing by clinical faculty to subsidize the academic mission of the health sciences center. The center was funded to provide a package of service and academic deliverables (outputs), rather than on the basis of payment for physician clinical activity (inputs). The new plan required a new governance structure representing stakeholders and raised a number of important issues: how to reconcile the preservation of physician professional autonomy with corporate responsibilities; how to gather requisite information so as to equitably allocate resources; and how to report to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in order to demonstrate accountability. In subsequent iterations of the agreement it was necessary to address issues of flexibility resulting from locked-in funding levels and to devise meaningful performance measures for departments and the center as a whole. The authors conclude that the Alternative Funding Plan represents a successful innovation in funding for an academic health sciences center in that it has created financial stability, as well as modest positive effects for education and research. The Ontario government hopes to replicate the model at the province's other four health sciences centers, and it may have applicability in any jurisdiction in which the costs of medical education outstrip the capacity of faculty clinical earnings. PMID:14985191

  2. Alternative funding for academic medicine: experience at a Canadian Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Paul; Shortt, S E D; Walker, D M C

    2004-03-01

    In 1994 the School of Medicine of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, its clinical teachers, and the three principal teaching hospitals initiated a new approach to funding, the Alternative Funding Plan, a pragmatic response to the inability of fee-for-service billing by clinical faculty to subsidize the academic mission of the health sciences center. The center was funded to provide a package of service and academic deliverables (outputs), rather than on the basis of payment for physician clinical activity (inputs). The new plan required a new governance structure representing stakeholders and raised a number of important issues: how to reconcile the preservation of physician professional autonomy with corporate responsibilities; how to gather requisite information so as to equitably allocate resources; and how to report to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care in order to demonstrate accountability. In subsequent iterations of the agreement it was necessary to address issues of flexibility resulting from locked-in funding levels and to devise meaningful performance measures for departments and the center as a whole. The authors conclude that the Alternative Funding Plan represents a successful innovation in funding for an academic health sciences center in that it has created financial stability, as well as modest positive effects for education and research. The Ontario government hopes to replicate the model at the province's other four health sciences centers, and it may have applicability in any jurisdiction in which the costs of medical education outstrip the capacity of faculty clinical earnings.

  3. Assessment of Service Desk Quality at an Academic Health Sciences Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; DeBerg, Jennifer; Kiscaden, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to an identified need for formal assessment, a small team of librarians designed and administered a survey to gauge the quality of customer service at their academic health sciences library. Though results did not drive major changes to services, several important improvements were implemented and a process was established to serve as a foundation for future use. This article details the assessment process used and lessons learned during the project. PMID:27391179

  4. Assessment of Service Desk Quality at an Academic Health Sciences Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; DeBerg, Jennifer; Kiscaden, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to an identified need for formal assessment, a small team of librarians designed and administered a survey to gauge the quality of customer service at their academic health sciences library. Though results did not drive major changes to services, several important improvements were implemented and a process was established to serve as a foundation for future use. This article details the assessment process used and lessons learned during the project.

  5. Collection development and outsourcing in academic health sciences libraries: a survey of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, D D; Hollander, S; Lanier, D

    1999-04-01

    Academic health sciences libraries in the United States and Canada were surveyed regarding collection development trends, including their effect on approval plan and blanket order use, and use of outsourcing over the past four years. Results of the survey indicate that serials market forces, budgetary constraints, and growth in electronic resources purchasing have resulted in a decline in the acquisition of print items. As a result, approval plan use is being curtailed in many academic health sciences libraries. Although use of blanket orders is more stable, fewer than one-third of academic health sciences libraries report using them currently. The decline of print collections suggests that libraries should explore cooperative collection development of print materials to ensure access and preservation. The decline of approval plan use and the need for cooperative collection development may require additional effort for sound collection development. Libraries were also surveyed about their use of outsourcing. Some libraries reported outsourcing cataloging and shelf preparation of books, but none reported using outsourcing for resource selection. The reason given most often for outsourcing was that it resulted in cost savings. As expected, economic factors are driving both collection development and outsourcing practices. PMID:10219477

  6. Feasibility of physician peer assessment in an academic health sciences centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Sharon; Vozzolo, Ben; Daneman, Denis; Macgregor, Daune

    2011-01-01

    Peer assessment has become an important component of physician evaluation. In an academic health sciences centre, in addition to clinical care there is a significant focus on education, training and research. The literature suggests that the use of a 360-degree evaluation can provide physicians with valuable information on many aspects of their practice and can inform both professional and personal development. We conducted a pilot study to determine the feasibility of using peer assessment as part of the evaluation of our academic physicians. To maintain anonymity, an outside company was engaged to conduct the study. Participants completed a self-assessment and provided the names of eight physician peers and eight non-physician peers who were then requested to complete an evaluation. In addition, 25 patients were asked to provide their feedback. All questionnaires were forwarded directly to the outside company, which then compiled the data and provided each participant with a final report. Results indicate that it is feasible to carry out peer assessment within an academic health sciences centre. Participants noted the value of the process for career development and quality improvement. PMID:21301240

  7. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Annual Statistics: a thematic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, James; Byrd, Gary D

    2003-04-01

    The Annual Statistics of Medical School Libraries in the United States and Canada (Annual Statistics) is the most recognizable achievement of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries in its history to date. This article gives a thematic history of the Annual Statistics, emphasizing the leadership role of editors and Editorial Boards, the need for cooperation and membership support to produce comparable data useful for everyday management of academic medical center libraries and the use of technology as a tool for data gathering and publication. The Annual Statistics' origin is recalled, and survey features and content are related to the overall themes. The success of the Annual Statistics is evident in the leadership skills of the first editor, Richard Lyders, executive director of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library. The history shows the development of a survey instrument that strives to produce reliable and valid data for a diverse group of libraries while reflecting the many complex changes in the library environment. The future of the Annual Statistics is assured by the anticipated changes facing academic health sciences libraries, namely the need to reflect the transition from a physical environment to an electronic operation.

  8. Providing health information to the general public: a survey of current practices in academic health sciences libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, S M

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 148 publicly and privately supported academic health sciences libraries affiliated with Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC-accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada to determine level of access and services provided to the general public. For purposes of this study, "general public" was defined as nonaffiliated students or health care professionals, attorneys and other nonhealth-related professionals, patients from affiliated or other hospitals or clinics, and general consumers. One hundred five (71%) libraries responded. Results showed 98% of publicly supported libraries and 88% of privately supported libraries provided access to some or all of the general public. Publicly supported libraries saw greater numbers of public patrons, often provided more services, and were more likely to circulate materials from their collections than were privately supported libraries. A significant number of academic health sciences libraries housed a collection of consumer-oriented materials and many provided some level of document delivery service, usually for a fee. Most allowed the public to use some or all library computers. Results of this study indicated that academic health sciences libraries played a significant role in serving the information-seeking public and suggested a need to develop written policies or guidelines covering the services that will be provided to minimize the impact of this service on primary clientele.

  9. Understanding the psychology of seeking support to increase Health Science student engagement in academic support services. A Practice Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Francis Hoyne; Keith McNaught

    2013-01-01

    Increasing student engagement within higher education academic support services is a constant challenge. Whilst engagement with support is positively associated with successful retention, and non-engagement connected to attrition, the most vulnerable students are often the least likely to engage. Our data has shown that Health Science students are reluctant to engage with academic support services despite being made aware of their academic deficiencies. The “psychology of seeking suppor...

  10. The presence of academic health sciences libraries on Facebook: the relationship between content and library popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F; Tennant, Michele R

    2012-01-01

    Social networks such as Facebook allow libraries to be proactive in reaching their users. While some libraries have popular Facebook pages, it remains unclear what attracts users to these pages. This study evaluates relationships between libraries' Facebook page content and popularity. An analysis of 72 academic health sciences libraries' Facebook pages showed positive correlations between number of library fans and number of tabs, photos, events, and wall posts on Facebook. Libraries posting videos had significantly more fans than libraries without them. This study contributes to an understanding of correlations between content and popularity on Facebook, with implications for library outreach.

  11. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors. PMID:24127925

  12. Understanding the psychology of seeking support to increase Health Science student engagement in academic support services. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Francis Hoyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing student engagement within higher education academic support services is a constant challenge. Whilst engagement with support is positively associated with successful retention, and non-engagement connected to attrition, the most vulnerable students are often the least likely to engage. Our data has shown that Health Science students are reluctant to engage with academic support services despite being made aware of their academic deficiencies. The “psychology of seeking support” was used as a lens to identify some of the multifaceted issues around student engagement. The School of Health Sciences made attendance at support courses compulsory for those students who were below the benchmark score in a post entrance literacy test. Since the policy change was implemented, there has been a 50% reduction in the fail rate of “at risk” students in a core literacy unit. These findings are encouraging and will help reduce student attrition in the long term.

  13. [Productivity and academic assessment in the Brazilian public health field: challenges for Human and Social Sciences research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães

    2012-12-01

    This article analyzes some challenges for knowledge output in the human and social sciences in the public health field, under the current academic assessment model in Brazil. The article focuses on the qualitative research approach in human and social sciences, analyzing its status in comparison to the other traditions vying for hegemony in the public health field, conjugating the dialogue with the literature, especially the propositions pertaining to the social fields present in the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with elements concerning the field's dynamics, including some empirical data. Challenges identified in the article include hurdles to interdisciplinary dialogue and equity in the production of knowledge, based on recognition of the founding place of human and social sciences in the public health field. The article discusses strategies to reshape the current correlation of forces among centers of knowledge in public health, especially those capable of impacting the committees and agendas that define the accumulation of symbolic and economic capital in the field.

  14. [Productivity and academic assessment in the Brazilian public health field: challenges for Human and Social Sciences research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães

    2012-12-01

    This article analyzes some challenges for knowledge output in the human and social sciences in the public health field, under the current academic assessment model in Brazil. The article focuses on the qualitative research approach in human and social sciences, analyzing its status in comparison to the other traditions vying for hegemony in the public health field, conjugating the dialogue with the literature, especially the propositions pertaining to the social fields present in the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with elements concerning the field's dynamics, including some empirical data. Challenges identified in the article include hurdles to interdisciplinary dialogue and equity in the production of knowledge, based on recognition of the founding place of human and social sciences in the public health field. The article discusses strategies to reshape the current correlation of forces among centers of knowledge in public health, especially those capable of impacting the committees and agendas that define the accumulation of symbolic and economic capital in the field. PMID:23288072

  15. Implementing blended learning into the academic programs of Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Ahmed R; Prem, Kumar D

    2014-06-01

    Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka, India, is established by an Act of Karnataka State Legislature in the year 1996. Its mandate is to provide training and development in health sciences sector. This University has done pioneering work in the field of curriculum designing for all the health sciences courses offered by the affiliated institutions. In this regard, it has taken lead among all the health sciences universities in India. With student strength of more than one lakh, it has now become a necessity to explore all the possible technological options, so as to provide a comprehensive education to the students. In this context, a proposal has been submitted to the executive head of the University to implement the Blended Learning Program.

  16. Using Facebook Page Insights Data to Determine Posting Best Practices in an Academic Health Sciences Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Kathryn M.; Thornhill, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library created a Facebook page and a corresponding managing committee in March 2010. Facebook Page Insights data collected from the library's Facebook page were statistically analyzed to investigate patterns of user engagement. The committee hoped to improve posting practices and increase user…

  17. Health Sciences Libraries Forecasting Information Service Trends for Researchers: Models Applicable to All Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Timothy J.; Cheek, Fern M.; Kupsco, Jeremy; Hartel, Lynda J.; Getselman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the value of current information services and to forecast the evolving information and data management needs of researchers, a study was conducted at two research-intensive universities. The methodology and planning framework applied by health science librarians at Emory University and The Ohio State University focused on…

  18. Evaluation of a data warehouse in an academic health sciences center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, J R; Einbinder, J S

    1999-01-01

    A data warehouse can provide significant benefits to a health care organization if successfully designed and implemented. The Clinical Data Repository (CDR) at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center improves access to needed data for clinical research and effective decision making at many levels of the organization. We conducted an evaluation of the CDR using a survey questionnaire and interviews of key executive leaders. Our results suggest factors that influence the initial decision to use an information resource, examine the impact of communication channels, and highlight key issues that determine the continued use and ultimate success of a healthcare data warehouse.

  19. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical Library Association, and other organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Carol G; Bader, Shelley A

    2003-04-01

    The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries has made collaboration with other organizations a fundamental success strategy throughout its twenty-five year history. From the beginning its relationships with Association of American Medical Colleges and with the Medical Library Association have shaped its mission and influenced its success at promoting academic health sciences libraries' roles in their institutions. This article describes and evaluates those relationships. It also describes evolving relationships with other organizations including the National Library of Medicine and the Association of Research Libraries.

  20. The Australian DREEM: evaluating student perceptions of academic learning environments within eight health science courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Brown

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to investigate student perceptions of learning environments at a major Australian University. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, year levels, educational backgrounds and gender. Methods: The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM and a demographic questionnaire were completed by 548 undergraduate students enrolled in the emergency health, midwifery, radiography and medical imaging, occupational therapy, pharmacy, nutrition and dietetics, physiotherapy and social work courses at Monash University. Convenience sampling was used and scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores across the sample were fairly high (M = 137.3; SD = 18.3, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments among students. Total scores were significantly higher for females (M = 138.8; SD = 17.2 than males (M = 132.3; SD = 20.7; t[sub](545[/sub] = 3.51; p = 0.002 and this trend was consistent across all aspects of perceived learning environment (although not always significant. Students who enrolled in their course directly after completing high school yielded less positive ratings on some DREEM subscales than students who did not enrol immediately after completing high school. Conclusions: The positive perception held by Monash University health science students towards their education and learning environments is hopefully indicative of similar courses within Australia and internationally. While future studies may help confirm this, the current findings offer a chance to explore the underlying causes of this positivity in more depth as well as compare similarities and differences between the specific health science disciplines.

  1. Predicting Academic Success of Health Science Students for First Year Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Evans, Tess; Chivers, Paola T.

    2016-01-01

    Students commencing tertiary education enter through a number of traditional and alternative academic pathways. As a result, tertiary institutions encounter a broad range of students, varying in demographic, previous education, characteristics and academic achievement. In recent years, the relatively constant increase in tertiary applications in…

  2. Web-scale discovery in an academic health sciences library: development and implementation of the EBSCO Discovery Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jolinda L; Obrig, Kathe S; Abate, Laura E

    2013-01-01

    Funds made available at the close of the 2010-11 fiscal year allowed purchase of the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) for a year-long trial. The appeal of this web-scale discovery product that offers a Google-like interface to library resources was counter-balanced by concerns about quality of search results in an academic health science setting and the challenge of configuring an interface that serves the needs of a diverse group of library users. After initial configuration, usability testing with library users revealed the need for further work before general release. Of greatest concern were continuing issues with the relevance of items retrieved, appropriateness of system-supplied facet terms, and user difficulties with navigating the interface. EBSCO has worked with the library to better understand and identify problems and solutions. External roll-out to users occurred in June 2012.

  3. What Is Different about E-Books? A MINES for Libraries® Analysis of Academic and Health Sciences Research Libraries' E-Book Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Terry; Franklin, Brinley

    2015-01-01

    Building on the theoretical proposals of Kevin Guthrie and others concerning the transition from print books to e-books in academic and health sciences libraries, this paper presents data collected using the MINES for Libraries® e-resource survey methodology. Approximately 6,000 e-book uses were analyzed from a sample of e-resource usage at…

  4. Competence Indicators in Academic Education and Early Labour Market Success of Graduates in Health Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Semeijn, J.H.; van der Velden, R.K.W.; Heijke, J.A.M.; Van der Vleuten, C. P. M.; Boshuizen, H. P. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effects of several educational and non-educational indicators of (aspects of) competence on short-term labour market outcomes for university graduates are estimated. The research question we address is: To what extent do indications of specific and generic competence during the educational program predict labour market outcomes? Labour market outcomes in this study pertain to employment chances and quality of the job (having a job, academic level, matching occupational doma...

  5. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Annual Statistics: an exploratory twenty-five-year trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Gary D; Shedlock, James

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents an exploratory trend analysis of the statistics published over the past twenty-four editions of the Annual Statistics of Medical School Libraries in the United States and Canada. The analysis focuses on the small subset of nineteen consistently collected data variables (out of 656 variables collected during the history of the survey) to provide a general picture of the growth and changing dimensions of services and resources provided by academic health sciences libraries over those two and one-half decades. The paper also analyzes survey response patterns for U.S. and Canadian medical school libraries, as well as osteopathic medical school libraries surveyed since 1987. The trends show steady, but not dramatic, increases in annual means for total volumes collected, expenditures for staff, collections and other operating costs, personnel numbers and salaries, interlibrary lending and borrowing, reference questions, and service hours. However, when controlled for inflation, most categories of expenditure have just managed to stay level. The exceptions have been expenditures for staff development and travel and for collections, which have both outpaced inflation. The fill rate for interlibrary lending requests has remained steady at about 75%, but the mean ratio of items lent to items borrowed has decreased by nearly 50%.

  6. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  7. Mentorship needs at academic institutions in resource-limited settings: a survey at makerere university college of health sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakwagala Fred

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mentoring is a core component of medical education and career success. There is increasing global emphasis on mentorship of young scientists in order to train and develop the next leaders in global health. However, mentoring efforts are challenged by the high clinical, research and administrative demands. We evaluated the status and nature of mentoring practices at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MAKCHS. Methods Pre-tested, self-administered questionnaires were sent by email to all Fogarty alumni at the MAKCHS (mentors and each of them was requested to complete and email back the questionnaire. In addition to training level and number of mentors, the questionnaires had open-ended questions covering themes such as; status of mentorship, challenges faced by mentors and strategies to improve and sustain mentorship within MAKCHS. Similarly, open-ended questionnaires were sent and received by email from all graduate students (mentees registered with the Uganda Society for Health Scientists (USHS. Qualitative data from mentors and mentees was analyzed manually according to the pre-determined themes. Results Twenty- two out of 100 mentors responded (14 email and 8 hard copy responses. Up to 77% (17/22 of mentors had Master's-level training and only 18% (4/22 had doctorate-level training. About 40% of the mentors had ≥ two mentees while 27% had none. Qualitative results showed that mentors needed support in terms of training in mentoring skills and logistical/financial support to carry out successful mentorship. Junior scientists and students reported that mentorship is not yet institutionalized and it is currently occurring in an adhoc manner. There was lack of awareness of roles of mentors and mentees. The mentors mentioned the limited number of practicing mentors at the college and thus the need for training courses and guidelines for faculty members in regard to mentorship at academic institutions. Conclusions

  8. Moving global health forward in academic institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Wernli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global health has attracted growing attention from academic institutions. Its emergence corresponds to the increasing interdependence that characterizes our time and provides a new worldview to address health challenges globally. There is still a large potential to better delineate the limits of the field, drawing on a wide perspective across sciences and geographical areas. As an implementation and integration science, academic global health aims primarily to respond to societal needs through research, education, and practice. From five academic institutions closely engaged with international Geneva, we propose here a definition of global health based on six core principles: 1 cross–border/multilevel approach, 2 inter–/trans–disciplinarity, 3 systems thinking, 4 innovation, 5 sustainability, and 6 human rights/equity. This definition aims to reduce the century–old divide between medicine and public health while extending our perspective to other highly relevant fields. Overall, this article provides an intellectual framework to improve health for all in our contemporary world with implications for academic institutions and science policy.

  9. Student Health and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11 Resources Health and Academics Data and Statistics Bullying and Absenteeism: Information for State and Local Education Agencies [PDF - 624 KB] Anti-Bullying Policies and Enumeration: An Infobrief for Local Education ...

  10. Effect of Personal Response Systems on Student Perception and Academic Performance in Courses in a Health Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.; Finn, Kevin E.; Campisi, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To increase student engagement, active participation, and performance, personal response systems (clickers) were incorporated into six lecture-based sections of four required courses within the Health Sciences Department major curriculum: freshman-level Anatomy and Physiology I and II, junior-level Exercise Physiology, and senior-level Human…

  11. Critical Connections: Health and Academics

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, Shannon L; Merlo, Caitlin L.; Basch, Charles E.; Wentzel, Kathryn R; Wechsler, Howell

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND While it is a national priority to support the health and education of students, these sectors must better align, integrate, and collaborate to achieve this priority. This article summarizes the literature on the connection between health and academic achievement using the Whole School, Whole Community, and Whole Child (WSCC) framework as a way to address health-related barriers to learning. METHODS A literature review was conducted on the association between student health and aca...

  12. Viewpoint: A challenge to academic health centers and the National Institutes of Health to prevent unintended gender bias in the selection of clinical and translational science award leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Molly; Bland, Carole

    2007-02-01

    In controlled studies, both men and women preferentially select men over women for leadership positions, even when credentials are identical and despite field studies demonstrating women's equivalent or slightly better leadership effectiveness. The assumption that men will make better leaders than women is attributed to the pervasive existence of unconscious stereotypes that characterize both men and leaders as agentic or action oriented and women as dependent. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap is a novel, prestigious award that will place considerable power in the hands of one principal investigator-conditions that predict activation of bias in favor of selecting male leaders. The authors review research supporting this assertion. To mitigate the impact of this bias and broaden the pool of potential leaders for this transformative initiative, the authors offer the following suggestions. To academic health centers they suggest (1) internal search committees comprised of at least 35% women that establish a priori the desired qualities for the CTSA leader and broadly solicit applicants, (2) explicit specification of the full range of desirable skills of a CTSA leader, and (3) systematic efforts to increase awareness of the negative impact of unconscious gender bias on women's advancement. To the NIH they suggest (1) the new multiple principal investigator rule for the CTSA program, (2) a statement in the request for applications (RFA) encouraging diversity among principal investigators, (3) repetition in the RFA of the public NIH statement of the importance of work life balance for young investigators, and (4) constitution of study sections with at least 35% women. PMID:17264704

  13. Viewpoint: A challenge to academic health centers and the National Institutes of Health to prevent unintended gender bias in the selection of clinical and translational science award leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Molly; Bland, Carole

    2007-02-01

    In controlled studies, both men and women preferentially select men over women for leadership positions, even when credentials are identical and despite field studies demonstrating women's equivalent or slightly better leadership effectiveness. The assumption that men will make better leaders than women is attributed to the pervasive existence of unconscious stereotypes that characterize both men and leaders as agentic or action oriented and women as dependent. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap is a novel, prestigious award that will place considerable power in the hands of one principal investigator-conditions that predict activation of bias in favor of selecting male leaders. The authors review research supporting this assertion. To mitigate the impact of this bias and broaden the pool of potential leaders for this transformative initiative, the authors offer the following suggestions. To academic health centers they suggest (1) internal search committees comprised of at least 35% women that establish a priori the desired qualities for the CTSA leader and broadly solicit applicants, (2) explicit specification of the full range of desirable skills of a CTSA leader, and (3) systematic efforts to increase awareness of the negative impact of unconscious gender bias on women's advancement. To the NIH they suggest (1) the new multiple principal investigator rule for the CTSA program, (2) a statement in the request for applications (RFA) encouraging diversity among principal investigators, (3) repetition in the RFA of the public NIH statement of the importance of work life balance for young investigators, and (4) constitution of study sections with at least 35% women.

  14. IBM, Elsevier Science, and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailar, John C; Cicolella, Andre; Harrison, Robert; LaDou, Joseph; Levy, Barry S; Rohm, Timothy; Teitelbaum, Daniel T; Wang, Yung-Der; Watterson, Andrew; Yoshida, Fumikazu

    2007-01-01

    Elsevier Science refused to publish a study of IBM workers that IBM sought to keep from public view. Occupational and environmental health (OEH) suffers from the absence of a level playing field on which science can thrive. Industry pays for a substantial portion of OEH research. Studies done by private consulting firms or academic institutions may be published if the results suit the sponsoring companies, or they may be censored. OEH journals often reflect the dominance of industry influence on research in the papers they publish, sometimes withdrawing or modifying papers in line with industry and advertising agendas. Although such practices are widely recognized, no fundamental change is supported by government and industry or by professional organizations.

  15. Health is Academic!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-11

    Research shows that when students eat healthy and are more physically active, they do better in school. With CDC’s help, communities nationwide are putting this research into practice, inside and outside the classroom, 365 days a year. Tune in to this podcast to hear specific steps that communities in Chicago and San Diego are taking to turn their schools into places where students not only learn the importance of eating healthier and being more physically active but, in fact, practice it.  Created: 7/11/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 7/11/2013.

  16. Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Stephen J; Ginther, Donna K; Kahn, Shulamit; Williams, Wendy M

    2014-12-01

    thereafter, leading to lower female propensities to major in math-intensive subjects in college but higher female propensities to major in non-math-intensive sciences, with overall science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors at 50% female for more than a decade. Post-college, although men with majors in math-intensive subjects have historically chosen and completed PhDs in these fields more often than women, the gap has recently narrowed by two thirds; among non-math-intensive STEM majors, women are more likely than men to go into health and other people-related occupations instead of pursuing PhDs. Importantly, of those who obtain doctorates in math-intensive fields, men and women entering the professoriate have equivalent access to tenure-track academic jobs in science, and they persist and are remunerated at comparable rates-with some caveats that we discuss. The transition from graduate programs to assistant professorships shows more pipeline leakage in the fields in which women are already very prevalent (psychology, life science, social science) than in the math-intensive fields in which they are underrepresented but in which the number of females holding assistant professorships is at least commensurate with (if not greater than) that of males. That is, invitations to interview for tenure-track positions in math-intensive fields-as well as actual employment offers-reveal that female PhD applicants fare at least as well as their male counterparts in math-intensive fields. Along these same lines, our analyses reveal that manuscript reviewing and grant funding are gender neutral: Male and female authors and principal investigators are equally likely to have their manuscripts accepted by journal editors and their grants funded, with only very occasional exceptions. There are no compelling sex differences in hours worked or average citations per publication, but there is an overall male advantage in productivity. We attempt to reconcile these results

  17. Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Stephen J; Ginther, Donna K; Kahn, Shulamit; Williams, Wendy M

    2014-12-01

    thereafter, leading to lower female propensities to major in math-intensive subjects in college but higher female propensities to major in non-math-intensive sciences, with overall science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors at 50% female for more than a decade. Post-college, although men with majors in math-intensive subjects have historically chosen and completed PhDs in these fields more often than women, the gap has recently narrowed by two thirds; among non-math-intensive STEM majors, women are more likely than men to go into health and other people-related occupations instead of pursuing PhDs. Importantly, of those who obtain doctorates in math-intensive fields, men and women entering the professoriate have equivalent access to tenure-track academic jobs in science, and they persist and are remunerated at comparable rates-with some caveats that we discuss. The transition from graduate programs to assistant professorships shows more pipeline leakage in the fields in which women are already very prevalent (psychology, life science, social science) than in the math-intensive fields in which they are underrepresented but in which the number of females holding assistant professorships is at least commensurate with (if not greater than) that of males. That is, invitations to interview for tenure-track positions in math-intensive fields-as well as actual employment offers-reveal that female PhD applicants fare at least as well as their male counterparts in math-intensive fields. Along these same lines, our analyses reveal that manuscript reviewing and grant funding are gender neutral: Male and female authors and principal investigators are equally likely to have their manuscripts accepted by journal editors and their grants funded, with only very occasional exceptions. There are no compelling sex differences in hours worked or average citations per publication, but there is an overall male advantage in productivity. We attempt to reconcile these results

  18. What are the barriers to scaling up health interventions in low and middle income countries? A qualitative study of academic leaders in implementation science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamey Gavin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most low and middle income countries (LMICs are currently not on track to reach the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. One way to accelerate progress would be through the large-scale implementation of evidence-based health tools and interventions. This study aimed to: (a explore the barriers that have impeded such scale-up in LMICs, and (b lay out an “implementation research agenda”—a series of key research questions that need to be addressed in order to help overcome such barriers. Methods Interviews were conducted with fourteen key informants, all of whom are academic leaders in the field of implementation science, who were purposively selected for their expertise in scaling up in LMICs. Interviews were transcribed by hand and manually coded to look for emerging themes related to the two study aims. Barriers to scaling up, and unanswered research questions, were organized into six categories, representing different components of the scaling up process: attributes of the intervention; attributes of the implementers; scale-up approach; attributes of the adopting community; socio-political, fiscal, and cultural context; and research context. Results Factors impeding the success of scale-up that emerged from the key informant interviews, and which are areas for future investigation, include: complexity of the intervention and lack of technical consensus; limited human resource, leadership, management, and health systems capacity; poor application of proven diffusion techniques; lack of engagement of local implementers and of the adopting community; and inadequate integration of research into scale-up efforts. Conclusions Key steps in expanding the evidence base on implementation in LMICs include studying how to: simplify interventions; train “scale-up leaders” and health workers dedicated to scale-up; reach and engage communities; match the best delivery strategy to the specific health problem and

  19. Reinventing the academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives. PMID:16249294

  20. Reinventing the academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives.

  1. Effect of personal response systems on student perception and academic performance in courses in a health sciences curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A; Finn, Kevin E; Campisi, Jay

    2011-09-01

    To increase student engagement, active participation, and performance, personal response systems (clickers) were incorporated into six lecture-based sections of four required courses within the Health Sciences Department major curriculum: freshman-level Anatomy and Physiology I and II, junior-level Exercise Physiology, and senior-level Human Pathophysiology. Clickers were used to gather anonymous student responses to questions posed within the class period after individual thought and peer discussion. Students (n = 293, 88% of students completing the courses) completed a perceptual survey on clicker effectiveness inserted into the Student Assessment of Learning Gains online instrument. Across courses and years, students uniformly rated several dimensions of clicker use as providing good to great gain in engaging them in active learning, increasing participation and involvement during class, maintaining attention, applying material immediately, providing feedback concerning their understanding, and offering an anonymous format for participation. Within these four sections, quiz grades were compared between clicker and nonclicker years. Significant increases in pre- and posttest scores were seen in Exercise Physiology in clicker years and on some, but not all material, in Anatomy and Physiology I and II based on content quizzes. Human Pathophysiology results were unexpected, with higher quiz scores in the nonclicker year. The results support the hypothesis of increased engagement with clicker use. The hypothesis of increased student performance was not consistently supported. Increased performance was seen in Exercise Physiology. In Anatomy and Physiology I and II, performance improved on some content quizzes. In Human Pathophysiology, performance did not improve with clickers.

  2. Educating the Public About Research Funded by the National Institutes of Health Using a Partnership Between an Academic Medical Center and Community-based Science Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Carney, Patricia A.; Bunce, Arwen; Perrin, Nancy; Howarth, Linda C.; Griest, Susan; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The NIH roadmap has among its goals, to promote studies designed to improve public understanding of biomedical and behavioral science, and to develop strategies for promoting collaborations between scientists and communities toward improving the public’s health. Here, we report findings on the impact of a partnership between the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) designed to inform the public about health research being conducted i...

  3. Academic Stress, Supportive Communication, and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGeorge, Erina L.; Samter, Wendy; Gillihan, Seth J.

    2005-01-01

    Academic stress is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes, including depression and physical illness. The current study examined the capacity of supportive communication reported as being received from friends and family to buffer the association between academic stress and health. College students completed measures of academic…

  4. Data science as an academic discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, F. Jack

    2006-01-01

    I recall being a proud young academic about 1970; I had just received a research grant to build and study a scientific database, and I had joined CODATA. I was looking forward to the future in this new exciting discipline when the head of my department, an internationally known professor, advised me that data was “a low level activity” not suitable for an academic. I recall my dismay. What can we do to ensure that this does not happen again and that data science is universally recognized as a...

  5. Environmental Health Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alan; Smith, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes an environmental health science technology curriculum designed to provide technicians in the areas of air, water and wastewater analyses, treatment plant operators, public health enforcement officers, and pollution inspectors. (GS)

  6. The Elaboration of the Academic Technology Roadmap (ATRM) : Three Cases in Academic Material Science Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Okutsu, Shoko; Tatsuse, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The Academic Technology Road Map (ATRM) was originally proposed to support academic Science and Engineering (S&E) laboratories. In this paper, ATRM is elaborated through three cases in academic materials science laboratories. According to those cases, a knowledge collaboration board (KCB) is newly designed based on the “Kadai-Barashi approach”and the original ATRM.

  7. Investigation of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Academic Self-Efficacy and Academic Motivation toward Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Hüseyin; Saylan, Asli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine pre-service science teachers' academic motivation and academic self-efficacy toward biology. The sample consisted of 369 pre-service science teachers who enrolled in the faculty of education of two universities in Turkey. Data were collected through Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) (Glynn & Koballa,…

  8. 2015 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Terri [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States); Mischo, Millicent [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Academic Programs (SSAP) are essential to maintaining a pipeline of professionals to support the technical capabilities that reside at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratories, sites, and plants. Since 1992, the United States has observed the moratorium on nuclear testing while significantly decreasing the nuclear arsenal. To accomplish this without nuclear testing, NNSA and its laboratories developed a science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain and enhance the experimental and computational tools required to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the stockpile. NNSA launched its academic program portfolio more than a decade ago to engage students skilled in specific technical areas of relevance to stockpile stewardship. The success of this program is reflected by the large number of SSAP students choosing to begin their careers at NNSA national laboratories.

  9. Global health: networking innovative academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálsdóttir, Björg; Neusy, André-Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Medically underserved communities suffer a high burden of morbidity and mortality, increasing with remoteness where access to health services is limited. Major challenges are the overall shortage and maldistribution of the health workforce. There is a lack of understanding of how academic institutions can best contribute to addressing these health inequities. A new international collaborative of health professions schools, Training for Health Equity Network, is developing and disseminating evidence, challenging assumptions, and developing tools that support health profession institutions striving to meet the health and health workforce needs of underserved communities.

  10. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention. PMID:9391932

  11. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention.

  12. Not Just Good Science Teaching: Supporting Academic Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cecilia; Weinburgh, Molly; Smith, Kathy Horak

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore ways in which they have worked together in understanding the complexities of academic language within the science classroom and discuss strategies they have used to teach academic language to young adolescent English Language Learners (ELLs) within inquiry-based science lessons. They discuss strategies they use…

  13. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future. PMID:23317516

  14. Recent statistics on U.S. academic research and education in ocean sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; Gordon, S.

    2002-12-01

    Recent statistics were collected on behalf of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy to ascertain the status of the U.S. academic infrastructure in support of research and higher education in the ocean sciences. The study focused on undergraduate and graduate programs as well as the facilities and funding that support academic research in the field It has provided the most comprehensive coverage of the ocean sciences community to date. The presentation will focus on key indicators of the health of the U.S. research enterprise in relation to the ocean sciences and discuss issues that need to be addressed by the higher education community in ocean sciences.

  15. Relationships between Academic Stress, Social Support, Mental Health and Academic Performance in Venezuelan University Students

    OpenAIRE

    LYA FELDMAN; LILA GONCALVES; GRACE CHACÓN-PUIGNAU; JOANMIR ZARAGOZA; NURI BAGÉS; JOAN DE PABLO

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate academic stress, social support and their relationships with mental health and academic performance in university students. Three hundred and twenty one students from a technological university in Caracas, Venezuela, responded instruments on academic stress, social support and mental health during the most academically stressful period. The results indicate that favorable conditions of mental health were associated to more social support and ...

  16. Attitudes of health science students towards clients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ogiwara, Shimpachiro; Ikezawa, Yoko; 荻原, 新八郎

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate attitudes of health science students towards clients with cancer (ATC). The objective was three-fold: 1) to describe health science students' ATC, 2) to compare ATC amongst health science students according to their professional discipline, academic seniority and gender, 3) to note whether their ATC differed according to: a) their experience with cancer clients during clinical placement; and/or b) their acquired perception through their class-work of the need for psych...

  17. Building diversity in a complex academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South-Paul, Jeannette E; Roth, Loren; Davis, Paula K; Chen, Terence; Roman, Anna; Murrell, Audrey; Pettigrew, Chenits; Castleberry-Singleton, Candi; Schuman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    For 30 years, the many diversity-related health sciences programs targeting the University of Pittsburgh undergraduate campus, school of medicine, schools of the health sciences, clinical practice plan, and medical center were run independently and remained separate within the academic health center (AHC). This lack of coordination hampered their overall effectiveness in promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2007, a group of faculty and administrators from the university and the medical center recognized the need to improve institutional diversity and to better address local health disparities. In this article, the authors describe the process of linking the efforts of these institutions in a way that would be successful locally and applicable to other academic environments. First, they engaged an independent consultant to conduct a study of the AHC's diversity climate, interviewing current and former faculty and trainees to define the problem and identify areas for improvement. Next, they created the Physician Inclusion Council to address the findings of this study and to coordinate future efforts with institutional leaders. Finally, they formed four working committees to address (1) communications and outreach, (2) cultural competency, (3) recruitment, and (4) mentoring and retention. These committees oversaw the strategic development and implementation of all diversity and inclusion efforts. Together these steps led to structural changes within the AHC and the improved allocation of resources that have positioned the University of Pittsburgh to achieve not only diversity but also inclusion and to continue to address the health disparities in the Pittsburgh community. PMID:23886998

  18. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting?

  19. Emerging Trends in Science Education in a Dynamic Academic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avwiri, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging Trends in Science Education in a Dynamic Academic Environment highlights the changes that have occurred in science education particularly in institutions of higher learning in southern Nigeria. Impelled by the fact that most Nigerian Universities and Colleges of Education still adhere to the practices and teaching methodologies of the…

  20. Institutionalizing the academic health department within the context of the 3-fold academic mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, William C; Goldhagen, Jeffrey; Bryant, Thomas; Harmon, Robert G; Wood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A mature model of an academic health department (AHD) that has been institutionalized over 2 decades is described within the context of the 3-fold traditional mission of academics (teaching, research, and service/practice). This adaptive model for AHDs, based on mutual benefits that can be viewed through the lenses of both the academic health center mission and the public health functions and services, has important implications for AHD sustainability. Continued collaboration in any academic-public health partnership will depend in part on the commitments of the changing leadership. However, institutionalizing support for the academic mission enables this collaboration to transcend changing leadership styles and priorities. The collaboration of Duval County Health Department and University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is an example of a model of AHD that has endured major changes in leadership within both the academic center and the Duval County Health Department. PMID:24667196

  1. Relationships between Academic Stress, Social Support, Mental Health and Academic Performance in Venezuelan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYA FELDMAN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate academic stress, social support and their relationships with mental health and academic performance in university students. Three hundred and twenty one students from a technological university in Caracas, Venezuela, responded instruments on academic stress, social support and mental health during the most academically stressful period. The results indicate that favorable conditions of mental health were associated to more social support and less academic stress. In women, higher stress levels were associated to a lesser amount of social support from friends whereas in men stress was related to less social support coming from close people and general social support. Both displayed better performance when perceived higher levels of academic stress and the social support of the near people was moderate. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for academic life and mental health in university students.

  2. What does the UK public want from academic science communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Illingworth, Sam; Verran, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of public academic science communication is to engage a non-scientist with a particular field of science and/or research topic, often driven by the expertise of the academic. An e-survey was designed to provide insight into respondent's current and future engagement with science communication activities. Respondents provided a wide range of ideas and concerns as to the 'common practice' of academic science communication, and whilst they support some of these popular approaches (such as open-door events and science festivals), there are alternatives that may enable wider engagement. Suggestions of internet-based approaches and digital media were strongly encouraged, and although respondents found merits in methods such as science festivals, limitations such as geography, time and topic of interest were a barrier to engagement for some. Academics and scientists need to think carefully about how they plan their science communication activities and carry out evaluations, including considering the point of view of the public, as although defaulting to hands-on open door events at their university may seem like the expected standard, it may not be the best way to reach the intended audience.

  3. What does the UK public want from academic science communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Illingworth, Sam; Verran, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of public academic science communication is to engage a non-scientist with a particular field of science and/or research topic, often driven by the expertise of the academic. An e-survey was designed to provide insight into respondent's current and future engagement with science communication activities. Respondents provided a wide range of ideas and concerns as to the 'common practice' of academic science communication, and whilst they support some of these popular approaches (such as open-door events and science festivals), there are alternatives that may enable wider engagement. Suggestions of internet-based approaches and digital media were strongly encouraged, and although respondents found merits in methods such as science festivals, limitations such as geography, time and topic of interest were a barrier to engagement for some. Academics and scientists need to think carefully about how they plan their science communication activities and carry out evaluations, including considering the point of view of the public, as although defaulting to hands-on open door events at their university may seem like the expected standard, it may not be the best way to reach the intended audience. PMID:27347384

  4. Academic health departments: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Christopher; Chang, Carol S; Malcolm, Jan; Russo, Pamela G

    2006-01-01

    In August of 2003, 23 institutions submitted proposals to build closer ties between state and local public health departments and schools of public health in response to a solicitation from the Association of Schools of Public Health supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This article describes the strategies proposed to build collaboration between public health academia and practice. Qualitative analysis discerned five principal approaches: the development of comprehensive planning processes; reform of the way practica are planned and implemented; the identification and nurturing of boundary-spanning individuals in academia and health agencies; the fostering of new approaches to joint research; and workforce development programs. Major themes that emerged included the importance of achieving a balance of power between academic and health department partners; the need to address cultural differences between institutions; a conviction that efforts at institutional change require both strong leadership and the cultivation of boundary spanners farther down the chain of command; and the idea that prospects for success may be improved if faculty and practitioners have tangible incentives to collaborate.

  5. Structure of Black Male Students Academic Achievement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascoe, Barbara

    Educational policies and practices have been largely unsuccessful in closing the achievement gap between Black and White students "Schwartz, 2001". This achievement gap is especially problematic for Black students in science "Maton, Hrabrowski, - Schmitt, 2000. Given the fact that the Black-White achievement gap is still an enigma, the purpose of this article is to address the Black female-Black male academic achievement gap in science majors. Addressing barriers that Black male students may experience as college science and engineering majors, this article presents marketing strategies relative to politics, emotional intelligence, and issues with respect to how science teaching, and Black male students' responses to it, are different. Many Black male students may need to experience a paradigm shift, which structures and enhances their science achievement. Paradigm shifts are necessary because exceptional academic ability and motivation are not enough to get Black males from their first year in a science, technology, education, and mathematics "STEM" major to a bachelor's degree in science and engineering. The conclusions focus on the balance of truth-slippery slopes concerning the confluence of science teachers' further ado and Black male students' theories, methods, and values that position their academic achievement in science and engineering majors.

  6. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  7. Translational Researchers' Perceptions of Data Management Practices and Data Curation Needs: Findings from a Focus Group in an Academic Health Sciences Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardyn, Tania P.; Resnick, Taryn; Camina, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    How translational researchers use data is becoming an important support function for libraries to understand. Libraries' roles in this increasingly complex area of Web librarianship are often unclearly defined. The authors conducted two focus groups with physicians and researchers at an academic medical center, the UCLA David Geffen School of…

  8. Community Essay: Implementation of the MediSend Program: a multidisciplinary medical surplus recovery initiative at an academic health science center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruh Workeneh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As a second year medical student my focus was narrowly on navigating and absorbing the enormous amount of information that I needed to pass my courses—it was not one year at a time, rather it was one course at a time. This changed when I became a student leader and met phenomenal individuals, like my co-author, who introduced the idea of medical surplus recovery to me, as well as Martin Lazar, who founded MediSend/International. The world was not simply going to wait while I struggled to finish medical school, and if I wanted to make a difference I had to jump in. In the article below we describe the MediSend Program, a student-conceived, student-driven effort to collect medical, dental, and educational surplus at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The students that helped and continue to help craft the MediSend Program have realized that they are not only important constituents of higher education, but they play a vital role in shaping university priorities. In the process, the MediSend Program has provided an uncommon learning experience, one that incorporates the values of compassion and altruism with environmental preservation and equitable resource distribution. I am no longer a student and consider my participation in sustainable solutions a duty, a sensibility that was shaped during my tenure in medical school. Sustainability should be a universal guiding principle in healthcare education and practice, as well as other disciplines, because it is the key to human survival.

  9. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach.

  10. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach. PMID:26604205

  11. Education: Firms Offer Academics Polymer Science Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides information on industry-sponsored programs for college faculty and advanced undergraduate students designed to improve polymer science training: these include residency programs for professors available at industrial laboratories, establishment of a Polymer Education Award, newsletter on course materials/sources in polymer science,…

  12. Postmodern Academic Science Education: Mentorship Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Nikkhah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to introduce and describe new definitions for global science education that will determine the extent and nature of humans’ future accomplishments. These will affect life quality worldwide. Science as an ultimate essence encircles theoretical and applied findings and discoveries. These can only contribute to forming a trivial core, whilst the most crucial are insightful moral surroundings. Morality is most concerned with mentorship commitments. To sustain a dense and rigid shape that progressively improves science and life quality, imagination must be complemented with harmonizing approaches. Such perceptions become an obligationas the growing knowledge creates novel questions and challenges. The upper tree of science glorified with blooming branches of knowledge, particularly over the last few centuries, is predicted to undergo progressive declines in the strength of its education foundations unless the lower tree receives most-deserving mentorship contemplations. Mentors must replace teachers, by definition, and commit to generating more qualified educators than themselves.Mentors are expected to welcome and manage challenges from mentees. Challenges play crucial roles in granting mentees with integrated pathways of scientific development. The resulting pictures will be eagerly prone to revisions and elaborations as mentees themselvesstep into the pathway. This systematic education will strengthen science roots in mentees' minds and will uphold a sturdy science body for the society. Science pictured as an integrated circle grants a prospect to envision where humans are and where not to end up. Maintaining a definitive shape for science in any major before and while enriching central cores with experimental novelties in minds and laboratories is crucial to improving man's fulfillment of time. These approaches are keys to preserving an integrated shape for science in the third millennium. Such integrities are an obligation to

  13. Academic mobbing: hidden health hazard at workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Sb

    2010-01-01

    Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, 'ganging up' behaviour adopted by academicians to "wear and tear" a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are "hidden" to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high achievers, with good integrity and principles. Mobbing activities appear trivial and innocuous on its own but the frequency and pattern of their occurrence over long period of time indicates an aggressive manipulation to "eliminate" the target. Mobbing activities typically progress through five stereotypical phases that begins with an unsolved minor conflict between two workers and ultimately escalates into a senseless mobbing whereby the target is stigmatized and victimized to justify the behaviours of the bullies. The result is always physical, mental, social distress or illness and, most often, expulsion of target from the workplace. Organizations are subjected to great financial loss, loss of key workers and a tarnished public image and reputation. Public awareness, education, effective counselling, establishment of anti-bullying policies and legislations at all levels are necessary to curb academic mobbing. General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in supporting patients subjected to mental and physical health injury caused by workplace bullying and mobbing. PMID:25606190

  14. Academic Effort and Achievement in Science: Beyond a Gendered Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Sweet, Robert

    2013-12-01

    This study employs the 2004 School Achievement Indicators Program (SAIP) data to examine whether academic effort manifested by greater investments in school and homework does result in higher literacy scores in science for Canadian students. The study compares four gender-immigrant profiles: Canadian-born males, immigrant males, Canadian-born females, and immigrant females on their scores on teacher-assigned grades in science and on the SAIP science literacy test, and across a range of dispositions, beliefs, and behaviors suggested in the literature as predictive of achievement in science. Study findings show that Canadian-born students, particularly boys, have higher performance in the science literacy test despite their lower achievement in the science classroom and the least investments of time in doing science homework. In contrast, immigrant female students demonstrate the highest academic effort and achievement in science courses which are not matched by similar results in the science literacy test. We discuss these results in relation to different socialization experiences with science and technology that limit female and immigrant students' abilities to transfer knowledge to new situations that have not been learned in the classroom.

  15. Strategies for developing biostatistics resources in an academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Leah J; Carter, Rickey E; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Harrell, Frank E; Lindsell, Christopher J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Mazumdar, Madhu; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Roberson, Paula K; Ware, James H

    2013-04-01

    Biostatistics--the application of statistics to understanding health and biology-provides powerful tools for developing research questions, designing studies, refining measurements, analyzing data, and interpreting findings. Biostatistics plays an important role in health-related research, yet biostatistics resources are often fragmented, ad hoc, or oversubscribed within academic health centers (AHCs). Given the increasing complexity and quantity of health-related data, the emphasis on accelerating clinical and translational science, and the importance of conducting reproducible research, the need for the thoughtful development of biostatistics resources within AHCs is growing.In this article, the authors identify strategies for developing biostatistics resources in three areas: (1) recruiting and retaining biostatisticians, (2) efficiently using biostatistics resources, and (3) improving biostatistical contributions to science. AHCs should consider these three domains in building strong biostatistics resources, which they can leverage to support a broad spectrum of research. For each of the three domains, the authors describe the advantages and disadvantages of AHCs creating centralized biostatistics units rather than dispersing such resources across clinical departments or other research units. They also address the challenges that biostatisticians face in contributing to research without sacrificing their individual professional growth or the trajectory of their research teams. The authors ultimately recommend that AHCs create centralized biostatistics units because this approach offers distinct advantages both to investigators who collaborate with biostatisticians as well as to the biostatisticians themselves, and it is better suited to accomplish the research and education missions of AHCs.

  16. Academic and Research Programs in Exercise Science, South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung-Shin; Song, Wook

    2009-01-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to review academic curriculum and current research focus of Exercise Science programs in South Korea. The information of this paper was collected by several different methods, including e-mail and phone interviews, and a discussion with Korean professors who attended the 2009 ACSM annual conference. It was agreed that exercise science programming in South Korea has improved over the last 60 years since being implemented. One of distinguishable achievement is that...

  17. The emergent discipline of health web science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Joanne S; Cumming, Grant P; Wilkinson, Mark D; Kahana, Eva

    2013-08-22

    The transformative power of the Internet on all aspects of daily life, including health care, has been widely recognized both in the scientific literature and in public discourse. Viewed through the various lenses of diverse academic disciplines, these transformations reveal opportunities realized, the promise of future advances, and even potential problems created by the penetration of the World Wide Web for both individuals and for society at large. Discussions about the clinical and health research implications of the widespread adoption of information technologies, including the Internet, have been subsumed under the disciplinary label of Medicine 2.0. More recently, however, multi-disciplinary research has emerged that is focused on the achievement and promise of the Web itself, as it relates to healthcare issues. In this paper, we explore and interrogate the contributions of the burgeoning field of Web Science in relation to health maintenance, health care, and health policy. From this, we introduce Health Web Science as a subdiscipline of Web Science, distinct from but overlapping with Medicine 2.0. This paper builds on the presentations and subsequent interdisciplinary dialogue that developed among Web-oriented investigators present at the 2012 Medicine 2.0 Conference in Boston, Massachusetts.

  18. Identifying Opportunities in Citizen Science for Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Cynthia M.; Cheney, Liz; Duong, Khue; Lea, Ben; Unno, Zoe Pettway

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science projects continue to grow in popularity, providing opportunities for nonexpert volunteers to contribute to and become personally invested in rigorous scientific research. Academic libraries, aiming to promote and provide tools and resources to master scientific and information literacy, can support these efforts. While few examples…

  19. Health Education Strategies for Coping with Academic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the significance of health education strategies for coping with academic stress. Comprehensive health education strategies for coping with academic stress can help students obtain the greatest benefits from education and become healthy and productive adults .One child out of four has an emotional, social,…

  20. Implementing Personalized Medicine in the Academic Health Center

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Scott T

    2016-01-01

    Recently we at Partners Health Care had a series of articles in the Journal of Personalized Medicine describing how we are going about implementing Personalized Medicine in an academic health care system [1–10].[...

  1. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences li...

  2. Die neue Hochschulbibliothek für Gesundheitswissenschaften der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum [The new Academic Health Sciences, Nursing and Therapeutics Library of the Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kustos, Annette

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] October 2009 the first state-funded University of Applied Sciences referring the fields public health, therapeutics and occupational medicine, the “Hochschule für Gesundheit hsg”, was founded in the City of , North Rhine-Westfalia. The study of health care/nursing, physical therapy, ergotherapy, logopedics and midwifery puts emphasis on an academic training for improving healthcare and therapeutics in German hospitals, medical offices and home care. Therefore a library had to be established which offers both practical text and specialist books and electronic resources and research material such as special research databases and journals. Temporarily located in only three rooms the library started setting up these electronic services within an e-learning environment and providing students and teachers with the important print material. The library also developed an integrated concept of functions and services, a “library development plan”, to ensure that a strategic process for elaborating the services is initialized in addition to the daily performance of improvisation skills. As to the establishment of a high level subject and usage related collection, media concept etc. the librarian in this new combined field of health and therapeutics finds himself in an unknown territory. There are no completely fitting statistics or models of other libraries to lean on. But by evaluating the usage of the offered media and services and observing developments in health sciences and its information market within a testing period the “canon” will be identified.In 2014 the library will be one of the main attractions on the “Health Campus Bochum” where the university and cooperating health research institutes, health administration and health care companies will be situated. Therefore the new library area in the second floor of a new building has to be planned involving the topics library workflows, circulation by RFID, shelving

  3. Tobacco use among fourth year Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) students of the College of Public Health: University of the Philippines Manila, academic year 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevarra, Jonathan P; Cordova, Renerio Q; Mercado, Chris Erwin G; Asaad, Abubakar S

    2014-10-01

    This study determines the prevalence of tobacco use among graduating Public Health students at the College of Public Health, University of the Philippines Manila. It also describes the exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, attitudes, behaviors and smoking cessation training of students. This study used a descriptive cross-sectional study design, adapting a standard questionnaire, pretested and administered to 52 Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) students at the College of Public Health, University of the Philippines Manila. Data generated from the survey were encoded using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and analyzed using Stata version 12. The prevalence of smoking among 4th year BSPH students was 5.8 % (current smokers). In the past 7 days, respondents have been exposed to secondhand smoke (44 % where they live; 79 % in places other than where they live). Majority were aware of the official policy on smoking ban in school, however, 80 % said that the policy is not enforced. Majority had favorable attitudes in terms of banning tobacco sales to adolescents, banning advertising of tobacco products, banning smoking in restaurants, discos/bars/pubs and enclosed public places. Majority of the respondents also believed that health professionals should get specific training on cessation techniques, that they do serve as role models, and that they have a role in giving advice about smoking cessation. More than three-quarters (76.9 %) of students said that health professionals who smoke are less likely to advise patients to quit. Most of the graduating students learned about the dangers of smoking, importance of obtaining tobacco use history, and providing educational support materials in their public health education but only a few received formal training about smoking cessation approaches. The implementation of the no-smoking policy of the university must be revisited. Smoking cessation approaches should be incorporated in the public health curriculum and the role

  4. The flipped classroom: practices and opportunities for health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" instructional model is being introduced into medical and health sciences curricula to provide greater efficiency in curriculum delivery and produce greater opportunity for in-depth class discussion and problem solving among participants. As educators employ the flipped classroom to invert curriculum delivery and enhance learning, health sciences librarians are also starting to explore the flipped classroom model for library instruction. This article discusses how academic and health sciences librarians are using the flipped classroom and suggests opportunities for this model to be further explored for library services. PMID:25316072

  5. The flipped classroom: practices and opportunities for health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" instructional model is being introduced into medical and health sciences curricula to provide greater efficiency in curriculum delivery and produce greater opportunity for in-depth class discussion and problem solving among participants. As educators employ the flipped classroom to invert curriculum delivery and enhance learning, health sciences librarians are also starting to explore the flipped classroom model for library instruction. This article discusses how academic and health sciences librarians are using the flipped classroom and suggests opportunities for this model to be further explored for library services.

  6. University Student and Faculty Opinions on Academic Integrity Are Informed by Social Practices or Personal Values, A Review of: Randall, Ken, Denise G. Bender and Diane M. Montgomery. “Determining the Opinions of Health Sciences Students and Faculty Regarding Academic Integrity.” International Journal for Educational Integrity 3.2 (2007: 27‐40.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To understand the opinions of students and faculty in physical therapy (PT and occupational therapy (OT regarding issues of academic integrity such as plagiarism and cheating.Design – Q method (a mixed method of qualitative data collection with application of quantitative methods to facilitate grouping and interpretation.Setting – An urban university‐affiliated health sciences facility in the mid‐western United States.Subjects – Thirty‐three students and five faculty members of ages 21 to 61 years, 30 associated with the physical therapy program and 8 with occupational therapy, including 6 males and 32 females.Methods – Initially, 300 opinion statements for, against, or neutral on the subject of academic integrity were gathered from journal articles, editorials and commentaries, Internet sites, and personal web logs, 36 of which were selected to represent a full spectrum of perspectives on the topic. Participants in the study performed a “Q‐sort” in which they ranked the 36 statements as more‐like or less‐like their own values. A correlation matrix was developed based on the participantsʹ rankings to create “factors” or groups of individuals with similar views. Two such groups were found and interpreted qualitatively to meaningfully describe the differing views of each group. Three participants could not be sorted into either group, being split between the factors. Main Results – Analysis of the two groups, using software specific to the Q method, revealed a good deal of consensus, particularly in being “most unlike” those statements in support of academic dishonesty. The two groups differed primarily in the motivation for academic honesty. Factor one, with 21 individuals, was labeled “Collective Integrity,” (CI being represented by socially oriented statements such as “I believe in being honest, true, virtuous, and in doing good to all people,” or “My goal is to help create a world

  7. Scale of Academic Emotion in Science Education: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Contemporary research into science education has generally been conducted from the perspective of 'conceptual change' in learning. This study sought to extend previous work by recognizing that human rationality can be influenced by the emotions generated by the learning environment and specific actions related to learning. Methods used in educational psychology were adopted to investigate the emotional experience of science students as affected by gender, teaching methods, feedback, and learning tasks. A multidisciplinary research approach combining brain activation measurement with multivariate psychological data theory was employed in the development of a questionnaire intended to reveal the academic emotions of university students in three situations: attending science class, learning scientific subjects, and problem solving. The reliability and validity of the scale was evaluated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results revealed differences between the genders in positive-activating and positive-deactivating academic emotions in all three situations; however, these differences manifested primarily during preparation for Science tests. In addition, the emotions experienced by male students were more intense than those of female students. Finally, the negative-deactivating emotions associated with participation in Science tests were more intense than those experienced by simply studying science. This study provides a valuable tool with which to evaluate the emotional response of students to a range of educational situations.

  8. Adolescent Health Behavior, Contentment in School, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.; Helgason, Asgeir R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between health behavior indicators, school contentment, and academic achievement. Methods: Structural equation modeling with 5810 adolescents. Results: Our model explained 36% of the variance in academic achievement and 24% in school contentment. BMI and sedentary lifestyle were negatively related to school…

  9. USGS Science Serves Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Herbert T.

    2010-01-01

    Human health so often depends on the health of the environment and wildlife around us. The presence of naturally occurring or human environmental contaminants and the emergence of diseases transferred between animals and humans are growing concerns worldwide. The USGS is a source of natural science information vital for understanding the quantity and quality of our earth and living resources. This information improves our understanding not only of how human activities affect environmental and ecological health, but also of how the quality of our environment and wildlife in turn affects human health. USGS is taking a leadership role in providing the natural science information needed by health researchers, policy makers, and the public to safeguard public health

  10. Contrastive Study of Metadiscourse in the Conclusion of Academic Pa-pers between Soft Science and Hard Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟伟

    2014-01-01

    Academic paper as a genre is communicative. Interactional metadiscourse is one of the linguistic features that can sig-nificantly show the communicative feature of texts. With different research methodologies and characteristics, academic papers of hard and soft science present different degree of communicative features. The corpus of this study consists of 16 academic papers among which 8 are from hard science and 8 from soft science. This article aims to explore the different ways of scholars from soft and hard science to use metadiscourse in the conclusion part of their academic papers to exert lights to the pedagogical develop-ment of academic papers.

  11. Political science as an academic discipline in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Duque Daza

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the current state of political science as an academic discipline in Colombia. Considering the concept of institutionalization as a departure point, the author examines five discipline components, namely, the development of teaching, educators, research, publications, and the recent emergence of a profession association as well as the implementation of the first national congress. The author identifies strengths and weaknesses of the Colombia’s recent institutionalization p...

  12. Academic Self-Concept: Modeling and Measuring for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Graham

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the author developed a model to describe academic self-concept (ASC) in science and validated an instrument for its measurement. Unlike previous models of science ASC, which envisage science as a homogenous single global construct, this model took a multidimensional view by conceiving science self-concept as possessing distinctive facets including conceptual and procedural elements. In the first part of the study, data were collected from 1,483 students attending eight secondary schools in England, through the use of a newly devised Secondary Self-Concept Science Instrument, and structural equation modeling was employed to test and validate a model. In the second part of the study, the data were analysed within the new self-concept framework to examine learners' ASC profiles across the domains of science, with particular attention paid to age- and gender-related differences. The study found that the proposed science self-concept model exhibited robust measures of fit and construct validity, which were shown to be invariant across gender and age subgroups. The self-concept profiles were heterogeneous in nature with the component relating to self-concept in physics, being surprisingly positive in comparison to other aspects of science. This outcome is in stark contrast to data reported elsewhere and raises important issues about the nature of young learners' self-conceptions about science. The paper concludes with an analysis of the potential utility of the self-concept measurement instrument as a pedagogical device for science educators and learners of science.

  13. Academic cartography: Understanding the directions of modern biological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Leah Grace

    2007-12-01

    Over the last three decades, the biological research has undergone drastic change. In addition to the many scientific and technological advancements, the legal, and hence economic, structures within which biological research occurs have also been significantly altered. In the early 1980's the patent laws were extended to encompass almost all products of biological research, including living organisms, and the U.S. Congress passed a series of laws which encouraged the intertwining of academic and industrial interests. This research explores how these legal and economic changes have shaped academic research agendas in the biological sciences. Using the University of California, Berkeley as a case study, I have employed a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods to (a) map the directions of biological research occurring in the four main UC Berkeley biology departments over the last two and a half decades, (b) characterize industrial involvement in biological research at UC Berkeley, and (c) understand the decision making calculus scientists and university administrators employ in crafting their personal research agendas and the research directions for their departments and colleges. This dissertation elucidates the necessary convergence of interests, resources, and skills required for any research project to proceed, explores the motivation of academic strength in both the laboratory and the university as a whole, and finally examines the co-construction of the cutting edge These concepts offer new insight into understanding the processes through which science takes its shape.

  14. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  15. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration. PMID:27326804

  16. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

  17. Marketing the Health Sciences Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, O. Gene

    The basic activities of marketing are discussed, including gathering information and determining needs, designing a program around the elements of the marketing mix, and managing the marketing program. Following a general discussion, applications of the marketing concepts to a health sciences library are described. The administrator of the health…

  18. TELEVISION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRANT, THEO. S.; MERRILL, IRVING R.

    A MAJOR MEDICAL CENTER CONDUCTED A SERIES OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES CONCERNED WITH THE USE OF CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION INSTRUCTION IN THE CURRICULUMS OF MEDICINE, DENTISTRY, PHARMACY, AND NURSING. THE SIX STUDIES REPORTED WERE (1) OVER 300 HEALTH SCIENCE TELEVISION PRESENTATIONS WERE PRODUCED, PRESENTED TO STUDENTS, AND EVALUATED. REPORTS WERE MADE…

  19. Building a sustainable Academic Health Department: the South Carolina model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lillian Upton; Waddell, Lisa; Kyle, Joseph; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited resources available to public health, it is critical that university programs complement the development needs of agencies. Unfortunately, academic and practice public health entities have long been challenged in building sustainable collaborations that support practice-based research, teaching, and service. The academic health department concept offers a promising solution. In South Carolina, the partners started their academic health department program with a small grant that expanded into a dynamic infrastructure that supports innovative professional exchange and development programs. This article provides a background and describes the key elements of the South Carolina model: joint leadership, a multicomponent memorandum of agreement, and a shared professional development mission. The combination of these elements allows the partners to leverage resources and deftly respond to challenges and opportunities, ultimately fostering the sustainability of the collaboration.

  20. Mergers involving academic health centers: a formidable challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, V D

    2001-10-01

    Escalating economic pressures on the clinical enterprise threaten the missions of education and research in many of the most prestigious academic health centers. Following the model of industry, mergers of the healthcare delivery systems of teaching hospitals and clinics held promise for economies of scale and an improved operating margin. Failure to follow business principles in constructing the merged entity, differences in organizational governance and culture, and inability of physician leadership to prioritize, downsize, and consolidate clinical programs to optimize operational efficiencies all compromise the success of such mergers in academic medicine. Academic institutions and their respective governing boards need to exercise greater discipline in financial analysis and a willingness to make difficult decisions that show favor to one parent institution over another if mergers are to be effective in this setting. To date, an example of a vibrant and successful merger of academic health centers remains to be found.

  1. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  2. Factors Influencing High School Students' Science Enrollments Patterns: Academic Abilities, Parental Influences, and Attitudes toward Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Ghada A.; Voss, Burton E.

    This study was designed, using a path analytic model, to assess the relative impact of different factors on science concentration decisions made by grade 10 high school students (N=237). Included in the model were selected demographic and socioeconomic factors, academic abilities factors (including logical thinking), indicators of home and school…

  3. Academic Mobbing: Hidden Health Hazard at Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, SB

    2010-01-01

    Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, ‘ganging up’ behaviour adopted by academicians to “wear and tear” a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are “hidden” to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high ...

  4. Academic health centers and society: an ethical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, E D

    1999-08-01

    Academic health centers--which combine university, medical school, and hospital--exist to satisfy universal human needs and thus are by definition instruments of social purpose. Their core mission is threefold: to provide medical knowledge that can help relieve and prevent illness and suffering, to supply practitioners able to apply that knowledge wisely, and to serve as sites where optimal use of medical knowledge can be demonstrated and investigated. Maintaining a balance between core mission and responsiveness to social trends is a delicate exercise. Overly close accommodation to such trends can endanger the core mission, as has occurred in the United States with regard to managed care. Society and academic health centers have mutual obligations. Obligations of society include giving academic health centers financial and other support and allowing them sufficient freedom to pursue their mission; obligations of academic medical centers include accepting greater scrutiny by society and providing social criticism on matters relating to health. A task for the future is to discern how academic health centers can be responsive to social needs without being totally subservient to societal desires. PMID:10495739

  5. Environmental health discipline science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in environmental health. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; animal and human subjects; and research and development. This document summarizes the history and current status of the program elements, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies scientific priorities, and defines critical questions in the three disciplines: (1) Barophysiology, (2) Toxicology, and (3) Microbiology. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Officers and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational research and development activities, both intramural and extramural, in this area. The document is divided into sections addressing these three disciplines.

  6. Health behaviors, affect, and academic performance : three longitudinal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Flückiger, Lavinia Heidy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health behaviors are a fundamental and highly fluctuating component of everyday life. Evidence capturing these natural daily fluctuations is limited. Therefore, this dissertation investigates how these daily dynamics in health behaviors are associated with other important aspects of young adults’ everyday lives and bridges separate research strands by integrating health behaviors, affect, stress, and academic performance in three intensive longitudinal studies. Method: These three ...

  7. Health sciences librarians and mental health laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, F R

    1978-10-01

    Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, O'Connor v. Donaldson and Bounds v. Smith, hold important implications for health sciences librarians serving in mental health facilities. The first, O'Connor, with its many ancillary holdings, puts mental health personnel on notice that patients have certain basic rights, which courts all over the country will now be required to enforce. In Bounds the court has ruled that prison authorities must assist prison inmates in preparing and filing legal papers. The ruling will most likely benefit all mentally disabled prisoners, and future litigation may expand this category to include: (1) persons committed under the criminal code, (2) persons under involuntary commitment not related to the criminal code, and (3) persons voluntarily committed. A selective annotated bibliography, consisting of background readings in mental health and the law, basic rights, law library materials, and mental health legal services, has been compiled to help librarians establish and develop legal collections in anticipation of court decisions that will expand the conditions of Bounds to include all mentally disabled patients. PMID:361117

  8. Educators Who Work in Science: The Narratives of Women Negotiating Careers in Academic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullos, Kimberly C.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this life story narrative study was to explore how women scientists develop views of self that enable them to negotiate careers within academic science. I framed the study using feminist standpoint theory as my theoretical foundation, and used possible selves theory as my conceptual framework. Eight women scientists working in academe described their journey regarding their views of self and career-related experiences. The study produced two key findings. First, seven themes emerged from my data analysis; these themes suggest that these women shared significant experiences in their quest to become scientists. Second, my feminist analysis of the participants' narratives indicates that distinct, but submerged gender-related tensions shaped their views of themselves as scientists and their science career decisions. These tensions include career choice and advancement constrained by family obligations, work environments that do not recognize or undervalue their skills and contributions to the profession, and perceived pressure to de-feminize their behavior to blend in to their work environment. Not unlike other women negotiating careers in academic science, they generally accepted their status as women to be an inherent part of their career pursuits and viewed workplace challenges as an opportunity to prove their competency. Seven of the eight women did not attribute their challenges to gender differences. However, the combined narratives revealed underlying conflicts between their views of self as women and as scientists resulting from their experiences in, and perceptions of, academic science environments. The study's principal theoretical contribution, from the feminist standpoint perspective, highlights the pervasive and unseen influence of gender dynamics. In this study, the participants developed views of themselves, not as scientists, but as "educators who work in science." This critical distinction enabled these participants, perhaps unknowingly

  9. A revisionist view of the integrated academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Judith

    2004-02-01

    Like many academic health centers that had expanded aggressively during the 1990s, the nation's first vertically integrated academic health center, the University of Pennsylvania Health System, was profoundly challenged by the dramatic and unanticipated financial impacts of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The author explains why-although Penn's Health System had lost $300 million over two years and its debts threatened to cause serious financial and educational damage to the rest of the University-Penn chose to manage its way out of the financial crisis (instead of selling or spinning off its four hospitals, clinical practices, and possibly even its medical school). A strategy of comprehensive integration has not only stabilized Penn's Health System financially, but strengthened its position of leadership in medical education, research, and health care delivery. The author argues that a strategy of greater horizontal integration offers important strategic advantages to academic health centers. In an era when major social and scientific problems demand broadly multidisciplinary and highly-integrated approaches, such horizontally integrated institutions will be better able to educate citizens and train physicians, develop new approaches to health care policy, and answer pressing biomedical research questions. Institutional cultural integration is also crucial to create new, innovative organizational structures that bridge traditional disciplinary, school, and clinical boundaries.

  10. Attribute Mathematical Model for Comprehensive Index System' Quality Evaluation for Natural Science Academic Journals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongLi; QunLi

    2004-01-01

    Journal evaluation is a compliated engineering system, how to evaluate academic journals more scientifically in scientific methods have becomes a problem of great concerns. This paper presents attribute mathematical model for comprehensive index system' quality evaluation for natural science academic journals, aiming to make comprehensive index system' quality evaluation for academic journals more objective and reasonable compared with other quantitative evaluation ways.

  11. Some Thoughts on the Issue of Making the Liberal Science Courses More Appealing to Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoon, Koh Aik; Jalal, Azman

    2008-01-01

    This paper traces the history of the Liberal Science courses and explores the mechanisms whereby the courses can be made more attractive to academics in the Faculty of Science and Technology (FST) at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM). (Contains 1 table.)

  12. Assessment for Effective Intervention: Enrichment Science Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Irit; Cohen, Donita

    2012-11-01

    Israel suffers from a growing problem of socio-economic gaps between those who live in the center of the country and residents of outlying areas. As a result, there is a low level of accessibility to higher education among the peripheral population. The goal of the Sidney Warren Science Education Center for Youth at Tel-Hai College is to strengthen the potential of middle and high school students and encourage them to pursue higher education, with an emphasis on majoring in science and technology. This study investigated the implementation and evaluation of the enrichment science academic program, as an example of informal learning environment, with an emphasis on physics studies. About 500 students conducted feedback survey after participating in science activities in four domains: biology, chemistry, physics, and computer science. Results indicated high level of satisfaction among the students. No differences were found with respect to gender excluding in physics with a positive attitudes advantage among boys. In order to get a deeper understanding of this finding, about 70 additional students conducted special questionnaires, both 1 week before the physics enrichment day and at the end of that day. Questionnaires were intended to assess both their attitudes toward physics and their knowledge and conceptions of the physical concept "pressure." We found that the activity moderately improved boys' attitudes toward physics, but that girls displayed decreased interest in and lower self-efficacy toward physics. Research results were used to the improvement of the instructional design of the physics activity demonstrating internal evaluation process for effective intervention.

  13. Digital chat reference in health science libraries: challenges in initiating a new service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R; Newhouse, Joshua D

    2005-01-01

    Digital reference service adds a valuable new dimension to health science reference services, but the road to implementation can present questions that require carefully considered decisions. This article incorporates suggestions from the published literature, provides tips from interviews with practicing academic health science librarians, and reports on data from students' exploration of academic health science library Web sites' digital reference services. The goal of this study is to provide guidelines to plan new services, assess user needs, and select software, and to showcase potential benefits of collaboration and proactive and user-friendly marketing. In addition, tips for successful operation and evaluation of services are discussed. PMID:15982952

  14. Digital chat reference in health science libraries: challenges in initiating a new service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R; Newhouse, Joshua D

    2005-01-01

    Digital reference service adds a valuable new dimension to health science reference services, but the road to implementation can present questions that require carefully considered decisions. This article incorporates suggestions from the published literature, provides tips from interviews with practicing academic health science librarians, and reports on data from students' exploration of academic health science library Web sites' digital reference services. The goal of this study is to provide guidelines to plan new services, assess user needs, and select software, and to showcase potential benefits of collaboration and proactive and user-friendly marketing. In addition, tips for successful operation and evaluation of services are discussed.

  15. Academic Training turns to matters of science and society

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Once again, CERN has opened its doors to matters of science and society. A recent academic training lecture series tackled the thorny issue of arms control. Although an issue far from normal training needs of CERN personnel, the series was well attended. Aseries of lectures about arms control at CERN? Surely some mistake! But there are many reasons why one of the world's most important physics laboratories should consider such weighty political and ethical matters - not least the concern for the issues felt by members of the CERN community. A large number of people followed the full series of lectures on arms control and disarmament by Francesco Calogero, Professor of theoretical physics at Rome's 'La Sapienza' University, demonstrating that CERN people are not only interested in purely scientific matters, but also in the implications for society. Professor Calogero, a former Secretary General of Pugwash1) and currently Chairman of the Pugwash Council, observed that, 'even if I dealt, albeit tersely, with the...

  16. The Evolving Academic Health Center: Challenges and Opportunities for Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirin, Steven; Summergrad, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regardless of the outcome of current efforts at healthcare reform, the resources that academic health centers need--to provide care for increasingly complex patient populations, support clinical innovation, grow the clinical enterprise, and carry out their research and teaching missions--are in jeopardy. This article examines the value…

  17. Health Behaviour and Academic Achievement in Icelandic School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in the relationship between health behaviours and academic achievement has recently intensified in the face of an epidemic of childhood and adolescent obesity and converging school reforms in the United States and other nations with advanced economies. Epidemiologic research has demonstrated that poor diet and lack of adequate physical…

  18. Lessons learned about coordinating academic partnerships from an international network for health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Airong; Omollo, Kathleen Ludewig

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing trend of academic partnerships between U.S., Canadian, and European health science institutions and academic health centers in low- and middle-income countries. These partnerships often encounter challenges such as resource disparities and power differentials, which affect the motivations, expectations, balance of benefits, and results of the joint projects. Little has been discussed in previous literature regarding the communication and project management processes that affect the success of such partnerships. To fill the gap in the literature, the authors present lessons learned from the African Health Open Educational Resources Network, a multicountry, multiorganizational partnership established in May 2008. The authors introduce the history of the network, then discuss actively engaging stakeholders throughout the project's life cycle (design, planning, execution, and closure) through professional development, relationship building, and assessment activities. They focus on communication and management practices used to identify mutually beneficial project goals, ensure timely completion of deliverables, and develop sustainable sociotechnical infrastructure for future collaborative projects. These activities yielded an interactive process of action, assessment, and reflection to ensure that project goals and values were aligned with implementation. The authors conclude with a discussion of lessons learned and how the partnership project may serve as a model for other universities and academic health centers in high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries that are interested in or currently pursuing international academic partnerships. PMID:24072125

  19. Reflected Appraisals, Academic Self-Perceptions, and Math/Science Performance during Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchey, Heather A.; Harter, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The authors tested a model of the relations among adolescents' perceptions of parents', teachers', and classmates' support for, valuing of, and beliefs about their competence in math/science; adolescents' own academic self-perceptions concerning math/science; and their academic performance. The sample included 378 middle school students; 65% were…

  20. Academical training of Health Sciences professionals as a resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research La formación docente de los profesionales de las Ciencias de la Salud como recurso para la integración docente asistencial e investigativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Eduardo Cortés Cortés

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic training of Health Sciences professionals is an essential resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research and should be considered as an inherent attribute of professional practice. In present times this issue is still being questioned, because educational practice has not been fully transformed in the clinical setting. This work supports the potentials of academic training in Health Sciences to achieve this integration and is a call for professionals to create scientific basis of educational knowledge production in order to link health care practice to teaching and research. Bibliographic analysis showed that assistance centers should be academic centers for the development of Health Sciences. Academic training of professionals enables the integration we are looking for and establishes a mutual empowerment relationship, where each dimension is favoured in its interface.La formación docente de los profesionales en las Ciencias de la Salud constituye un recurso esencial para lograr la integración docencia, asistencia e investigación y debe ser vista como un atributo inherente al ejercicio profesional. En los momentos actuales este tema se encuentra cuestionado, porque aún no se ha logrado transformar de manera importante la práctica educativa en el contexto asistencial. Este trabajo fundamenta las potencialidades que posee la formación docente en las Ciencias de la Salud para lograr esta integración y hace un llamado para que se acentúe en los profesionales una base científica de producción de conocimientos pedagógicos, que permitirá el vínculo de su práctica asistencial con la docente y la investigativa. El análisis de la bibliografía pone de manifiesto que los centros asistenciales deben ser un centro académico de desarrollo de las Ciencias de la Salud. La formación docente de los profesionales posibilita la integración mencionada y establece una relación de potenciación mutua, donde cada dimensión resulta

  1. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it. PMID:25738387

  2. Research in health sciences library and information science: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A

    1992-10-01

    A content analysis of research articles published between 1966 and 1990 in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association was undertaken. Four specific questions were addressed: What subjects are of interest to health sciences librarians? Who is conducting this research? How do health sciences librarians conduct their research? Do health sciences librarians obtain funding for their research activities? Bibliometric characteristics of the research articles are described and compared to characteristics of research in library and information science as a whole in terms of subject and methodology. General findings were that most research in health sciences librarianship is conducted by librarians affiliated with academic health sciences libraries (51.8%); most deals with an applied (45.7%) or a theoretical (29.2%) topic; survey (41.0%) or observational (20.7%) research methodologies are used; descriptive quantitative analytical techniques are used (83.5%); and over 25% of research is funded. The average number of authors was 1.85, average article length was 7.25 pages, and average number of citations per article was 9.23. These findings are consistent with those reported in the general library and information science literature for the most part, although specific differences do exist in methodological and analytical areas.

  3. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Verification and Validation Whitepaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R; Graziani, F; Trucano, T

    2006-03-31

    The purpose of this whitepaper is to provide a framework for understanding the role that verification and validation (V&V) are expected to play in successful ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance (PSAA) Centers and projects. V&V have been emphasized in the recent specification of the PSAA (NNSA, 2006): (1) The resulting simulation models lend themselves to practical verification and validation methodologies and strategies that should include the integrated use of experimental and/or observational data as a key part of model and sub-model validation, as well as demonstrations of numerical convergence and accuracy for code verification. (2) Verification, validation and prediction methodologies and results must be much more strongly emphasized as research topics and demonstrated via the proposed simulations. (3) It is mandatory that proposals address the following two topics: (a) Predictability in science & engineering; and (b) Verification & validation strategies for large-scale simulations, including quantification of uncertainty and numerical convergence. We especially call attention to the explicit coupling of computational predictability and V&V in the third bullet above. In this whitepaper we emphasize this coupling, and provide concentrated guidance for addressing item 2. The whitepaper has two main components. First, we provide a brief and high-level tutorial on V&V that emphasizes critical elements of the program. Second, we state a set of V&V-related requirements that successful PSAA proposals must address.

  4. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  5. Video-games do not negatively impact adolescent academic performance in science, mathematics or reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Aaron; Sauer, James D

    2014-01-01

    Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and reading. Contrary to claims that increased video-gaming can impair academic performance, differences in academic performance were negligible across the relative frequencies of videogame use. Videogame use had little impact on adolescent academic achievement. PMID:24699536

  6. Video-games do not negatively impact adolescent academic performance in science, mathematics or reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Drummond

    Full Text Available Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and reading. Contrary to claims that increased video-gaming can impair academic performance, differences in academic performance were negligible across the relative frequencies of videogame use. Videogame use had little impact on adolescent academic achievement.

  7. Video-games do not negatively impact adolescent academic performance in science, mathematics or reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Aaron; Sauer, James D

    2014-01-01

    Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and reading. Contrary to claims that increased video-gaming can impair academic performance, differences in academic performance were negligible across the relative frequencies of videogame use. Videogame use had little impact on adolescent academic achievement.

  8. Implicit Theories of Ability of Grade 6 Science Students: Relation to Epistemological Beliefs and Academic Motivation and Achievement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason A.; Pajares, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We investigated: (a) the associations of implicit theories and epistemological beliefs and their effects on the academic motivation and achievement of students in Grade 6 science and (b) the mean differences of implicit theories, epistemological beliefs, and academic motivation and achievement as a function of gender and race/ethnicity (N=508).…

  9. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior. PMID:26422592

  10. Developing E-science and Research Services and Support at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Layne M; Butler, John T; Johnston, Lisa R

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of e-science and research support services in the Health Sciences Libraries (HSL) within the Academic Health Center (AHC) at the University of Minnesota (UMN). A review of the broader e-science initiatives within the UMN demonstrates the needs and opportunities that the University Libraries face while building knowledge, skills, and capacity to support e-research. These experiences are being used by the University Libraries administration and HSL to apply support for the growing needs of researchers in the health sciences. Several research areas that would benefit from enhanced e-science support are described. Plans to address the growing e-research needs of health sciences researchers are also discussed.

  11. Climate Change: Science, Health and the Environment

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Climate Change: Science, Health and the Environment Howard Frumkin, MD, DrPH, Director of CDC's National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, discusses the science of climate change, the potential for shifts in the natural world to affect our wellbeing, and the challenges of emerging issues in environmental health.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  12. Oral health knowledge and behavior among male health sciences college students in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honkala Sisko

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health auxiliary personnel have an important role in oral health promotion when they graduate and start working in the health care system. This study aims to find out oral health knowledge and oral health behavior of male Health Sciences College students. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all students at the male Health Sciences College in Kuwait (N = 153 during the academic year 2001/2002. The students filled the anonymous questionnaire in the class after the lecture. The response rate was 84% (n = 128. The questions consisted information on the general background, oral health behavior and oral health knowledge. Results Oral health knowledge seemed to be limited and very few background factors were associated with it. More than half of the students had visited a dentist during the previous 12 months, but only one third of students were brushing twice a day or more often. Conclusions It may be concluded that the male Health Sciences College students seemed to have appropriate knowledge on some oral health topics, but limited knowledge on the others. Their toothbrushing practices are still far behind the international recommendation (twice a day and also the knowledge, why it should be done so frequently also very limited.

  13. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee; Research Career... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T....

  14. Discovering epistemological axes for academic programs in computer science through network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Casillas Santillán; Alonso Castillo Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Academic programs in higher education institutions (HEI) are constantly under construction. They are never finished at all. As reader could agree, the current merging of knowledge in present societies is inexorable. The available cyber-infrastructure is able to support new approaches in science development. Hence, academic programs in HEI are clearly under the pressure to be constantly modernized in order to provide valid and up to date knowledge. Every academic program has this challenge in ...

  15. Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in advanced science classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascoe, Barbara Jean

    The purpose of this study was to examine gifted Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in science. Major concerns were to determine how these self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential influenced gifted Black males' capacity to compete in advanced science classes and to determine how science teachers may have influenced participants' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential. This study required an approach that would allow an interpretive aspect for the experiences of gifted Black males in advanced science classes. An intrinsic qualitative case study design with a critical theory framework was used. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Each participant was interviewed twice and each interview averaged 45 minutes. The purposeful sample consisted of nine gifted high school Black males between the ages of fourteen and eighteen. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. The categories of gifted Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential included gifted high achievers, gifted 'could do better' high achievers, gifted 'could do better' situational nonachievers, and gifted 'could do better' underachievers. Gifted Black male participants' perceptions regarding their science teachers' influence on their self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential included validation, reinforcement, and enhancement. These participants' perceptions regarding how science teachers' influenced their academic performance in science included science teachers' content knowledge, science teachers' skills to make science challenging and engaging, and a safe learning environment. The conclusions of this study described competing power dynamics of science teachers and gifted Black males' interactions in the science learning environment. The discussion also included a summary of relationships among the emergent themes

  16. Tufts academic health information network: concept and scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, N S

    1986-04-01

    Tufts University School of Medicine's new health sciences education building, the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Health Communications, will house a modern medical library and computer center, classrooms, auditoria, and media facilities. The building will also serve as the center for an information and communication network linking the medical school and adjacent New England Medical Center, Tufts' primary teaching hospital, with Tufts Associated Teaching Hospitals throughout New England. Ultimately, the Tufts network will join other gateway networks, information resource facilities, health care institutions, and medical schools throughout the world. The center and the network are intended to facilitate and improve the education of health professionals, the delivery of health care to patients, the conduct of research, and the implementation of administrative management approaches that should provide more efficient utilization of resources and save dollars. A model and scenario show how health care delivery and health care education are integrated through better use of information transfer technologies by health information specialists, practitioners, and educators.

  17. Smoking in Health Science Students with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Krommydas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that asthmatic students in a health science department would avoid the hazards of cigarette smoking due to the knowledge they gain through their studies. Surprisingly, health science students with asthma had a higher prevalence of smoking than their healthy colleagues.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF JURISPRUDENTIAL INQUIRY MODEL OF TEACHING ON THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS.

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal; S S Patil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Jurisprudential Inquiry Model of teaching on Academic Achievement in Social Science among the Secondary school Students. The study was conducted on a Purposive sample, a topic selected social science topic was taught through JIM. And its academic effectiveness was tested through a standardised Academic Achievement test on Social Science constructed by the researchers. Results revealed that Academic Achievement in Experimental...

  19. Helping ELLs Meet Standards in English Language Arts and Science: An Intervention Focused on Academic Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Diane; Artzi, Lauren; Barr, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards require students to understand and produce academic language that appears in informational text. Vocabulary is a critical domain of academic language, but English language learners (ELLs) come to the English Language Arts classroom with more limited English vocabulary than…

  20. The Effects of an Academic Environment Intervention on Science Identification among Women in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Laura R.; Betz, Diana E.; Sekaquaptewa, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Academic environments can feel unwelcoming for women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. Two studies examined academic environments of female undergraduates majoring in STEM fields at a university in the United States. In Study 1, we compared women in STEM who are in a welcoming environment to those in a traditional STEM…

  1. German Influences on the Spanish Academic Discourse in Educational Sciences between 1945 and 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roith, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The idiosyncrasy of national academic discourses in educational sciences and the flow of ideas between them is a topic that has inspired recent research, even though it has not been treated very exhaustively. This study presents some results of an investigation into German influences on the Spanish academic discourse in educational sciences…

  2. Complying with the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy to Facilitate Science Availability for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Social work researchers are making significant advances in science funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve the health of underserved and marginalized populations throughout the world. Unfortunately, research results are often only available to other scientists at academic institutions, limiting their impact. To facilitate the…

  3. Welcome to Health Information Science and Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless n...

  4. Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Toby L; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students' spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students' spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students' success. PMID:25404167

  5. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data.

  6. Strategic planning and entrepreneurism in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C T

    1988-01-01

    This article examines the academic medical center as a mature component of the industry, whose complex mission can be reconciled with the public's changing needs in an era of cost containment through the use of increasingly businesslike strategic planning. New dimensions in academic health center missions (as a result of changing public mandates) emphasize the need to identify the most appropriate settings for both the delivery of patient care and physician education. Strategies to meet these new demands, reflecting a market-oriented approach, such as diversification through corporate reorganization and joint ventures are delineated. Legal, tax, and regulatory problems that develop as a result of not-for-profit hospital engagement in unrelated business activity are also reviewed.

  7. Türkiye'de Yayınlanan Akademik Dergilerin Niteliklerindeki Zaman İçerisindeki Değişim Nedenleri: Sağlık, Sosyal vr Teknik Bilim Alanlarında Yayınlanan Dergiler Üzerine Bir İnceleme / Reasons of Change in the Essential Properties of Academic Journals Being Published in Turkey: An Investigation upon the Journals of Health, Social and Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi Kozak

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out by using data obtained out of the resulting databases of two data collection attempts concerning academic periodicals published in Turkey -being namely those of 1997-1998 and 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate changes going on last five years in general knowledge, scientific article evaluation and academic writing applications of academic periodicals related to medical sciences, social sciences and physical sciences. It was concluded that academic Turkish periodicals showed improvements according to the criteria of academic promotion (raising in last five years and that the criteria of academic raising had an positive effect on improving the quantity of scientific studies.

  8. Health Sciences Librarian as an Adult Trainer

    OpenAIRE

    Τσαλαπατάνη, Ειρήνη; Καλογεράκη, Ελένη

    2011-01-01

    The role of the health sciences librarian as it is shaped by the socio-economic conditions, technological developments and specific information needs of health professionals requires knowledge, skills and attitudes combined with communication skills, management and leadership abilities. The modern health sciences librarian seems to be “borrowing" features from the adult qualified instructor who constantly has to adopt roles in a dynamic learning process, and depending on the circumstances...

  9. The relationship between competencies acquired through Swiss academic sports science courses and the job requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, T; Studer, F; Nagel, S

    2016-01-01

    In view of the changes in and growing variety of sports-related occupations, it is highly relevant for educational institutions to know how well the educational contents of their sport science courses meet the professional requirements. This study analyses the relationship between the competencies acquired through academic sports science courses and the requirements of the relevant jobs in Switzerland. The data for this empirical analysis were drawn from a sample of n = 1054 graduates of different academic sport science programmes at all eight Swiss universities. The results show that academic sport science courses primarily communicate sports-specific expertise and practical sports skills. On the other hand, most graduates consider that the acquisition of interdisciplinary competencies plays a comparatively minor role in sport science education, even though these competencies are felt to be an important requirement in a variety of work-related environments and challenges.

  10. The relationship between competencies acquired through Swiss academic sports science courses and the job requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, T; Studer, F; Nagel, S

    2016-01-01

    In view of the changes in and growing variety of sports-related occupations, it is highly relevant for educational institutions to know how well the educational contents of their sport science courses meet the professional requirements. This study analyses the relationship between the competencies acquired through academic sports science courses and the requirements of the relevant jobs in Switzerland. The data for this empirical analysis were drawn from a sample of n = 1054 graduates of different academic sport science programmes at all eight Swiss universities. The results show that academic sport science courses primarily communicate sports-specific expertise and practical sports skills. On the other hand, most graduates consider that the acquisition of interdisciplinary competencies plays a comparatively minor role in sport science education, even though these competencies are felt to be an important requirement in a variety of work-related environments and challenges. PMID:25599128

  11. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. Method: An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Results: Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. Conclusions: The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for “community” building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections. PMID:20428277

  12. Political Science Theory for Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Community health educators are well versed in the behavior sciences, including intervention theories. However, most public health professionals are not familiar with the policy theories related to political advocacy. Because health educators are engaging in policy advocacy more frequently, and as a result of the profession including policy…

  13. Family medicine as a model of transition from academic medicine to academic health care: Estonia's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the development of academic family medicine in an environment of traditional academic medicine at the Tartu University, Estonia. The introduction of university family medicine teachers to everyday practice and practitioners to academic teaching and research helps bridge the gap between theory and practice, and it shows changed approach to academic medicine. PMID:15495281

  14. Kin of coauthorship in five decades of health science literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia; Buchan, Iain; Fanti, Iuri; Meloni, Sandro; Palladino, Pietro; Torvik, Vetle I

    2016-08-01

    Family background-kinship-can propagate careers. The evidence for academic nepotism is littered with complex associations and disputed causal inferences. Surname clustering, albeit with very careful consideration of surnames' flows across regions and time periods, can be used to reflect family ties. We examined surname patterns in the health science literature, by country, across five decades. Over 21 million papers indexed in the MEDLINE/PubMed database were analyzed. We identified relevant country-specific kinship trends over time and found that authors who are part of a kin tend to occupy central positions in their collaborative networks. Just as kin build potent academic networks with their own resources, societies may do well to provide equivalent support for talented individuals with fewer resources, on the periphery of networks.

  15. Kin of coauthorship in five decades of health science literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia; Buchan, Iain; Fanti, Iuri; Meloni, Sandro; Palladino, Pietro; Torvik, Vetle I

    2016-08-01

    Family background-kinship-can propagate careers. The evidence for academic nepotism is littered with complex associations and disputed causal inferences. Surname clustering, albeit with very careful consideration of surnames' flows across regions and time periods, can be used to reflect family ties. We examined surname patterns in the health science literature, by country, across five decades. Over 21 million papers indexed in the MEDLINE/PubMed database were analyzed. We identified relevant country-specific kinship trends over time and found that authors who are part of a kin tend to occupy central positions in their collaborative networks. Just as kin build potent academic networks with their own resources, societies may do well to provide equivalent support for talented individuals with fewer resources, on the periphery of networks. PMID:27457939

  16. On the Health of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Harold G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the present status of science as an industrialized-affluent culture resting upon a public woefully lacking in scientific background and scientists with activities taken in by nihilism. Suggests all scientists actively work together through teaching, talk, and behavior to counter the forces of anti-science and nihilism. (CC)

  17. Epistemology, Practical Work and Academic Skills in Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kirschner, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses the inherent flaws in considering and using the epistemology of the natural sciences as equivalent to a pedagogic basis for teaching and learning in the natural sciences. It begins with a discussion of the difference between practising science and learning to practice science. It follows with a discussion and refutation of three commonly held motives for using practicals in science education. It concludes with the presentation of three new, better motives for their use.

  18. Epistemology, practical work and Academic skills in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Paul A.

    1992-09-01

    This article discusses the inherent flaws in considering and using the epistemology of the natural sciences as equivalent to a pedagogic basis for teaching and learning in the natural sciences. It begins with a discussion of the difference between practising science and learning to practice science. It follows with a discussion and refutation of three commonly held motives for using practicals in science education. It concludes with the presentation of three new, better motives for their use.

  19. Beyond knowledge transfer: The social construction of autonomous academic science in university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Dina Louise

    Autonomy is a social product. Although some might view autonomy as the absence of social interference in individual action, it is in fact produced through social institutions. It enables social actors to act; it is the justification for the allocation of enormous public resources into institutions classified as "public" or "nonprofit;" it can lead to innovation; and, significantly, it is key to the public acceptance of new technologies. In this dissertation, I analyze the social construction of autonomy for academic science in U.S. university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations. University-industry relationships (UIRs) are a site of concern about the influence of commercial interests on academic science. Agricultural biotechnology is a contentious technology that has prompted questions about the ecological and public health implications of genetically-modified plants and animals. It has also spurred awareness of the industrialization of agriculture and accelerating corporate control of the global food system. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with over 200 scientists and administrators from nine U.S. research universities and thirty agricultural biotechnology companies, I find that both the academy and industry have a vested interest in the social construction of the academy as an autonomous space from which claims to objective, disinterested scientific knowledge can be made. These claims influence government regulation, as well as grower and public acceptance of agricultural biotechnology products. I argue that the social production of autonomy for academic science can be observed in narratives and practices related to: (1) the framing of when, how and why academic scientists collaborate with industry, (2) the meanings ascribed to and the uses deemed appropriate for industry monies in academic research, and (3) the dissemination of research results into the public domain through publications and patents. These narratives and practices

  20. The Relationship Between Suicide Ideation, Behavioral Health, and College Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Susan M; Franklin, Cynthia; Yueqi, Yan; Johnson, Shannon; Brownson, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The impact of suicidal ideation on college students' academic performance has yet to be examined, yet mental health is often linked with academic performance. Underclassmen and upperclassmen were compared on behavioral health outcomes related to academic success (N = 26,457). Ideation (b = -0.05, p Students reported higher GPAs when participating in extracurricular activities during the past year. Ideation, beyond mental health, is an important when assessing academic performance. Increasing students' connections benefits students experiencing behavioral concerns but also aids in suicide prevention initiatives and improves academic outcomes. Creating integrated health care systems on campus where physical, mental health and academic support services is crucial to offer solutions for students with severe or co-morbid mental health histories. PMID:26831304

  1. Academic Integration Supplement to the Advanced Food Science and Nutrition Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This supplement to an advanced food science and nutrition curriculum guide was developed for use in integrating academic principles with vocational home economics education in Texas. It contains learning and evaluation experiences specifically designed to integrate mathematics, science, language arts, and social studies principles within the…

  2. Academic Integration Supplement to the Food Science and Nutrition Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This supplement to a food science and nutrition curriculum guide was developed for use in integrating academic principles with vocational home economics education in Texas. It contains learning and evaluation experiences specifically designed to integrate mathematics, science, language arts, and social studies principles within the food science…

  3. Predicting Stereotype Endorsement and Academic Motivation in Women in Science Programs: A Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Marie-Noelle; Guay, Frederic; Senecal, Caroline; Larose, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a model based on stereotype threat theory. The hypothesis is that women who are exposed to a low percentage of women in a science program are more likely to endorse the gender stereotype that science is a male domain, which will in turn undermine their autonomous academic motivation. A total of 167 women university…

  4. Academic Help Seeking and Peer Interactions of High School Girls in Computer Science Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Paul S.

    Through interviews and classroom observations, this study investigated the academic help-seeking and interactions of high school girls with their computer science classmates in both a private school and a public school setting. The study explored five aspects of this help-seeking interaction: (1) females as a gender minority in computer science;…

  5. Health and Academic Achievement: Cumulative Effects of Health Assets on Standardized Test Scores among Urban Youth in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; Schwartz, Marlene; Gilstad-Hayden, Kathryn; McCaslin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Institute of Medicine (2012) concluded that we must "strengthen schools as the heart of health." To intervene for better outcomes in both health and academic achievement, identifying factors that impact children is essential. Study objectives are to (1) document associations between health assets and academic achievement,…

  6. Constructivist strategy for health science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Klopper

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to explore and describe a constructivist strategy for Health Science Educators. Changes in the higher education field in South Africa have impacted on the practice of health science educators. In the past, health science educators often envisaged their teaching task as  the transmission of content. This however no longer meets the needs of our practices.  In order to describe the strategy, the survey list of Dickoff, James and Wiedenbach (1968 was used to identify the core concepts. Each of the identified concepts was then described based on a literature review. The strategy advocates that health science  educators should shift from being lecturers to being learning facilitators based on the principles of constructivist learning, in order to create a context conducive to learning.

  7. The role biomedical science laboratories can play in improving science knowledge and promoting first-year nursing academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Pam

    The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play In Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an analysis of the role bioscience labs have in first-year nursing academic success is apposite. In response, this study sought to determine whether concurrent enrollment in anatomy and microbiology lecture and lab courses improved final lecture course grades. The investigation was expanded to include a comparison of first-year nursing GPA and prerequisite bioscience concurrent lecture/lab enrollment. Additionally, research has indicated that learning is affected by student perception of the course, instructor, content, and environment. To gain an insight regarding students' perspectives of laboratory courses, almost 100 students completed a 20-statement perception survey to understand how lab participation affects learning. Data analyses involved comparing anatomy and microbiology final lecture course grades between students who concurrently enrolled in the lecture and lab courses and students who completed the lecture course alone. Independent t test analyses revealed that there was no significant difference between the groups for anatomy, t(285) = .11, p = .912, but for microbiology, the lab course provided a significant educational benefit, t(256) = 4.47, p = .000. However, when concurrent prerequisite bioscience lecture/lab enrollment was compared to non-concurrent enrollment for first-year nursing GPA using independent t test analyses, no significant difference was found for South Dakota State University, t(37) = -1.57, p = .125, or for the University of South Dakota, t(38) = -0.46, p

  8. Mental health predicts better academic outcomes: a longitudinal study of elementary school students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J Michael; Guzmán, Javier; McCarthy, Alyssa E; Squicciarini, Ana María; George, Myriam; Canenguez, Katia M; Dunn, Erin C; Baer, Lee; Simonsohn, Ariela; Smoller, Jordan W; Jellinek, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The world's largest school-based mental health program, Habilidades para la Vida [Skills for Life (SFL)], has been operating on a national scale in Chile for 15 years. SFL's activities include using standardized measures to screen elementary school students and providing preventive workshops to students at risk for mental health problems. This paper used SFL's data on 37,397 students who were in first grade in 2009 and third grade in 2011 to ascertain whether first grade mental health predicted subsequent academic achievement and whether remission of mental health problems predicted improved academic outcomes. Results showed that mental health was a significant predictor of future academic performance and that, overall, students whose mental health improved between first and third grade made better academic progress than students whose mental health did not improve or worsened. Our findings suggest that school-based mental health programs like SFL may help improve students' academic outcomes.

  9. Health Sciences in Iran; Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani R.* PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As this is the first issue of the International Archives of Health Sciences, a scholarly journal of Kashan University of medical Sciences, we start with an editorial of Dr. Rouhullah Dehghani, the editor-in-chief, to explain the aims and views of the editorial board members and the scope of the journal.

  10. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  11. One institution's experience in transforming the health sciences library of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allee, Nancy J; Blumenthal, Jane; Jordan, Karen; Lalla, Nadia; Lauseng, Deborah; Rana, Gurpreet; Saylor, Kate; Song, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing a need to be more relevant to its constituents, and aligned with institutional priorities, the Taubman Health Sciences Library redefined its mission, roles, and space. This transformation facilitated innovative, team-based collaborations within the health sciences community and the addition of new roles and responsibilities in academic and clinical engagement, research and informatics, enabling technologies, community outreach, and global health. Library space is being redesigned, and a branch library dedicated to interdisciplinary partnerships has been established. Information gained from this experience will be useful to other libraries faced with budget, resource, and staffing challenges and will offer practical ideas for becoming more integrated into the academic, research, and clinical work of the health sciences enterprise.

  12. What does the UK public want from academic science communication? [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Redfern

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The overall aim of public academic science communication is to engage a non-scientist with a particular field of science and/or research topic, often driven by the expertise of the academic. An e-survey was designed to provide insight into respondent’s current and future engagement with science communication activities. Respondents provided a wide range of ideas and concerns as to the ‘common practice’ of academic science communication, and whilst they support some of these popular approaches (such as open-door events and science festivals, there are alternatives that may enable wider engagement. Suggestions of internet-based approaches and digital media were strongly encouraged, and although respondents found merits in methods such as science festivals, limitations such as geography, time and topic of interest were a barrier to engagement for some. Academics and scientists need to think carefully about how they plan their science communication activities and carry out evaluations, including considering the point of view of the public, as although defaulting to hands-on open door events at their university may seem like the expected standard, it may not be the best way to reach the intended audience.

  13. Social support, stress, health, and academic success in Ghanaian adolescents: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozah, Franklin N; Pevalin, David J

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the role psychosocial factors play in promoting the health and academic success of adolescents. A total of 770 adolescent boys and girls in Senior High Schools were randomly selected to complete a self-report questionnaire. School reported latest terminal examination grades were used as the measure of academic success. Structural equation modelling indicated a relatively good fit to the posteriori model with four of the hypothesised paths fully supported and two partially supported. Perceived social support was negatively related to stress and predictive of health and wellbeing but not academic success. Stress was predictive of health but not academic success. Finally, health and wellbeing was able to predict academic success. These findings have policy implications regarding efforts aimed at promoting the health and wellbeing as well as the academic success of adolescents in Ghana.

  14. Techno-scientific hybrids. Science communication in pursuit of an academic identity

    OpenAIRE

    Nico Pitrelli; Yurij Castelfranchi

    2009-01-01

    A recent article published in Science Communication addresses the training issue in issue in our discipline. Henk Mulder and his colleagues discuss the shared features that university curricula should or could have to favour the full admission of science communication into the academic circle. Having analysed analogies and differences in the curricula that a number of schools provide all over the world, the authors reached the conclusion that much remains to be done. Science communication see...

  15. Low Response Rate and Other Factors Render Academic Health Science Library System Study Ungeneralizable. A Review of: Folb, B. L., Wessel, C. B., & Czechowski, L. J. (2011. Clinical and academic use of electronic and print books: The Health Sciences Library System e-book study at the University of Pittsburgh. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 99(3, 218-228. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.99.3.009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Melssen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the factors, barriersand facilitators, preference, and intended useof e-book compared to print book usage by allpatrons in a health science library system,which serves a university with health sciencedegree programs and a hospital system.Design – Two online surveys.Setting – University of Pittsburgh HealthSciences Library System, which includes theUniversity of Pittsburgh’s six schools of healthsciences (medicine, dental medicine, nursing,pharmacy, public health, and rehabilitationand the University of Pittsburgh MedicalCenter hospitals and programs.Subjects – All health sciences library systemusrers, including faculty, researchers, clinicians,residents, fellows, employees, and students.Methods – Two versions of the survey weredeployed in 2009 using Opinio. There were 46questions for the University of PittsburghMedical Center (UPMC survey and 47questions for the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsurvey. The surveys were pilot tested byHealth Sciences Library System (HSLSlibrarians and graduate students in a surveymethods class. The survey was edited based onthe feedback provided and receivedinstitutional review board approval as anexempt study.A total of 5,292 email addresses wererandomly selected by SPSS from a pool of 9,472 UPMC and Pitt patrons registered with a HSLS remote access password; 2,684 patrons from UPMC and 2,608 patrons from Pitt were selected. HSLS librarians were excluded from the survey. Participants were emailed a link to the survey in March of 2009. Three email reminders were sent at five day intervals. Data was collected for 22 days and exported from Opinio to SPSS statistics software. Survey results were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations.Main Results – Of the 5,292 emails sent, 979 surveys were submitted and 871 were completed fully. The 108 partially completed the surveys were analyzed using pair wise deletion. All HSLS user groups were represented and all

  16. Tufts academic health information network: concept and scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, N S

    1986-04-01

    Tufts University School of Medicine's new health sciences education building, the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Health Communications, will house a modern medical library and computer center, classrooms, auditoria, and media facilities. The building will also serve as the center for an information and communication network linking the medical school and adjacent New England Medical Center, Tufts' primary teaching hospital, with Tufts Associated Teaching Hospitals throughout New England. Ultimately, the Tufts network will join other gateway networks, information resource facilities, health care institutions, and medical schools throughout the world. The center and the network are intended to facilitate and improve the education of health professionals, the delivery of health care to patients, the conduct of research, and the implementation of administrative management approaches that should provide more efficient utilization of resources and save dollars. A model and scenario show how health care delivery and health care education are integrated through better use of information transfer technologies by health information specialists, practitioners, and educators. PMID:3708191

  17. How Does Grit Impact College Students' Academic Achievement in Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelais, Paul; Lemay, David John; Doleck, Tenzin

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that achievement is not solely based on the cognitive abilities of the learner, but rather on the combination of cognitive ability and personality traits. This paper explores how grit affects student academic performance and success in first-year college physics students in the context of a Quebec Collège d'enseignement…

  18. EXAMINING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF SPORTS SCIENCES FACULTY STUDENTS: THE CASE OF FIRAT UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDOĞDU, Cemal; ÇELEBİ, Evrim

    2015-01-01

    The most emphasised aspect of teaching is student achievement. It is the reason for teaching and the product teaching produces. The potential of a well - qualified workforce with high academic achievement is thought to be the primary factor in the development of a society. This study was designed to examine the academic achievement of students studying at the Sports Sciences Faculty of Fırat University in terms of a ...

  19. Video-Games Do Not Negatively Impact Adolescent Academic Performance in Science, Mathematics or Reading

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Drummond; James D Sauer

    2014-01-01

    Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and readi...

  20. Cluster Analysis of Assessment in Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; White, Sue; Power, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Academic content common to health science programs is often taught to a mixed group of students; however, content assessment may be consistent for each discipline. This study used a retrospective cluster analysis on such a group, first to identify high and low achieving students, and second, to determine the distribution of students within…

  1. Resource allocation in academic health centers: creating common metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Keith A; Castellanos, Nathan; Wartman, Steven A

    2011-09-01

    Optimizing resource allocation is essential for effective academic health center (AHC) management, yet guidelines and principles for doing so in the research and educational arenas remain limited. To address this issue, the authors analyzed responses to the 2007-2008 Association of Academic Health Centers census using ratio analysis. The concept was to normalize data from an individual institution to that same institution, by creating a ratio of two separate values from the institution (e.g., total faculty FTEs/total FTEs). The ratios were then compared across institutions. Generally, this strategy minimizes the effect of institution size on the responses, size being the predominant limitation of using absolute values for developing meaningful metrics. In so doing, ratio analysis provides a range of responses that can be displayed in graphical form to determine the range and distribution of values. The data can then be readily scrutinized to determine where any given institution falls within the distribution. Staffing ratios and operating ratios from up to 54 institutions are reported. For ratios including faculty numbers in the numerator or denominator, the range of values is wide and minimally discriminatory, reflecting heterogeneity across institutions in faculty definitions. Values for financial ratios, in particular total payroll expense/total operating expense, are more tightly clustered, reflecting in part the use of units with a uniform definition (i.e., dollars), and emphasizing the utility of such ratios in decision guidelines. The authors describe how to apply these insights to develop metrics for resource allocation in the research and educational arenas. PMID:21785307

  2. Resource allocation in academic health centers: creating common metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Keith A; Castellanos, Nathan; Wartman, Steven A

    2011-09-01

    Optimizing resource allocation is essential for effective academic health center (AHC) management, yet guidelines and principles for doing so in the research and educational arenas remain limited. To address this issue, the authors analyzed responses to the 2007-2008 Association of Academic Health Centers census using ratio analysis. The concept was to normalize data from an individual institution to that same institution, by creating a ratio of two separate values from the institution (e.g., total faculty FTEs/total FTEs). The ratios were then compared across institutions. Generally, this strategy minimizes the effect of institution size on the responses, size being the predominant limitation of using absolute values for developing meaningful metrics. In so doing, ratio analysis provides a range of responses that can be displayed in graphical form to determine the range and distribution of values. The data can then be readily scrutinized to determine where any given institution falls within the distribution. Staffing ratios and operating ratios from up to 54 institutions are reported. For ratios including faculty numbers in the numerator or denominator, the range of values is wide and minimally discriminatory, reflecting heterogeneity across institutions in faculty definitions. Values for financial ratios, in particular total payroll expense/total operating expense, are more tightly clustered, reflecting in part the use of units with a uniform definition (i.e., dollars), and emphasizing the utility of such ratios in decision guidelines. The authors describe how to apply these insights to develop metrics for resource allocation in the research and educational arenas.

  3. Teamwork, motivational profiles and academic performance in computer science engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Perez Martinez, Jorge Enrique; García Martín, Javier; Sierra Alonso, Almudena

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at discussing several issues related to the teamwork generic competence, motivational profiles and academic performance. In particular, we study the improvement of teamwork attitude, the predominant types of motivation in different contexts and some correlations among these three components of the learning process. The above-mentioned aspects are of great importance. Currently, the professional profile of engineers has a strong teamwork component and the motivational...

  4. Academic Career Development Stress and Mental Health of Higher Secondary Students--An Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anjali; Halder, Santoshi; Goswami, Nibedita

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the mental health of students with their academic career-related stressors collecting data from 400 students of different schools of Eastern part of India by using; namely General Information Schedule (GIS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the Academic Career Development Stress Scale. The data was subjected to t…

  5. Academic Entrepreneurship and Exchange of Scientific Resources: Material Transfer in Life and Materials Sciences in Japanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Sotaro; Walsh, John P.; Baba, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    This study uses a sample of Japanese university scientists in life and materials sciences to examine how academic entrepreneurship has affected the norms and behaviors of academic scientists regarding sharing scientific resources. Results indicate that high levels of academic entrepreneurship in a scientific field are associated with less reliance…

  6. Health, Wellbeing and Social Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Giovanni; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    For social interventions aimed at improving nutrition behavior evidence from randomized trials is essential but cannot be the only approach of research activities. Interventions on dietary habits require considerations on food security, economic and environmental sustainability, and a broad meaning of wellbeing which includes, but also goes beyond, health effects. The model of research in nutrition requires a new consideration of observational studies, mainly through different analytical models. Nutrition and food studies need research programs where medical (nutrition and health), psychology (how we behave), economics (how resources are used and their impact on wellbeing) and sociology (how social determinant shape behavior) collaborate. PMID:25785783

  7. Oral Health Literacy and Behavior of Health Sciences University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti N Mohd-Dom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the level of oral health literacy and behavior among health sciences. Methods: The method used descriptive cross-sectional survey involving 609 students from Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Oral health literacy level and behaviour was assessed with a validated and pretested self-administered questionnaire using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS tool and modified Oral Health Adult Literacy Questionnaire (OHL-AQ. Results: A total of 509 participants involved in the study (83.6%. The overall mean oral health literacy score was 10.27 (95% CI 7.92, 12.62, which found dental students showing statistically significant higher scores (mean=11.36, 95% CI 9.70, 13.02 compared to medical (mean=10.72, 95% CI 8.67, 12.77, allied health sciences (mean=9.89, 95% CI 7.34, 12.44 and pharmacy (mean=9.55, 95% CI 7.23, 11.87. Almost all respondents are non-smokers (99.8% and non-drinkers (97.2%. Only 19.1% pay regular dental visits every 6-12 months while 51.1% visit dentist only when they have dental pain. Conclusion: There appears to be a positive relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behavior. Health science university students should be provided substantial dental health education in their curriculum as they show good potential as strategic partners in oral health.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.404

  8. Women, race, and science: The academic experiences of twenty women of color with a passion for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela C.

    Women of color drop out of science at higher rates than other students. This study is an ethnographic examination of why this occurs and how women of color can be supported in studying science. Through participant observation in science classes, labs, and a program supporting high-achieving students of color, as well as interviews with minority women science students, the student identities celebrated by science departments, as well as those embraced by my informants, were uncovered. Cultural norms of science classes often differed from those of the women in the study. Only one identity---apprentice research scientist---was celebrated in science settings, although others were tolerated. The women tended to either embrace the apprentice research scientist identity, form an alternative science-oriented identity, or never form a satisfying science student identity. Women who were more racially marked were more likely to fall into the second and third groups. This study uncovered difficulties which women students of color faced more than other science students. In addition, it uncovered several seemingly neutral institutional features of science lectures and labs which actually served to discourage or marginalize women students of color. It revealed values held in common by the women in the study and how those characteristics (especially altruism and pride and pleasure in academic challenge) led them to study science. It also revealed strategies used by the most successful women science students, as well as by professors and programs most successful at supporting women of color in the study of science. Based on this study, increasing the participation of women of color in science holds the possibility of altering the basic values of science; however, institutional features and personal interactions within science departments tend to resist those changes, primarily by encouraging women of color to abandon their study of science.

  9. A conceptual model of the academic discipline nursing science

    OpenAIRE

    W.J. Kotze

    1989-01-01

    At their annual meeting during 1987, the heads of the Departments of Nursing at South African Universities discussed the sub-division of Nursing Science. They identified the following problems in this regard:

  10. Increasing the capacity of health sciences to address health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Sandra P; Broyles, Shelia L; Rivera, Lourdes M; Reznik, Vivian M

    2009-09-01

    In order to create a cohort of investigators who are engaged in health disparities research, scholarship, and practice, and to increase the amount of funding in the university that is invested in research focused on reducing health disparities, the San Diego EXPORT Center implemented 2 major initiatives: (1) the support of underrepresented minority (URM) junior faculty development and (2) the funding for pilot research grants in health disparities. This paper describes the activities employed by the center and summarizes the outcomes of these two initiatives. Ninety-five percent (18 of 19) URM junior faculty completed the faculty development program, and 83.3% (15 of 18) of the completers are advancing in their academic careers at University of California San Diego (UCSD) and are teaching, working with populations at risk and/or conducting research in health disparities. EXPORT awarded 7 investigators a total of $429186 to conduct pilot research, and 71.4% (5/7) have now obtained $4.7 million in independent extramural funding. The San Diego EXPORT Center has increased the research capacity, strengthened the infrastructure for health disparities research, and created a cohort of successful URM junior faculty who are advancing in their academic careers. These investigators are already changing the climate at UCSD by their leadership activities, research focus, peer-networking, and mentoring of students.

  11. Non-parallel processing: Gendered attrition in academic computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohoon, Joanne Louise Mcgrath

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of disproportionate female attrition from computer science as an instance of gender segregation in higher education. By adopting a theoretical framework from organizational sociology, it demonstrates that the characteristics and processes of computer science departments strongly influence female retention. The empirical data identifies conditions under which women are retained in the computer science major at comparable rates to men. The research for this dissertation began with interviews of students, faculty, and chairpersons from five computer science departments. These exploratory interviews led to a survey of faculty and chairpersons at computer science and biology departments in Virginia. The data from these surveys are used in comparisons of the computer science and biology disciplines, and for statistical analyses that identify which departmental characteristics promote equal attrition for male and female undergraduates in computer science. This three-pronged methodological approach of interviews, discipline comparisons, and statistical analyses shows that departmental variation in gendered attrition rates can be explained largely by access to opportunity, relative numbers, and other characteristics of the learning environment. Using these concepts, this research identifies nine factors that affect the differential attrition of women from CS departments. These factors are: (1) The gender composition of enrolled students and faculty; (2) Faculty turnover; (3) Institutional support for the department; (4) Preferential attitudes toward female students; (5) Mentoring and supervising by faculty; (6) The local job market, starting salaries, and competitiveness of graduates; (7) Emphasis on teaching; and (8) Joint efforts for student success. This work contributes to our understanding of the gender segregation process in higher education. In addition, it contributes information that can lead to effective solutions for an

  12. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  13. Computers, health care, and medical information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, T L; Korpman, R A

    1980-10-17

    The clinical laboratory is examined as a microcosm of the entire health care delivery system. The introduction of computers into the clinical laboratory raises issues that are difficult to resolve by the methods of information science or medical science applied in isolation. The melding of these two disciplines, together with the contributions of other disciplines, has created a new field of study called medical information science. The emergence of this new discipline and some specific problem-solving approaches used in its application in the clinical laboratory are examined.

  14. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizewski, J.A., E-mail: cizewski@rutgers.edu

    2014-06-15

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  15. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development

  16. A Study of the Academic Performance of Male Students Compared To Female Students in Secondary Elective Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Delores

    The purpose of this study is to compare the academic performance of male and female students in high school elective science courses. The data for this study were drawn from the grade books of six teachers of elective science courses and consists of the grades earned by the males and females during one academic year. The number of students…

  17. Academic Job Placements in Library and Information Science Field: A Case Study Performed on ALISE Web-Based Postings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated and analyzed the state of academic web-based job announcements in Library and Information Science Field. The purpose of study was to get in depth understanding about main characteristics and trends of academic job market in Library and Information science field. The study focused on web-based version announcement as it was…

  18. Reducing Unintentional Plagiarism amongst International Students in the Biological Sciences: An Embedded Academic Writing Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Aysha; Bowman, Marion; Seabourne, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is general agreement in the literature that international students are more likely to plagiarise compared to their native speaker peers and, in many instances, plagiarism is unintentional. In this article we describe the effectiveness of an academic writing development programme embedded into a Biological Sciences Taught Masters course…

  19. The Knowledge of Web 2.0 by Library and Information Science Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daihani, Sultan

    2009-01-01

    This research paper reports the results of a Web-based survey designed to explore the attitude of Library and Information Science (LIS) academics to Web 2.0. It investigates their familiarity with Web 2.0 concepts, tools and services and applications as these relate to LIS education, and the barriers to their use. A Web-based questionnaire was…

  20. Showing Up: The Importance of Class Attendance for Academic Success in Introductory Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy; Jensen, Murray; Hatch, Jay; Duranczyk, Irene; Staats, Susan; Koch, Laura

    2003-01-01

    In order for students to succeed academically, they need to be motivated, and the simplest expression of student motivation is class attendance. Displays data on how student grades are associated with class attendance in a variety of introductory science courses. (SOE)

  1. The Effect of Teaching Strategy Based on Multiple Intelligences on Students' Academic Achievement in Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Ali; Laei, Susan; Ahmadyan, Hamze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Teaching Strategy based on Multiple Intelligences on students' academic achievement in sciences course. Totally 40 students from two different classes (Experimental N = 20 and Control N = 20) participated in the study. They were in the fifth grade of elementary school and were selected…

  2. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at th

  3. Measuring and Comparing Academic Language Development and Conceptual Understanding via Science Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Margarita; Tong, Fuhui; Irby, Beverly J.; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this quantitative study measured and compared the academic language development and conceptual understanding of fifth-grade economically disadvantaged English language learners (ELL), former ELLs, and native English-speaking (ES) students as reflected in their science notebook scores. Using an instrument they developed, the authors…

  4. 75 FR 32857 - Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 691 Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) Programs CFR Correction In Title 34 of the Code of...

  5. Foreign Language Professional Communicative Competence as a Component of the Academic Science Teacher's Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Roza A.; Baykova, Olga V.; Kusainov, Askarbek K.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem raised in the article is explained by the increasing demand for qualified specialists who have a good command of a foreign language. The communicative competence of an academic science teacher under the conditions of international cooperation development is of great importance. The article discusses the problem of…

  6. The Effect of Inquiry-Based Learning Method on Students' Academic Achievement in Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based learning method on students' academic achievement in sciences lesson. A total of 40 fifth grade students from two different classes were involved in the study. They were selected through purposive sampling method. The group which was assigned as experimental group was…

  7. Academic Experiences in a Cross-National Tertiary Program: Language Immersion Amid the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores Malaysian students' problems within their science and engineering tertiary courses in Japanese through their diary entries and semi-structured interviews. The study analyses how students implement management strategies to overcome their problems. Although many studies are available regarding students' academic activities in a…

  8. Teacher Qualification and Students' Academic Performance in Science Mathematics and Technology Subjects in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musau, Lydia M.; Abere, Migosi Joash

    2015-01-01

    Performance in Science, Mathematics and Technology (SMT) subjects among students in Kitui County, Kenya has perpetually been unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to look into the extent to which teacher qualification influenced students' academic performance in SMT subjects. The study applied ex-post-facto survey research design. Random…

  9. Resolved: Academic Debate Should Be a Part of Political Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelicheva, Mariya Y.

    2007-01-01

    Should political science educators use debate for teaching their undergraduate students? This article argues for incorporation of academic debate into curriculum of undergraduate courses. It demonstrates the process of arriving at a decision favorable of debate through exploration and analysis of competitive reasons, arguments, and evidence for…

  10. Motivation and Academic Help-Seeking in High School Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yuk Fai; Pajares, Frank; Oberman, Paul S.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the degree to which academic motivation predicted the executive help-seeking, instrumental help-seeking, perceived benefits of help-seeking, and avoidance of help-seeking of high school students enrolled in computer science (n = 314). Task goals were positively associated with instrumental…

  11. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  12. Scale of Academic Emotion in Science Education: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary research into science education has generally been conducted from the perspective of "conceptual change" in learning. This study sought to extend previous work by recognizing that human rationality can be influenced by the emotions generated by the learning environment and specific actions related to learning. Methods used…

  13. Science academy statements on water, health, and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    Several days prior to the Group of 8 (G8) summit of nations on 26-27 May in Deauville, France, science academies from those nations and five others issued joint statements calling for the governments to take actions regarding water and health as well as science education. The water and health statement indicates that nearly 3 billion people will be living in water-scarce countries by 2050 and that 2.6 billion already lack access to proper sanitation and nearly 900 million lack access to a clean water supply. The statement calls for developing basic infrastructure for sanitation, promoting education to change the behavior of populations regarding water supply, funding research and development to identify pathogens, and improving water management and hygiene standards, among other measures.

  14. HSOCLCUG: A Network of Health Sciences Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Amy D.; Estrada, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the activities of the Health Sciences OCLC User Group, which was organized to establish a forum for communication; provide information about National Library of Medicine cataloging rules in OCLC; maintain close relations with the National Library of Medicine and the Medical Libraries Association; and represent its constituency to OCLC.…

  15. Disparities in academic achievement and health: the intersection of child education and health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Kitzman, Harriet

    2009-03-01

    Recent data suggest that that the United States is failing to make significant progress toward the Healthy People 2010 goal of eliminating health disparities. One missing element from the US strategy for achieving this goal is a focus on gaps in child development and achievement. Academic achievement and education seem to be critical determinants of health across the life span and disparities in one contribute to disparities in the other. Despite these linkages, national policy treats child education and health as separate. Landmark education legislation, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, is due for Congressional reauthorization. It seeks to eliminate gaps in academic child achievement by 2014. It does so by introducing accountability for states, school districts, and schools. In this special article, we review health disparities and contributors to child achievement gaps. We review changes in achievement gaps over time and potential contributors to the limited success of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, including its unfunded mandates and unfounded assumptions. We conclude with key reforms, which include addressing gaps in child school readiness through adequate investment in child health and early education and reductions in child poverty; closing the gap in child achievement by ensuring equity in school accountability standards; and, importantly, ensuring equity in school funding so that resources are allocated on the basis of the needs of the students. This will ensure that schools, particularly those serving large numbers of poor and minority children, have the resources necessary to promote optimal learning. PMID:19255042

  16. The hand of science academic writing and its rewards

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin, Blaise

    2005-01-01

    The collaborative character of science and scholarship, whether formal or informal in nature, is the focus of this discussion by a master of the subject. The world of scholarly communication is evolving with exponential speed. Propelled by the Web and the rapid transition from paper to electronic journals, the scale of the research effort is moving from the individual to research conducted by dozens of scientists scattered all over the globe.These changes evoke many questions: What does it mean to be an author in an age of collective effort? How are responsibility and credit allocated in collaborative endeavors? What is the relationship between reading, referencing and reputation - the political economy of citation? How are social relations inscribed in intellectual space? Will the move to online and open access publishing provide new measures of authorial salience and intellectual impact? Cronin answers these questions as he captures the complex relationship between authorship and the reward system of scienc...

  17. Investigating the Relationship of Resilience to Academic Persistence in College Students with Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relationships between measures of inter- and intrapersonal resilience and mental health were examined with respect to academic persistence in college students with mental health issues. A sample of 121 undergraduate students with mental health issues was recruited from campus mental health offices offering college counseling,…

  18. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  19. Factors Affecting Academic Failure in Nursing Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic failure of students is a major problem of higher education. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the factors causing academic failure in nursing students of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods: This qualitative study was carried out via conventional qualitative content analysis approach. A total of 21 nursing students (18 males and 3 females who had a Grade Point Average (GPA lower than the previous semester and were conditioned (average 12 were selected through purposive sampling from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Qom University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews conducted with each individual. Interviews were continued until data saturation, taking about 45 to 70 minutes. Data analysis was performed simultaneously with data gathering. Results: In this study, the mean age of participants was 21.9±4.1 year. Data analysis demonstrated that individual factors, factors related to curriculum, teaching methods of the faculty, large number of students in class, lack of formative assessment of teachers, lack of interaction between the faculty and students, and failure to comply with lesson plans were major causes of academic failure among students. Conclusion: Based on the results, managers, instructors and counselors can monitor their students' academic achievement by careful planning, active teaching methods and continuous assessment of students, and conduct individual and group counseling sessions to prevent academic failure.

  20. The relationship between self-efficacy and academic motivation among students of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Roohi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: self-efficacy is referred to individual's beliefs about their abilities to learn and doing significant tasks in life. This study aims to determine the relationship between self-efficacy and academic motivation in a group of medical sciences' students. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 275 students of Golestan University of Medical Sciences (GOUMS were selected using stratified random sampling method. A questionnaire consists of questions regarding demographic, academic motivation, and self-efficacy beliefs were used to collect data. Pearson correlation coefficients, independent T-Test and one way ANOVA were applied on the data. Results: The average of students’ academic motivation was 30.3±4.0. 50.2 percent of students had self-efficacy higher than average. Self-efficacy had significant correlation with intrinsic motivation sub-scale (r=0.196, P=0.001 and total score of academic motivation scale (r=0.155, P=0.01. There were no significant correlations between self-efficacy and extrinsic motivation (r=0.054, P=0.376 and motivation sub-scale (r=0.104, P=0.08. There was no significant difference between two genders in self-efficacy. Conclusion: Improvement in self-efficacy of medical sciences' students could improve their motivation.

  1. 'Science first': An exploration of the assessment and role of language in the editorial practices of 'hard science' academic journals

    OpenAIRE

    Von Delius, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Publication in international, peer-reviewed, academic journals is increasingly characterized by the dominance of English as the language of research dissemination. Multiple studies attest to the disadvantages perceived and encountered by NNES (non-native English speaking) scholars as a result; yet, only a limited number have addressed the ‘gatekeeper’ side of the editorial process, with an exclusive focus on publication within social science journals (Belcher, 2007; Fl...

  2. Interpreting the relationships between single gender science classes and girls' academic motivation and interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonya L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent single gender science classes affect motivation to learn scientific concepts, interest in science, and college major intent among high school and middle school girls. This study was designed to determine whether students' motivation to learn science changes when they are placed in a single gender science class. The study also measured whether the students' level of interest in science and desire to major in science changes based on their enrollment in a single gender class. Finally, the study investigated the career and college major intentions of the sample population used in the study. Girls in single gender groupings engage in more academic risk taking and participate more than girls in coeducational classes. This benefit alone responds to reform efforts and supports the abolition of gender-based obstacles. Single gender grouping could help encourage more girls to take interest in majoring in science, a field that is considered to be masculine. By increasing students' interest in science while enrolled in single gender classes, students may become more motivated to learn science. This study was conducted using seven, eighth, ninth and tenth grade girls from single sex and coeducational science classes. The students participated in 2 surveys, the Science Motivational Survey and the Test of Science Related Attitudes, at the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester. In respect to girls in high school single gender science classes, results were contrary to recent studies that state that girls who received science education in a single gender setting have an increase in motivation and attitude towards science. The results did show that middle school girls in single gender science classes did show an increase in motivation.

  3. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  4. Impacting Children's Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, Timothy A.; Hannon, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity…

  5. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environment Kids Health Kids Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs ... environment we live in today. Environment & Health Songs Coloring ...

  6. Academic attainment and the high school science experiences among high-achieving African American males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trice, Rodney Nathaniel

    This study examines the educational experiences of high achieving African American males. More specifically, it analyzes the influences on their successful navigation through high school science. Through a series of interviews, observations, questionnaires, science portfolios, and review of existing data the researcher attempted to obtain a deeper understanding of high achieving African American males and their limitations to academic attainment and high school science experiences. The investigation is limited to ten high achieving African American male science students at Woodcrest High School. Woodcrest is situated at the cross section of a suburban and rural community located in the southeastern section of the United States. Although this investigation involves African American males, all of whom are successful in school, its findings should not be generalized to this nor any other group of students. The research question that guided this study is: What are the limitations to academic attainment and the high school science experiences of high achieving African American males? The student participants expose how suspension and expulsion, special education placement, academic tracking, science instruction, and teacher expectation influence academic achievement. The role parents play, student self-concept, peer relationships, and student learning styles are also analyzed. The anthology of data rendered three overarching themes: (1) unequal access to education, (2) maintenance of unfair educational structures, and (3) authentic characterizations of African American males. Often the policies and practices set in place by school officials aid in creating hurdles to academic achievement. These policies and practices are often formed without meaningful consideration of the unintended consequences that may affect different student populations, particularly the most vulnerable. The findings from this study expose that high achieving African American males face major

  7. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  8. Climate Science Centers: Growing Federal and Academic Expertise in the Nation's Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's (Interior) natural and cultural resource managers face increasingly complex challenges exacerbated by climate change. In 2009, under Secretarial Order 3289, Interior created eight regional Climate Science Centers managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and in partnership with universities. Secretarial Order 3289 provides a framework to coordinate climate change science and adaptation efforts across Interior and to integrate science and resource management expertise from Federal, State, Tribal, private, non-profit, and academic partners. In addition to broad research expertise, these Federal/university partnerships provide opportunities to develop a next generation of climate science professionals. These include opportunities to increase the climate science knowledge base of students and practicing professionals; build students' skills in working across the boundary between research and implementation; facilitate networking among researchers, students, and professionals for the application of research to on-the-ground issues; and support the science pipeline in climate-related fields through structured, intensive professional development. In 2013, Climate Science Centers supported approximately 10 undergraduates, 60 graduate students, and 26 postdoctoral researchers. Additional students trained by Climate Science Center-affiliated faculty also contribute valuable time and expertise, and are effectively part of the Climate Science Center network. The Climate Science Centers' education and training efforts have also reached a number of high school students interested in STEM careers, and professionals in natural and cultural resource management. The Climate Science Centers are coordinating to build on each other's successful education and training efforts. Early successes include several intensive education experiences, such as the Alaska Climate Science Center's Girls on

  9. Health status appraisal of women students and correlation with socio-academic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh Ramdas Patil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health is important factor for the maintenance of general health. According to experts of World Health Organization, health is a status of well-being of body, mind, society and not only the lack of disease. The purpose of study was to examine effects of associated factors on health status and academic performance of female students staying at hostel. The study aimed to establish correlations between various factors pertaining to health and academic performance of the students. Aim: To find out important predictors of academic performance & mental health of women students. Methods: The current study was an observational cross sectional study. The 373 female students taking pharmaceutical education were selected using systematic random sampling. The survey involved meetings of investigators with participants, explanation of study objectives to participants, filling of designed proforma and analysis of collected data. Results: Among 373 students; 247 (66.21% were experienced homesickness initially, 56 (15.01% students were homesick at the time of survey, while 70 (18.76% students never experienced homesickness. The 85 (22.78% students had poor, 212 (56.83% students had average & 76 (20.37% students had good academic performance. Majority of students (60.58% were found to take measures for relieving stress. Out of 85 students having poor academic performance, 47 (55.29% students were found to be mentally poor. Alternatively, among 152 students with poor mental health, 69 (45.39% students had poor academic performance. Conclusion: Academic related stressors, victimization by tutors, relationship problems with parents and colleagues, homesickness due to staying away from families, conflicts between parents and hesitation to share personal problems with others were found to be important predictors of mental health problems & academic performance of women students.

  10. Academic computer science and gender: A naturalistic study investigating the causes of attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declue, Timothy Hall

    Far fewer women than men take computer science classes in high school, enroll in computer science programs in college, or complete advanced degrees in computer science. The computer science pipeline begins to shrink for women even before entering college, but it is at the college level that the "brain drain" is the most evident numerically, especially in the first class taken by most computer science majors called "Computer Science 1" or CS-I. The result, for both academia and industry, is a pronounced technological gender disparity in academic and industrial computer science. The study revealed the existence of several factors influencing success in CS-I. First, and most clearly, the effect of attribution processes seemed to be quite strong. These processes tend to work against success for females and in favor of success for males. Likewise, evidence was discovered which strengthens theories related to prior experience and the perception that computer science has a culture which is hostile to females. Two unanticipated themes related to the motivation and persistence of successful computer science majors. The findings did not support the belief that females have greater logistical problems in computer science than males, or that females tend to have a different programming style than males which adversely affects the females' ability to succeed in CS-I.

  11. Computer Applications in Health Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, computer application development has experienced exponential growth, not only in the number of publications but also in the scope or contexts that have benefited from its use. In health science training, and medicine specifically, the gradual incorporation of technological developments has transformed the teaching and learning process, resulting in true "educational technology". The goal of this paper is to review the main features involved in these applications and highlight the main lines of research for the future. The results of peer reviewed literature published recently indicate the following features shared by the key technological developments in the field of health science education: first, development of simulation and visualization systems for a more complete and realistic representation of learning material over traditional paper format; second, portability and versatility of the applications, adapted for an increasing number of devices and operative systems; third, increasing focus on open source applications such as Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). PMID:26254251

  12. Computer Applications in Health Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, computer application development has experienced exponential growth, not only in the number of publications but also in the scope or contexts that have benefited from its use. In health science training, and medicine specifically, the gradual incorporation of technological developments has transformed the teaching and learning process, resulting in true "educational technology". The goal of this paper is to review the main features involved in these applications and highlight the main lines of research for the future. The results of peer reviewed literature published recently indicate the following features shared by the key technological developments in the field of health science education: first, development of simulation and visualization systems for a more complete and realistic representation of learning material over traditional paper format; second, portability and versatility of the applications, adapted for an increasing number of devices and operative systems; third, increasing focus on open source applications such as Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

  13. Implementing Twitter in a health sciences library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Colleen; Graham, Jamie; Morton-Owens, Emily G

    2010-10-01

    The NYU Health Sciences Libraries created an account on Twitter, a microblogging service, as a new outreach tool marketed to students, faculty, and staff. The team used Twitter to promote resources, events, and news. Twitter is a part of a pipeline of information that also includes the library's Web site and Facebook. Although it is difficult to measure the effectiveness of a social networking tool, the overhead of using Twitter is so low that it merits consideration. PMID:21058176

  14. The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play in Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an…

  15. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  16. Emotional intelligence and academic performance in university students of natural science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Cuellar, Jose Habacuc

    This research presents the concept of emotional intelligence, more specifically of John D. Mayer, Peter Salovey and David R. Caruso, as an important element to be applied in learning science. It is an explanatory-correlation study between emotional intelligence and academic performance of students in natural sciences from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras campus. The population is approximately 2,539 students, with a sample of approximately 337 students. The instrument used to calculate the IE is the TMSS-24 composted of three dimensions of the original scale: Attention, Clarity and Repair. It was validated by Fernandez, B. P., Extremera, N. and Natalio, R. (2004), with reliability in Attention of (0.86), Clarity (0.90) and Repair (0.86). For the calculation of academic achievement (RA) was used an average of the courses seen by the students in the academic semester of 2007. The variables emotional intelligence and its components with academic achievement (RA), Index of general application of the student, gender, age and studies concentration were correlated but it was founded no correlation between them. It was founded a difference in the attention on gender, where it is concluded that woman express better and more the feelings than men.

  17. Archiving electronic Grey Literature of Korean Academic Societies in Science and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyung-Yang (KORDIC); Choi, Seon-Heui; Choi, Sung-Pil; Shim, Huyng-Sup (KORDIC); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2000-01-01

    Korean academic societies in the field of science and technology are the major sources for producing STI (scientific and technological information) in Korea. They produce various kinds of printed materials including journals, proceedings, preprints, seminar/workshop materials of the study group in a society, and so on. While journals and proceedings are published and distributed to members via conventional routes, however, other materials are not. The secretariat of societies can play importa...

  18. Applied social science? academic contributions to the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry and their consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murji, Karim

    2010-01-01

    A decade on from the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry, this article examines the contributions of social scientists to the enquiry on two key issues: the meaning of institutional racism and the police response to racial violence. These academic inputs are characterised as instrumental and reflexive forms of knowledge. While social science applied to social policy is most effective in instrumental mode, rather than reflexively, there are various factors – suchas the interpretation of evidence, media ...

  19. Causes of academic failure of medical and medical sciences students in Iran: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Azari, Sheida; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Fata, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Academic failure of medical and medical sciences students is one of the major problems of higher education centers in many countries. This study aims to collect and compare relevant researches in this field in Iran. Methods: The appropriate keywords were searched in the national and international databases, and the findings were categorized into related and non-related articles accordingly. Results: Only 22 articles were included in this systematic review. In terms of content anal...

  20. The Relationship between Sleep Quality and Social Intimacy, and Academic Burn-Out in Students of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Arbabisarjou, Azizollah; Mehdi, Hashemi Seyed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Alizadeh, Kobra Haji; Yarmohammadzadeh, Peyman; Feyzollahi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Academic burnout leads to creation of a series of negative and scattered thoughts, loss of hope and emotional and physical exhaustion in carrying out activities. Two factors that affect academic burnout are sleep quality and social intimacy. This study was conducted in order to investigate the relationship between sleep quality and social intimacy, and academic burn-out in the students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Materials & Methods: This study was descriptive and c...

  1. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  2. Science IA (Agriscience). A Science Credit for Agriculture: Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Samuel C.

    Because college-bound students often had trouble fitting agricultural education courses into their schedules, and because science teachers rejected the idea of giving a science credit for 2 years of agricultural education, a new integrated course was created in Tennessee. It is now called Science IA (Agriscience). It is taught by a teacher with an…

  3. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients. PMID:25162618

  4. Addressing the "Global Health Tax" and "Wild Cards": Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young "expat" global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  5. The Implementation of a Cost Effectiveness Analyzer for Web-Supported Academic Instruction: An Example from Life Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anat; Nachmias, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes implementation of a quantitative cost effectiveness analyzer for Web-supported academic instruction that was developed in our University. The paper presents the cost effectiveness analysis of one academic exemplary course in Life Science department and its introducing to the course lecturer for evaluation. The benefits and…

  6. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  7. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of program relevance, rigor, and relationships. Science coursework delivery site served as the study's independent variable for the two naturally formed groups representing students (n = 18) who completed a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program and students (n = 18) who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program. Students in the first group, a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, hands-on projects at the zoo while students in the second group, those students who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, simulated projects in the classroom. These groups comprised the two research arms of the study. Both groups of students were selected from the same school district. The study's two dependent variables were achievement and school climate. Achievement was analyzed using norm-referenced 11th-grade pretest PLAN and 12th-grade posttest ACT test composite scores. Null hypotheses were rejected in the direction of improved test scores for both science program groups---students who completed the zoo-based experiential academic high school science program (p composite score comparison was not statistically different ( p = .93) indicating program equipoise for students enrolled in both science programs. No overall weighted grade point average score improvement was observed for students in either science group, however, null hypotheses were rejected in the direction of improved science grade point average scores for 11th-grade (p scores and school district criterion reference math and

  8. Statistical concepts in biology and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Huma; Javaid, Aisha; Rehman, Rehana; Hussain, Zahir

    2014-01-01

    In view of its applied aspects, Statistics serves as a separate mathematical science. In that respect, biostatistics is the application of statistical concepts and methods in biology, public health and medicine. One major task of medical biostatistics is to understand why a disease occurs in certain area and why that disease does not occur in other areas. In general, the advantages for properly applying statistics for a country are to keep the detailed information of people in a country. However, there must in mind be the other face of the task remembering not to adapt these surveys and limited data with entirety for quick applications that might be less advantageous. Some of the programs are much expensive and time consuming and people may feel not comfortable conveying their personal information just for the sake of applying a so called organized procedure. In such conditions, one must consider the moral values as well. Another quite unfortunate fact is that a statistical data can be misused for personal needs of a presenter. There must be ways to eradicate such customs at the governmental level. Basic and higher courses, certificate courses, diploma programs, degree programs, and other opportunities for students can be well organized and can be utilized in various employment areas in industry, government, life sciences, computer science, medicine, public health, education, teaching, research, and survey research. Statisticians, hence, are very important people for establishing various schemes, programs, institutions and organizations in medical and biological sectors. PMID:25358229

  9. Statistical concepts in biology and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Huma; Javaid, Aisha; Rehman, Rehana; Hussain, Zahir

    2014-01-01

    In view of its applied aspects, Statistics serves as a separate mathematical science. In that respect, biostatistics is the application of statistical concepts and methods in biology, public health and medicine. One major task of medical biostatistics is to understand why a disease occurs in certain area and why that disease does not occur in other areas. In general, the advantages for properly applying statistics for a country are to keep the detailed information of people in a country. However, there must in mind be the other face of the task remembering not to adapt these surveys and limited data with entirety for quick applications that might be less advantageous. Some of the programs are much expensive and time consuming and people may feel not comfortable conveying their personal information just for the sake of applying a so called organized procedure. In such conditions, one must consider the moral values as well. Another quite unfortunate fact is that a statistical data can be misused for personal needs of a presenter. There must be ways to eradicate such customs at the governmental level. Basic and higher courses, certificate courses, diploma programs, degree programs, and other opportunities for students can be well organized and can be utilized in various employment areas in industry, government, life sciences, computer science, medicine, public health, education, teaching, research, and survey research. Statisticians, hence, are very important people for establishing various schemes, programs, institutions and organizations in medical and biological sectors.

  10. Die neue Hochschulbibliothek für Gesundheitswissenschaften der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum – Zwischenbericht einer strategisch angelegten Planung [The new Academic Health Sciences, Nursing and Therapeutics Library of the Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum – interim report of a strategically oriented planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kustos, Annette

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] The academic library of “Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg”, which was founded to form a branch of academic health professionals within the German health supply system in October 2009 in Bochum, shaped a “library development plan” in the beginning of 2010 as a strategic frame for elaborating the services but also including the hurdles and barriers and therefore reasons for changing some decisions. The plan is permanently communicated to university bodies, protagonist scientists and students. Furthermore an online user satisfaction and interests survey concerning collection, usability, web service and library building was initialized as an additional data fundament. Users also can give personal feedback because of the immediate vicinity to the library. A special services newsletter, which was launched after the survey, subject database analysis for scientists as well as curricular and individual library training courses (information literacy program also preserve approach to the customers.After initial problems a high-quality collection of still important printed material as textbooks and research books together with e-books and e-Journals was built up. Databases are offered by DBIS and the federative medical search engine Medpilot of the “Zentralbibliothek für Medizin, Köln”. Thus a strategic subject search is possible. By establishing the open source library management system Koha embedded in a resource discovery system (RDS context the quick access to the up to 40,000 volumes limited print collection plus lots of electronic resources through an integrative user interface is achievable. As to the diversity of user groups web portal solutions for students (Moodle, academic staff, external users or corporate clients have to be considered. Library building with furnishing and basic technical devices, library user regulations and workflows are further strategic steps on the way to develop a normal academic library and a

  11. Towards a unified taxonomy of health indicators: academic health centers and communities working together to improve population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Ahmed, Syed; Franco, Zeno; Kissack, Anne; Gabriel, Davera; Hurd, Thelma; Ziegahn, Linda; Bates, Nancy J; Calhoun, Karen; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Eder, Milton Mickey; Ferrans, Carol; Hacker, Karen; Rumala, Bernice B; Strelnick, A Hal; Wallerstein, Nina

    2014-04-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program represents a significant public investment. To realize its major goal of improving the public's health and reducing health disparities, the CTSA Consortium's Community Engagement Key Function Committee has undertaken the challenge of developing a taxonomy of community health indicators. The objective is to initiate a unified approach for monitoring progress in improving population health outcomes. Such outcomes include, importantly, the interests and priorities of community stakeholders, plus the multiple, overlapping interests of universities and of the public health and health care professions involved in the development and use of local health care indicators.The emerging taxonomy of community health indicators that the authors propose supports alignment of CTSA activities and facilitates comparative effectiveness research across CTSAs, thereby improving the health of communities and reducing health disparities. The proposed taxonomy starts at the broadest level, determinants of health; subsequently moves to more finite categories of community health indicators; and, finally, addresses specific quantifiable measures. To illustrate the taxonomy's application, the authors have synthesized 21 health indicator projects from the literature and categorized them into international, national, or local/special jurisdictions. They furthered categorized the projects within the taxonomy by ranking indicators with the greatest representation among projects and by ranking the frequency of specific measures. They intend for the taxonomy to provide common metrics for measuring changes to population health and, thus, extend the utility of the CTSA Community Engagement Logic Model. The input of community partners will ultimately improve population health.

  12. Coordinators for health science libraries in the Midwest Health Science Library Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtum, E A; McKloskey, J; Mahan, R

    1977-01-01

    In the summer of 1973 one resource library in each of the six states of the Midwest Health Science Library Network received funding from the National Library of Medicine to hire a coordinator for health science libraries. The development of the role of coordinator is examined and evaluated. The coordinators have proved valuable in the areas of consortium formation, basic unit development, communication facilitation, and program initiation. The function of the coordinators in the extensive planning effort now being undertaken by the network and the future need for the coordinator positions are discussed. PMID:843649

  13. Translational science and the hidden research system in universities and academic hospitals: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Bryn; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Innovation systems (IS) and science policy scholarship predominantly focus on linkages between universities and industry, and the commercial translation of academic discoveries. Overlooked in such analyses are important connections between universities and academic hospitals, and the non-commercial aspects of translational science. The two types of institutions tend to be collapsed into a single entity-'the university'-and relational flows are lost. Yet the distinctions and flows between the two are crucial elements of translational science and the biomedical innovation system. This paper explores what has been called the 'hidden research system' that connects hospitals, universities, and their resources, with the clinical and scientific actors who make the linkages possible. Then, using a novel conceptual model of translational science, we examine the individual interactions and dynamics involved in a particular example of the biomedical innovation system at work: the diagnosis of IRAK-4 deficiency, a rare immunological disorder, and the translational flows that result. Contra to conventional IS analyses, we are able to point to the strong role of public-sector institutions, and the weak role of the private-sector, in the translational processes described here. Our research was conducted within a Canadian network of scientists and clinician-scientists studying the pathogenomics of immunological disorders and innate immunity. PMID:21168250

  14. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2012-01-01

    Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned.

  15. A paradigm for the next millennium: health information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, L L

    1991-01-01

    Although historically a major concern of both the artist and the scientist was the observation of nature, the two disciplines split when science became more wedded to mathematics and quantification. Today, with visualization, art and science can again together provide a view of the natural world. A prototype curriculum for a new multidisciplinary science--Health Information Science--incorporates aspects of computer science, cognitive psychology, bioengineering, biomedical visualization, medicine, dentistry, anthropology, mathematics, library science, and the visual arts.

  16. Science homework with video directions for parents: The impact on parental involvement and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Kathy L.

    The benefits of effective parental involvement in education have been well documented and can be far reaching. When educators make an effort to involve families, parental involvement can be even more meaningful. Homework is a commonly practiced and accepted connection between school and home and affords parents many opportunities to interact with their children on educational endeavors. However, parental involvement may be limited because educators do not reach out to parents, parents feel their children do not need their help, or parents are unfamiliar with the content and therefore unable to help. The purpose of this study was too develop and implement a tool to enhance parental involvement and academic achievement of fourth grade science students. The tool used in this study was a weekly science video to be viewed by parents when it accompanied science homework assignments. To begin, the researcher created six science videos for parents to watch that supplemented weekly homework assignments. Consequently, the researcher set up treatment and comparison groups to test the effectiveness of the supplemental videos in terms of parental involvement and academic achievement. A mixed methods approach was used to collect data from parents and students throughout the study. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data was collected throughout this study from both parents and students. Additionally, data was collected from a variety of sources including baseline, midpoint, and endpoint surveys; scores on homework assignments; and focus group interview sessions with parents and students. Data analysis revealed an overall positive impact on parental involvement and academic achievement when the videos were utilized.

  17. Medical students from natural science and nonscience undergraduate backgrounds. Similar academic performance and residency selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, R L; Sarnacki, R E; Schimpfhauser, F T; Katz, L A

    1980-06-27

    The majority of matriculating US medical students continue to major in the natural sciences as college undergraduates in the belief that this will enhance their chances of admission to and their performance in medical school. The present study compared the academic performance and residency selection of natural science and nonscience majors in three separate medical school classes at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Statistical analysis of grades in the first two years of medical school, clinical performance in the third year, and part I and part II National Board Medical Examination scores revealed no significant differences across three class replications. Residency selection among graduating seniors was also independent of undergraduate major. It is suggested that admissions committees, premedical advisors, and students reconsider their attitudes about the necessity of concentration in the natural sciences before entering medical school.

  18. Describing an Academic and Nonprofit Organization Partnership to Educate At-Risk Adolescents about Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Steven J.; Skager, Cherie; Kraiger, Anneliese

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to suggest community-based interventions can change community-wide behaviors and attitudes toward cardiovascular health. This article describes a partnership between an academic institution and a community nonprofit organization to develop and implement a cardiovascular health promotion program targeting at risk high…

  19. The Impact of Part Time Employment on Students' Health and Academic Performance: A Scottish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Claire; McNeish, Sharon; McColl, John

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between part time working, mental and physical health and academic performance. Fifty per cent of the undergraduate full time respondents had part time jobs. Mean pay per hour was ?4.25 and mean number of hours worked was 14 hours. When the current state of students' health was compared to…

  20. An analysis of Science Olympiad participants' perceptions regarding their experience with the science and engineering academic competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirt, Jennifer L.

    Science education and literacy, along with a focus on the other STEM fields, have been a center of attention on the global scale for decades. The 1950's race to space is often considered the starting point. Through the years, the attention has spread to highlight the United States' scientific literacy rankings on international testing. The ever-expanding global economy and global workplace make the need for literacy in the STEM fields a necessity. Science and academic competitions are worthy of study to determine the overall and specific positive and negative aspects of their incorporation in students' educational experiences. Science Olympiad is a national science and engineering competition that engages thousands of students each year. The purpose of this study was to analyze the perceptions of Science Olympiad participants, in terms of science learning and interest, 21st century skills and abilities, perceived influence on careers, and the overall benefits of being involved in Science Olympiad. The study sought to determine if there were any differences of perception when gender was viewed as a factor. Data was acquired through the Science Olympiad survey database. It consisted of 635 usable surveys, split evenly between males and females. This study employed a mixed methods analysis. The qualitative data allowed the individual perceptions of the respondents to be highlighted and acknowledged, while the quantitative data allowed generalizations to be identified. The qualitative and quantitative data clearly showed that Science Olympiad had an impact on the career choices of participants. The qualitative data showed that participants gained an increased level of learning and interest in science and STEM areas, 21st century skills, and overall positive benefits as a result of being involved. The qualitative data was almost exclusively positive. The quantitative data however, did not capture the significance of each researched category that the qualitative

  1. Impacting Children’s Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy A. Brusseau; James C. Hannon

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity opportunities including physical education and recess. To combat physical inactivity in you, numerous organizations are promoting a Comprehensive School Physica...

  2. Undergraduate African American females in the sciences: A qualitative study of student experiences affecting academic success and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien-Wood, Idara R.

    Given the lack of literature on Undergraduate African American females in the sciences (UAAFS), this study sought to explicate their experiences at one large, predominantly White, Research I institution in the southwestern United States. In particular, the purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the academic success and persistence of Black females in the natural and physical sciences. Data was collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 15 Black female science majors. Findings from this study identified several supportive mechanisms for academic success: family, religion, teaching assistants and friends. Also identified were seven barriers to academic success: employment, lack of diversity, cultural dissonance, unwelcoming Research I environment, faculty, advisors, classmates, and lab groups. Further, an analysis of students' responses revealed numerous instances of racial and gender micro-aggressions. Recommendations are provided to address factors identified as affecting student academic success and persistence as well as a culture of micro-aggressive behavior.

  3. Sustaining the edge: factors influencing strategy selection in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Szabat, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    Competition within the acute care sector as well as increased penetration by managed care organizations has influenced the structure and role of academic health centers during the past decade. The market factors confronting academic health centers are not dissimilar from conditions that confront other organizations competing in mature industries characterized by declining profitability and intense rivalry for market share. When confronted with intense competition or adverse external events, organizations in other industries have responded to potential threats by forming alliances, developing joint ventures, or merging with another firm to maintain their competitive advantage. Although mergers and acquisitions dominated the strategic landscape in the healthcare industry during the past decade, recent evidence suggests that other types of strategic ventures may offer similar economic and contracting benefits to member organizations. Academic health centers have traditionally been involved in network relationships with multiple partners via their shared technology, collaborative research, and joint educational endeavors. These quasi-organizational relationships appear to have provided a framework for strategic decisions and allowed executives of academic health centers to select strategies that were competitive yet closely aligned with their organizational mission. The analysis of factors that influenced strategy selection by executives of academic health centers suggests a deliberate and methodical approach to achieving market share objectives, expanding managed care contracts, and developing physician networks. PMID:12469571

  4. The correlation between physical activity and grade point average for health science graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eugenia C; Hernandez, Erika C; Coltrane, Ambrosia K; Mancera, Jayme M

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have reported positive associations between physical activity and academic achievement. However, a common belief is that improving academic performance comes at the cost of reducing time for and resources spent on extracurricular activities that encourage physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported physical activity and grade point average (GPA) for health science graduate students. Graduate students in health science programs completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and reported their academic progress. Most participants (76%) reported moderate to vigorous physical activity levels that met or exceeded the recommended levels for adults. However, there was no significant correlation between GPA and level of physical activity. Negative findings for this study may be associated with the limited range of GPA scores for graduate students. Future studies need to consider more sensitive measures of cognitive function, as well as the impact of physical activity on occupational balance and health for graduate students in the health fields. PMID:25069099

  5. A Paradigm for the Next Millenium: Health Information Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lewis

    1991-01-01

    Described is a curriculum for a new multidisciplinary science-Health Information Science-that incorporates aspects of computer science, cognitive psychology, bioengineering, biomedical visualization, medicine, dentistry, anthropology, mathematics, library science, and the visual arts. The situation of the medical illustration profession is…

  6. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health...

  7. The challenge of developing academic language in Spanish and English through science: The case of two teachers' strategic teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra Patricia

    This case study examines the practice of two bilingual education teachers in an attempt to understand the planning and instructional activities occurring in their classrooms by focusing on students' academic language development during science instruction. This site was selected as an 'instrumental' case to examine for several reasons. This school is among the few in the district that is teaching science. Despite the political climate related to bilingual education, the teachers at this school offer an articulated dual immersion program from K to grade six. This site has experienced success in beginning to close the achievement gap between English learners and their native English speaking peers on standardized test measures. Using a qualitative approach, data was collected from two unique cases through detailed observations of classroom practice, audio-taped lessons, an initial and a follow up interview, artifacts and an initial survey. Scarcella's (2003) framework on academic language was used to analyze the different components of academic language of the science instruction. A theoretical framework from Stoddart et al. on levels of integrated planning expertise and Dell' Alba & Sandberg's concept of embodied understanding of practice also informed the study. Three main findings were drawn from this study: (a) academic language can be effectively taught through science instruction when teachers have the expertise to integrate language learning with science inquiry; (b) the teaching of and planning for academic language development through content is shaped over time by teachers' teaching and personal experiences with the content and their ability to integrate both; (c) While a theoretical model of academic language can be used to analyze teachers' instructional strategies during a science lesson, this model has limitations. Teachers' understanding of their own practice developed overtime shaped the way they manipulated the curriculum for their particular grade

  8. The Effect of a Health Intervention on Academic Achievement: A Study on 7-9 year old Icelandic Children

    OpenAIRE

    Katrín Gunnarsdóttir 1986

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims: Health and education can be seen as two types of human capital investments. Childhood health and academic achievement have a lasting effect on adult life and some studies indicate that returns to human capital are higher in childhood. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between academic achievement and health in children by focusing on the hypothesis that receiving a school-based physical activity and dietary intervention might affect academic achievemen...

  9. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ibrahim Abdul Ghani; Khawaldeh, Mohammad Falah Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students' trends. The study…

  10. Introduction to Strand 9: environmental, health and outdoor science education

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Graça Simões; Achiam, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The field of environmental, health and outdoor science education has been increasing worldwide and this has also been found in the number and quality of the proposals to ESERA Conferences. In ESERA 2015 the strand “Environmental, health and outdoor science education” was focused on the following proposed areas of research: Ecological and Environmental Education, Education for Sustainable Development, environmental health, health education and health promotion; Lifestyles and attitudes towards...

  11. Identifying Patterns of Early Risk for Mental Health and Academic Problems in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study of Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examined profiles of individual, academic, and social risks in elementary school, and their association with mental health and academic difficulties in adolescence. Latent profile analyses of data from 574 urban youth revealed three risk classes. Children with the "well-adjusted" class had assets in the academic and social…

  12. Information Literacy among Educational Academic Members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batul Keykha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of information literacy is considered a required factor for instructors of higher education system due to its impact on educational and research activities, and performance of educational academic members is a main factor that affects the output of system. The aim of this study was to report and compare the information literacy among the academic members of departments of clinical and basic biomedical sciences in 2011. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed using a valid and reliable questionnaire distributed among 48 full-time equivalent academic members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences in both clinical (19 members and basic biomedical departments (29 members. Data were analyzed using Fisher, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square statistics in SPSS 17. Results: Information literacy of the members was at an average level at both knowledge and attitude levels but it was low at the practice. There was a significant difference between two groups in terms of awareness about information resources; however, the difference was not significant for the utilization of information resources. Conclusion: Members of department of basic biomedical sciences were more aware than those of clinical department about the information resources but such awareness has not resulted in more use of resources in the educational and research activities. Despite positive attitude of all members towards the application of electronic information resources in both educational and research activities, their awareness of information literacy skills and practicing were not satisfying in educational and research sections. As a final point, Information literacy is hence suggested as a part of continuing medical education courses.

  13. Commentary: Teaching creativity and innovative thinking in medicine and the health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Roberta B

    2011-10-01

    The National Academies of Science recently criticized the state of scientific innovation and competitiveness in the United States. Evaluations of already-established creativity training programs--examining a broad array of students, from school age to adult and with a wide range of abilities--have shown that such courses improve thinking skills, attitudes, and performance. Although academic medicine provides informal training in creativity and innovation, it has yet to incorporate formal instruction on these topics into medical education. A number of existing, thoughtfully constructed and evaluated creativity programs in other fields provide a pedagogical basis for developing creativity training programs for the health sciences. The content of creativity training programs typically includes instruction and application in (1) divergent thinking, (2) problem solving, and (3) creative production. Instructional formats that have been shown to elicit the best outcomes are an admixture of lectures, discussion, and guided practice. A pilot program to teach innovative thinking to health science students at the University of Texas includes instruction in recognizing and finding alternatives to frames or habitual cognitive patterns, in addition to the constructs already mentioned. As innovation is the engine of scientific progress, the author, founder of Innovative Thinking, the creativity training pilot program at the University of Texas, argues in this commentary that academic health centers should implement and evaluate new methods for enhancing science students' innovative thinking to keep the United States as a worldwide leader in scientific discovery. PMID:21955715

  14. Academic Language Knowledge and Comprehension of Science Text for English Language Learners and Fluent English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sandy Ming-San

    As an initial step toward understanding which features of academic language make science-based expository text difficult for students with different English language proficiency (ELP) designations, this study investigated fifth-grade students' thoughts on text difficulty, their knowledge of the features of academic language, and the relationship between academic language and reading comprehension. Forty-five fifth-grade students participated in the study; 18 students were classified as English language learners (ELLs) and 27 students were fluent-English speakers. Participants read two science passages, answered comprehension questions, and engaged in a retrospective interview which probed their knowledge on the academic language features of vocabulary, grammar, and discourse. Qualitative analysis was used to code students' thoughts about the challenges to reading comprehension and to identify the challenges that were related to academic language. Quantitative analyses were conducted to examine whether students' knowledge of academic language features and reading comprehension differed by students' ELP designations, as well as to investigate the relationship between students' knowledge of academic language features and reading comprehension. Results for the qualitative analysis revealed that students found difficult vocabulary, reading abilities, and prior knowledge as the greatest challenges to comprehending the science passages. Results from the quantitative analyses indicated that ELL students' knowledge of academic vocabulary, grammar, discourse knowledge, and reading comprehension (as measured by multiple-choice questions) were significantly lower than the fluent-English speaking students. The results also indicated that vocabulary, not grammar or discourse features, was significantly related to students' comprehension scores. The results have implications for understanding the features of academic language that influence students' comprehension of expository

  15. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  16. Generation X: implications for faculty recruitment and development in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Janet; Brown, Ann J

    2005-03-01

    Differences and tensions between the Baby Boom generation (born 1945-1962) and Generation X (born 1963-1981) have profound implications for the future of academic medicine. By and large, department heads and senior faculty are Boomers; today's residents and junior faculty are Generation X'ers. Looking at these issues in terms of the generations involved offers insights into a number of faculty development challenges, including inadequate and inexpert mentoring, work-life conflicts, and low faculty morale. These insights suggest strategies for strengthening academic medicine's recruitment and retention of Generation X into faculty and leadership roles. These strategies include (1) improving career and academic advising by specific attention to mentoring "across differences"--for instance, broaching the subject of formative differences in background during the initial interaction; adopting a style that incorporates information-sharing with engagement in problem solving; offering frequent, frank feedback; and refraining from comparing today to the glories of yesterday; to support such improvements, medical schools should recognize and evaluate mentoring as a core academic responsibility; (2) retaining both valued women and men in academic careers by having departments add temporal flexibility and create and legitimize less-than-full-time appointments; and (3) providing trainees and junior faculty with ready access to educational sessions designed to turn their "intellectual capital" into "academic career capital."Given the trends discussed in this article, such supports and adaptations are indicated to assure that academic health centers maintain traditions of excellence.

  17. Progress report Physics and Health Sciences. Health Sciences section. 1987 July 01-December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the fourth semi-annual period since the Research Company was reorganized. We now have eight research fellows on staff, six fully funded by Physics and Health Sciences (P and HS). The first section of this report contains an excellent topical review of the program in Health Sciences on tritium toxicity which involves scientists from all three of the Chalk River branches of Health Sciences. Their work on cancer proneness is expanding data on apparently normal people and has been extended to include cancer patients. All tests are now blind. The work was the subject of two very fine TV presentations, one each shown on the French and English networks of the CBC. Investigation also continues on the complex influence of hyperthermia on cancer induction and promotion. The potency of natural killer cells in human blood which have the ability to recognize and destroy cancerous cells have been shown to be very sensitive to temperature. A method may have been found for extending the life of T-lymphocytes grown in culture beyond the present 30 to 60-day limit. Activities in environmental research are moving in the direction of studies of a more fundamental nature so that the results will have a certain portability. Model studies form a large part of this new emphasis and notable among those is the Twin Lakes tracer study. Work is in progress to follow the plume the full 240 metres to the discharge zone with considerable success in the mathematical modelling. Members of the Health Sciences unit at CRNL were active as resource people for the Hare Commission on Ontario Nuclear Safety Review during the late fall. At Partnerships for Profit, which brought 85 senior executives of Canadian business in contact with the Research Company's capabilities, Physics and Health Sciences manned four booths on cancer screening, environmental protection, ANDI and nuclear physics instrumentation. Discussions with MOSST and other government departments were initiated on the

  18. EXAMINING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF SPORTS SCIENCES FACULTY STUDENTS: THE CASE OF FIRAT UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The most emphasised aspect of teaching is student achievement. It is the reason for teaching and the product teaching produces. The potential of a well - qualified workforce with high academic achievement is thought to be the primary factor in the development of a society. This study was designed to examine the academic achievement of students studying at the Sports Sciences Faculty of Fırat University in terms of a set of variables. The entire population was included, and the study was conducted with 684 students (80.1%. A que stionnaire developed by the researchers was used as the data - gathering instrument. The data were evaluated using a statistical package program, and presented as frequency, percentage and means. The Kruskal Wallis and Mann - Whitney U tests were used to analy se the data. This research found that there was a significant relationship between the students’ academic achievement scores and their age, gender, mothers' state of employment, place of residence, departments, year of study and type of education (p<0.05.

  19. Where can we find future K-12 science and math teachers? a search by academic year, discipline, and academic performance level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Laura J.; Dorfield, Jennifer K.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2005-11-01

    Responding to the increasing math and science teacher shortage in the United States, this study intended to determine which science, engineering, and math (SEM) majors during which years in their undergraduate education and from which academic performance levels are most interested in K-12 teaching. Results may aid policymakers and practitioners in making most effective use of this traditional undergraduate candidate pool when designing K-12 science and math teacher recruitment programs. A survey of SEM majors from two research-oriented, urban universities is used to assess participants' interest in K-12 teaching both compared to other career choices and in isolation. Results indicate that the more successful targets for K-12 teacher recruitment include (1) SEM undergraduates in their junior and senior years independent of SEM major, (2) SEM undergraduates with mid-academic performance levels independent of SEM major and academic year, and (3) math majors followed by natural science majors and, as least promising targets, engineering majors. Results remain independent from gender and ethnicity variables.

  20. Latina and European American Girls' Experiences with Academic Sexism and their Self-Concepts in Mathematics and Science During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell

    2010-12-01

    The study investigated Latina and European American adolescent girls' (N = 345, M = 15.2 years, range = 13 to 18) experiences with academic sexism in mathematics and science (M/S) and their M/S perceived competence and M/S value (liking and importance). M/S academic sexism was based on girls' reported experiences hearing sexist comments about girls' abilities in math and science. Older European American adolescents, and both younger and older Latina adolescents, who experienced several instances of academic sexism felt less competent in M/S than girls who experienced less sexism (controlling for M/S grades). In addition, among older girls (regardless of ethnicity), those who experienced several instances of academic sexism valued M/S less than girls who experienced less sexism.

  1. Operational Health Physics-Science or Philosophy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    Operational health physics is concerned with protecting workers and the public from harm due to ionizing radiation. This requires the application of philosophy (ethics) as well as science. Operational health physics philosophy has been dominated by the ICRP. A particular aspect of ICRP's philosophy that is often misunderstood is (As low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account). (ALARA) Although the ALARA philosophy has been interpreted as a cost-benefit approach it is in fact a risk-benefit approach including social considerations as the ICRP has emphasised from time to time. A recent report has accused the ICRP of using a discarded philosophical approach, namely Utilitarianism, as a result of which its recommendations are unethical. The report suggests that a (rights) based philosophy such as Rawls' Theory of Justice would be a more appropriate basis. This paper discusses this accusation, considers some relevant philosophies and concludes that the accusation is not valid and that ICRP's recommendations are ethical but are frequently misinterpreted. (Author)

  2. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. atmospheric, ground water), dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  3. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes (e.g., Strontium 85, Strontium 90, Tritium), environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. ground water) dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  4. Building sustainable community partnerships into the structure of new academic public health schools and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughan, Monica; Gillman, Laura B; Boumbulian, Paul; Davis, Marsha; Galen, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    We describe and assess how the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia, established in 2005, has developed formal institutional mechanisms to facilitate community-university partnerships that serve the needs of communities and the university. The College developed these partnerships as part of its founding; therefore, the University of Georgia model may serve as an important model for other new public health programs. One important lesson is the need to develop financial and organizational mechanisms that ensure stability over time. Equally important is attention to how community needs can be addressed by faculty and students in academically appropriate ways. The integration of these 2 lessons ensures that the academic mission is fulfilled at the same time that community needs are addressed. Together, these lessons suggest that multiple formal strategies are warranted in the development of academically appropriate and sustainable university-community partnerships.

  5. Impacting Children’s Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. BRUSSEAU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity opportunities including physical education and recess. To combat physical inactivity in you, numerous organizations are promoting a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program to encourage academic achievement and overall health. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs include five components and should be centered around 1 quality physical education, 2 physical activity before and after school, 3 physical activity during school (both recess and classroom activity, 4 staff involvement, and 5 family and community engagement.

  6. School nurse case management for children with chronic illness: health, academic, and quality of life outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehner Engelke, Martha; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-08-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, seizures, or sickle-cell anemia in 5 different school districts who were provided case management by school nurses. The children ranged in age from 5 to 19 years. At the end of the school year, children experienced an improvement in quality of life and gained skills and knowledge to manage their illness more effectively. Classroom participation, grades, and participation in extracurricular activities also increased for many children. The study provides evidence of the positive impact school nurses have on children with chronic illness and suggests ways they can measure the outcomes of their interventions. PMID:18757353

  7. Economics and Health Reform: Academic Research and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry A; Miller, Erin A

    2015-08-01

    Two prior studies, conducted in 1966 and in 1979, examined the role of economic research in health policy development. Both concluded that health economics had not been an important contributor to policy. Passage of the Affordable Care Act offers an opportunity to reassess this question. We find that the evolution of health economics research has given it an increasingly important role in policy. Research in the field has followed three related paths over the past century-institutionalist research that described problems; theoretical research, which proposed relationships that might extend beyond existing institutions; and empirical assessments of structural parameters identified in the theoretical research. These three strands operating in concert allowed economic research to be used to predict the fiscal and coverage consequences of alternative policy paths. This ability made economic research a powerful policy force. Key conclusions of health economics research are clearly evident in the Affordable Care Act.

  8. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  9. 77 FR 33472 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific...

  10. 76 FR 26311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to...

  11. 78 FR 18359 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  12. 78 FR 42968 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building...

  13. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel;...

  14. 75 FR 7487 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch,...

  15. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Division of Extramural Research... Division. Organizing Institute: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dates and Times:...

  16. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied...

  17. 77 FR 12602 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building...

  18. 77 FR 61613 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-10-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P....

  19. 77 FR 22793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences,...

  20. 77 FR 40076 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-07-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences,...

  1. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: November 15... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander...

  2. 75 FR 10293 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-03-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Special Emphasis... Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences;...

  3. 78 FR 26793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences,...

  4. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs..., recreation, and health care services for their students, as deemed necessary by the local school board...

  5. Major Differences: Variations in Undergraduate and Graduate Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization across Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Zhou, Sasha; Wagner, Blake, III; Beck, Katie; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores variations in mental health and service utilization across academic disciplines using a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students (N = 64,519) at 81 colleges and universities. We report prevalence of depression, anxiety, suicidality, and self-injury, and rates of help-seeking across disciplines, including results…

  6. The Relationship between Mental Health, Acculturative Stress, and Academic Performance in a Latino Middle School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albeg, Loren J.; Castro-Olivo, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between acculturative stress, symptoms of internalizing mental health problems, and academic performance in a sample of 94 Latino middle school students. Students reported on symptoms indicative of depression and anxiety related problems and acculturative stress. Teachers reported on students' academic…

  7. Academic Stress and Health: Exploring the Moderating Role of Personality Hardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hystad, Sigurd W.; Eid, Jarle; Laberg, Jon C.; Johnsen, Bjorn H.; Bartone, Paul T.

    2009-01-01

    Attending university is a pleasurable experience for many students. Yet for others it represents a highly stressful time of extensive studying and pressure to meet the requirements of academia. Academic stress is associated with a variety of negative outcomes such as physical illness and deteriorating mental health. This paper explores the…

  8. Contributions of Ecological School Mental Health Services to Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Beth; Spies, Rob; Champion, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an ecological framework for school mental health services that differs in important ways from existing service delivery models. The model is based on research describing ecological frameworks underlying students' school success. Ecological characteristics of schools and classrooms that promote academic success are described…

  9. School Start Times, Sleep, Behavioral, Health, and Academic Outcomes: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insufficient sleep in adolescents has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of adverse outcomes, from poor mental and physical health to behavioral problems and lower academic grades. However, most high school students do not get sufficient sleep. Delaying school start times for adolescents has been proposed as a policy…

  10. Social and Emotional Learning in the Classroom: Promoting Mental Health and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Kenneth W.; Gueldner, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    This highly engaging, eminently practical book provides essential resources for implementing social and emotional learning (SEL) in any K-12 setting. Numerous vivid examples illustrate the nuts and bolts of this increasingly influential approach to supporting students' mental health, behavior, and academic performance. Helpful reproducibles are…

  11. Assessment of Ecological Factors as an Integral Part of Academic and Mental Health Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysseldyke, Jim; Lekwa, Adam J.; Klingbeil, David A.; Cormier, Damien C.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of ecological factors that affect individual mental health or academic functioning is an important component of educational and psychological consultation. Researchers and practitioners have conceptualized such ecological or environmental factors in a variety of ways and from a broad range of perspectives. In this article we…

  12. Leadership Practices of Clinical Trials Office Leaders in Academic Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Diana D.

    2012-01-01

    In the ever-changing clinical research environment, academic health centers seek leaders who are visionary and innovative. Clinical trials offices across the country are led by individuals who are charged with promoting growth and change in order to maximize performance, develop unique research initiatives, and help institutions achieve a…

  13. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates of students' competence. The unique integration questions of the ISPE were judged to have good content validity from experts and students, suggestive that integration, a most crucial element of clinical competence, while done in the mind of the

  14. Mental Health of Hmong Americans: A Metasynthesis of Academic Journal Article Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Song E. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The mental health of Hmong Americans has been studied since their arrival in the United States. The purpose of this metasynthesis to utilize a qualitative approach to analyze academic journal article studies that assess mental health issues in Hmong Americans. Forty-eight published articles from 1983 to 2012 were chosen for analysis. Each of the selected articles focused on Hmong participants and contained findings relevant to the psychological well-being of Hmong Americans. Results...

  15. An academic-practice model to improve the health of underserved neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wros, Peggy; Mathews, Launa Rae; Voss, Heather; Bookman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The Interprofessional Care Access Network is an innovative model for academic-practice partnership providing care coordination for vulnerable and underserved clients and populations in identified neighborhoods. Interprofessional student teams, including health professions students from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, and dentistry, collaborate with community service organizations and primary care clinics to address social determinants of health identified as barriers to achieving health care outcomes and Triple Aim goals. Teams are supervised by a nursing faculty in residence and address issues such as housing, health insurance, food security, and lack of primary care. Two case studies demonstrate the potential impact of the project. PMID:25739066

  16. Self-care and yoga-academic-practice collaboration for occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gina

    2013-12-01

    High rates of stress and burnout among nurses and other health care providers justify the exploration of innovative interventions designed to reduce stress and promote self-care among this population. A growing body of evidence supports the physical and psychosocial benefits of yoga and suggests the potential for yoga to support self-care and reduce stress among health care providers. This article describes the formation of an academic-practice collaboration to use yoga as a model for occupational health and wellness among nurses employed at a tax-supported urban health system. In addition, recommendations for program sustainability over time are discussed. PMID:24328918

  17. Latina and European American Girls’ Experiences with Academic Sexism and their Self-Concepts in Mathematics and Science During Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated Latina and European American adolescent girls’ (N = 345, M = 15.2 years, range = 13 to 18) experiences with academic sexism in mathematics and science (M/S) and their M/S perceived competence and M/S value (liking and importance). M/S academic sexism was based on girls’ reported experiences hearing sexist comments about girls’ abilities in math and science. Older European American adolescents, and both younger and older Latina adolescents, who experienced several instan...

  18. Assembling GHERG: Could “academic crowd–sourcing” address gaps in global health estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Marušić, Ana; Sridhar, Devi; Nair, Harish; Adeloye, Davies; Theodoratou, Evropi; Chan, Kit Yee

    2015-01-01

    In recent months, the World Health Organization (WHO), independent academic researchers, the Lancet and PLoS Medicine journals worked together to improve reporting of population health estimates. The new guidelines for accurate and transparent health estimates reporting (likely to be named GATHER), which are eagerly awaited, represent a helpful move that should benefit the field of global health metrics. Building on this progress and drawing from a tradition of Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG)’s successful work model, we would like to propose a new initiative – “Global Health Epidemiology Reference Group” (GHERG). We see GHERG as an informal and entirely voluntary international collaboration of academic groups who are willing to contribute to improving disease burden estimates and respect the principles of the new guidelines – a form of “academic crowd–sourcing”. The main focus of GHERG will be to identify the “gap areas” where not much information is available and/or where there is a lot of uncertainty present about the accuracy of the existing estimates. This approach should serve to complement the existing WHO and IHME estimates and to represent added value to both efforts. PMID:26445671

  19. Assembling GHERG: Could "academic crowd-sourcing" address gaps in global health estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Marušić, Ana; Sridhar, Devi; Nair, Harish; Adeloye, Davies; Theodoratou, Evropi; Chan, Kit Yee

    2015-06-01

    In recent months, the World Health Organization (WHO), independent academic researchers, the Lancet and PLoS Medicine journals worked together to improve reporting of population health estimates. The new guidelines for accurate and transparent health estimates reporting (likely to be named GATHER), which are eagerly awaited, represent a helpful move that should benefit the field of global health metrics. Building on this progress and drawing from a tradition of Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG)'s successful work model, we would like to propose a new initiative - "Global Health Epidemiology Reference Group" (GHERG). We see GHERG as an informal and entirely voluntary international collaboration of academic groups who are willing to contribute to improving disease burden estimates and respect the principles of the new guidelines - a form of "academic crowd-sourcing". The main focus of GHERG will be to identify the "gap areas" where not much information is available and/or where there is a lot of uncertainty present about the accuracy of the existing estimates. This approach should serve to complement the existing WHO and IHME estimates and to represent added value to both efforts. PMID:26445671

  20. Assembling GHERG: Could “academic crowd–sourcing” address gaps in global health estimates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Rudan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent months, the World Health Organization (WHO, independent academic researchers, the Lancet and PLoS Medicine journals worked together to improve reporting of population health estimates. The new guidelines for accurate and transparent health estimates reporting (likely to be named GATHER, which are eagerly awaited, represent a helpful move that should benefit the field of global health metrics. Building on this progress and drawing from a tradition of Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG’s successful work model, we would like to propose a new initiative – “Global Health Epidemiology Reference Group” (GHERG. We see GHERG as an informal and entirely voluntary international collaboration of academic groups who are willing to contribute to improving disease burden estimates and respect the principles of the new guidelines – a form of “academic crowd–sourcing”. The main focus of GHERG will be to identify the “gap areas” where not much information is available and/or where there is a lot of uncertainty present about the accuracy of the existing estimates. This approach should serve to complement the existing WHO and IHME estimates and to represent added value to both efforts.

  1. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-06-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role-serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as 'inter-group connectors'. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the 'connector/betweenness' measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional 'betweenness centrality', provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health policies. PMID

  2. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-06-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role-serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as 'inter-group connectors'. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the 'connector/betweenness' measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional 'betweenness centrality', provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health policies.

  3. Sustaining librarian vitality: embedded librarianship model for health sciences libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    With biomedical information widely accessible from anywhere at any time, health sciences libraries have become less centralized, and they are challenged to stay relevant and vital to the mission and strategic goals of their home institution. One solution is to embed librarians at strategic points in health professions' education, research, and patient care. This article discusses a proposed five-level model of embedded librarianship within the context of health sciences libraries and describes different roles, knowledge, and skills desirable for health sciences librarians working as embedded librarians.

  4. Sustaining librarian vitality: embedded librarianship model for health sciences libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    With biomedical information widely accessible from anywhere at any time, health sciences libraries have become less centralized, and they are challenged to stay relevant and vital to the mission and strategic goals of their home institution. One solution is to embed librarians at strategic points in health professions' education, research, and patient care. This article discusses a proposed five-level model of embedded librarianship within the context of health sciences libraries and describes different roles, knowledge, and skills desirable for health sciences librarians working as embedded librarians. PMID:23869633

  5. Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Rachel A A

    2012-01-01

    Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences provides graduate students in the social and health sciences with the basic skills that they need to estimate, interpret, present, and publish statistical models using contemporary standards. The book targets the social and health science branches such as human development, public health, sociology, psychology, education, and social work in which students bring a wide range of mathematical skills and have a wide range of methodological affinities. For these students, a successful course in statistics will not only offer statistical content

  6. Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

    This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both

  7. Secondary science students' beliefs about class discussions: a case study comparing and contrasting academic tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Pimentel, Diane; McNeill, Katherine L.

    2016-08-01

    The dialogue that occurs in science classrooms has been the subject of research for many decades. Most studies have focused on the actual discourse that occurs and the role of the teacher in guiding the discourse. This case study explored the neglected perspective of secondary science students and their beliefs about their role in class discussions. The study participants (N = 45) were students in one of the three differentially tracked chemistry classes taught by the same teacher. Findings about the differences that exist among students from different academic tracks are reported. While it seems that epistemological beliefs focusing on content are common for the students in this study, the students' social framing in the different tracks is important to consider when teachers attempt to transition to more dialogic forms of discourse. Some key findings of this study are (a) students' beliefs that science is a body of facts to be learned influenced the factors they deemed important for whole-class discussion, (b) students from the lower-level track who typically were associated with lower socioeconomic status were more likely to view their role as passive, and (c) students' comfort level with the members of the class seemed to influence their decisions to participate in class discussions.

  8. The influence of high school academics on freshman college mathematics and science courses at SUNY Oswego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayali, Tolga

    This study examined the relationship between 2011 freshman college mathematics and science grades and freshman students' high school academics and demographic data, exploring the factors that contribute to the success of first-year STEM majoring freshman students at State University of New York at Oswego. The variables were Gender, Race, SES, School Size, Parent with College Education, High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), Transfer Credit, SAT Composite Score, and New York State Regents Exam results, based on data from 237 freshman students entering college immediately following high school. The findings show HSGPA as a significant predictor of success in freshman College Mathematics and Sciences, Transfer Credit as a significant predictor in College Mathematics and College Chemistry, SES as a significant predictor in College Biology and College Chemistry, Parent with College Education as a significant predictor in College Biology and New York State Chemistry Regents Exam as a significant predictor in College Chemistry. Based on these findings, guidance counselors, science educators, and education institutions can develop a framework to determine which measurements are meaningful and advise students to focus on excellent performance in the Chemistry Regents Exams, take more college courses during high school, and maintain a high grade point average.

  9. Attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Monim Batiha; Mohammed ALBashtawy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood is fundamental to saving lives and is considered to be the force that sustains our bodies. Objective: To assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was employed to assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. 453 students (56.7% male) from the four health faculties (Pharmacy, Genetic engineering, Nursing, and Hospital administration) were surveyed...

  10. An Evaluation of a Voluntary Academic Medical Center Website Designed to Improve Access to Health Education among Consumers: Implications for E-Health and M-Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Hollingsworth, Nicole Rosella

    2012-01-01

    Academic Medical Centers across the United States provide health libraries on their web portals to disseminate health promotion and disease prevention information, in order to assist patients in the management of their own care. However, there is a need to obtain consumer input, consumer satisfaction, and to conduct formal evaluations. The purpose…

  11. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section 1987 January 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the third semi-annual period since the Reserach Company was reorganized. A highlight of the period was the first peer review of all the activities in Physics and Health Sciences by external examiners. The review was conducted in April by three separate Technical Review Committees (TRC) one for each of the three main areas: health sciences, nuclear physics and condensed matter physics. In all cases the TRCs gave strong support to our programs having a mandate to assess research programs with respect to (a) their quality and (b) their relevance to Canada. The principal programs reviewed were: DNA damage and repair mechanisms; synergistic effects of chemicals and radiation; the tritium RBE study; radiosensitivity of human bone marrow cells; radioprotective enzymes; radiation biochemistry; chemistry of oxazolinones, benzofuroxanes and cyclodextrins; myeloid leukemia in mice; tritium monitoring, and quality factors; metabolic modeling; neutron dosimetry; groundwater/contaminant modeling; sediment exchange and speciation; and atmospheric dispersion. Very considerable effort was spent on preparing a proposal for a centre of excellence in toxicology for presentation in March to the Premier's Council in the Province of Ontario. Although the proposal was not one of the 7 (out of 28) successful proposals, much useful preparatory work was done towards the establishing of a centre for health and environmental research on toxic agents

  12. The Design of Cognitive Social Simulation Framework using Statistical Methodology in the Domain of Academic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the behavior of the cognitive architecture in the context of social simulation using statistical methodologies is currently a growing research area. Normally, a cognitive architecture for an intelligent agent involves artificial computational process which exemplifies theories of cognition in computer algorithms under the consideration of state space. More specifically, for such cognitive system with large state space the problem like large tables and data sparsity are faced. Hence in this paper, we have proposed a method using a value iterative approach based on Q-learning algorithm, with function approximation technique to handle the cognitive systems with large state space. From the experimental results in the application domain of academic science it has been verified that the proposed approach has better performance compared to its existing approaches.

  13. Testing a model of science process skills acquisition: An interaction with parents' education, preferred language, gender, science attitude, cognitive development, academic ability, and biology knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Paul J.

    Path analysis techniques were used to test a hypothesized structural model of direct and indirect causal effects of student variables on science process skills. The model was tested twice using data collected at the beginning and end of the school year from 67 9th- and 10th-grade biology students who lived in a rural Franco-American community in New England. Each student variable was found to have significant effects, accounting for approximately 80% of the variance in science process skills achievement. Academic ability, biology knowledge, and language preference had significant direct effects. There were significant mediated effects by cognitive development, parents' education, and attitude toward science in school. The variables of cognitive development and academic ability had the greatest total effects on science process skills. Implications for practitioners and researchers are discussed.

  14. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Community Involvement Congress Events Environmental Stewardship Research Highlights Technology Transfer Visiting NIEHS Your Environment. Your Health. Search NIEHS submit Home Health & Education ...

  15. Progress report. Physics and health sciences. Health sciences section. 1988 January 01-June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work of the Health Sciences section in the first half of 1988 covered the areas of radiation risks; neutron, thermoluminescence and beta dosimetry; tritium, stack and effluent monitoring; radiochemical analysis; atmospheric, lake and river processes; groundwater and streamflow interactions; flow and contaminant transport in groundwater; environmental assessment criteria, techniques and implementation; environmental monitoring; radiation sensitivity and mutagenesis; and radiobiology. Members of the section were closely involved with the international re-evaluation of risk estimates taking into account the new data on dose for Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors

  16. Academic Medicine's Critical Role in the "Third Curve" of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Harold L

    2016-05-01

    Over the last several years, the health care landscape has changed at an unprecedented rate due to new economic and regulatory forces ushered in by the Affordable Care Act and the introduction of innovative technologies, such as personalized medicine, that are poised to open the door to consumer-driven health care. Tremendous pressure exists on academic health centers to rapidly evolve clinically while not abandoning their unique academic mission. The convergence of personalized medicine, new digital technologies, and changes in health professionals' scope of practice alongside new payment structures will accelerate the move to a patient-centered health system. In this Commentary, the author argues that these new tools and resources must be embraced to improve the health of patients. With the traditional, fee-for-service model of care as "Curve I" and the post-Flexner era of population-based medicine as "Curve II," the author identifies the emergence of "Curve III," which is characterized by patient-centered, consumer-directed models of care. As the old models of health care undergo transition and the impact of technology and analytics grow, future practitioners must be trained to embrace this change and function effectively in the "third curve" of consumer-driven health care.

  17. The impact of maths support tutorials on mathematics confidence and academic performance in a cohort of HE Animal Science students

    OpenAIRE

    Nieky van Veggel; Jonathan Amory

    2014-01-01

    Students embarking on a bioscience degree course, such as Animal Science, often do not have sufficient experience in mathematics. However, mathematics forms an essential and integral part of any bioscience degree and is essential to enhance employability. This paper presents the findings of a project looking at the effect of mathematics tutorials on a cohort of first year animal science and management students. The results of a questionnaire, focus group discussions and academic performance a...

  18. Bridging the gap to first year health science: Early engagement enhances student satisfaction and success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Thalluri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Student academic success and positive satisfaction in first year health sciences programs is shaped by their transition experience. An introduction to core knowledge, study skills, and engagement with staff and students has historically been overlooked, but this has been newly recognised as a contributor to first year success, especially with mass higher education of students from diverse backgrounds. The University of South Australia ‘Preparing for Health Sciences’ workshop was designed to assist the student transition into health science programs. The workshop improved confidence and enthusiasm in starting university (56% pre- and 95% post-workshop, and 97% considered the workshop effective overall. Introduction to biological principles was widely considered to be beneficial (87%. The attrition rate after the first semester in 2014 was 7.6%, which is appreciably lower than the standard 12% in science-based courses. These findings demonstrate that an introductory workshop does greatly assist in the transition of students into their health science programs.

  19. The Effect of the Directly Reflective Approach to Teaching the Nature of Science in Science and Technology Education on Academic Achievement and Scientific Attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Balci; Murat Demirbaş

    2012-01-01

    Information is constantly renewed and changed all over the world, which has reflections on all aspects of our lives. It is education that is especially influenced by the process. Various alternatives are put forward to how to teach students knowledge. One of these alternatives is teaching the nature of science. The present paper is a study on the effect of the directly reflective approach, a method used for teaching the nature of science, on students’ academic achievements and attitudes towar...

  20. [The Health Technology Assessment Engine of the Academic Hospital of Udine: first appraisal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment Engine (HTAE) of the Academic Hospital of Udine aggregates about one hundred of health technology assessment websites. It was born thanks to Google technology in 2008 and after about four years of testing it became public for everybody from the Homepage of the Italian Society of Health Technology Assessment (SIHTA). In this paper the first results obtained with this resource are reported. The role of the scientific librarian is examined not only as a support specialist in bibliographic search but also as a creative expert in managing new technologies for the community.

  1. The Public Good and Academic Capitalism: Science and Engineering Doctoral Students and Faculty on the Boundary of Knowledge Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Bresonis, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the research-related experiences of 48 doctoral students and 22 faculty in science and engineering fields at three research universities, with specific emphasis on the intersection of the public good and academic capitalism. Identifying an expansive, intersecting organizational space between the public good and academic…

  2. Home Influences on the Academic Performance of Agricultural Science Students in Ikwuano Local Government Area of Abia State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndirika, Maryann C.; Njoku, U. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the home influences on the academic performance of agricultural science secondary school students in Ikwuano Local Government Area of Abia State. The instrument used in data collection was a validated questionnaire structured on a two point rating scale. Simple random sampling technique was used to select…

  3. The Academic Librarian Labor Market and the Role of the Master of Library Science Degree: 1975 through 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Marybeth F.; Grimes, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the evolving role of the Master of Library Science (MLS) degree in academic libraries, pooled cross-sectional data were collected from job advertisements in "College and Research Library News." Beginning with 1975 and continuing at 5-year intervals through 2005, pertinent information from all job advertisements in each monthly issue…

  4. Language as a tool for science : The language productivity and academic language use of pupils and teachers during a video feedback coaching intervention in kindergarten science lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menninga, Astrid; van Dijk, Marijn; Wetzels, Anna; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Geert, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to gain insight into language productivity and academic language of pupils and teachers in the course of a teacher intervention during science education in kindergarten. The current study consists of a reanalysis of videotaped classroom observations (Author Citation, 2012), and speci

  5. A model for faculty practice teaching clinics developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hollaren, M T; Romm, C L; Cooney, T G; Bardana, E J; Walker, J; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    In 1988 the Oregon Health Sciences University established its first faculty practice teaching clinic wherein physicians in training were incorporated into a faculty private practice clinic; this pilot project proved very successful and has been subsequently adopted as the model for essentially all outpatient clinics (both medical and surgery) in the university system. The model encourages efficiency, overhead control, and appropriate staffing; it also compensates faculty members for their additional time spent teaching. The authors conclude this model may help other academic training centers adapt to the changing demands of medical education. PMID:1729995

  6. Usability Testing as a Method to Refine a Health Sciences Library Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Andrea H; Moody, David A; Bennett, Jason C

    2016-01-01

    User testing, a method of assessing website usability, can be a cost-effective and easily administered process to collect information about a website's effectiveness. A user experience (UX) team at an academic health sciences library has employed user testing for over three years to help refine the library's home page. Test methodology used in-person testers using the "think aloud" method to complete tasks on the home page. Review of test results revealed problem areas of the design and redesign; further testing was effective in refining the page. User testing has proved to be a valuable method to engage users and provide feedback to continually improve the library's home page.

  7. Norwegian health journalists’ ability to report on health research: A concern to science education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Pettersen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper reports of the recent health science research might be important in health promotion and for the readers’ achievement of health literacy. However, such reports are often scientifically deficient and inaccurate. Through the use of a questionnaire and in-depth interviews, Norwegian newspaper health journalists were asked about their educational background, reporting ability and improvement needs, what their sources of health news normally are, and what counts as news – and why. The results showed that none of the health journalist questionnaire respondents (N = 20 had any qualification in the health or biological sciences. Most journalists expressed restricted knowledge of statistics and of the discourse of science, and many journalists stated a need for the improvement of their critical evaluation skills of health claims. The two journalist interview informants expressed that commercial communication bureaus were increasingly applied as sources of health research reports, and the selected health news must contribute to sales-success for the newspapers. To critically select and evaluate the health news from the various sources, health journalists in Norway probably need to improve their knowledge of biological science and statistics, as well as their critical thinking skills and critical health literacy. It is argued that in these improvement approaches, the journalists reporting on health might benefit from learning about the “nature of science.” Results are discussed in a science education perspective.

  8. Inequality in Societies, Academic Institutions and Science Journals: Gini and k-indices

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Asim; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

    2014-01-01

    Social inequality is traditionally measured by the Gini-index ($g$). Most of the estimates of the income or wealth data indicate the $g$ value to be widely dispersed across the countries of the world: \\textit{g} values typically range from $0.30$ to $0.65$ at a particular time (year). We estimated similarly the Gini-index for the citations earned by the yearly publications of various academic institutions and the science journals. The ISI web of science data suggests remarkably strong inequality and universality ($g=0.70\\pm0.07$) across all the universities and institutions of the world, while for the journals we find $g=0.65\\pm0.15$ for any typical year. We define a new inequality measure, namely the $k$-index, saying that the cumulative income or citations of ($1-k$) fraction of people or papers exceed those earned by the fraction ($k$) of the people or publications respectively. We find, while the $k$-index value for income ranges from $0.60$ to $0.75$ for income distributions across the world, it has a va...

  9. Academic Language Development through Technology: English Learners in a Fifth Grade Science Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yeong

    Grounded in sociocultural models of learning, this study explores structures for participation and types of interaction that occur during the performance of technology-assisted tasks in a science classroom to detail some of the opportunities for learning made available to English learners (ELs) and some practices that might constitute effective instruction within such a context. In particular, this study explores how ELs use language to socialize and how they are socialized to use language during technology-assisted tasks in a science classroom within a given participant structure. Findings show that five different participant structures were used during technology-assisted tasks, all of which required ELs to understand and use varied interaction patterns; different levels of authority and responsibilities were given to interlocutors in each structure. As different participant structures employed different interactional patterns and practices, learners behaved according to differing norms expected by each participant structure. Findings showed that members of the class shared the rules regarding the initiation of interactions and open topics, as well as allowing time to listen and follow the cue of teachers or technology. In this sense, the class functioned as a community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991). Each participant structure appeared to contribute to the variety of the interaction types, as well as to kinds of subsequent learning and socialization of ELs, providing divergent levels of transparency, legitimacy, and peripherality to ELs. The integration of technology unfolded differently across participant structures and has implications for ELs' academic language learning opportunities.

  10. Public health, academic medicine, and the alcohol industry's corporate social responsibility activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry's economic interests. PMID:23237151

  11. Public health, academic medicine, and the alcohol industry's corporate social responsibility activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry's economic interests.

  12. Strategic planning as a tool for achieving alignment in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Eve J; Church, Kathryn C

    2012-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010, there is an urgent need for medical schools, teaching hospitals, and practice plans to work together seamlessly across a common mission. Although there is agreement that there should be greater coordination of initiatives and resources, there is little guidance in the literature to address the method to achieve the necessary transformation. Traditional approaches to strategic planning often engage a few leaders and produce a set of immeasurable initiatives. A nontraditional approach, consisting of a Whole-Scale (Dannemiller Tyson Associates, Ann Arbor, MI) engagement, appreciative inquiry, and a balanced scorecard can, more rapidly transform an academic health center. Using this nontraditional approach to strategic planning, increased organizational awareness was achieved in a single academic health center. Strategic planning can be an effective tool to achieve alignment, enhance accountability, and a first step in meeting the demands of the new landscape of healthcare. PMID:23303997

  13. Strategic planning as a tool for achieving alignment in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Eve J; Church, Kathryn C

    2012-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010, there is an urgent need for medical schools, teaching hospitals, and practice plans to work together seamlessly across a common mission. Although there is agreement that there should be greater coordination of initiatives and resources, there is little guidance in the literature to address the method to achieve the necessary transformation. Traditional approaches to strategic planning often engage a few leaders and produce a set of immeasurable initiatives. A nontraditional approach, consisting of a Whole-Scale (Dannemiller Tyson Associates, Ann Arbor, MI) engagement, appreciative inquiry, and a balanced scorecard can, more rapidly transform an academic health center. Using this nontraditional approach to strategic planning, increased organizational awareness was achieved in a single academic health center. Strategic planning can be an effective tool to achieve alignment, enhance accountability, and a first step in meeting the demands of the new landscape of healthcare.

  14. Teaching and Learning the Language of Science: A Case Study of Academic Language Acquisition in a Dual Language Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Robin Margaretha

    English language learners (EL) are the fastest growing sub-group of the student population in California, yet ELs also score the lowest on the science section of the California Standardized Tests. In the area of bilingual education, California has dramatically changed its approach to English learners since the passage of Proposition 227 in 1998, which called for most EL instruction to be conducted in English (Cummins, 2000; Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2008). In reality, this means that EL students are often placed in programs that focus on basic language skills rather than rigorous content, meaning that they are not getting access to grade level science content (Lee & Fradd, 1998). As a result, many EL students exit eighth grade without a strong foundation in science, and they continue to score below their English-speaking peers on standardized achievements. While the usefulness of the academic language construct remains controversial (Bailey, 2012), the language used in science instruction is nevertheless often unfamiliar to both EL and English proficient students. The discourse is frequently specialized for discipline-specific interactions and activities (Bailey, 2007; Lemke, 1990). This qualitative case study examined academic language instruction in three middle school science classrooms at a dual language charter school. The goal was to understand how teachers integrate academic language and content for linguistically diverse students. The findings fom this study indicate that targeting language instruction in isolation from science content instruction prohibits students from engaging in the "doing of science" and scientific discourse, or the ability to think, reason, and communicate about science. The recommendations of this study support authentically embedding language development into rigorous science instruction in order to maximize opportunities for learning in both domains.

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  16. A First Course in Biostatistics for Health Sciences Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraway, J. A.; Sharples, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the content of a course on introductory biostatistics for health science students. Emphasizes the way in which study design and critical evaluation of research are developed in tandem with statistical methodology. (Author/MM)

  17. An introduction to the Semantic Web for health sciences librarians*

    OpenAIRE

    Robu, Ioana; Robu, Valentin; Thirion, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The paper (1) introduces health sciences librarians to the main concepts and principles of the Semantic Web (SW) and (2) briefly reviews a number of projects on the handling of biomedical information that uses SW technology.

  18. Shaping the Future of Academic Health Centers: The Potential Contributions of Departments of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Warren P.; DuBard, C Annette

    2006-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) must change dramatically to meet the changing needs of patients and society, but how to do this remains unclear. The purpose of this supplement is to describe ways in which departments of family medicine can play leadership roles in helping AHCs evolve. This overview provides background for case studies and commentaries about the contribution of departments of family medicine in 5 areas: (1) ambulatory and primary care, (2) indigent care, (3) education in commun...

  19. "Innovation" institutes in academic health centers: enhancing value through leadership, education, engagement, and scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Farmer, Steven A; Akman, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    In the next decade, the biggest change in medicine in the United States will be the organizational transformation of the delivery system. Organizations-including academic health centers-able to achieve better outcomes for less will be the financial winners as new payment models become more prevalent. For medical educators, the question is how to prepare the next generation of physicians for these changes. One solution is the development of new "innovation" or "value" institutes. Around the nation, many of these new institutes are focused on surmounting barriers to value-based care in academic health centers, educating faculty, house staff, and medical students in discussions of cost-conscious care. Innovation institutes can also lead discussions about how value-based care may impact education in environments where there may be less autonomy and more standardization. Quality metrics will play a larger role at academic health centers as metrics focus more on outcomes than processes. Optimizing outcomes will require that medical educators both learn and teach the principles of patient safety and quality improvement. Innovation institutes can also facilitate cross-institutional discussions to compare data on utilization and outcomes, and share best practices that maximize value. Another barrier to cost-conscious care is defensive medicine, which is highly engrained in U.S. medicine and culture. Innovation institutes may not be able to overcome all the barriers to making medical care more cost-conscious, but they can be critical in enabling academic health centers to optimize their teaching and research missions while remaining financially competitive.

  20. Academic Majors and Subject-Area Certifications of Health Education Teachers in the United States, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardina, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify academic preparation and subject-area certifications of K-12 public school staff teaching at least one health education class during 2011-2012 academic year. In general, teachers who are well qualified to teach a subject area are more likely to positively affect student achievement. Methods: Data…

  1. Responding to the Marketplace: Workforce Balance and Financial Risk at Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retchin, Sheldon M

    2016-07-01

    Elsewhere in this issue, Welch and Bindman present research demonstrating that academic health centers (AHCs) continue to disproportionately comprise specialists and subspecialist faculty physicians compared with community-based physician groups. This workforce composition has served AHCs well through the years-specialists fuel the clinical engine of the major tertiary and quaternary missions of AHCs, and they also dominate much of the clinical and translational research enterprise. AHCs are not alone-less than one-third of U.S. physicians practice primary care. However, health reform has prompted many health systems to reconsider this configuration. Payers, employers, and policy makers are shifting away from fee-for-service toward value-based care. Large community-based physician groups and their parent health systems appear to be far ahead of AHCs with a more balanced physician workforce. Many are leveraging their emphasis on primary care to participate in population health initiatives, such as accountable care organizations, and some own their own health plans. These approaches largely assume some element of financial risk and require both a more balanced workforce and an infrastructure to accommodate the management of covered lives. It remains to be seen whether AHCs will reconsider their own physician specialty composition to emphasize primary care-and, if they do, whether the traditional academic model, or a more community-based approach, will prevail. PMID:27224298

  2. Mental Health of Hmong Americans: A Metasynthesis of Academic Journal Article Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song E. Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The mental health of Hmong Americans has been studied since their arrival in the United States. The purpose of this metasynthesis to utilize a qualitative approach to analyze academic journal article studies that assess mental health issues in Hmong Americans. Forty-eight published articles from 1983 to 2012 were chosen for analysis. Each of the selected articles focused on Hmong participants and contained findings relevant to the psychological well-being of Hmong Americans. Results of this study revealed several common themes: trends in research, depression,anxiety, adjustment issues, family issues, substance abuse, other mental health concerns, factors linked to mental health, help seeking behavior and perceptions, effectiveness of mental health treatments, strengths and resiliency, and supportive factors.

  3. Pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy in relation to personality traits and academic self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senler, Burcu; Sungur-Vural, Semra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among pre-service science teachers' personality traits, academic self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy by proposing and testing a conceptual model. For the specified purpose, 1794 pre-service science teachers participated in the study. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were administered to assess pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy, personality, and academic self-regulation respectively. Results showed that agreeableness, neuroticism, performance approach goals, and use of metacognitive strategies are positively linked to different dimensions of teaching self-efficacy, namely self-efficacy for student engagement, instructional strategies, and classroom management. In general, while agreeableness and neuroticism were found to be positively associated with different facets of self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy, openness was found to be negatively linked to these adaptive outcomes. PMID:23866205

  4. Pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy in relation to personality traits and academic self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senler, Burcu; Sungur-Vural, Semra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among pre-service science teachers' personality traits, academic self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy by proposing and testing a conceptual model. For the specified purpose, 1794 pre-service science teachers participated in the study. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were administered to assess pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy, personality, and academic self-regulation respectively. Results showed that agreeableness, neuroticism, performance approach goals, and use of metacognitive strategies are positively linked to different dimensions of teaching self-efficacy, namely self-efficacy for student engagement, instructional strategies, and classroom management. In general, while agreeableness and neuroticism were found to be positively associated with different facets of self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy, openness was found to be negatively linked to these adaptive outcomes.

  5. Science-based health innovation in Ghana: health entrepreneurs point the way to a new development path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Science, technology and innovation have long played a role in Ghana’s vision for development, including in improving its health outcomes. However, so far little research has been conducted on Ghana’s capacity for health innovation to address local diseases. This research aims to fill that gap, mapping out the key actors involved, highlighting examples of indigenous innovation, setting out the challenges ahead and outlining recommendations for strengthening Ghana’s health innovation system. Methods Case study research methodology was used. Data were collected through reviews of academic literature and policy documents and through open-ended, face-to-face interviews with 48 people from across the science-based health innovation system. Data was collected over three visits to Ghana from February 2007 to August 2008, and stakeholders engaged subsequently. Results Ghana has strengths which could underpin science-based health innovation in the future, including health and biosciences research institutions with strong foreign linkages and donor support; a relatively strong regulatory system which is building capacity in other West African countries; the beginnings of new funding forms such as venture capital; and the return of professionals from the diaspora, bringing expertise and contacts. Some health products and services are already being developed in Ghana by individual entrepreneurs, which are innovative in the sense of being new to the country and, in some cases, the continent. They include essential medicines, raw pharmaceutical materials, new formulations for pediatric use and plant medicines at various stages of development. Conclusions While Ghana has many institutions concerned with health research and its commercialization, their ability to work together to address clear health goals is low. If Ghana is to capitalize on its assets, including political and macroeconomic stability which underpin investment in health

  6. Inequality in societies, academic institutions and science journals: Gini and k-indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asim; Chattopadhyay, Nachiketa; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2014-09-01

    Social inequality is traditionally measured by the Gini-index (g). The g-index takes values from 0 to 1 where g=0 represents complete equality and g=1 represents complete inequality. Most of the estimates of the income or wealth data indicate the g value to be widely dispersed across the countries of the world: g values typically range from 0.30 to 0.65 at a particular time (year). We estimated similarly the Gini-index for the citations earned by the yearly publications of various academic institutions and the science journals. The ISI web of science data suggests remarkably strong inequality and universality (g=0.70±0.07) across all the universities and institutions of the world, while for the journals we find g=0.65±0.15 for any typical year. We define a new inequality measure, namely the k-index, saying that the cumulative income or citations of (1-k) fraction of people or papers exceed those earned by the fraction (k) of the people or publications respectively. We find, while the k-index value for income ranges from 0.60 to 0.75 for income distributions across the world, it has a value around 0.75±0.05 for different universities and institutions across the world and around 0.77±0.10 for the science journals. Apart from above indices, we also analyze the same institution and journal citation data by measuring Pietra index and median index.

  7. Smartphone use at a university health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushhousen, Ellie; Norton, Hannah F; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth; Jesano, Rae; David, Don; Tennant, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of library patrons conducted by librarians and information technology specialists at the Health Science Center Libraries at the University of Florida. The purpose of the survey was to learn if and how library patrons were using smartphones to perform their work-related tasks and how patrons felt the library could support smartphone use at the Health Science Center.

  8. Gender differences on osteoporosis health beliefs and related behaviors in non-academic community Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin-Ping; Xia, Ru-Yi; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Xin-Shuang; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis represents the major public health concern worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess osteoporosis beliefs and actual performance of osteoporosis preventive behaviors in non-academic community Chinese population and to explore whether the differences exist in community females and males. A cross sectional study including 137 females and 122 males was conducted in four non-academic communities of Xi'an city during November 2012, selected by multi-stage sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The respondents' mean age was 56.06 ± 5.81 years. 35.5% of the participants had a bone mineral density test. The participants exhibit relatively low osteoporosis health beliefs. The total health belief score was 63.30 ± 8.55 and 64.13 ± 6.47 in females and males respectively. There was significant gender differences in the subscales of Perceived seriousness (p = 0.03), Perceived barriers to exercise (p = 0.004) and Perceived motivation (p = 0.01). Participants had low frequencies of preventive practices. Gender differences were revealed in current smoking and alcohol intake, soybean food intake, smoking history (p academic Chinese and the scope for enhancing osteoporosis intervention considering the gender difference.

  9. Understanding the factors that influence high science achievers' academic choices and intent to pursue or opt out of the hard sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quihuis, Gisell

    Drawing on Eccles and her colleagues' Expectancy-Value model of academic behavior and choice, this dissertation study set out to serve three purposes: (1) to understand how high achieving high school students who aspire to science college degrees compare, in terms of motivational beliefs and social experiences, with other high achievers who do not aspire to science college degrees; (2) to understand why some high school students who excel in the hard sciences are unsure about pursuing a science degree in college; and (3) to examine whether gender differences in motivational beliefs and social experiences found in previous research on math (see Eccles 1984) exist for science among high achieving high school students. Survey and interview data showed that gender differences previously found in Eccles' research on math exist for science among a select group of high achieving high school students. Yet, these gender differences did not explain students' aspirations for science. Motivation, classroom perceptions, science engagement, as well as other science-related experiences at home and school, including parent and teacher influences, were also important factors associated with students' aspirations for science. Results and implications for this study are encouraging because they suggest that both parents and educators can help more high achievers become interested in science. Parents can expose their children, male and female alike, to science at home early on in their childhood and teachers can help students sustain and further develop an interest in science at school. In this manner, both parents and teachers can work together as a team to encourage more high achievers to aspire to science degrees in their future. Lastly, it is important to note that this study found Eccles' model of motivation and choice helpful in understanding not only gender differences in math and the hard sciences, but also aspiration differences that cut across gender among students

  10. Health Technology Assessment - science or art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    The founding disciplines of HTA are clearly scientific, and have been firmly based among the natural sciences. However, common definitions of HTA indicate that HTA is something more than the "pure application of science". This article investigates whether this "something" also makes HTA an art. The question of whether HTA is a science or an art is pursued in two specific and historically rich directions. The first is whether HTA is an art in the same way that medicine is described as an art. It has been argued extensively that medicine is based on two different and partly incompatible cultures, i.e., the natural sciences and humanities. Medicine is based on disciplines within the natural sciences, while its value judgments have been placed in the humanities camp. This dichotomy is present in HTA as well, and the first part of the investigation illustrates how HTA is an art in terms of its inherent and constitutive value-judgments. The second part of the science/art-scrutiny leads us to the ancient (Hippocratic) concept of art, téchne, where we find an etymological and a conceptual link between HTA and art. It demonstrates HTA is not an arbitrary process, even though it involves value judgments and relates complex decision making processes. As an art (téchne) HTA has a specific subject matter, requires inquiry and mastery of general rational principles, and is oriented to a specific end. In conclusion, the science-or-art-question makes sense in two specific perspectives, illustrating that HTA is a science based art. This has implications for the practice of HTA, for its education, and for the status of its results.

  11. Objectivity and ethics in environmental health science.

    OpenAIRE

    WING, STEVE

    2003-01-01

    During the past several decades, philosophers of science and scientists themselves have become increasingly aware of the complex ways in which scientific knowledge is shaped by its social context. This awareness has called into question traditional notions of objectivity. Working scientists need an understanding of their own practice that avoids the naïve myth that science can become objective by avoiding social influences as well as the reductionist view that its content is determined simply...

  12. 'An exploration of the health beliefs of Chinese nurses' and nurse academics' health beliefs: A Q-methodology study'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dan; Stone, Teresa E; Petrini, Marcia A; McMillan, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    Q-methodology was used to investigate the health beliefs of Chinese clinical nurses and nurse academics. Twenty-eight participants from one hospital and nursing school in China were involved. The four stages of this study included: (i) concourse development from literature review, Internet searches, and key informant interviews; (ii) A pilot study to develop the Q-sample from the concourse; (iii) participants sorted the Q-sample statements along a continuum of preference (Q-sorting); and (iv) PQ data analysis using principal component analysis and varimax rotation. Five viewpoints were revealed: (i) factor 1--health management and the importance of evidence; (ii) factor 2--challenging local cultural belief, and Eastern and Western influences; (iii) factor 3--commonsense; (iv) factor 4--health and clinical practice; and (v) factor 5--health and nursing education. This study presents a need for nurses and nurse academics to think critically, examine their long-held health beliefs, and promote the use of evidence-based practice.

  13. Culture, Health, and Science: A Multidisciplinary Liberal Arts Alternative to the Public Health Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lynn M; Knight, Sabina; Gubrium, Aline C

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2003 call by the Institute of Medicine to educate undergraduates in public health, various models have emerged for incorporating public health into the liberal arts and sciences. One model is a professionalized public health major that uses core public health competencies to prepare a workforce of health professionals. A second model offers a broad-based public health major rooted in liberal arts principles, resisting the utilitarian trend toward human capital formation. A third model resists even the label of "public health," preferring instead to introduce undergraduates to many ways of analyzing human health and healing. The multidisciplinary Culture, Health, and Science Program, based on six key commitments for preparing liberal arts students to analyze health and respond to global health challenges, is offered as an alternative to the public health major. PMID:26857453

  14. 76 FR 27653 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health...

  15. 78 FR 59944 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health...

  16. 76 FR 5184 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health...

  17. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. ] Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institute of Environmental Health...

  18. 77 FR 6569 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Special Emphasis... Branch, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health...

  19. Science and social responsibility in public health.

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Douglas L.; Mckeown, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsib...

  20. The public communication of science in public health graduate programs in Brazil: From the coordinators' perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C. A.; Gallo, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Introduction - The elaboration process of public policies for science and technology in knowledge societies should include not only experts, but all society members. There are studies on lay people's perception of science and technology. However, what is the scientists' perspective on public communication of science? Objectives - To describe and characterize the concepts that coordinators of Brazilian public health graduate programs have about public communication of science. Methods - This is an analytical and descriptive report of an exploratory research (doctoral study). The answers of fifty-one coordinators to two questionnaires were submitted for content analysis. The categories were transformed into variables that allowed the data processing by the Hiérarchique Classificatoire et Cohésitive (CHIC®) software. Results - Similarity analysis strongly suggested (0,99) that coordinators understand public communication as a communication directed to academic peers and students, also as a form of participation in scientific events and communication by scientific papers. Likewise, the implication analysis suggested a strong implication (0,98) between scientific communication understood as public communication. Conclusion - The notion of public communication of science as a social right and as a commitment and responsibility of researchers and research centers is not explicitly present in the narrative of the coordinators, although in general the coordinators conceive it as a relevant activity. This study thus contributes to a reflection on the role of scientists, researchers and research centers in public communication of science and technology.

  1. The Academic Profession in Academic Science Times%学院科学时代的大学学术职业

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊华军

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the academic profession in academic science times is that the faculty tends to extend the verified knowledge. The faeul- ty's scientific research is accompanied with talent training and social service. So the faculty becomes the pure scientist, whose professional spirit has the characteristics of eommunism,universalism,disinterestedness,originality and organized skepticism. The reason of the faculty promoting social progress is that the institutionalization of the professional development and the mechanism of the professional organization ensuring the good function of the academic community.%在学院科学时代,大学教师以"扩展被验证了的知识"为使命,将科学研究与人才培养和社会服务统一起来,由此,大学教师是一名"纯科学家",其专业精神表征为公有性、普遍性、祛私利性、独创性以及有组织的怀疑性等特征。大学教师之所以能推动社会的进步,离不开体制化的大学教师专业发展制度和保证学术共同体良性运转的专业组织机制。

  2. Education projects: an opportunity for student fieldwork in global health academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Molly V

    2012-01-01

    Universities, especially in higher-income countries, increasingly offer programs in global health. These programs provide different types of fieldwork projects, at home and abroad, including: epidemiological research, community health, and clinical electives. I illustrate how and why education projects offer distinct learning opportunities for global health program fieldwork. As University of California students, we partnered in Tanzania with students from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science (MUHAS) to assist MUHAS faculty with a curricular project. We attended classes, clinical rounds, and community outreach sessions together, where we observed teaching, materials used, and the learning environment; and interviewed and gathered data from current students, alumni, and health professionals during a nationwide survey. We learned together about education of health professionals and health systems in our respective institutions. On the basis of this experience, I suggest some factors that contribute to the productivity of educational projects as global health fieldwork.

  3. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pasthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma.

  4. Learning from Longitudinal Research in Criminology and the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstaay, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews longitudinal research within criminology and the health sciences on the relationship between reading and criminal, delinquent, or antisocial behavior. Longitudinal research in criminology, medicine, and psychology examines the role of reading within a broad set of interactive processes, connecting literacy to public health via…

  5. Health and environment: social science perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kopnina; H. Keune

    2010-01-01

    In this new book the authors examine the contribution of social scientists to the topics of health and environment. They present diverse perspectives on classical and contemporary debates by focusing on social scientific framing of environment and health, as well as on the potential contribution of

  6. Education for health: perspectives and experiences in higher education in health sciences, Medellín, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita M. Gómez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to know the current panorama of education for health (efh in some institutions of higher education that train health professionals in Medellín, Colombia, and furthermore, to promote academic discussions among professionals who are interested in efh. Methodology: a qualitative research based on a multiple case study was conducted taking into account the specific cases of some higher education programs in health sciences in Medellín. Ethnographic techniques including individual and group interviews were utilized. Results: efh is currently facing quite a contradictory situation: first of all, its importance is highlighted but on the other hand, evidences suggest a limited development. Moreover, the efh has an overlapping identity as it is mistaken for other fields, disciplines, programs and some other different kinds of health activities. A tension between conceptions of efh aimed to behavior change based on traditional pedagogical models and other alternative points of view more focused in human development is identified. An uneven curriculum development was also found when different institutions were compared. Finally, poor research development was pointed out in efh. Conclusions: efh represents an important dimension of public health which becomes contradictory with the incipient development of this field and the prevailing traditional models of efh as it is evidenced in this research. A predominant biomedical model focused in morbidity which is primarily present in the educational programs training health professionals and a poorly developed pedagogical approach in this field support the understanding of these findings

  7. Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  8. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Hedayat; Jariani, Mojgan; Beiranvand, Shorangiz; Saki, Mandana; Aghajeri, Nasrin; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R). Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%), depersonalization (81.1%), and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%). Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members. PMID:26989668

  9. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat Nazari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%, depersonalization (81.1%, and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%. Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members.

  10. The Academic Profession in Post-academic Science Times%后学院科学时代的大学学术职业

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊华军

    2012-01-01

    在后学院科学时代,作为学术资本家的大学教师不仅要具备学科性知识、跨学科知识、实践性知识和条件性知识等专业知识,还应具备批判性反思式教学能力、跨学科研究能力、学术资本化服务能力,并遵守职业伦理规范。为更好地以实际应用为导向生产知识,大学教师要进入学术圈,其专业发展须纳入体制建设中。同时,专业组织是由不同人员组成的有形组织,其运行依靠一套严格的官僚管理制度加以保证。%In post-academic science times,the faculty as academic capitalists should have advanced knowledge,interdisciplinary knowledge,practical knowledge,conditional knowledge etc.They also should have the ability of critically reflective instruction,interdisciplinary research,academic capitalism service and abiding by the professional ethics etc.In order to produce knowledge based on the practical application,the faculty should enter the academic circle and bring their professional development into institution-building.Meanwhile,the professional organization is composed of different tangible organization,whose operation is guaranteed by a set of strict bureaucratic management system.

  11. University School for Health Sciences Students' Opinions about Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Kerime Derya Tasci; Sevgi Ozkan

    2007-01-01

    This research was conducted as a descriptive study for the purpose of determining the opinions of students about infertility who are in health education, are single and do not have children. There were 246 students in the sample who were registered in the Nursing and Health Officer Schools of Denizli School for Health Sciences of Pamukkale University. It was planned to conducted the research on the entire population however because some students did not want to participate a total of 227 stud...

  12. Advancing Global Health – The Need for (Better) Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In his perspective "Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health," Ooms argues that actions taken in the field of global health are dependent not only on available resources, but on the normative premise that guides how these resources are spent. This comment sets out how the application of a predominately biomedical positivist research tradition in global health, has potentially limited understanding of the value judgements underlying decisions in the field. To redress this critical social science, including health policy analysis has much to offer, to the field of global health including on questions of governance. PMID:27239873

  13. Development of a replicable process for translating science into practical health education messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyus, Nadra C; Freeman, Randall J; Gibbons, M Christopher

    2006-09-01

    There has been considerable discussion about translating science into practical messages, especially among urban minority and "hard-to-reach" populations. Unfortunately, many research findings rarely make it back in useful format to the general public. Few innovative techniques have been established that provide researchers with a systematic process for developing health awareness and prevention messages for priority populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the early development and experience of a unique community-based participatory process used to develop health promotion messages for a predominantly low-income, black and African-American community in Baltimore, MD. Scientific research findings from peer-reviewed literature were identified by academic researchers. Researchers then taught the science to graphic design students and faculty. The graphic design students and faculty then worked with both community residents and researchers to transform this information into evidence-based public health education messages. The final products were culturally and educationally appropriate, health promotion messages reflecting urban imagery that were eagerly desired by the community. This early outcome is in contrast to many previously developed messages and materials created through processes with limited community involvement and by individuals with limited practical knowledge of local community culture or expertise in marketing or mass communication. This process may potentially be utilized as a community-based participatory approach to enhance the translation of scientific research into desirable and appropriate health education messages. PMID:17019920

  14. Financial sustainability of academic health centers: identifying challenges and strategic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Jim P; Li, Tao; Shiyanbola, Oyewale O; Jacobson, Janelle J

    2014-06-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) play a vital role in the health care system. The training of health care personnel and delivery of health care services, especially to the most complex and financially challenged patients, has been a responsibility increasingly shouldered by AHCs over the years. Additionally, AHCs play a significant role in researching and developing new treatment protocols, including discovering and validating new health technologies. However, AHCs face unique financial challenges in fulfilling their social mission in the health care system. Reforms being implemented under the Affordable Care Act and shifting economic patterns are threatening the financial sustainability of AHCs.The authors review challenges facing AHCs, including training new health care professionals with fewer funding resources, disproportionate clinical care of complex and costly patients, charity care to uninsured and underinsured, and reduced research funding opportunities. Then, they provide a review of some potential solutions to these challenges, including new reimbursement methods, improvements in operational efficiency, price regulation, subsidization of education, improved decision making and communication, utilization of industrial management tools, and increasing internal and external cooperation. Devising solutions to the evolving problems of AHCs is crucial to improving health care delivery in the United States. Most likely, a combination of market, government, and system reforms will be needed to improve the viability of AHCs and assist them in fulfilling their social and organizational missions. PMID:24871234

  15. Comparing Self-Regulatory and Early Academic Skills as Predictors of Later Math, Reading, and Science Elementary School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, William M., III

    The achievement score gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged children at school entry is a major problem in education today. Identifying the skills critical for school readiness is an important step in developing interventions aimed at addressing these score gaps. The purpose of this study is to compare a number of school readiness skills with an eye toward finding out which are the best predictors of later academic achievement in math, reading, and science. The predictors were early reading, math, general knowledge, socioemotional skills, and motor skills. Data were obtained from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study of 1998 (NCES, 1998) database. While controlling for an extensive set of family characteristics, predictions were made across five years - from the end of kindergarten to the end of fifth grade. Consistent with current findings, reading and math skills predicted later achievement. Interestingly, general knowledge, attention, and fine motor skills also proved to be important predictors of later academic achievement, but socioemotional skills were not. The findings were interpreted from a neurobiological perspective involving the development of self-regulation. These school entry skills are used to predict later achievement in reading, math, and science. I argued that in addition to acquiring early academic knowledge, children need to regulate the use of this knowledge to meet academic goals.

  16. Can online activities improve attitude to homework and improve academic performance in science with fifth year students at second level

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dea, Michael

    2013-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed The purpose of this investigation was to determine if online activities could improve attitude and academic achievement in Science with a group of students at secondary level education. The problems with homework are experienced by educators worldwide and with the use of online multimedia and technology, this investigation sought to determine if this could bring about a change. A group of sixteen students were involved in the investigation; these students were studying...

  17. Knowledge transfer activities in social sciences and humanities: Explaining the interactions of research groups with non-academic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Olmos Peñuela, Julia; Castro Martínez, Elena; D'Este Cukierman, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to achieve a better understanding of the processes underlying knowledge transfer (KT) in social sciences and humanities (SSH). The paper addresses: first, the extent of SSH research groups' engagement in KT and the formal KT activities used to interact with non-academic communities; and second, how the characteristics of research groups may influence engagement in various types of KT. The empirical analysis is at research group level using data derived from a quest...

  18. The Analysis of Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Academic Achievement in Medical Students of Basic Sciences Program

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Ghaffari; Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadeh; Eskandar Fathi Azar; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parisa Golanbar; Hossein Mazouchian; Elham Abbasi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Learning style is an individual’s preferred method of encountering information in specific situations in order to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes through study or experience. Students and Planers’ awareness of learning styles facilitate the teaching process, increases satisfaction and makes the future choices easier. This study aimed to examine different learning styles and their relation to academic achievement in medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz Uni...

  19. Patterns and Problems of Information Use in the Production of Articles by Academics in the Humanities and Social Sciences in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Chumchit Saechan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the patterns of the use of information by academics in the humanities and social sciences in Thailand when producing academic articles, and to study and compare the problems encountered in their use of information based on the variables: gender, age, education, academic role and discipline. Citation analysis includes 3,464 citations from 203 articles in six qualified journals indexed in the Thai Citation Index Centre and international databases. A survey research u...

  20. Mouth breathing: adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Yosh

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of health care professionals are unaware of the negative impact of upper airway obstruction (mouth breathing) on normal facial growth and physiologic health. Children whose mouth breathing is untreated may develop long, narrow faces, narrow mouths, high palatal vaults, dental malocclusion, gummy smiles, and many other unattractive facial features, such as skeletal Class II or Class III facial profiles. These children do not sleep well at night due to obstructed airways; this lack of sleep can adversely affect their growth and academic performance. Many of these children are misdiagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and hyperactivity. It is important for the entire health care community (including general and pediatric dentists) to screen and diagnose for mouth breathing in adults and in children as young as 5 years of age. If mouth breathing is treated early, its negative effect on facial and dental development and the medical and social problems associated with it can be reduced or averted.

  1. Risk communications in nuclear energy as science and technology. Arrangement and analysis of academic findings and practical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems in communication among the government, enterprise, experts and so on and the society and people, now confront us in several areas of science and technology. In order to be accepted by the society, each area of science and technology has experienced common processes such as beginnings, business, society introduction, problem renovation and maturity. Each area can be positioned based on the degree of maturity, which helps to find solutions of the problems. Arrangement and analysis of academic findings and practical cases on risk communications in nuclear energy are described. (T. Tanaka)

  2. ACADEMIC GENEALOGIES WITH RESPECT TO NARRATIVE IN HUMAN AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AND THEIR IMPLICATION FOR PUBLIC POLICIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Taiki; Nakano, Takeshi; Hatori, Tsuyoshi

    In human and society science, narrative is regarded as an important issue to understand dynamic actions of human being and society. Therefore, narrative is also expected to be important for public policies that try to improve dynamic actions of human being and society. In th is study, we review academic genealogies with respect to narratives including western philosophy, hermeneutics, historical science, historical philosophy, literary criticism, clinical psychology and sociology, narrative psychology and folklore. Then we discuss how narrative can be pragmatically applied for public policies.

  3. The Effect of the Directly Reflective Approach to Teaching the Nature of Science in Science and Technology Education on Academic Achievement and Scientific Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Balci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Information is constantly renewed and changed all over the world, which has reflections on all aspects of our lives. It is education that is especially influenced by the process. Various alternatives are put forward to how to teach students knowledge. One of these alternatives is teaching the nature of science. The present paper is a study on the effect of the directly reflective approach, a method used for teaching the nature of science, on students’ academic achievements and attitudes towards science. The study was based on a quasi-experimental design and conducted on one of the primary schools located in Kırıkkale. The study included a test on academic achievement designed by the researcher and the scientific attitude inventory (Demirbaş and Yağbasan, 2006 for data collection. The data were analyzed through the SPSS. The study concluded that the directly reflective approach did not have an influence on the students’ academic achievements but enabled them to maintain their scores in the scientific attitude scale. Another conclusion is that the students included in the control group tended to have lower scores in the scientific attitude scale in the course of time.

  4. Interprofessional education in an enrichment programme for prospective health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Erika K; VanderWielen, Lynn; Harris, Kevin A; Ford-Smith, Cheryl D

    2016-03-01

    Effective and meaningful interprofessional education opportunities for prospective health sciences students are important to prepare students for the work environment they will encounter after training. This article briefly describes the Summer Academic Enrichment Program, a programme for students pursuing entry to dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and physical therapy schools. The programme evaluation includes investigation of the programme's effectiveness to impact attitudes towards interprofessional teams and collaboration. The Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale and the Revised Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale were administered at the beginning and the end of the programme. Statistical analysis of pre-assessment subscale scores indicated that pre-pharmacy students reported significantly more positive attitudes towards team value than pre-dental students at the beginning of the programme, with post-assessment results indicating that these differences had been eliminated. Additionally, all students demonstrated significantly more positive attitudes towards interprofessional teams during the post-assessment. PMID:26890065

  5. How health behaviors relate to academic performance via affect: an intensive longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Flueckiger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This intensive longitudinal study examined how sleep and physical activity relate to university students' affect and academic performance during a stressful examination period. METHODS: On 32 consecutive days, 72 first-year students answered online questionnaires on their sleep quality, physical activity, positive and negative affect, learning goal achievement, and examination grades. First-year university students are particularly well-suited to test our hypotheses: They represent a relatively homogeneous population in a natural, but controlled setting, and simultaneously deal with similar stressors, such as examinations. Data were analyzed using multilevel structural equation models. RESULTS: Over the examination period, better average sleep quality but not physical activity predicted better learning goal achievement. Better learning goal achievement was associated with increased probability of passing all examinations. Relations of average sleep quality and average physical activity with learning goal achievement were mediated by experienced positive affect. In terms of day-to-day dynamics, on days with better sleep quality, participants reported better learning goal achievement. Day-to-day physical activity was not related to daily learning goal achievement. Daily positive and negative affect both mediated the effect of day-to-day sleep quality and physical activity on daily learning goal achievement. CONCLUSION: Health behaviors such as sleep quality and physical activity seem important for both academic performance and affect experience, an indicator of mental health, during a stressful examination period. These results are a first step toward a better understanding of between- and within-person variations in health behaviors, affect, and academic performance, and could inform prevention and intervention programs for university students.

  6. Did They Sell Their Soul to the Devil? Some Comparative Case-Studies on Academic Entrepreneurs in the Life Sciences in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provasi, Giancarlo; Squazzoni, Flaminio; Tosio, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at eight comparative case-studies on academic entrepreneurs in life sciences conducted in Europe in 2008. The interviewees were selected from the KEINS database that lists all academic inventors from Italy, France, Sweden and the Netherlands who have one or more patent applications registered at the European Patent Office,…

  7. Roles of managers in academic health centers: strategies for the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kristina L

    2002-03-01

    This article addresses survival strategies of academic health centers (AHCs) in responding to market pressures and government reforms. Using six case studies of AHCs, the study links strategic changes in structure and management to managerial role performance. Utilizing Mintzberg's classification of work roles, the roles of liaison, monitor, entrepreneur, and resource allocator were found to be used by top-level managers as they implement strategies to enhance the viability of their AHCs. Based on these new roles, the study recommends improving management practices through education and training as well as changing organizational culture to support management decision making and foster the continued growth of managers and their AHCs.

  8. Testing a Model of the Relationship of Demographic, Affective, and Fitness Variables to Academic Achievement among Non-Science Majors at an Independent University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Andrew Martin

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of specific attributes of college students to their academic achievement at an independent university in central Florida. Academic achievement was measured as the numeric score on the final exam in a survey-of-science course (EDS 1032) required for non-science majors. Attribute sets included personological, affective, and fitness variables. A hypothesized diagram of the direct and indirect effects among these attributes relative to academic achievement was developed and tested using data collected Spring 2014 from 168 students in four sections of EDS 1032 at Florida Institute of Technology. Multiple regression results revealed that 19% of the variance in a students' academic achievement was due to the influence of these three sets of research factors; this was found to be statistically significant. The results of mediation analyses also indicated that three variables had significant direct effects on academic achievement, namely gender, number of academic credits, and sports motivation. In addition, gender had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via stress, and the number of academic credits had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via sports motivation. These findings indicated that female students scored roughly six points higher than male students on this final exam. Also, gender's influence on academic achievement was partially attributable to the student's level of stress (e.g., male students with high levels of stress had lower grades on this final exam than female students with the same level of stress). In addition, it was found that students taking more academic credits were likely to score higher on this final exam than those students taking fewer credits. Further, as students' level of sports amotivation increased, the strength of the relationship between the number of student academic credits and academic achievement decreased. These results support Self

  9. Improving Health with Science: Exploring Community-Driven Science Education in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Anne Emerson

    This study examines the role of place-based science education in fostering student-driven health interventions. While literature shows the need to connect science with students' place and community, there is limited understanding of strategies for doing so. Making such connections is important for underrepresented students who tend to perceive learning science in school as disconnected to their experiences out of school (Aikenhead, Calabrese-Barton, & Chinn, 2006). To better understand how students can learn to connect place and community with science and engineering practices in a village in Kenya, I worked with community leaders, teachers, and students to develop and study an education program (a school-based health club) with the goal of improving knowledge of health and sanitation in a Kenyan village. While students selected the health topics and problems they hoped to address through participating in the club, the topics were taught with a focus on providing opportunities for students to learn the practices of science and health applications of these practices. Students learned chemistry, physics, environmental science, and engineering to help them address the health problems they had identified in their community. Surveys, student artifacts, ethnographic field notes, and interview data from six months of field research were used to examine the following questions: (1) In what ways were learning opportunities planned for using science and engineering practices to improve community health? (2) In what ways did students apply science and engineering practices and knowledge learned from the health club in their school, homes, and community? and (3) What factors seemed to influence whether students applied or intended to apply what they learned in the health club? Drawing on place-based science education theory and community-engagement models of health, process and structural coding (Saldana, 2013) were used to determine patterns in students' applications of their

  10. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (padvantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. PMID:26296595

  11. Summary recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, The Computer-based Patient Record Institute, The Medical Library Association, The Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, The American Health Information Management Association, and The American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-11-01

    Clinical software systems are becoming ubiquitous. A growing literature documents how these systems can improve health care delivery, but concerns about patient safety must now be formally addressed. In 1996, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called for discussions on regulation of software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. These recommendations were revised and approved by the American Medical informatics Association Public Policy Committee and Board. Other organizations reviewed, modified, and approved the recommendations, and the Boards of Directors of most of the organizations in the consortium endorsed the guidelines. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risk and four classes of monitoring and regulatory action that can be applied on the basis of the risk level. The consortium recommends that most clinical software systems be supervised locally and that developers of health care information systems adopt a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively; therefore, the FDA should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on systems that pose high clinical risk and provide limited opportunity for competent human intervention. PMID:9382409

  12. Summary recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, The Computer-based Patient Record Institute, The Medical Library Association, The Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, The American Health Information Management Association, and The American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-11-01

    Clinical software systems are becoming ubiquitous. A growing literature documents how these systems can improve health care delivery, but concerns about patient safety must now be formally addressed. In 1996, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called for discussions on regulation of software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. These recommendations were revised and approved by the American Medical informatics Association Public Policy Committee and Board. Other organizations reviewed, modified, and approved the recommendations, and the Boards of Directors of most of the organizations in the consortium endorsed the guidelines. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risk and four classes of monitoring and regulatory action that can be applied on the basis of the risk level. The consortium recommends that most clinical software systems be supervised locally and that developers of health care information systems adopt a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively; therefore, the FDA should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on systems that pose high clinical risk and provide limited opportunity for competent human intervention.

  13. 76 FR 7574 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615...: Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERC) State of the...

  14. From access to success in science: An academic-student affairs intervention for undergraduate freshmen biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jacqueline Nouvelle

    The first year experience is known to present an array of challenges for traditional college students. In particular, freshmen who major in a STEM discipline have their own unique set of challenges when they transition from high school science and math to college science and math; especially chemistry. As a result, students may encounter negative experiences which lower academic and social confidence. This project was designed as a pilot study intervention for a small group of freshmen biology students who were considered academically at-risk due their math SAT scores. The study occurred during the fall semester involving an enhanced active learning component based on the Peer-led Team Learning (PLTL) general chemistry supplemental pedagogy model, and a biology-focused First Year Experience (FYE). PLTL workshops took place in freshmen residence halls, creating a live-n-learn community environment. Mid-term and final chemistry grades and final math grades were collected to measure academic progress. Self-reporting surveys and journals were used to encourage participants to reconstruct their experiences and perceptions of the study. Descriptive analysis was performed to measure statistical significance between midterm and final grade performance, and a general inductive qualitative method was used to determine academic and social confidence as well as experiences and perceptions of the project. Findings of this project revealed a statistically significant improvement between chemistry midterm and final grades of the sample participants. Although academic confidence did not increase, results reveal that social confidence progressed as the majority of students developed a value for studying in groups.

  15. The Influence of Protégé-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Physical sciences and engineering doctoral programs serve as the most important conduit through which future academics are trained and prepared in these disciplines. This study examined women doctoral students' protégé-mentor relationships in Physical sciences and engineering programs. Particularly, the study examined the influence of such relationships on this group of women's academic career aspirations. A qualitative approach and ethnographic traditions were utilized to explore women doct...

  16. Celebrating the Past by Expanding the Future : The Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University 1986–2006

    OpenAIRE

    Hammar, Mats; Bergdahl, Björn; Öhman, Lena

    2006-01-01

    During the fall of 2006, the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) celebrates its 20th birthday. Linköping has a long tradition of health education; our nursing programme started already in 1895 and occupational therapy began in 1965. From the late 1960’s, medical students from Uppsala spent their last seven semesters in Linköping, mainly for clinical studies. After some years, academic and teachers from the young faculty, together with the county council, realized the enormous potential benefits ...

  17. Bourdieu and Academic Capitalism: Faculty "Habitus" in Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    We present Bourdieu's notions of field, capital, "habitus," and strategy and how these concepts apply today in light of academic capitalism using an empirical study of faculty work in one specific field in engineering that exemplifies current tendencies brought by academic capitalism. We conclude with a discussion of practical implications.…

  18. Deviancy from the Norms of Science: The Effects of Anomie and Alienation in the Academic Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, John M.

    1993-01-01

    A study applying anomie theory to behavior of college faculty, especially as alienation from the academic reward system results in deviation from professional norms of communality, disinterestedness, universalism, and organized skepticism, is reported. Implications for use of norms as interpretive devices, ambivalence of academics toward norms,…

  19. Addressing the “Global Health Tax” and “Wild Cards”: Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young “expat” global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  20. 75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... explore opportunities to enhance NOAA's ongoing ocean health efforts and their impacts on ecosystem and... roles in addressing ocean health issues? (2) What are the right ocean health science questions, products and services for NOAA? (3) Are there additional ocean health science issues that should be included...

  1. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in adolescents, (2) how do they affect their school performances and (3) are they improved by a Health Promoting School intervention that applies a Whole School Approach? Firstly, it was studied how healt...

  2. Engaging Youth of Color in Applied Science Education and Public Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to…

  3. Genetics in population health science: strategies and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Daniel W; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-10-01

    Translational research is needed to leverage discoveries from the frontiers of genome science to improve public health. So far, public health researchers have largely ignored genetic discoveries, and geneticists have ignored important aspects of population health science. This mutual neglect should end. In this article, we discuss 3 areas where public health researchers can help to advance translation: (1) risk assessment: investigate genetic profiles as components in composite risk assessments; (2) targeted intervention: conduct life-course longitudinal studies to understand when genetic risks manifest in development and whether intervention during sensitive periods can have lasting effects; and (3) improved understanding of environmental causation: collaborate with geneticists on gene-environment interaction research. We illustrate with examples from our own research on obesity and smoking.

  4. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  5. Uma nova disciplina: o direito sanitário A new (Brazilian academic discipline: health law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Gandolfi Dallari

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available A reivindicação da saúde como direito tem levado o Estado a assumir responsabilidades crescentes pela promoção, proteção e recuperação da saúde do povo. A atuação do Estado contemporâneo - de Direito - é orientada por normas jurídicas. O conhecimento das normas que regulam a ação estatal no campo da saúde é indispensável ao sanitarista, profissional designado pela sociedade para trabalhar especificamente pela elevação de seu nível de saúde. Nessa linha, foram analisadas experiências estrangeiras com o ensino do direito sanitário, juntamente com as recomendações dos organismos internacionais de saúde. Conclui-se que a implementação do ensino do direito sanitário, no Brasil, é urgente.The demand for health seen as the citizen's right, has led the State to accept increasing responsabilities regarding the health of the people, as evidenced by policies of health promotion, protection and recovery. The activity of a modern State ("State of law" is exercised according to juridical principles. It is highly advisable, therefail, that health workers-those professionals that society has appointed to work on its behalf for the raising of its health levels should have knowledge of the rules which guide the State's performance in the health area. Thus, foreign experiences in teaching health law as well as the recommendations of International Health Agencies, analysed in this paper, lead us to conclude that the teaching of health law is a must among the Brazilian academic priorities.

  6. Microfluidics: an emerging technology for food and health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gisela; Lee, Abraham P

    2010-03-01

    Microfluidics is an emerging technology with the potential to streamline workflows and processes in the food and health sciences. Because of extreme miniaturization, less reagent consumption and more efficient sample-to-answer protocols are not only attainable but in many cases demonstrated. In this article, we present some key examples of relevant research at the Micro/Nano Fluidics Fundamentals Focus (MF3) Center that has direct applications in food, environmental, and physiological health monitoring.

  7. The ergonomics/human factors approach to health sciences libraries.

    OpenAIRE

    Bube, J L

    1985-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals scant information on the application of ergonomics to health sciences libraries. Ergonomics research has identified and validated many genuine health hazards in business offices and industrial settings. While appearing innocuous, the library environment is affected by these hazards. As sophisticated technology and machinery are introduced into libraries, the human factors must be considered. This paper examines the hazards of the library environment as ident...

  8. Conceptualising collaboration in context: an exploration of the collaborative experiences of academics in health and social care

    OpenAIRE

    Kniveton, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains the findings of a qualitative research project that addressed the question ‘why collaborate? Focus was on the experiences of academics in health and social care collaborating to develop interprofessional and interdisciplinary initiatives, including interprofessional education (IPE). The project was based upon the premise, first, that academics need to collaborate effectively if interprofessional initiatives like IPE are to develop and be sustained and secondly, that...

  9. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in adol

  10. A grounded theory study on the academic success of undergraduate women in science, engineering, and mathematics fields at a private, research university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroch, Amber Michelle

    2011-12-01

    This grounded theory study revealed the common factors of backgrounds, strategies, and motivators in academically successful undergraduate women in science, engineering, and mathematics (SEM) fields at a private, research university in the West. Data from interviews with 15 women with 3.25 or better grade point averages indicated that current academic achievement in their college SEM fields can be attributed to previous academic success, self awareness, time management and organizational skills, and maintaining a strong support network. Participants were motivated by an internal drive to academically succeed and attend graduate school. Recommendations are provided for professors, advisors, and student affairs professionals.

  11. What do clinicians want? Interest in integrative health services at a North Carolina academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eadie Dee

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. Methods We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006. The survey contained questions on referrals and recommendations in the past year and interest in therapies or services if they were to be provided at the medical center in the future. Results Responses were received from 173 clinicians in 26 different departments, programs and centers. There was strong interest in offering several specific therapies: therapeutic exercise (77%, expert consultation about herbs and dietary supplements (69%, and massage (66%; there was even stronger interest in offering comprehensive treatment programs such as multidisciplinary pain management (84%, comprehensive nutritional assessment and advice (84%, obesity/healthy lifestyle promotion (80%, fit for life (exercise and lifestyle program, 76%, diabetes healthy lifestyle promotion (73%; and comprehensive psychological services for stress management, including hypnosis and biofeedback (73%. Conclusion There is strong interest among medical staff at an academic health center in comprehensive, integrated services for pain, obesity, and diabetes and in specific services in fitness, nutrition and stress management. Future studies will need to assess the cost-effectiveness of such services, as well as their financial sustainability and impact on patient satisfaction, health and quality of life.

  12. [A methodological approach to assessing the quality of medical health information on its way from science to the mass media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serong, Julia; Anhäuser, Marcus; Wormer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    A current research project deals with the question of how the quality of medical health information changes on its way from the academic journal via press releases to the news media. In an exploratory study a sample of 30 news items has been selected stage-by-stage from an adjusted total sample of 1,695 journalistic news items on medical research in 2013. Using a multidimensional set of criteria the news items as well as the corresponding academic articles, abstracts and press releases are examined by science journalists and medical experts. Together with a content analysis of the expert assessments, it will be verified to what extent established quality standards for medical journalism can be applied to medical health communication and public relations or even to studies and abstracts as well. PMID:26028455

  13. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  14. Leadership in academic health centers in the US: a review of the role and some recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    The leadership of the US's most complex academic health centers (AHCs)/medical centers requires individuals who possess a high level of clinical, organizational, managerial, and interpersonal skills. This paper first outlines the major attributes desired in a dean/vice president of health affairs before then summarizing the educational opportunities now generally available to train for such leadership and management roles. For the most part, the masters in health administration (MHA), the traditional MBA, and the numerous alternatives primarily available at universities are considered far too general and too lacking in emotional intelligence tutoring to be particularly relevant for those who aspire to these most senior leadership positions. More appropriate educational options for these roles are discussed: (a) the in-house leadership and management programs now underway at some AHCs for those selected early on in their career for future executive-type roles as well as for those who are appointed later on to a chair, directorship or similar position; and (b) a more controversial approach of potentially establishing at one or a few universities, a mid-career, professional program (a maximum of 12 months and therefore, being completed in less time than an MBA) leading to a masters degree in academic health center administration (MHCA) for those who aspire to fill a senior AHC leadership position. The proposed curriculum as outlined herein might be along the lines of some carefully designed masters level on-line, self-teaching modules for the more technical subjects, yet vigorously emphasizing integrate-type courses focused on enhancing personal and professional team building and leadership skills. PMID:25595014

  15. Leadership in academic health centers in the US: a review of the role and some recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    The leadership of the US's most complex academic health centers (AHCs)/medical centers requires individuals who possess a high level of clinical, organizational, managerial, and interpersonal skills. This paper first outlines the major attributes desired in a dean/vice president of health affairs before then summarizing the educational opportunities now generally available to train for such leadership and management roles. For the most part, the masters in health administration (MHA), the traditional MBA, and the numerous alternatives primarily available at universities are considered far too general and too lacking in emotional intelligence tutoring to be particularly relevant for those who aspire to these most senior leadership positions. More appropriate educational options for these roles are discussed: (a) the in-house leadership and management programs now underway at some AHCs for those selected early on in their career for future executive-type roles as well as for those who are appointed later on to a chair, directorship or similar position; and (b) a more controversial approach of potentially establishing at one or a few universities, a mid-career, professional program (a maximum of 12 months and therefore, being completed in less time than an MBA) leading to a masters degree in academic health center administration (MHCA) for those who aspire to fill a senior AHC leadership position. The proposed curriculum as outlined herein might be along the lines of some carefully designed masters level on-line, self-teaching modules for the more technical subjects, yet vigorously emphasizing integrate-type courses focused on enhancing personal and professional team building and leadership skills.

  16. Physical and mental health, substance abuse and preventive behaviour: disparities between Central/Eastern versus Western European first-year university students in social sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Ion; Bucki, Barbara; Baumann, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Students at many European universities are in poor health and have unhealthy lifestyles. This study assessed and compared physical and mental health, substance use and preventive behaviour among Polish and Romanian students versus students from France, a longer-standing member of the European Union. Methods: Four months after the beginning of the academic year, 934 French (Metz), 480 Polish (Katowice), and 195 Romanian (Iasi) first-year students of human and social sciences vol...

  17. The potential conflict between policy and ethics in caring for undocumented immigrants at academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacari Stone, Lisa; Steimel, Leah; Vasquez-Guzman, Estela; Kaufman, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are at the forefront of delivering care to the diverse medically underserved and uninsured populations in the United States, as well as training the majority of the health care workforce, who are professionally obligated to serve all patients regardless of race or immigration status. Despite AHCs' central leadership role in these endeavors, few consolidated efforts have emerged to resolve potential conflicts between national, state, and local policies that exclude certain classifications of immigrants from receiving federal public assistance and health professionals' social missions and ethical oath to serve humanity. For instance, whereas the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides a pathway to insurance coverage for more than 30 million Americans, undocumented immigrants and legally documented immigrants residing in the United States for less than five years are ineligible for Medicaid and excluded from purchasing any type of coverage through state exchanges. To inform this debate, the authors describe their experience at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) and discuss how the UNMH has responded to this challenge and overcome barriers. They offer three recommendations for aligning AHCs' social missions and professional ethics with organizational policies: (1) that AHCs determine eligibility for financial assistance based on residency rather than citizenship, (2) that models of medical education and health professions training provide students with service-learning opportunities and applied community experience, and (3) that frontline staff and health care professionals receive standardized training on eligibility policies to minimize discrimination towards immigrant patients. PMID:24556759

  18. The Analysis of Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Academic Achievement in Medical Students of Basic Sciences Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghaffari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Learning style is an individual’s preferred method of encountering information in specific situations in order to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes through study or experience. Students and Planers’ awareness of learning styles facilitate the teaching process, increases satisfaction and makes the future choices easier. This study aimed to examine different learning styles and their relation to academic achievement in medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive – analytical study, the sample consisted of all medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2012. The data was collected through a questionnaire which included respondents’ demographic information and overall grade point average (GPA as well as Kolb standard questions on learning styles. Results: 4.3%, 47.8%, 44.9% and 2.9% of students preferred diverger, assimilator, converger and accommodator learning styles, respectively. Mean overall GPA of students who preferred diverger learning styles was 14.990.39±. Students who prefer assimilator, converger and accommodator learning styles had mean overall GPAs of 14.940.56±, 15.080.58± and 14.830.29± respectively. The findings showed no significant relationship between students’ learning academic achievement and their learning styles (p = 0.689. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between Students’ academic achievement and their learning styles. Furthermore, the majorit of the students preferred accommodator and converger learning styles. Consequently, adopting interactive teaching methods, using tutorials, running simulation programs, launching laboratory activities and encouraging students to think and analyze problems and issues can be greatly effective in prolonging their learning lifecycle.

  19. Faculty Perceptions of Critical Thinking at a Health Sciences University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Joie; Morgan, Christine; Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The fostering of critical thinking skills has become an expectation of faculty, especially those teaching in the health sciences. The manner in which critical thinking is defined by faculty impacts how they will address the challenge to promote critical thinking among their students. This study reports the perceptions of critical thinking held by…

  20. Integrating health sciences library resources into course management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; Inman, Megan B

    2014-01-01

    As distance education and blended learning grows, so does the need for health sciences librarians to become involved with course management systems. This article will provide some information on how to become involved with course management systems and will also provide information on a few of the more popular systems available.

  1. Changes in Information Delivery Since 1960 in Health Science Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Louise

    1974-01-01

    An overview of information needs and services in the health sciences since 1960, with emphasis on the services of the National Library of Medicine and some other recent government-funded systems for information dissemination. Includes an extensive list of references. (LS)

  2. Qualitative Research in PBL in Health Sciences Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Qualitative methodologies are relatively new in health sciences education research, especially in the area of problem-based learning (PBL). A key advantage of qualitative approaches is the ability to gain in-depth, textured insights into educational phenomena. Key methodological issues arise, however, in terms of the strategies of…

  3. West Virginia University's Health Sciences and Technology Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Ann; Dooley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the Health Sciences and Technology Academy, an outreach and engagement program by West Virginia University to encourage higher education faculty members and administrators, public school teachers, and community leaders to assume the responsibility of mentoring high school students. The primary goal is to increase the college…

  4. Science for Health Literacy: It's Never Been so Important

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Marcus; Woods-Townsend, Kathryn; Griffiths, Janice; Christodoulou, Andri; Byrne, Jenny; Bay, Jacquie; Godfrey, Keith; Inskip, Hazel; Hanson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a project called "LifeLab," developed by researchers at the Education School, Faculty of Medicine and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Southampton (UK), to promote a science-oriented approach to health literacy among teenagers. The main purposes of "LifeLab" are: (1) to improve…

  5. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  6. GIS: A Spatial Turn in the Health Science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Ejstrud, Bo; Troelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years health science seems to have taken a “spatial turn” with a renewed interest in spatially oriented research. There are a number of reasons behind this rediscovery of “the power of maps”. One of the predominant drivers has been the development of Geographical Information Systems (GI...

  7. A comparison of online versus face-to-face teaching delivery in statistics instruction for undergraduate health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fletcher; Lemonde, Manon

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess if online teaching delivery produces comparable student test performance as the traditional face-to-face approach irrespective of academic aptitude. This study involves a quasi-experimental comparison of student performance in an undergraduate health science statistics course partitioned in two ways. The first partition involves one group of students taught with a traditional face-to-face classroom approach and the other through a completely online instructional approach. The second partition of the subjects categorized the academic aptitude of the students into groups of higher and lower academically performing based on their assignment grades during the course. Controls that were placed on the study to reduce the possibility of confounding variables were: the same instructor taught both groups covering the same subject information, using the same assessment methods and delivered over the same period of time. The results of this study indicate that online teaching delivery is as effective as a traditional face-to-face approach in terms of producing comparable student test performance but only if the student is academically higher performing. For academically lower performing students, the online delivery method produced significantly poorer student test results compared to those lower performing students taught in a traditional face-to-face environment.

  8. Perceptions on the importance of gerontological education by teachers and students of undergraduate health sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Muñoz Elsa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main challenge of higher education institutions throughout the world is to develop professionals capable of understanding and responding to the current social priorities of our countries. Given the utmost importance of addressing the complex needs of an increasingly elderly population in Mexico, the National Autonomous University of Mexico has systematically incorporated modules dealing with primary gerontological health care into several of its undergraduate programs in health sciences. The objective of this study was to analyze teacher's and student's perceptions about the current educational practices on gerontology. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 26 teachers and 122 undergraduate students. Subjects were administered interviews and responded survey instrument. Results A vast proportion of the teachers (42% reported students' attitudes towards their academic training as the most important factor affecting learning in the field of gerontology, whereas students reported that the main problems of education in gerontology were theoretical (32% and methodological (28%. In addition, 41% of students considered education on ageing matters as an essential element for their professional development, as compared to 19% of teachers (p Conclusion Our findings suggest that the teachers' perceptions about the low importance of education on ageing matters for the professional practice of health sciences could be a negative factor for gerontology teaching.

  9. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. PMID:22863210

  10. Science to support aquatic animal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Harris, M. Camille

    2016-10-18

    Healthy aquatic ecosystems are home to a diversity of plants, invertebrates, fish and wildlife. Aquatic animal populations face unprecedented threats to their health and survival from climate change, water shortages, habitat alteration, invasive species and environmental contaminants. These environmental stressors can directly impact the prevalence and severity of disease in aquatic populations. For example, periodic fish kills in the upper Chesapeake Bay Watershed are associated with many different opportunistic pathogens that proliferate in stressed fish populations. An estimated 80 percent of endangered juvenile Puget Sound steelhead trout die within two weeks of entering the marine environment, and a role for disease in these losses is being investigated. The introduction of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) into the Great Lakes—a fishery worth an estimated 7 billion dollars annually—resulted in widespread fish die-offs and virus detections in 28 different fish species. Millions of dying sea stars along the west coast of North America have led to investigations into sea star wasting disease. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are assisting managers with these issues through ecological investigations of aquatic animal diseases, field surveillance, and research to promote the development of mitigation strategies.

  11. Science at Sea: Meeting Future Oceanographic Goals with a Robust Academic Research Fleet

    OpenAIRE

    Fleet, COEOTNOR; Board, OS; Studies, DOEAL; Council, NR

    2009-01-01

    Meeting Future Oceanographic Goals with a Robust Academic Research Fleet Committee on Evolution of the National Oceanographic Research Fleet, Ocean Studies Board, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council ...

  12. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colf, Leremy A; Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  13. 78 FR 39739 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: July 24-26, 2013... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709,...

  14. 75 FR 41506 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box...

  15. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park,...

  16. 77 FR 37423 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis..., Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O....

  17. 76 FR 62080 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: November 9, 2011...'l Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park,...

  18. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170...

  19. 76 FR 7572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice..., Director, Division of Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919)...

  20. 76 FR 13650 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919)...

  1. 75 FR 3474 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The...: Discussion of program policies and issues. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building...

  2. 75 FR 78719 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch, P.O. Box 12233 MD...

  3. 77 FR 4572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box...

  4. 75 FR 68367 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park,...

  5. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch, P.O. Box 12233 MD...

  6. 76 FR 63311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis...-Tilotta, PhD, Scientific Review Administrator, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office...

  7. 78 FR 8156 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709,...

  8. 75 FR 32797 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD...

  9. 77 FR 74198 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. The... program policies and issues. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101,...

  10. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Research and Training, Nat. Institute Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30,...

  11. 77 FR 43849 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: August 22-23... Training, Nat'l Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30, Research...

  12. 78 FR 51734 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 76 FR 7225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC..., National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park,...

  14. 75 FR 61765 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. ] Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch, P.O....

  15. 76 FR 21387 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170...

  16. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis.... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3171, Research Triangle Park,...

  17. 75 FR 41505 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: August 10-12... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Conference Rooms...

  18. 76 FR 58521 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Environmental Health Science, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919)...

  19. 78 FR 27410 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences;...

  20. 78 FR 14562 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Program Operations, Scientific Review Branch, P.O. Box 12233,...