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Sample records for academic english language

  1. Assessing Academic Language of English Language Learners. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jeff; Rhodes, Nancy

    A project to identify alternative strategies for assessing the academic language of English language learners is reported. First, literature on the concept of academic language is reviewed, and then findings from classroom research are used to propose an alternative conceptualization of academic language, one which focuses on the role of stylistic…

  2. The Challenge for Non-First-Language-English Academic Publishing in English Language Research Outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Vince; Straesser, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a reflective critique of practice within the field of mathematics education in relation to the challenges faced by non-first-language-English speaking academics when they attempt to publish in English language research outlets. Data for this study are drawn from communications between a German and an Australian academic as the…

  3. The Influence of Classroom Drama on English Learners' Academic Language Use during English Language Arts Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Loughlin, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher and student academic discourse was examined in an urban arts-integrated school to better understand facilitation of students' English language learning. Participants' discourse was compared across English language arts (ELA) lessons with and without classroom drama in a third-grade classroom of English learning (EL) students (N = 18) with…

  4. 75 FR 13751 - Office of English Language Acquisition; Overview Information; Language Enhancement, and Academic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of English Language Acquisition; Overview Information; Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Foreign Language Assistance... improving foreign language learning in the State. Priorities: This notice involves two competitive...

  5. Building English Language Learners' Academic Vocabulary: Strategies and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibold, Claire

    2011-01-01

    According to Beck, McKeown, and Kucan's Three Tier Model (2002), when it comes to language instruction the distinction between academic vocabulary words and content specific words has a significant bearing on the language success of English language learners (ELLs). In this article, the author describes strategies that give teachers and parents…

  6. After exit: Academic achievement patterns of former English language learners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester J. de Jong

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available With few exceptions, accountability systems for programs for English language learners (ELLs have focused on the achievement patterns of ELLs who are still considered “limited English proficient” and program evaluations have been unable to answer the question whether ELLs actually catch up with English proficient peers after attending a bilingual or English as a Second Language (ESL program. Disaggregating data for former ELLs can therefore provide important information for long-term district and program accountability. The study was concerned with the achievement patterns in English language arts, Math, and Science of former ELLs who attended a bilingual and a English as a Second Language (ESL program. It also explored whether length of program participation and grade level exited played a significant role in predicting academic achievement patterns for these exited students. Results indicate that 4th grade students more closely paralleled non- ELL students’ achievement patterns than 8th grade students, particularly for the BE students. While length of program participation is not a significant predictor of former ELLs’ academic success, exit grade does emerge as an important variable to take into consideration in setting exit guidelines.

  7. Helping ELLs Meet Standards in English Language Arts and Science: An Intervention Focused on Academic Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Diane; Artzi, Lauren; Barr, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards require students to understand and produce academic language that appears in informational text. Vocabulary is a critical domain of academic language, but English language learners (ELLs) come to the English Language Arts classroom with more limited English vocabulary than…

  8. Academic Language Knowledge and Comprehension of Science Text for English Language Learners and Fluent English-Speaking Students

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    As an initial step toward understanding which features of academic language make science-based expository text difficult for students with different English language proficiency (ELP) designations, this study investigated fifth-grade students' thoughts on text difficulty, their knowledge of the features of academic language, and the relationship between academic language and reading comprehension. Forty-five fifth-grade students participated in the study; 18 students were classified as Engli...

  9. Effects of Academic and Non-Academic Instructional Approaches on Preschool English Language Learners' Classroom Engagement and English Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    This research compared the relative impact of different preschool activities on the development of bilingual students' English-language skills. The study investigated whether bilingual preschool children would engage more, and use more of their second language (English), during free-play (non-academic) versus teacher-structured (academic)…

  10. English academic language skills: Perceived difficulties by undergraduate and graduate students, and their academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Berman

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An EAP needs survey conducted at a major Canadian university among first-year Bachelor's- and Master's-level students reveals that native speakers (NS and non-native speakers (NNS of English perceive that the language skills that are necessary for academic study are of different levels of difficulty. Furthermore, English language difficulties appear to negatively affect the academic achievement of NNS graduate students as compared to their NS peers. However, such difficulties, although acknowledged to exist by NNS undergraduates, do not appear to affect their academic performance as compared with that of their NS counterparts.

  11. The Relationship between Mathematics and Language: Academic Implications for Children with Specific Language Impairment and English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Arizmendi, Genesis D.; Beal, Carole R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined the relationship between mathematics and language to better understand the nature of the deficit and the academic implications associated with specific language impairment (SLI) and academic implications for English language learners (ELLs). Method: School-age children (N = 61; 20 SLI, 20 ELL, 21 native…

  12. The Academic English Language Needs of Industrial Design Students in UiTM Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzmi, Nor Aslah; Bidin, Samsiah; Ibrahim, Syazliyati; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the academic English language lacks and needs of Industrial Design students in Universiti Teknologi MARA Kedah (UiTM). It highlights the lacks and needs for English for Academic Purposes in helping the students to succeed in the program through the usage of English language. The research tools used were in…

  13. A Study of English Language Learning Beliefs, Strategies, and English Academic Achievement of the ESP Students of STIENAS Samarinda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Noor

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate; students' English academic achievement, beliefs about English language learning, English language learning strategies, and the relationship of them. Descriptive and correlational design, quantitative methods were applied in this research. The students' final English scores of the first year, BALLI, and SILL were…

  14. Academic Language Knowledge and Comprehension of Science Text for English Language Learners and Fluent English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sandy Ming-San

    As an initial step toward understanding which features of academic language make science-based expository text difficult for students with different English language proficiency (ELP) designations, this study investigated fifth-grade students' thoughts on text difficulty, their knowledge of the features of academic language, and the relationship between academic language and reading comprehension. Forty-five fifth-grade students participated in the study; 18 students were classified as English language learners (ELLs) and 27 students were fluent-English speakers. Participants read two science passages, answered comprehension questions, and engaged in a retrospective interview which probed their knowledge on the academic language features of vocabulary, grammar, and discourse. Qualitative analysis was used to code students' thoughts about the challenges to reading comprehension and to identify the challenges that were related to academic language. Quantitative analyses were conducted to examine whether students' knowledge of academic language features and reading comprehension differed by students' ELP designations, as well as to investigate the relationship between students' knowledge of academic language features and reading comprehension. Results for the qualitative analysis revealed that students found difficult vocabulary, reading abilities, and prior knowledge as the greatest challenges to comprehending the science passages. Results from the quantitative analyses indicated that ELL students' knowledge of academic vocabulary, grammar, discourse knowledge, and reading comprehension (as measured by multiple-choice questions) were significantly lower than the fluent-English speaking students. The results also indicated that vocabulary, not grammar or discourse features, was significantly related to students' comprehension scores. The results have implications for understanding the features of academic language that influence students' comprehension of expository

  15. English Language Teaching and the Promotion of Academic Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrington Ntombela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutions of higher learning carry a burden of inculcating a culture of academic ethical behaviour among students as part of their responsibility to produce citizens of high calibre. In fact, this burden is more expedient and pronounced because of aberrant behaviours such as cheating that can affect institutions’ credibility.   This paper therefore looks into potentially the prevalent attitude towards cheating among students in a University College in Oman. The research is carried out qualitatively through video recording a testing session and through unstructured interviews in order to gather evidence of cheating and to establish reasons why students cheat. Most importantly, it seeks to address this attitude by advocating the role that English Language Teaching (ELT plays in dealing with this problem. The main reasonbehind cheating, which seems to reflect the prevailing socio-cultural dimension, is highlighted and measures to address the attitude are put forward.

  16. English Language Teacher Education in Turkey: Policy vs Academic Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingappa, Laura J.; Polat, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines curriculum frameworks in English language teacher education (ELTE) programs in Turkey in light of current second language (L2) teaching standards and research vs Turkey's Higher Education Council (HEC) mandates. It also investigates program directors' perceptions about the current situations of their programs with…

  17. The Cognitive Coaching-Supported Reflective Teaching Approach in English Language Teaching: Academic and Permanence Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyildiz, Seçil Tümen; Semerci, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the cognitive coaching-supported reflective teaching approach in English language teaching on the academic success of students and on the permanence of success. It was conducted during the spring semester of 2013/2014 academic year at the School of Foreign Languages, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey.…

  18. Enhancing Academic Instruction for Adolescent English Language Learners with or at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haager, Diane; Osipova, Anna V.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of children worldwide attend schools where the language of instruction does not match their native language, presenting significant challenges with learning the content and vocabulary of academic content areas (e.g., social studies, science). In the U.S., these students are designated as English language learners…

  19. The Relationship between the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Scores and Academic Success of International Master's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcuino, Cathy Lee T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are related to academic success defined by final cumulative grade point average (GPA). The data sample, from three Midwestern universities, was comprised of international graduate students who…

  20. The relationship between mathematics and language: academic implications for children with specific language impairment and English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Arizmendi, Genesis D; Beal, Carole R

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined the relationship between mathematics and language to better understand the nature of the deficit and the academic implications associated with specific language impairment (SLI) and academic implications for English language learners (ELLs). School-age children (N = 61; 20 SLI, 20 ELL, 21 native monolingual English [NE]) were assessed using a norm-referenced mathematics instrument and 3 experimental computer-based mathematics games that varied in language demands. Group means were compared with analyses of variance. The ELL group was less accurate than the NE group only when tasks were language heavy. In contrast, the group with SLI was less accurate than the groups with NE and ELLs on language-heavy tasks and some language-light tasks. Specifically, the group with SLI was less accurate on tasks that involved comparing numerical symbols and using visual working memory for patterns. However, there were no group differences between children with SLI and peers without SLI on language-light mathematics tasks that involved visual working memory for numerical symbols. Mathematical difficulties of children who are ELLs appear to be related to the language demands of mathematics tasks. In contrast, children with SLI appear to have difficulty with mathematics tasks because of linguistic as well as nonlinguistic processing constraints.

  1. ELF in English language teaching: Researching attitudes of Serbian academic community

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    Ošmjanski Vera B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the empirical part of the research was to explore the attitude of the Serbian academic community towards the English language used as lingua franca (ELF, i.e. neutral variety of the English language. The results might be a starting point in considering whether to include ELF in the language policy and, consequently, into English curricula in Serbia. The research included members of Serbian academic community, students of different departments, and English language teachers in the state owned and privately owned universities in Belgrade, Novi Sad and Nis. After examining their attitudes towards key postulates of ELF the conclusions are that it is necessary to start discussions about the concepts of the variety and to reassess current deeply rooted ideas about the English language from the perspective of modern linguistic trends. The need for a more liberal approach to the variety is not generated only in the needs of the market, i.e. those people to whom English is a practical means of international communication, but also the need to adjust ELT (English Language Teaching to modern linguistic tendencies and the European Council recommendations.

  2. English Language Immersion and Students' Academic Achievement in English, Chinese and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liying; Li, Miao; Kirby, John R.; Qiang, Haiyan; Wade-Woolley, Lesly

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that second language immersion is an effective means of facilitating primary school students' second language without undermining competence in their first language. Despite the rapid growth of English immersion (EI) programmes in China, only limited empirical research has been conducted to evaluate students' academic…

  3. The English proficiency and academic language skills of Australian bilingual children during the primary school years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennaoui, Kamelia; Nicholls, Ruth Jane; O'Connor, Meredith; Tarasuik, Joanne; Kvalsvig, Amanda; Goldfeld, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests that early proficiency in the language of school instruction is an important predictor of academic success for bilingual children. This study investigated whether English-proficiency at 4-5 years of age predicts academic language and literacy skills among Australian bilingual children at 10-11 years of age, as part of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children ( LSAC, 2012 ). The LSAC comprises a nationally representative clustered cross-sequential sample of Australian children. Data were analysed from a sub-sample of 129 bilingual children from the LSAC Kindergarten cohort (n = 4983), for whom teachers completed the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) checklist (a population measure of early childhood development) and the Academic Rating Scale (ARS) language and literacy subscale. Linear regression analyses revealed that bilingual children who commenced school with stronger English proficiency had higher academic language and literacy scores at the end of primary school (β = 0.45). English proficiency remained a significant predictor, even when accounting for gender and socio-economic disadvantage (β = 0.38). The findings indicate that bilingual children who begin school without English proficiency are at risk of difficulties with academic language and literacy, even after 6 years of schooling. Risk factors need to be identified so early support can be targeted towards the most vulnerable children.

  4. The Relationship between English Language Proficiency, Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem of Non-Native-English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Smitha; Qiqieh, Sura

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to find out the relationship between English Language proficiency, self-esteem, and academic achievement of the students in Abu Dhabi University (ADU). The variables were analyzed using "t" test, chi-squire and Pearson's product moment correlation. In addition, Self-rating scale, Self-esteem inventory and Language…

  5. Evaluating an academic writing program for nursing students who have English as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing skills are essential to the successful completion of preregistration nursing programs, yet the development of such skills is a challenge for many nursing students, particularly those who speak English as a second language (ESL). It is vital to develop and evaluate strategies that can support academic writing skills for ESL nursing students. This qualitative study evaluated a four-day academic writing intervention strategy designed to support ESL first-year nursing students. Data from the program showed two major areas of difficulty for participants relating to academic writing: problems understanding course content in English, and problems expressing their understanding of that content in English. The participants noted a key benefit of this program was the provision of individual feedback. Programs such as this intervention successfully meet the demands of ESL nursing students, although ongoing support is also needed.

  6. The Effects of English/Language Arts Academic Vocabulary Alignment on Elementary Student Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Stacey Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide professional development in vocabulary instructional practices and analyze the impact on student achievement. This quasi-experimental study utilized the PLC to curriculum map English/Language Arts state academic vocabulary words in K-4 into each of the four nine-weeks. The first through fourth grade…

  7. Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) Academics' Perceptions about Research in a Transitional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China and across the world. However, Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language academics' research output has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This case study…

  8. A Bourdieuian Analysis: Teachers' Beliefs about English Language Learners' Academic Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2014-01-01

    Using Pierre Bourdieu's concept of "habitus," this work analyzes five teachers' beliefs about English language learners' academic challenges. In reference to reproductive and inventive qualities of "habitus," this article argues that teachers' beliefs that are linked to their socio-cultural backgrounds can delimit or enhance…

  9. Embedded academic writing support for nursing students with English as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Koch, Jane; Weaver, Roslyn; Everett, Bronwyn; Jackson, Debra

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports a study which evaluated a brief, embedded academic support workshop as a strategy for improving academic writing skills in first-year nursing students with low-to-medium English language proficiency. Nursing students who speak English as a second language have lower academic success compared with their native English-speaking counterparts. The development of academic writing skills is known to be most effective when embedded into discipline-specific curricula. Using a randomized controlled design, in 2008 106 students pre-enrolled in an introductory bioscience subject were randomized to receive either the intervention, a 4-day embedded academic learning support workshop facilitated by two bioscience (content) nursing academics and a writing and editing professional, or to act as the control group. The primary focus of the workshop was to support students to work through a mock assignment by providing progressive feedback and written suggestions on how to improve their answers. Of the 59 students randomized to the intervention, only 28 attended the workshop. Bioscience assignment results were analysed for those who attended (attendees), those randomized to the intervention but who did not attend (non-attendees), and the control group. Using anova, the results indicated that attendees achieved statistically significantly higher mean scores (70.8, sd: 6.1) compared to both control group (58.4, sd: 3.4, P = 0.002) and non-attendees (48.5, sd: 5.5, P = 0.001). A brief, intensive, embedded academic support workshop was effective in improving the academic writing ability of nursing students with low-to-medium English language proficiency, although reaching all students who are likely to benefit from this intervention remains a challenge.

  10. An academic writing needs assessment of English-as-a-second-language clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Fen; Bakken, Lori L

    2004-01-01

    Academic writing for publication is competitive and demanding for researchers. For the novice English-as-a-second-language (ESL) researcher, the pressure to publish compounds the difficulties of mastering the English language. Very few studies have used ESL graduate and post-graduate students as academic writing research subjects. The purpose of this project was to assess the learning needs of ESL clinical investigators regarding academic writing for English scholarly publication. A qualitative evaluation approach was used to examine the gap between the current and desired proficiency level for the academic writing of ESL clinical investigators. We considered the perspectives of seven ESL clinical investigators plus three mentors and three writing instructors. Semi-structured questions were asked. Field notes were organized using a field-work recording system. They were analyzed using the constant comparative method. ESL clinical investigators do not accurately perceive their writing deficiencies. They have little knowledge of criteria for academic writing and they are influenced by their prior English learning experiences in their home culture, which engender passive attitudes toward seeking appropriate writing resources. Adequate time is especially needed to develop successful writing skills. Four basic steps are recommended to guide program planners in developing ESL writing activities for professional learning: (1) recognize discrepancies, (2) establish clear standards and performance criteria for scholarly writing, (3) develop individual plans, and (4) organize long-term writing assistance.

  11. English as a World Language in Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Bilal; Bada, Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Language is a phenomenon which can hardly be viewed separate from its very inherent component, culture. This component does by all means play a significant role in enabling the language to gain a global status. No doubt, some prominent issues do contribute to this process: political, economic, and military supremacy, to name but a few. This study…

  12. An academic English language intervention for first year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A history of segregation, inequality and inappropriate decisions regarding language policy in the South African education system could be blamed in part for the low language proficiency levels displayed by students who enter university education for the first time (Weideman & Van Rensburg, 2002). As a result, the ...

  13. English Language Proficiency Tests and Academic Achievement: A Study on the Malaysian University English Test as a Predictor of Technical Programme Undergraduates Academic Achievement

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    Nurhazlini Rahmat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Malaysian education system, English has always played an important role. In acknowledging its importance, Malaysian University English Test (MUET has been introduced to enable continued emphasis on this role.  MUET has been made compulsory for those who wish to pursue a first degree programme in local universities. This study aims to examine the relationship between English language proficiency test (as measured by MUET bands to predict the undergraduates academic achievement (as measured by Cumulative Grade Point Average score. It also aims to determine the recommended MUET band as an entry requirement for prospective technical programme undergraduates in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM. The study was carried out among 225 final year undergraduates of five different faculties in UPM, namely Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, and Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.  The data used were obtained by administering a brief questionnaire and were quantitatively analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 19.  The study revealed that there is a medium positive correlation between English language proficiency and academic achievement where students who have scored higher bands for MUET are the ones who obtained higher CGPA in their study. Based on the findings, it is recommended that UPM and other local universities make changes towards the minimum MUET entry requirement to help prospective undergraduates excel in their academic study. Keywords: English language proficiency, academic achievement, technical programme, MUET, CGPA

  14. Academic performance of English first and second-language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this retrospective analysis of 140 third-year Psychology students, their academic performance was analysed in relation to their performance in the previous two years and, in particular, on a tutorial-based foundation programme in the first semester of their first-year. The results indicate that performance in third-year is not ...

  15. English Language Teaching and the Promotion of Academic Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntombela, Berrington

    2011-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning carry a burden of inculcating a culture of academic ethical behaviour among students as part of their responsibility to produce citizens of high calibre. In fact, this burden is more expedient and pronounced because of aberrant behaviours such as cheating that can potentially affect institutions' credibility. This…

  16. English Language Teaching and the Promotion of Academic Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Berrington Ntombela

    2011-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning carry a burden of inculcating a culture of academic ethical behaviour among students as part of their responsibility to produce citizens of high calibre. In fact, this burden is more expedient and pronounced because of aberrant behaviours such as cheating that can affect institutions’ credibility.   This paper therefore looks into potentially the prevalent attitude towards cheating among students in a University College in Oman. The research is carried out qual...

  17. Academic Language, English Language Learners, and Systemic Functional Linguistics: Connecting Theory and Practice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Teacher educators need linguistic tools to help preservice teachers develop a deeper understanding of the academic language demands of the literacy practices required by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Systemic functional linguistics (SFL) serves as a tool for developing teachers' knowledge of content-area language. Teachers' increased…

  18. Comparative-Descriptive Study of Academic Vocabulary Specific Instruction on 3rd Grade English Language Learner Reading Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Language must be taught with academic vocabulary that is meaningful and that can be transferred between content and context. This comparative-descriptive research study examines how academic specific instruction increases students' learning of a second language acquisition (i.e., English). The conceptual framework of the study drew research…

  19. English Language Proficiency As An Indicator Of Academic Performance At A Tertiary Institution

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    D. F. Stephen

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to ascertain the impact of English language proficiency on academic success of first-year black and Indian students in human resources management at a tertiary institution. Students enrolled for the period between 1996 and 2002 were included in the study. Statistical tests of differences between means were conducted. Significantly, the Indian group exhibited superior English language proficiency levels, compared to their black counterparts. The hypothesis that English language proficiency is associated with academic success appears to be substantially correct. Opsomming Die doel van die ondersoek was om die impak van Engelse taalvaardigheid op akademiese sukses van Swart en Indiese eerstejaarstudente in menslike hulpbronbestuur aan ’n tersiêre instelling te ondersoek. Studente wat vir die periode tussen 1996 en 2002 ingeskryf was, is in die studie betrek. Statistiese toetse vir verskille tussen gemiddeldes is toegepas. Die Indiese groep het beduidend beter taalvaardigheid as hulle Swart eweknieë openbaar. Die hipotese dat Engelse taalvaardigheid met akademiese sukses verband hou, blyk substantief korrek te wees.

  20. EFFECTS OF METACOGNITIVE STRATEGY INSTRUCTION ON THE READING COMPREHENSION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS THROUGH COGNITIVE ACADEMIC LANGUAGE LEARNING APPROACH (CALLA

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    Batul Shamsi Nejad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the reading needs of English as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL learners, educators are urged to develop effective instructional means for teaching reading comprehension and reading strategy use. Although studies on foreign language reading strategies are burgeoning in the realm of language acquisition research, recent interest has spotlighted learners’ metacognitive awareness of strategies. This study investigated the effect of metacognitive strategy training on the reading comprehension of 111 intermediate EFL learners. The participants received five sessions of instruction on metacognitive strategies guided by the blueprints of Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA. The results of t-test, and two-ways analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed that there was a significant positive relationship between the students' metacognitive reading strategy use and their reading comprehension performance. There was also a significant positive relationship between the use of CALLA and the students' reading comprehension performance.

  1. Comparison between students’ academic performance and their abilities in written English language skills: A Tanzanian perspective

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    Sotco Claudius Komba

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the study which sought to compare between the students’ academic performance and their abilities in written English Language Skills. The study was conducted at the Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA, Tanzania. The respondents were 358 finalists from six degree programmes selected randomly out of the 20 degree programmes at the university. The findings indicated that there was a statistically significant positive relationship between the students’ abilities in the English Writing Skills Test (EWST and their University GPAs (r=314, p< 0.01. However, the content analysis of the EWST essays showed that the students had serious problems in spelling, using appropriate forms of adjectives, punctuation marks, simple present tense, recognizing passive voice and using relative pronouns and prepositions.

  2. English language status and English communication in culturally diverse academic departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    universities, results showed that English fluency had a positive association with inter-individual communication and management communication, both in English, while linguistic distance only had a positive relationship with inter-individual communication in English. Implications of these findings are discussed...

  3. Unravelling the differences in attrition and academic performance of international and domestic nursing students with English as an additional language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Roy Xun; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Salamonson, Yenna

    2014-12-01

    High attrition and academic underperformance have been highlighted among students who speak English as an additional language (EAL) in higher education, and a lack of language skills is often cited as a key explanatory factor. Although the relationship between English-language skills and academic performance among EAL students has been established, group differences between international and domestic EAL nursing students is not known. The aim of this study was to compare attrition rates and academic performance of international and domestic EAL nursing students, taking into consideration levels of English-language usage and socio-demographic characteristics of these groups. A prospective correlational study. From 2010 to 2012, nursing students at a large Australian university, who attended an orientation session before course commencement, were invited to complete a survey to assess their English-language usage. Data collected included students' enrolment status and GPA at 12months. Compared with their domestic counterparts, the attrition rate of international EAL students was significantly lower (7.9% versus 13.3%, p=0.018). Similarly, international students also had higher GPAs (4.1 versus 4.0, p=0.011). Although the levels of English-language usage were not related to academic performance, recent arrivals in both international (p=0.047) and domestic (p=0.001) student groups had higher GPAs. This study suggests that language acculturation, indicated by English-language usage and the length of stay in the host country, was not sufficient to ensure successful transition into the academic environment for either international or domestic EAL nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE RESULTS OF ENGLISH TEACHING AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF IN THE ARTIFICIAL BILINGUALISM ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Rasskazova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the conditions of the modern globalization, one of the most significant indicators of competitiveness of the universities is the academic mobility of students, graduate students, teachers and research associates that implies their free and competent enough foreign language skills, first of all English. Yet, until recently, comparatively little attention has been paid to foreign language skills of the Russian academic teaching staff. However, in recent years, with regard to the process acceleration of internationalization of the higher education to provide own effective functioning and remain a demanded one in education and training market, domestic higher education institutions are forced to quickly fill in the gaps of foreign language knowledge among academic teaching staff. The aim of this article is to analyse and describe the tuition outcomes for academic teaching staff based on the official exam results from Cambridge English Language Assessment for three years (2015–2017. Methodology and research methods. The research, which is grounded in interdisciplinary approach and lies at the intersection of psychology, linguistics and pedagogics, was conducted on the basis of the statistical analysis and generalization of mean scores of English language testing results, taking into account qualitative and quantitative standards of speech skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking and use of English (for levels B2, C1. Results and scientific novelty. The essential strengthening and development of the Cambridge English system for level increase of proficiency in English among the Russian academic teaching staff is proved. The data of external peer evaluation provided by exam centre Cambridge English Language Assessment including the foreign language training results of academic teaching staff are analysed. The results obtained show that contrary to the wide-spread opinion that productive skills (speaking and writing take longer

  5. English language proficiency and academic performance: A study of a medical preparatory year program in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Thalamkandathil, Nazer; Parupalli, Srinivas Rao; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Balaha, Magdy Hassan; Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hamad

    2015-01-01

    All medical schools in Saudi Arabia have English as the primary official medium of instruction. Most of the high school education, however, is delivered in Arabic and hence the transition to an English based learning environment tends to be difficult for some students. Our study aims to correlate English language proficiency with academic performance among medical students in their preparatory year. A cross-sectional study design was used. Test scores of 103 preparatory year students (54 female and 49 male) were analyzed after the students completed an English language course and medical introductory course in their preparatory year. The total score obtained in the English course assessment was compared to each component of the medical content assessment. A significantly positive correlation (Spearman's Rho, at 0.01 levels) was seen between the scores of the English exam and the written exam (P English exam score was not obtained for the other components of the medical assessment, namely; student assignments, presentations and portfolios. English language proficiency is an important factor in determining academic proficiency of medical students in our college at the preparatory year level.

  6. The challenge of developing academic language in Spanish and English through science: The case of two teachers' strategic teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra Patricia

    This case study examines the practice of two bilingual education teachers in an attempt to understand the planning and instructional activities occurring in their classrooms by focusing on students' academic language development during science instruction. This site was selected as an 'instrumental' case to examine for several reasons. This school is among the few in the district that is teaching science. Despite the political climate related to bilingual education, the teachers at this school offer an articulated dual immersion program from K to grade six. This site has experienced success in beginning to close the achievement gap between English learners and their native English speaking peers on standardized test measures. Using a qualitative approach, data was collected from two unique cases through detailed observations of classroom practice, audio-taped lessons, an initial and a follow up interview, artifacts and an initial survey. Scarcella's (2003) framework on academic language was used to analyze the different components of academic language of the science instruction. A theoretical framework from Stoddart et al. on levels of integrated planning expertise and Dell' Alba & Sandberg's concept of embodied understanding of practice also informed the study. Three main findings were drawn from this study: (a) academic language can be effectively taught through science instruction when teachers have the expertise to integrate language learning with science inquiry; (b) the teaching of and planning for academic language development through content is shaped over time by teachers' teaching and personal experiences with the content and their ability to integrate both; (c) While a theoretical model of academic language can be used to analyze teachers' instructional strategies during a science lesson, this model has limitations. Teachers' understanding of their own practice developed overtime shaped the way they manipulated the curriculum for their particular grade

  7. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction…

  8. Integrating Language, Literacy, and Academic Development: Alternatives to Traditional English as a Second Language and Remedial English for Language Minority Students in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, George C.; Kibler, Amanda K.

    2015-01-01

    This article argues for the importance of integrating a focus on language, literacy, and academic development for United States-educated language minority (US-LM) students, sometimes called "Generation 1.5." It describes four initiatives at community colleges in California that aim to do so. US-LM students have completed some K-12…

  9. The Politics of English, Language and Uptake: The Case of International Academic Journal Article Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Theresa; Curry, Mary Jane

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on 95 text histories from a longitudinal project on writing for publication in 4 national contexts, this article analyses the language ideologies enacted in referees' and editors' comments on articles submitted for publication in English-medium "international" journals. It considers how orientations to "English,"…

  10. Assessment of English Language Learners in the Era of New Academic Content Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alison L.; Carroll, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is twofold: (1) to provide a detailed review of current language assessment policies and practices with English language learner (ELL) students under the federal requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB; 2001) and relevant research in order to evaluate their technical quality and validity, and (2) to examine…

  11. Effects of goal-setting skills on students’academic performance in english language in Enugu Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Iyabo Idowu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effectiveness of goal-setting skills among Senior Secondary II students’ academic performance in English language in Enugu Metropolis, Enugu state, Nigeria. Quasi-experimental pre-test, post- test control group design was adopted for the study. The initial sample was 147 participants (male and female Senior Secondary School II students drawn from two public schools in Enugu zone of Enugu Metropolis. The final sample for the intervention consisted of 80 participants. This sample satisfied the condition for selection from the baseline data. Two research hypotheses were formulated and tested at 0.05 level of significance. Data generated were analyzed using the mean, standard deviation and t-test statistical method. The findings showed that performance in English language was enhanced among participants exposed to goal-setting intervention compared to those in the control group. The study also showed that there is a significant gender difference in students’ performance with female participants recording a higher mean score than males. Parental level of education was also found to be related to performance in English Language. Based on the findings, goal-setting intervention was recommended as a strategy to enhancing students’ academic performance particularly in English Language

  12. It is presented initially: linear dislocation & inter-language strategies in Brazilian Academic abstracts in english and portuguese It is presented initially: linear dislocation & inter-language strategies in Brazilian Academic abstracts in english and portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Johns

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, as in the rest of the world, the academic community is under pressure to publish in English so that research findings can enter the mainstream of international debate as rapidly and effectively as possible. For the same reason, it is the editorial policy of most Brazilian academic journals that all papers, whether published in Portuguese or English, should be accompanied by abstracts in both languages. If the inclusion of English abstracts is not to become a meaningless ritual, it is a matter of some importance to evaluate how well the writers of such abstracts succeed in communicating the substance of their work to their peers outside Brazil, and also to examine the linguistic features that may facilitate or interfere with that communication. Although preliminary work has been undertaken by the author on both these questions, the present paper addresses the second only, with special reference to a problem at the intersection of syntax and discourse. In Brazil, as in the rest of the world, the academic community is under pressure to publish in English so that research findings can enter the mainstream of international debate as rapidly and effectively as possible. For the same reason, it is the editorial policy of most Brazilian academic journals that all papers, whether published in Portuguese or English, should be accompanied by abstracts in both languages. If the inclusion of English abstracts is not to become a meaningless ritual, it is a matter of some importance to evaluate how well the writers of such abstracts succeed in communicating the substance of their work to their peers outside Brazil, and also to examine the linguistic features that may facilitate or interfere with that communication. Although preliminary work has been undertaken by the author on both these questions, the present paper addresses the second only, with special reference to a problem at the intersection of syntax and discourse.

  13. Analysis of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol Model on Academic Performance of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Sandra W.

    This quantitative comparative descriptive study involved analyzing archival data from end-of-course (EOC) test scores in biology of English language learners (ELLs) taught or not taught using the sheltered instruction observation protocol (SIOP) model. The study includes descriptions and explanations of the benefits of the SIOP model to ELLs, especially in content area subjects such as biology. Researchers have shown that ELLs in high school lag behind their peers in academic achievement in content area subjects. Much of the research on the SIOP model took place in elementary and middle school, and more research was necessary at the high school level. This study involved analyzing student records from archival data to describe and explain if the SIOP model had an effect on the EOC test scores of ELLs taught or not taught using it. The sample consisted of 527 Hispanic students (283 females and 244 males) from Grades 9-12. An independent sample t-test determined if a significant difference existed in the mean EOC test scores of ELLs taught using the SIOP model as opposed to ELLs not taught using the SIOP model. The results indicated that a significant difference existed between EOC test scores of ELLs taught using the SIOP model and ELLs not taught using the SIOP model (p = .02). A regression analysis indicated a significant difference existed in the academic performance of ELLs taught using the SIOP model in high school science, controlling for free and reduced-price lunch (p = .001) in predicting passing scores on the EOC test in biology at the school level. The data analyzed for free and reduced-price lunch together with SIOP data indicated that both together were not significant (p = .175) for predicting passing scores on the EOC test in high school biology. Future researchers should repeat the study with student-level data as opposed to school-level data, and data should span at least three years.

  14. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@.com.

  15. The Relationship Between Mental Health Problems, Acculturative Stress, and Academic Performance in Latino English Language Learner Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Albeg, Loren Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Latino adolescents, especially English language learners (ELLs) are considered to be a highly vulnerable group in our schools today. Despite their apparent need for additional social-emotional and academic learning (SEAL) supports, there is very little research to inform the type of cultural modifications (if any) needed to make SEAL interventions more appropriate for this population. Accordingly, this study focused on identifying the effects of acculturative stress (a culturally specific str...

  16. The interplay of locus of control and academic achievement among Iranian English foreign language learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbubeh Yazdanpanah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to look at the relationship between locus of control (LOC orientation and academic achievement (ACH ofuniversity-age English Foreign Language (EFL learners. LOC is the extent to which individuals attribute their achievementseither to external influences such as fate or to their own efforts. The sample for the study included 120 students studyingEnglish literature at the department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics of Shiraz University. They were chosen conveniently,on a voluntary basis, from the sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The instrument used was the revised version of LOCquestionnaire (Rotter, 2003 which identifies orientations of internality or externality. The participants' grade point averageswere the measure of their ACH. A number of statistical analyses such as Pearson product-moment correlation, the regressionanalysis, and the T-tests for the independent samples were performed on the data to achieve the objectives of the study. Thefindings of this study revealed that (a the LOC and the socio-economic status (SES have significant relationships with theuniversity EFL students' ACH (b the LOC is a good predictor of the participants' ACH (c the internals perform at higher levels ofachievement than the externals (d there is a significant difference between mid/high SES-students and low SES-students in LOCorientation (e the external students with a mid/high SES achieve significantly lower averages than the external students with alow SES, but the internal students with a mid/high SES achieve only a little lower averages than the internal students with a lowSES (f the internals' grades for the general and the major courses have significant relationships with their LOC, but this is not sofor the externals (g the age and the year of the study do not have significant relationships with LOC and with ACH (h there isno main difference between male and female participants in LOC orientation (i and finally, there is not a

  17. Web 2.0 Tools and Academic Literacy Development in a US Urban School: A Case Study of a Second-Grade English Language Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-shin

    2014-01-01

    This study explores a second-grade English language learner's literacy development and ability to use blogging for social and academic purposes, in the context of learning academic writing genres in a US urban school. Grounded in sociocultural theories, it conceptualizes learning as appropriation, and language as a dynamic and functional system of…

  18. Double threshold in bi- and multilingual contexts: preconditions for higher academic attainment in English as an additional language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Simone; Siemund, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Bi- and multilingualism has been shown to have positive effects on the attainment of third and additional languages. These effects, however, depend on the type of bi- and multilingualism and the status of the languages involved (Cenoz, 2003; Jessner, 2006). In this exploratory trend study, we revisit Cummins' Threshold Hypothesis (1979), claiming that bilingual children must reach certain levels of attainment in order to (a) avoid academic deficits and (b) allow bilingualism to have a positive effect on their cognitive development and academic attainment. To this end, we examine the attainment of English as an academic language of 16-years-old school children from Hamburg (n = 52). Our findings support the existence of thresholds for literacy attainment. We argue that language external factors may override positive effects of bilingualism. In addition, these factors may compensate negative effects attributable to low literacy attainment in German and the heritage languages. We also show that low attainment levels in migrant children's heritage languages preempt high literacy attainment in additional languages.

  19. From Test Scores to Language Use: Emergent Bilinguals Using English to Accomplish Academic Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mojica, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Prominent discourses about emergent bilinguals' academic abilities tend to focus on performance as measured by test scores and perpetuate the message that emergent bilinguals trail far behind their peers. When we remove the constraints of formal testing situations, what can emergent bilinguals do in English as they engage in naturally occurring…

  20. Academic Writing for Graduate-Level English as a Second Language Students: Experiences in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman-Taveau, Rebekah; Karathanos-Aguilar, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Graduate-level ESL students in Education are future multicultural educators and promising role models for our diverse K-12 students. However, many of these students struggle with academic English and, in particular, writing. Yet little research or program development addresses the specific writing-support needs of this group. This article shares…

  1. Ideologies "of" English Language Teaching in Iranian Academic Research: Mainstream, Alternative, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed-Abdolhamid; Ghafar Samar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Mainstream trends of English language teaching (ELT) are predominantly constructed within the epistemological boundaries shaped by the traditional conceptions of linguistics, learning, and teaching as well as positivist research methodology. What tends to be overshadowed by such conceptions is the underlying foundational belief structure of ELT…

  2. The Importance of English Language Competency in the Academic Success of International Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael; Maxey, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigate the information content of two commonly used admission tests, namely the Graduate Management Admission Test and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The analysis extends prior research by investigating the incremental information content of individual components from one admission test conditional on the…

  3. Language motivation and attitudes: a study with English for Academic Purposes learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Azeredo Cerqueira

    2015-12-01

    The study investigates English for Academic Purposes (EAP course learners’ motivation within the L2 Motivational Self System Framework (cf. DÖRNYEI; CLÉMENT, 2001; DÖRNYEI, 2005; CSIZÉR; DÖRNYEI, 2005b and their achievement. The framework consists of three components, of which the ideal L2 self is the most important in the maintenance of motivation.  Brazilian learners of EAP, students of a federal university in Belo Horizonte, participated in the study. The data was collected by means of questionnaires about attitude and motivation towards the L2, L2 learning and EAP, and also the ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds of learners. The EAP course as a program component of a broader, federal Brazilian policy with both national and international stakeholders was also examined. The results suggest that the learners possess a well-established ideal L2 self.  The variables measured in this project presented a positive tendency towards L2 motivation. This confirms that the participants were motivated to learn the L2 language, in this case English.  The socioeconomic and ethnic variables indicate that whites from a middle-class background are the majority group on campus. Recommendations for further research in L2 motivation and policy studies conclude the paper. Keywords: EAP. Educational policy. International education. L2 motivational self system. Language attitudes. L2 learning.   Resumo Este estudo investiga a motivação de aprendizes de Inglês para Fins Acadêmicos (IFA a partir do Modelo de Autossistema Motivacional na L2 (DÖRNYEI; CLÉMENT, 2001; DÖRNYEI, 2005; CSIZÉR; DÖRNYEI, 2005b e o aproveitamento dos aprendizes no curso. O modelo de Autossistema Motivacional na L2 consiste de três componentes, nos quais o self ideal na L2é o mais importante para a manutenção da motivação. Os participantes do estudo eram aprendizes brasileiros de IFA, estudantes de uma universidade em Belo Horizonte. Os dados foram coletados em questionários sobre

  4. English Learner Students' Readiness for Academic Success: The Predictive Potential of English Language Proficiency Assessment Scores in Arizona and Nevada. REL 2017-172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Eric; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    When is the right moment to transition an English learner student from part-time participation in English language development classes into full-time participation in mainstream English-only classes? English learner students should be moved into full-time mainstream English-only classes when they are sufficiently fluent in English to be able to…

  5. International Undergraduate English Language Learners' Perception of Language and Academic Acquisition through Online Learning: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Olga Noemi

    2014-01-01

    Many institutional programs are changing to incorporate more online opportunities as a way to meet the needs of their students. Therefore, international English language learners are being encouraged to take online courses in order to complete their programs of study at United States colleges or universities (Tan, Lee, & Steven, 2010). In this…

  6. Moodling English Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah; Arslan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to emphasize the importance of using Moodle in foreign language learning and teaching by reviewing relevant literature and introducing a Moodle-based environment aiming to help English learners to practice their English by themselves. Firstly, the use of Moodle in education and more specifically in English Language Teaching is…

  7. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction with traditional science classroom instruction as compared to when instructed using solely traditional science classroom instruction. The targeted sample population consisted of fourth-grade students enrolled in a public elementary school located in the southeastern region of the United States. The convenience sample size consisted of 115 fourth-grade students enrolled in science classes. The pretest and posttest academic achievement data collected consisted of the science segment from the Spring 2015, and Spring 2016 state standardized assessments. Pretest and posttest academic achievement data were analyzed using an ANCOVA statistical procedure to test for differences, and the researcher reported the results of the statistical analysis. The results of the study show no significant difference in science academic achievement between treatment and control groups. An interpretation of the results and recommendations for future research were provided by the researcher upon completion of the statistical analysis.

  8. Science as a second language: Analysis of Emergent Bilinguals performance and the impact of English language proficiency and first language characteristics on the Colorado measures of academic success for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Joanna K.

    In an age when communication is highly important and states across the nation, including Colorado, have adopted Common Core State Standards, the need for academic language is even more important than ever. The language of science has been compared to a second language in that it uses specific discourse patterns, semantic rules, and a very specific vocabulary. There is a need for educators to better understand how language impacts academic achievement, specifically concerning Emergent Bilinguals (EBs). Research has identified the need to study the role language plays in content assessments and the impact they have on EBs performance (Abedi, 2008b; Abedi, Hofestter & Lord, 2004; Abedi & Lord, 2001). Since language is the means through which content knowledge is assessed, it is important to analyze this aspect of learning. A review of literature identified the need to create more reliable and valid content assessments for EBs (Abedi, 2008b) and to further study the impact of English proficiency on EBs performance on standardized assessments (Solorzano, 2008; Wolf, & Leon, 2009). This study contributes to the literature by analyzing EBs performance on a state-level science content assessment, taking into consideration English language proficiency, receptive versus productive elements of language, and students' home language. This study further contributes by discussing the relationship between language proficiency, and the different strands of science (physical, life, and earth) on the state science assessment. Finally, this study demonstrates that home language, English language proficiency, and receptive and productive elements of language are predictive of EBs' achievement on the CMAS for science, overall and by strand. It is the blending of the social (listening and speaking) with the academic (reading and writing) that is also important and possibly more important.

  9. Improving English Language Learners' Academic Writing: A Multi-Strategy Approach to a Multi-Dimensional Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulanda Ángel, Nora Lucía; Martínez García, Juan Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The demands of the academic field and the constraints students have while learning how to write appropriately call for better approaches to teach academic writing. This research study examines the effect of a multifaceted academic writing module on pre-service teachers' composition skills in an English teacher preparation program at a medium sized…

  10. 76 FR 14954 - National Professional Development Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION National Professional Development Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... certification and licensure as teachers who work in language instruction educational programs or serve ELs...

  11. Using the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) Group Model to Promote Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Steen, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group model is used to promote self-esteem and academic performance of English as a second language (ESL) students. The findings from the preliminary data indicated that the participants' self-esteem was significantly improved after participation in the group. There was no significant improvement in the total…

  12. English Language Teaching Profile: Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    A profile of English language teaching in Poland is provided in outline form. The following topics are dealt with: the role of English in the country, teaching hours per week in English at each educational level, English language versus English literature, public examinations, syllabuses and textbooks, specialized English programs, adult English…

  13. Effects of English Language Proficiency on the Academic Performance of International Students: A USQ Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes the effects that English proficiency has on the performance of international students in comparison with Australian students at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ), concentrating particularly on overseas students studying externally and admitted under the alternative English entrance requirements. (Author/LRW)

  14. The Correlates of Academic Performance for English Language Learner Students in a New England District. REL 2014-020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Caroline E.; O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Irwin, Clare W.

    2014-01-01

    The number of English language learners has grown in the Northeast & Islands Region over the past decade. While the total student population shrank 3.5 percent between 2001/02 and 2009/10, the population of English language learner students grew 7.6 percent and now constitutes 6.1 percent of students in the region, up from 5.5 percent in…

  15. Adolescents' Use of Academic Language in Historical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance of academic language, research on academic language is often limited to academic vocabulary and focused on the English language learners. Informed by systemic functional linguistics, this study examined adolescents' use of academic language and the relationships between its use and students' reading ability and their writing…

  16. English as an African Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Gaurav

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the role of the English language in postcolonial African literature, focusing on the politics of language, "Africanized" English, and the social languages used in Chinua Achebe's novels and concludes that English today is as much an African language as a British or American one. (Contains 37 references.) (MDM)

  17. Students' Need Analysis of English Reading Skills for Academic Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Wahyono, Edi; Puspitasari, Dewi

    2015-01-01

    The study explores students' needs for English reading skills among students of English Language Studies. It also explores the difficulties in reading skill for academic purposes (English for research) faced by the students. The study is based on the two basic aspects of exploring language needs: Target Situation Analysis and Present Situation Analysis. The participants of the study are 13 graduate students of English Language Studies of PostGraduate Program in the third semester. Questionnai...

  18. English Language Proficiency and Early School Attainment among Children Learning English as an Additional Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Katie E.; Gooch, Debbie; Norbury, Courtenay F.

    2017-01-01

    Children learning English as an additional language (EAL) often experience lower academic attainment than monolingual peers. In this study, teachers provided ratings of English language proficiency and social, emotional, and behavioral functioning for 782 children with EAL and 6,485 monolingual children in reception year (ages 4-5). Academic…

  19. Developing Reading Comprehension and Academic Vocabulary for English Language Learners through Science Content: A Formative Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Ana; Rutherford, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This formative experiment explored the extent to which two instructional frameworks that varied in the explicitness of academic vocabulary instruction, comprehension strategy instruction, and supports for student autonomy influenced reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, perceptions of autonomy supports, and reading engagement in…

  20. Proposing a Knowledge Base for Teaching Academic Content to English Language Learners: Disciplinary Linguistic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkan, Sultan; De Oliveira, Luciana C.; Lee, Okhee; Phelps, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: The current research on teacher knowledge and teacher accountability falls short on information about what teacher knowledge base could guide preparation and accountability of the mainstream teachers for meeting the academic needs of ELLs. Most recently, research on specialized knowledge for teaching has offered ways to…

  1. Challenges and motivators influencing the academic performance of English as an additional language (EAL) nursing students: the perspectives of the students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; McKiel, Elaine; Hwang, Jihye Jasmine

    2009-09-01

    Canada's rising immigrant population has led to an increasing number of nursing students for whom English is an"additional language" (EAL). Although many of these students are successful academically, there is a persistent small number who struggle due to their limited English-language skills and their different cultural knowledge and practices. Despite the difficulties they experience, the students' desire to enter the nursing profession remains strong. A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that influence these students' academic performance from the perspectives of the students themselves and their instructors. Fourteen EAL nursing students were interviewed. Analysis of the interview data revealed factors that influenced the students' experiences in their nursing programs.The authors describe the students' perspectives on the challenges and motivators they encountered in their nursing programs. They also recommend strategies that could help EAL students to achieve success in their nursing studies.

  2. Educating English Language Learners: Building Teacher Capacity. Roundtable Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Keira Gebbie; Sanderman, Alicia R.; Levy, Jack

    2008-01-01

    In the Fall of 2007, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students (OELA) established the following strategic priority: Develop policy and program recommendations to improve the professional development of English language learner…

  3. Borrowing Legitimacy as English Learner (EL) Leaders: Indiana's 14-Year History with English Language Proficiency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita-Mullaney, Trish

    2017-01-01

    English language proficiency or English language development (ELP/D) standards guide how content-specific instruction and assessment is practiced by teachers and how English learners (ELs) at varying levels of English proficiency can perform grade-level-specific academic standards in K-12 US schools. With the transition from the state-developed…

  4. English Language Teaching Profile: Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Cyprus discusses the role of English within the Greek Cypriot community and within the educational system. Areas covered include English language requirements and English within the curriculum, teaching personnel and teacher training, instructional materials, English…

  5. Language and Academic Identity: A Study of the Experiences of Non-Native English Speaking International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Olivia; Greenberg, Katherine; Paulus, Trena

    2009-01-01

    This phenomenological study explores the experiences of non-native English-speaking international students regarding language, culture and identity in the context of their graduate studies. Interviews were conducted with each of the eight participants. Interpretive analysis was used within a constructivist frame. The findings of this study are…

  6. Preparing History Teachers to Work with English Learners through a Focus on the Academic Language of Historical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall-Leckrone, Laura; McQuillan, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports empirical evidence about the influence of embedding language-based strategies into a history methods course to prepare novice history teachers to teach English learners (ELs). Mixed methods were used in an action research cycle to analyze participants' attitudes and preparedness to teach ELs history before and after being…

  7. Expression evaluation of a quoted author in academic discourse: Inter-language (Lithuanian and English case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiešienė Vilija

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyse subject expression evaluation of the non-author language, i.e. the author whose thoughts, discoveries, research results or assumptions are relied on in scientific texts in Lithuanian and English languages, elucidate both universal properties of expression evaluation and the specific ones determined by a particular language and culture. Publication texts of education science field of social science area were selected for the research. Expression evaluation of a quoted author was analysed identifying neutral (surname / name and surname, nationality and residence, scientific and professional activity, time, scientific discoveries, activity achievements, family relations and subjective (logic and emotional evaluation attributes. It was determined that education science texts of both languages, Lithuanian and English, do not exhibit a variety of quoted author expression. No examples purveying all possible semantic meanings of attributes were found in both languages. Prevalence of neutral attributes of science subjects and similar aspects of usage of some attributes (surname / name and surname, nationality or residence reveal general citation traditions determined by universal scientific text regularities rather than a particular language or culture. On the other hand, some tendencies were observed characteristic only to the texts of one or another language and reflecting specific evaluation features of science subject. In the articles of native English speakers, scientific discoveries, results of scientific activity of quoted authors are emphasised whereas Lithuanian authors are more liable to highlight scientific or professional activity and time. Moreover, it is essential to mention that every text represents its author‘s personality to some extent. Thus, the choice of the particular means of expression can be determined by personal qualities of an author.

  8. Helping Taiwanese Graduate Students Help Themselves: Applying Corpora to Industrial Management English as a Foreign Language Academic Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Barry Lee

    2015-01-01

    Lack of knowledge in the conventional use of vocabulary and multiword patterns in one's respective field of expertise causes Taiwanese students to produce academic writing that is markedly "non-nativelike." This is because Taiwanese students are first and foremost second language readers and often have difficulty "picking up…

  9. English as an Academic Lingua Franca: The ELFA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauranen, Anna; Hynninen, Niina; Ranta, Elina

    2010-01-01

    English is unquestionably the world language of academia--yet its most notable characteristic, being predominantly used by non-native speakers, has not seriously been taken on board in ESP descriptive studies. The project English as an academic lingua franca (ELFA) based at the University of Helsinki investigates academic discourses, branching out…

  10. Contextualizing Instruction for English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rhonda D.

    2016-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities (LD) can find navigating the content areas quite difficult due to challenges involving limitations in English language proficiency, gaps in English academic vocabulary, difficulties with working memory and long-term memory, and limited background knowledge on content area topics. However,…

  11. Publishing Academic Texts in English: A Polish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Anna; Lewkowicz, Jo

    2008-01-01

    The language in which to publish is a complex issue for academics in Poland. With the growth of English as the global lingua franca it may appear to be the obvious language of choice. Yet, publishing in English inevitably brings with it linguistic challenges. It also raises concerns of a social and ideological nature. Choosing to publish in Polish…

  12. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ...) The percentage of ELs served by the program who are making progress in learning English as measured by... English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English... grants for eligible entities to develop high levels of academic attainment in English among English...

  13. Developing Oral Language Skills in Middle School English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2018-01-01

    Oral language development can help English learners develop academic proficiency with the English language. In this investigation, at one middle school, teachers focused on improving oral language skills. Using a formative experiment process, the teachers developed an intervention to accomplish their pedagogical goal and then tracked data to see…

  14. Semantic processing skills of Grade 1 English language learners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on part of the first phase of a longitudinal project investigating the development of academic language in English as the Language of Teaching and Learning (LoLT) by Foundation phase learners in two different educational contexts. In the first context, the learners were all English additional language ...

  15. AP English language & composition

    CERN Document Server

    Bureau, Susan; Allen, John; Nesselrode, Katherine A; McGauley, Kristi R; Nesselrode, Katherine A; McGauley, Kristi R

    2013-01-01

    All Access for the AP® English Language and Composition Exam Book + Web + Mobile Everything you need to prepare for the Advanced Placement® exam, in a study system built around you! There are many different ways to prepare for an Advanced Placement® exam. What's best for you depends on how much time you have to study and how comfortable you are with the subject matter. To score your highest, you need a system that can be customized to fit you: your schedule, your learning style, and your current level of knowledge. This book, and the online tools that come with it, will help you personalize your AP® English Language and Composition prep by testing your understanding, pinpointing your weaknesses, and delivering flashcard study materials unique to you. The REA AP® All Access system allows you to create a personalized study plan through three simple steps: targeted review of exam content, assessment of your knowledge, and focused study in the topics where you need the most help. Here's how it works: Review ...

  16. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  17. Language Training: English

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise benz

    2005-01-01

    Oral Expression The next session will take place from January to March 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Timetable: Tuesday 11.30 to 13.30 Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to March 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registration and further information on these courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langu...

  18. Language Training: English

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    Oral Expression The next session will take place from January to March 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Timetable: Tuesday 11.30 to 13.30 Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to March 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registration and further information on these courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  19. Multilingual Faculty across Academic Disciplines: Language Difference in Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the dominance of the English language in scholarship, multilingual academics often encounter challenges in achieving academic biliteracy and identifying successful language negotiation practices in academia. Through personal interviews with self-identified multilingual academics across academic disciplines, this paper explores how they…

  20. Factors that contribute to Hispanic English Language Learners' high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas: A multicase study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Antonio

    The purpose of this multicase study was to discover factors that contribute to Hispanic English language learners' (ELL) high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Participants were high school seniors enrolled in college-level classes who had scored commended on the science exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and ranked toward the top of their class. One student from each of four different high schools in south Texas were selected to participate. Schools identified students meeting the participant criteria and provided consent documents. In this qualitative research study, students were interviewed on three different dates. Administrators and science teachers were also interviewed for triangulation. Significant findings showed that intrinsic qualities were mainly responsible for factors contributing to high academic performance. Hispanic ELL students need meaningful responsibilities to internalize self-esteem and self-efficacy to realize high academic performance. Self-motivation, a contributing factor, provides students with a positive outlook on high academic performance and the ability to defer more immediate undermining rewards. Students expect to contribute to society by helping others. This helps their self-esteem as well as their self-worth and supports high academic performance. Parental and teacher support are critical for high academic performance. Low socioeconomic status alone is not a causal factor for poor academic performance. School administrations should assign willing and enthusiastic teachers as mentors to target students and provide skills to parents that promote, inspire, and motivate students' intrinsic qualities. Future studies should examine different leadership styles that maximize teachers' ability to influence students' high academic performance. Finally, students should be given guidance in setting career goals and demonstrating that high academic achievement is attainable and

  1. English Language Teaching Profile: Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This is a summary in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Cameroon. Cameroon is officially a French/English bilingual state but English at present plays the minor part. There are five francophone and two anglophone provinces with populations of five million and one and a half million respectively. In the anglophone provinces…

  2. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  3. Improving Science and Vocabulary Learning of English Language Learners. CREATE Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Diane; Artzi, Lauren; Mazrum, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This brief reviews previous research related to the development of science knowledge and academic language in English language learners as well as the role of English language proficiency, learning in a second language, and first language knowledge in science learning. It also describes two successful CREATE interventions that build academic and…

  4. Turkish Young Language Learners' Attitudes Towards English

    OpenAIRE

    KIZILTAN, NALAN; ATLI, IŞIL

    2013-01-01

    This study has been conducted in fourteen 4th graders’ classrooms in Turkish curriculum laboratory elementary schools in seven cities of Turkey during the academic year 2006-2007 in order to find out young language learners’ attitudes towards English and English lessons in Turkish elementary schools. To determine young language learners’ attitudes towards English language inside and outside the classroom, two questionnaires have been developed. The findings of the study have revealed that the...

  5. Standard English and Language Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    ソランキ, ネイディン

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the attitudes and opinions surrounding Standard English (SE) within the United Kingdom. The definition of SE, for the purposes of this study, is standard grammar and standard pronunciation of southern English, commonly referred to as 'BBC English'. The subject of SE and attitudes towards different accents and dialects of British English is emotive and attracts strong opinions. The main issues discussed here are the place of language in society, the social implications ...

  6. The Influence of Teacher Power on English Language Learners' Self-Perceptions of Learner Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Abel; Cochran, Kathryn; Karlin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    English language learners (ELL) are students with a primary language spoken other than English enrolled in U.S. educational settings. As ELL students take on the challenges of learning English and U.S. culture, they must also learn academic content. The expectation to succeed academically in a foreign culture and language, while learning to speak…

  7. Repositioning Ghana Schools as English Language Learner Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Although English has traditionally been the only language of instruction in Ghana, most young children do not speak English at home. This paper argues that students' academic performance might be improved if their native languages were also used in school. Such an approach offers benefits in areas such as classroom participation, engagement in…

  8. Skipping English Language Lessons and its Effect on Senior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education stake-holders should curb truancy in schools and classes. Government should enforce discipline and make school environment friendly. English Language teachers should keep subject attendance registers. Key Words: truancy, academic achievement, subject attendance register, bullying, English language, ...

  9. Foreign Language Anxiety in a New English Program in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Thailand boasts a robust ESL system in both public and private schools, where students learn various subjects from native speakers in the English language. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is a subject that is relevant to ESL instruction and learning. This study assesses associations between FLCA and academic performance in English and…

  10. Relationship of Teaching Efficiency with Academic Self-Efficacy and Self-Directed Learning among English Language Students: University Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shohoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-directed learning is originated from adult education which has currently gained a special place in educational systems and is influenced by many variables such as teaching self-efficacy and self-directed learning. This research investigated the relationship of teachers’ teaching with academic self-efficacy and self-directed learning from English language students' perspectives. Methods: The study population comprised of all bachelor, master and Ph.D. English language students of Allameh Tabataba’i University (2014-2015 who had passed at least one semester. A total of 159 students were selected as study sample using Cochran formula and proportional stratified sampling. The data were collected through three standard questionnaires with confirmed validity and reliability. Data were analyzed by one-sample t-test, Pearson correlation and multiple regression. Results: With regard to teaching efficiency, content presentation, learning evaluation and class management skills were higher than average and lesson planning and control over content skills were at an average level. Also, all dimensions of academic self-efficacy and self-directed learning were significantly higher than average. The correlation between teaching efficiency and self-efficacy (r=0.367 and self-directed learning (r=0.571, and between self-efficacy and self-directed learning (r=0.523 was statistically significant (P<0.01. Moreover, a combination of teaching efficiency dimensions could predict different dimensions of self-efficacy and all components of self-directed learning. Furthermore, self-efficacy dimensions were good predictors of self-directed learning. Conclusion: Success in the realm of academia and organizational learning depends on the learners’ updated knowledge and skills and self-directed learning. Also, it seems teachers’ efficient teaching affects students’ academic self-efficacy, orienting them toward self-directed learning.

  11. Language, Mathematics and English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoniou, Misty; Qing, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There is a correlation between language proficiency and achievement in mathematics (Riordain & O'Donoghue, 2009), and this is particularly evident for children who speak English as an additional language or dialect. More effort needs to be made in mathematics classrooms to develop cognitive competencies, including the ability to decode and…

  12. Self-Efficacy and Academic Performance in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, K. P.; Jumana, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This study reviews the relevant self-efficacy related literature, a central point of social cognitive theory, in the area of language learning. Role of self-efficacy in academic performance of learners is also considered. In the global world, English language has become the fundamental means of international affairs and communication. As a…

  13. Strategic English Writing for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2017-01-01

    Writing is one of the four abilities in English Learning. Many students need to write their theses and dissertations in English in order to achieve their academic degrees. English writing is in fact an access of international and intercultural communication with native-speakers and non-native speakers, in academic fields. After reading abundant…

  14. Metacognitive awareness of reading strategies of University of Botswana English as Second Language students of different academic reading proficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Magogwe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored metacognitive awareness level of University of Botswana students in the Faculty of Social Sciences. It also considered the more recent research focusing on the role of metacognitive awareness in reading and how it relates to proficiency. The following questions are addressed: (1 What are the self-reported reading proficiencies of the University of Botswana students? (2 Are the University of Botswana students aware of their metacognitive reading strategies? (3 What kind of metacognitive reading strategies are frequently used? (4 Is there a difference in metacognitive awareness of reading strategies used by high- and low-proficiency students respectively? The Survey of Reading Strategies Questionnaire (SORS developed by Mokhtari and Sheorey (2002, and the semi-structured interview technique were used to collect data for this study. The findings indicate that University of Botswana English as Second Language (ESL students reported high reading proficiency and high use of metacognitive strategies, but there was no vast difference in terms of proficiency. Students who reported their proficiency as high had an edge over low-proficiency ones mainly because their management and monitoring of reading was guided more by the goals they have set themselves than by the tests and assignments they were supposed to write.

  15. From a social digital identity to an academic digital identity: Introducing ePortfolios in English language enhancement courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Hiradhar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Social digital networking is a facet of living that recognizes no national borders or social boundaries and has become a way of life. This paper investigates the social networking habits of students at Lingnan University and considers how these habits can be channelled for academic purposes by introducing an ePortfolio system into their language enhancement courses. The investigation analyzed the purpose and usage of these social profiles thus forming the basis of the need for academic profiles. After considering the attitudes and motivations of students, this paper reports on the adoption of an ePortfolio platform which best suits the academic needs of students by introducing it into two important language enhancement courses. The paper thus explores students’ attitudes towards two forms of digital identities: social and academic. This process has led to arriving at an ePortfolio system that is in synch with the other digitized aspects of students’ lives. Résumé : Le réseautage social numérique est l’une des facettes de la vie qui ne connaît ni les frontières nationales, ni les démarcations sociales; cette pratique est devenue un mode de vie. Le présent article examine les habitudes de réseautage social des étudiants de l’Université Lingnan et étudie la façon dont ces habitudes peuvent être canalisées à des fins universitaires par l’introduction d’un système de portfolios électroniques dans les cours de perfectionnement des langues. L’enquête a analysé quelles fonctions ces profils sociaux remplissent et quelle est l’utilisation qui en est faite, ce qui constitue la base du besoin de profils universitaires. Après avoir examiné la réponse et la motivation des étudiants, cet article présente les résultats de l’adoption d’une plateforme de portfolios électroniques qui répond bien aux besoins des étudiants universitaires à la suite de son introduction dans deux cours importants de

  16. Mathematics and English, Two Languages: Teachers' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Shosh; Markovits, Zvia

    2013-01-01

    English is an international language used all over the world. Mathematics is the language of sciences but it is also a language used in everyday life. Although both are perceived as languages, mathematics and English are considered as two completely distinct disciplines. In this paper we first discuss English and mathematics as languages. Then we…

  17. Implications for English Language T

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... will be able to communicate in diverse communicative situations of daily living. Introduction. Applied Linguists and language teachers generally agree that communication is the goal of language teaching. Here in Nigeria, the main aim of teaching. English is to help students acquire relevant communication ...

  18. Dual-Language Learners: Strategies for Teaching English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passe, Angèle Sancho

    2013-01-01

    Support dual-language learners as they develop the skills necessary for school readiness and success For dual-language learners--children who are learning both English and a home language--the first eight years are crucial for building strong foundations for academic success. During this time, children acquire the early literacy skills needed to…

  19. English language learning materials a critical review

    CERN Document Server

    Tomlinson

    2010-01-01

    This research collection presents a critical review of the materials used for learning English around the world. The first section includes a discussion of materials for specific learners and purposes, such as young learners, self-study, academic writing and general proficiency. The second section presents a detailed study of the materials used in Europe, Asia, North America, South America, Africa and Australia, and critically evaluates their effectiveness in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Taking both the teacher's and the learner's needs into consideration, the book m

  20. Teaching language arts to English language learners

    CERN Document Server

    Vásquez, Anete; Smith, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    This thoroughly revised and updated edition of Teaching Language Arts to English Language Learners provides readers with the comprehensive understanding of both the challenges that face ELLs and ways in which educators might address them in the language arts classroom. The authors offer proven techniques that teachers can readily use to teach reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary as well as speaking, listening, and viewing skills. A complete section is also devoted to ways teachers can integrate all five strands of the language arts curriculum into a comprehensive unit of study w

  1. Academic Language in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  2. Teaching English as an International Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, A. F.; Yazan, B.

    2013-01-01

    English has unquestionably become a global phenomenon, generating a fundamental discussion of EIL pedagogy for English language teaching practitioners around the world. Teaching English as an International Language captures this important moment in the history of English language teaching. Readers will find an accessible introduction to the past,…

  3. English Language Teaching Profile: Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in the Central African Republic discusses the role of English and English within the educational system. While French is the official language and Sango is the national language, English is taught in all secondary schools, is used as the medium of instruction in the University…

  4. Learner Views on English and English Language Teaching in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Lin, Chih-Kai; Wiley, Terrence G.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, China has represented one of the major growth areas in the world for English language education, and studying English has been a priority among its foreign language educational policies. As English has gained more popularity in China, some have noted the potential value of English as a means to greater educational access and…

  5. Teaching students for whom English is a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S; Hartley, J T

    1990-01-01

    Nursing students for whom English is a second language (ESL) are now found in greater numbers in nursing schools. Their presence in nursing contributes to the diversity of the profession, but the language difficulties these students experience may influence academic achievement. Nurse educators can assist ESL students in reaching their career goal by being aware of the special language problems the students can encounter in academic settings and by instituting early and appropriate retention interventions.

  6. English Code Switching in Indonesian Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Dedy

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing phenomenon, worldwide, of inserting English words, phrases or expressions, into the local language: this is part of the acceptance of English as current world language. Indonesia is experiencing the use of this mixture of language when using either their own Indonesian or local language; English words, phrases and expressions…

  7. English-Language Writing Instruction in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Melinda

    2005-01-01

    Second language writing scholars have undertaken descriptions of English-language writing instruction in a variety of international settings, describing the role of various contextual factors in shaping English-language writing instruction. This article describes English-language writing instruction at various levels in Poland, noting how it is…

  8. Positivity of the English language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloumann, Isabel M; Danforth, Christopher M; Harris, Kameron Decker; Bliss, Catherine A; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2012-01-01

    Over the last million years, human language has emerged and evolved as a fundamental instrument of social communication and semiotic representation. People use language in part to convey emotional information, leading to the central and contingent questions: (1) What is the emotional spectrum of natural language? and (2) Are natural languages neutrally, positively, or negatively biased? Here, we report that the human-perceived positivity of over 10,000 of the most frequently used English words exhibits a clear positive bias. More deeply, we characterize and quantify distributions of word positivity for four large and distinct corpora, demonstrating that their form is broadly invariant with respect to frequency of word use.

  9. Is English a dyslexic language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, K

    2000-01-01

    McGuinness has suggested that there 'is no diagnosis and no evidence for any special type of reading disorder like dyslexia', and that poor teaching accounts for low levels of English literacy performance, rather than inherent personal deficits. Implicit in this is the assumption that some languages have simple grapheme-phoneme codes in which there is a one-to-one mapping, making them easy to teach and learn, while others have more complicated structures and are more difficult for teachers and students. There is now an increasing number of studies which demonstrate that readers in more transparent orthographies such as Italian, Spanish, Turkish, Greek and German have little difficulty in decoding written words, while English children have many more problems. Increasingly, lack of orthographic transparency in English is seen as having a powerful negative effect on the development of reading skills in English-speaking children. There is evidence that English-speaking children who fail to acquire reading skills may fall into two distinct categories: those who would succeed in languages, other than English, that have greater orthographic consistency; and those who would still have problems even with perfect orthographic transparency. The first, larger, group is let down by the interaction of poor teaching methods and an incomprehensible system of orthography. The present study examines word factors associated with poor spelling and reading that have been identified. Three factors account for the relative ease with which pupils can spell words: frequency of the word in the English language; length of the word; and the presence of 'tricky' letters or letter combinations. Data are presented illustrating the predictive model of spelling and reading which enables word difficulty to be calculated from the characteristics of English words. The implications the model has for teaching and learning English are elaborated, with reference to the possible benefits to be derived

  10. Strategy Use for Listening in English as a Foreign Language: A Comparison of Academic and Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Researchers of learner and language use strategies have long suggested that appropriate application of strategies can facilitate second or foreign language learning. Listening is the most fundamental skill in language learning, but for decades this skill was not emphasized in secondary schools in Taiwan. However, in 2012 a new national English…

  11. Evidence That International Undergraduates Can Succeed Academically Despite Struggling with English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass-Holmes, Barry; Vaughn, Allison A.

    2015-01-01

    Many American universities require international applicants whose native language is not English to submit English proficiency exam scores presumably because of proficiency's potential to predict future academic success. The present study provides evidence, however, that such applicants can succeed academically despite struggling with English.…

  12. Development potential of the English language learning tourism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Travel in order to learn English has become an enormous global industry, and in recent years South Africa has started to feature more prominently in the plans of English language learning tourists from all over the world. While the academic product tends to be similar wherever it is offered, the potential for added value lies ...

  13. Syracuse University English Language Institute: Business Communication for Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berly, Geraldine; McGraw, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The Syracuse University English Language Institute (ELI), housed within University College, has been offering noncredit executive English courses on a contract basis for the past 12 years. Despite its small size and limited resources, the ELI, whose main mission is to prepare international students for academic study, also manages a successful…

  14. Exploring the Relationship among International Students' English Self-Efficacy, Using English to Learn Self-Efficacy, and Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-hsuan; Harrison, Jamie; Cardullo, Victoria; Lin, Xi

    2018-01-01

    One of the major challenges for international students to pursue academic goals in the United States is English language proficiency, which often negatively affects academic success. Even students with confidence in their English language proficiency encounter challenges using English in class. Previous research indicates self-efficacy positively…

  15. Bridging English Language Learner Achievement Gaps through Effective Vocabulary Development Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Despite a well-documented history of immigration in the United States of America and rise in population of students that speak a language other than English, academic achievement gaps between English Language Learners and their native English language speaking counterparts from Grades Pre-Kindergarten through the college/university level still…

  16. Preparing English as a Second Language Students for College Level Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Hector

    2014-01-01

    In a diverse classroom, there are students who are in need of both mathematics and English as a second language instruction. One of the challenges faced at Lake Washington Institute of Technology (LWIT) was the development of a pathway for English language learners into core academic courses at the college. In addition, English language learners…

  17. Language Training: English Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 28 February to 24 June 2005 (2/3 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from March to June 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from March to June 2005. T...

  18. Language Training: English Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 28 February to 24 June 2005 (2/3 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from March to June 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from March to June 2005. Th...

  19. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  20. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  1. Language Identity among Iranian English Language Learners: A Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Saeed; Khatib, Mohammad; Baleghizadeh, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    The present study is a nationwide survey of language identity among English language learners in Iran. The participants who completed the survey in this research included 1851 English language learners from different parts of the country who belonged to different genders, age groups and English language proficiency levels. The main instrument was…

  2. LANGUAGE AND GENDER IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murni Mahmud

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the impact of gender differences in English Language Teaching. It explores students’ learning styles as affected by the notions about men and women differences in communication. The data collected in 2008 from 20 males and 20 females’ English students of the State University of Makassar. It is to reveal their attitudes towards speaking to different sex, strategy to express opinion, group work preferences, activeness/passiveness, and their perception to increase English skills dealing with sex difference. It is revealed that female than male students were reluctant to speak to different sex; females preferred the direct way to express opinions (writing, work with the same sex, and tended to be passive in class. In addition, females saw the high possibility to increase their English skills by working with the same sex but the reverse is true for males. These different styles of female and male students in learning English were affected by the notions of women’s language.

  3. The Impact of Formal English Language Development on the Reading Achievement of English Language Learners in an Urban School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, Shelby

    2010-01-01

    With the onset of No Child left behind legislation, the English Language Learner (ELL) subgroup gained new attention. Schools and districts failing to meet accountability targets began to seek out programs and strategies that would better ensure the academic progress of those students who were learning grade-level content while learning English.…

  4. An Investigation of Language Teachers' Explorations of the Use of Corpus Tools in the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, John David

    2013-01-01

    Despite claims that the use of corpus tools can have a major impact in language classrooms (e.g., Conrad, 2000, 2004; Davies, 2004; O'Keefe, McCarthy, & Carter, 2007; Sinclair, 2004b; Tsui, 2004), many language teachers express apparent apathy or even resistance towards adding corpus tools to their repertoire (Cortes, 2013b). This study…

  5. English Language Proficiency and Content Assessment Performance: A Comparison of English Learners and Native English Speakers Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, Suzi Keller; Farmer, Aarek

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the accountability requirements established in Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Educational Act (ESEA) legislation, English Learners (ELs) are expected to make progress in both content area academic achievement and English Language Proficiency (ELP). In Tennessee ELs progress is measured by administering WIDA-Access to…

  6. A Framework for Explicit Vocabulary Instruction with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.; Tindall, Evie R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic vocabulary development is critical to the success of all learners--particularly English language learners (ELLs). This article presents a framework for integrating explicit academic vocabulary instruction for ELLs into middle school classrooms. The framework embodies five research-based principles and serves as a vehicle for structuring…

  7. Chemical education experiences from the English language learner perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Annette

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande Valley (RGV) is a region populated by Spanish-speaking immigrants and their descendants producing a large English Language Learner (ELL) student population. ELLs have historically had low literacy rates and achievement levels when compared to their counterparts. In order to address this achievement gap, previous research efforts and curriculum interventions have focused on language acquisition as being the determining factor in ELL education, with little attention given to academic content acquisition. More current research efforts have transitioned into English language acquisition through academic content instruction; this present research study specifically focuses on ELL experiences in chemistry. Participants were high school chemistry students who identified as ELL or had recently exited out of ELL status. Students were interviewed to identify factors that attributed to their experiences in chemistry. Findings indicate code-switching as a key to learning chemistry in English but also the deterrent in English language acquisition.

  8. Scaffolding Language, Literacy, and Academic Content in English and Spanish: The Linguistic Highway from Mesoamerica to Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Katherine; Rueda, Robert; Chilton, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article contains a description of the Dual Proficiency (DP) program in an urban elementary school located in the heart of a large south-western city, as well as the teachers who designed and now implement DP, and the immigrant community participating by choice in DP. We write from a context where, ironically, the number of English language…

  9. Language Training: English

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Oral Expression The next session will take place from January to March 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Timetable: Tuesday 11.30 to 13.30 Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from Januar...

  10. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  11. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  12. 14 CFR 221.4 - English language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false English language. 221.4 Section 221.4... REGULATIONS TARIFFS General § 221.4 English language. All tariffs and other documents and material filed with the Department pursuant to this part shall be in the English language. ...

  13. Technology Integration by General Education Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, Marie Simone

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing population of English language learners (ELLs) in elementary schools across the United States, and a current academic achievement gap between ELLs and non-ELLs. Researchers have found that integration of Web 2.0 tools has benefitted ELLs in language learning settings, outside of the general classroom. The research problem…

  14. Re-contextualising academic writing in English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne

    six focal students’ challenges in re-contextualising themselves as writers in English in a new university environment, data were generated from regular interviews with the participants over one semester, supplemented by questionnaires, documentary evidence, and observational data. Analyses building......’ experiences as writers of English, manifested in three main areas of concern: ideational, linguistic, and interpersonal. These writing concerns were embedded in more global processes of establishing academic continuity and in managing English-mediated instruction and learning in the English...

  15. Impact of English Proficiency on Academic Performance of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Hwang, Eunjin; Wanjohi, Reubenson

    2015-01-01

    Using an ex-post facto, non-experimental approach, this research examined the impact of English language proficiency and multilingualism on the academic performance of international students enrolled in a four-year university located in north central Louisiana in the United States. Data were collected through a self-reported questionnaire from 59…

  16. Gender as predictor of academic achievement in English among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the influence of gender on academic achievement in English Language among senior secondary school students in Calabar metropolis, Cross River State. The researchers adopted survey designfor the study. The study sample comprise 660 Senior Secondary School two (SSS II) students drawn from ...

  17. gender as predictor of academic achievement in english among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    The study examined the influence of gender on academic achievement in English Language among senior secondary school students in Calabar metropolis, Cross River State. The researchers adopted survey designfor the study. The study sample comprise 660 Senior Secondary School two (SSS II) students drawn from ...

  18. The Habitat Factor in ELF(A)--English as a Lingua Franca (In Academic Settings)--And English for Plurilingual Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller-Schwaner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article considers a case of local language socialization and accommodation in a multilingual community of practice: the use of English as an additional academic language for specific purposes at a bilingual Swiss university and its implications for teaching. The acronym ELF(A) is used throughout as short for English as a Lingua Franca (in…

  19. Academic Self-Efficacy, Social Relationships, and English Language Proficiency as Predictors of International Students' College Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaba, Abir

    2016-01-01

    International students represent a significant proportion of the college student population in the United States (Institute of International Education, 2015). They contribute to campus research, diversity, and the economy. In order to maintain these academic, cultural, and economic profits, universities should investigate the factors related to…

  20. Perspectives and Practices of Academics and Students of English Language Teaching Post-Graduate Programs within the Mediation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmali, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    Due to unsatisfactory number of researches investigating ELT post-graduate programs, and perceptions of academics and students in these programs regarding mediation theory of Feuerstein, this study attempted to investigate the aspects of this theory in doctorate and master programs in ELT department of a state university. Methodologically, this…

  1. Re-contextualising academic writing in English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne

    ’ experiences as writers of English, manifested in three main areas of concern: ideational, linguistic, and interpersonal. These writing concerns were embedded in more global processes of establishing academic continuity and in managing English-mediated instruction and learning in the English......-as-a-lingua-franca context, involving critical re-evaluation of known academic practices and more complex understandings of what learning to write in English entails. The EAP course produced variable effects among the participants in supporting their academic endeavours in content subjects. The study suggests that providing......With the internationalisation of European higher education continuing apace, English literacy is becoming essential for full participation in university practices, creating both possibilities and challenges for students in the internationalised university in non-English dominant Europe. A growing...

  2. Cambridge IGCSE English first language

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2013-01-01

    Revised edition for the 2015 syllabus to help your students prepare for their examination and enhance their enjoyment of English. This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE First Language English (0500 and 0522) syllabuses, for first teaching from 2013. ? Develops the skills necessary to become a better reader and writer. ? Offers detailed advice and preparation for the examination. ? Teaches skills for successful writing of essays and coursework assignment. We are working with Cambridge International Examinations to gain endorsement for this title.

  3. Effect of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety on Turkish University Students' Academic Achievement in Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat; Dogan, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to identify to what extent the Turkish students' English classroom anxiety affects their academic achievement in English language. In this quantitative descriptive study, a correlational survey model was employed, and the convenience sampling was done. In order to collect data, the Foreign Language Classroom…

  4. ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHER CANDIDATES’ PERCEPTIONS OF LANGUAGE TEACHERS: A METAPHOR STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep ÇETİN KÖROĞLU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor studies are accepted as research tools by general education and language pedagogy scholars in related fields. It is considered that metaphors are useful tools to investigate and construct teacher’s professional life. Metaphor studies generally focus on teacher-produced or student-produced metaphor images and qualitative data are used to analyze these images. The current research utilized pre-service English language teacher’s metaphor perceptions about English language teachers. Therefore, the participants of the study will be English language teachers in the future, their perceptions about English language teachers are quite important to investigate their identity building process. The participants of the present research are 128 English language teacher candidates who are first graders of English language teaching department at Gazi University. The data were collected in 2014- 2015 academic years. The data were collected through a scale which had been developed by researchers of the study. The scale consists of two part that are investigate participants’ perceptions through their drawings and metaphors. The data were analyzed through content analysis. The results show that English language teacher candidates’ perceptions vary and mostly positive metaphors were used to describe English language teachers. The current research is significant in terms of understanding English language teacher candidates’ perceptions about their future career.

  5. Book Review: English Language Learning and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaei, Abouzar; Motallebzadeh, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a very helpful book which gives us information and knowledge of using technology in language learning and teaching. It contains detailed consideration to articulatory and auditory Language learning as well as to the practicalities of English language learning. The book discusses the relationship between English language learning and technology. 

  6. Using Trialogues to Measure English Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Youngsoon; Zapata-Rivera, Diego; Cho, Yeonsuk; Luce, Christine; Battistini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of technology-assisted, trialogue-based tasks to measure the English language proficiency of students learning English as a second or foreign language. A presumed benefit of the system for language assessment is its suitability for use in scenario-based tasks that integrate multiple language skills. This integration allows test…

  7. Book Review: English Language Learning and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaei, Abouzar; Motallebzadeh, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a very helpful book which gives us information and knowledge of using technology in language learning and teaching. It contains detailed consideration to articulatory and auditory Language learning as well as to the practicalities of English language learning. The book discusses the relationship between English language learning and technology.

  8. Positivity of the English language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M Kloumann

    Full Text Available Over the last million years, human language has emerged and evolved as a fundamental instrument of social communication and semiotic representation. People use language in part to convey emotional information, leading to the central and contingent questions: (1 What is the emotional spectrum of natural language? and (2 Are natural languages neutrally, positively, or negatively biased? Here, we report that the human-perceived positivity of over 10,000 of the most frequently used English words exhibits a clear positive bias. More deeply, we characterize and quantify distributions of word positivity for four large and distinct corpora, demonstrating that their form is broadly invariant with respect to frequency of word use.

  9. Languages for Specific Academic Purposes or Languages for General Academic Purposes? A Critical Reappraisal of a Key Issue for Language Provision in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The debate about the subject specificity of university language tuition has been going on for decades; it has mostly been discussed in the context of English for Academic Purposes. This paper considers the case for disciplinary specificity with regard to languages other than English. Few, if any, developed curricula, syllabuses, suitable textbooks…

  10. Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT): Data-Driven, Computer Assisted Discovery in Learning Academic English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohát, Róbert; Rödlingová, Beata; Horáková, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT), currently of 150,000+ words, aims to make academic language instruction a more data-driven and student-centered discovery learning as a special type of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL), emphasizing students' critical thinking and metacognition. Since 2013, high school English as an additional…

  11. English language teaching methods and approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalovska, Nina; Ivanovska, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    This handbook for English language students presents the major teaching methods and approaches that have been used in English language teaching and learning. It is divided into two parts. Part I gives an overview of first and second/foreign language acquisition theories, such as the behaviourist, the innatist, the cognitive, the interactionist and the creative-construction theory. Part II describes the English language teaching methods and approaches that have been popular at different times ...

  12. Overlap and Uniqueness: Linguistic Componential Traits Contributing to Expressive Skills in English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Hye K.; O'Brien, Beth

    2018-01-01

    This study identified robust predictors of expressive skills in academic English as a foreign language. The participants were 92 Korean-speaking learners of English. The field test of the Pearson Test of English Academic was used as a secondary data analysis. Four communicative skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) and six enabling…

  13. Pre-TOEFL guide academic English practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Preparing for TOEFL Do you plan to take TOEFL or IELTS but are not ready for the challenge? Do you need more practice? If you do, then this book is for you. It is also for those who just want to practice their academic English. Whatever your purpose, this book will give you the foundation in academic English you need for TOEFL and IELTS success.

  14. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND ROMANIAN MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Condruz-Bacescu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the significant increase of English words and expressions in Romanian media, in the general context of English and American words’ invasion. The premise from which we start to analyze the influence of English on Romanian audiovisual space is that this influence is specific not only to Romania, but is also found in many countries worldwide. Massive borrowing of Anglo-American terms was obvious after the Second World War in most European languages. This paper constitutes an awareness call to all communication specialists, putting particular emphasis on journalists’ role and those responsible in communication to convey future generations a constant concern for all that means Romanian language. The second part of the paper presents examples of necessary borrowings and luxury Anglicisms from different fields: economic, financial, trade, education and research; sports, communication and media terminology. Then, the next part deals with examples from Romanian newspapers, magazines, from TV and radio. The media, the main providers of Anglicisms, have built a secondary reality, relying on information, reports and interpretations which they select, order them according to priorities, and spread them among the public, using a certain terminology. The attitude of speakers and specialists to the avalanche of English terms in Romanian audiovisual language must be a rational one, since it is necessary to measure both advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, in this paper I wish to plead for quality in journalistic expression without blaming the use of anglicisms or neologisms regardless of the language of origin. On the contrary, I would like to emphasize that, when their use is justified in terms of terminology and when they come to cover a semantic void or a more precise meaning, borrowings may be a demonstration of spirituality, enrichment, networking and integration of science and modern technology. The conclusion is that the

  15. High-Stakes Plumbing in the Twenty-First Century: Fixing the Cracks in the Academic Pipeline for Undocumented English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Thomas, Holly; Sourdot, Ludovic A.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the severe educational crisis in the United States regarding the ability of institutions of higher education to recruit, retain and appropriately serve Latin@ English Language Learners (ELLs). In particular, it highlights the plight of undocumented ELLs who attend U.S. high schools and universities, but cannot work upon…

  16. Hindsight of an English Language Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Phap

    This keynote address by a native Vietnamese speaker who did not learn English until he was college-age, through the now obsolete "grammar-translation" method, recounts his difficulties in learning to converse orally in English. He stresses the need to teach conversational English to English Language Learners (ELLs) in addition to…

  17. English Language Teaching Profile: Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Hong Kong provides a brief background of the social, economic, and linguistic situation, and covers the following topics: the role of English, English within the educational system, the teaching cadre, teaching materials, English outside the educational system, and British…

  18. Identity, Literacy, and English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny

    2013-01-01

    In the field of English language teaching, there has been increasing interest in the way literacy development is influenced by institutional and community practices, and the way power is implicated in language learners' engagement with text. In this paper, I trace the trajectory of my research on identity, literacy, and English language teaching,…

  19. Identity, Literacy, and English-Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny

    2010-01-01

    In the field of English-language teaching, there has been increasing interest in how literacy development is influenced by institutional and community practice and how power is implicated in language-learners' engagement with text. In this article, I trace the trajectory of my research on identity, literacy, and English-language teaching informed…

  20. English Language Narratives of Filipino Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofranco, Lee Ann L.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Bedore, Lisa M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The current study focuses on describing the English language narrative skills of children who have been exposed to the Filipino language. Method: Eight children between the ages of 6;0 (years;months) and 7;7 who spoke primarily English but who were exposed to the Filipino language at home participated. Each child produced three narrative…

  1. Diagnosing University Students' Academic Writing in English: Is Cognitive Diagnostic Modelling the Way Forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qin

    2017-01-01

    The study utilised a fine-grained diagnostic checklist to assess first-year undergraduates in Hong Kong and evaluated its validity and usefulness for diagnosing academic writing in English. Ten English language instructors marked 472 academic essays with the checklist. They also agreed on a Q-matrix, which specified the relationships among the…

  2. Syntactic Boundaries and the Mechanics of Written Academic English: A Workshop for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Susan; Mercer, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The academic demands of classroom English require students to think about language structure in ways that they are not used to. Everybody "knows" much English grammar intuitively but the academic rules themselves can be difficult to articulate. This goes for punctuation, too: errors often reflect students' lack of explicit knowledge of grammatical…

  3. Axiological Role of English Adjectives in English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkina, Natalya N.; Kostina, Nataliia N.; Urazayeva, Nailya R.; Lomakina, Yekaterina A.; Emets, Tatiana V.; Gallyamova, Maria S.; Melnikova, Elena P.; Trutnev, Alexey Yu.; Lukina, Oksana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on peculiarities of English adjective teaching as one of main and important lexicological basis. As the English language nowadays is important and universal as a native language of worldwide society, exactly that's why process of learning must include wide range of techniques not only as a process of learning theories but also…

  4. World Englishes, English as an International Language and Applied Linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickaya, Ferit

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses World Englishes (WEs) in relation to English as an International Language (EIL) and Applied Linguistics. Taking into account Kachru's interesting but at the same time controversial debate about the status of English in its varieties, which are commonly called WEs and the opposing ideas presented by Quirk, it is aimed to present…

  5. Refining English Language Tests for University Admission: A Malaysian Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Abd Samad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available English has now become the lingua franca of much of technological, business and academic endeavours. Consequently, learning the English language is now seen as vital, especially at the university level where proficiency in the language has become a selection criterion. At present, the Malaysian University English Test (MUET has been adopted by Malaysian public universities as an indicator of English language proficiency. A student’s overall result depends on all the four language components of the MUET and often determines the number and nature of the English language courses he or she has to attend at university. This study seeks to examine whether MUET is an accurate predictor of performance and success at university and how the MUET can be finetuned as an entry level English language test. It was carried out among 52 third year undergraduates of the Faculty of Educational Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia, admitted into the Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL programme. The findings of the study do not offer conclusive evidence about the validity of MUET as a predictor of academic success. However, six models of various combinations of scores on language components on the MUET scores are examined in terms of their effectiveness in increasing the accuracy in selecting students for the TESL programme. The correlations obtained using these models indicate that the combination of various components of the MUET can be used to more accurately predict student achievement at tertiary level than the cumulative MUET score itself. The results of these correlations and their implications in using language tests as admission requirements in general are also discussed

  6. Effective Strategies for Developing Academic English: Professional Development and Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Erica; Fitts, Shanan; Quirk, Mathew; Jung, Woo

    2010-01-01

    The development of academic English and advanced literacy is crucial for student success, especially for English language learners. In this study, researchers used a survey to investigate which instructional strategies 108 fourth- and fifth-grade teachers learned in professional development and found to be effective for providing English learners…

  7. Expand your english a guide to improving your academic vocabulary

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Steve

    2018-01-01

    Writing academic prose in English is especially difficult for non-native speakers, largely because the standard vocabulary used in this genre can be quite different from colloquial English. Expand Your English: A Guide to Improving Your Academic Vocabulary is a unique and invaluable guide that will enable the reader to overcome this hurdle. It will become the favourite go-to reference book for both beginners and for intermediate learners struggling with the complexities of English-language academic writing. Steve Hart covers 1,000 vocabulary items that are essential for good academic writing. The first section describes 200 key terms in detail, grouping them into logical sets of 10. Through careful repetition, the reader will find it easy to retain, retrieve, and reuse these essential phrases. The second section explains a further 800 terms, grouping them according to function, meaning, and the areas of an essay where they are likely to be used. The expansive scope of Expand Your English gives non-native spea...

  8. Expand your English a guide to improving your academic vocabulary

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Steve

    2018-01-01

    Writing academic prose in English is especially difficult for non-native speakers, largely because the standard vocabulary used in this genre can be quite different from colloquial English. Expand Your English: A Guide to Improving Your Academic Vocabulary is a unique and invaluable guide that will enable the reader to overcome this hurdle. It will become the favourite go-to reference book for both beginners and for intermediate learners struggling with the complexities of English-language academic writing. Steve Hart covers 1,000 vocabulary items that are essential for good academic writing. The first section describes 200 key terms in detail, grouping them into logical sets of 10. Through careful repetition, the reader will find it easy to retain, retrieve, and reuse these essential phrases. The second section explains a further 800 terms, grouping them according to function, meaning, and the areas of an essay where they are likely to be used. The expansive scope of Expand Your English gives non-native spea...

  9. English as a second language: variations and pedagogical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Carrió Pastor, Mª Luisa; Alonso Almeida, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Academic World Education and Research Center. In this paper, English texts written by Spanish learners with B2 level of proficiency, following the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), were contrasted with texts written by native English speakers in order to detect the most common writing changes (variations) motivated by the mother tongue of the writers. Our objective was to determine the causes of these ...

  10. Globalization, English language education, and language policy in Asia and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    中村, 優治

    2016-01-01

    Globalization of English and English language teaching in AsiaMeaning of globalization in JapanEnglish as a global language and English language policy makers in JapanGlobalization force of English and English teachers in Japan : a case study of a videoconferencing classDiscrepancy between the government English language policy and the actual English teachers' practices in the classroom

  11. Teaching legal english as a second language

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Codruta BADEA

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, legal English has attracted increasing interest and awareness, especially because English is predominantly the language of international legal practice. Legal English must be seen in the overall context of English for Specific Purposes , as it shares the important elements of need analysis, syllabus design, course design, and materials selection and development which are common to all fields of work in ESP. As with other varieties of ESP, Legal English implies the def...

  12. Language Planning, English Language Education and Development Aid in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erling, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    The increased status of English as the language of international communication and business has meant that development aid has increasingly been used to finance language planning initiatives aimed at improving and/or expanding English language education. The intended outcome of this aid is often to provide expanded economic returns and…

  13. English Language Teaching in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthafa, Bachrudin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the education system in Indonesia, the development of a national English syllabus, English in elementary and secondary schools and in higher education, private sector English courses, teacher preparation and professional development, and expatriate English teachers. (Author/VWL)

  14. An investigation of mathematics and science instruction in English and Spanish for English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Esquivel, Marina

    The contextual demands of language in content area are difficult for ELLS. Content in the native language furthers students' academic development and native language skills, while they are learning English. Content in English integrates pedagogical strategies for English acquisition with subject area instruction. The following models of curriculum content are provided in most Miami Dade County Public Schools: (a) mathematics instruction in the native language with science instruction in English or (b) science instruction in the native language with mathematics instruction in English. The purpose of this study was to investigate which model of instruction is more contextually supportive for mathematics and science achievement. A pretest and posttest, nonequivalent group design was used with 94 fifth grade ELLs who received instruction in curriculum model (a) or (b). This allowed for statistical analysis that detected a difference in the means of .5 standard deviations with a power of .80 at the .05 level of significance. Pretreatment and post-treatment assessments of mathematics, reading, and science achievement were obtained through the administration of Aprenda-Segunda Edicion and the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test. The results indicated that students receiving mathematics in English and Science in Spanish scored higher on achievement tests in both Mathematics and Science than the students who received Mathematics in Spanish and Science in English. In addition, the mean score of students on the FCAT mathematics examination was higher than their mean score on the FCAT science examination regardless of the language of instruction.

  15. English Language Learners Utilizing the Accelerated Reader Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Frank, II

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact (positive, negative, or neutral) of Accelerated Readers (AR), a standard based intervention, on the academic achievement of English Language Learners at Carolina Herrera Elementary School. Carolina Herrera Elementary School, was analyzed using these specific lenses: (1) curriculum and…

  16. A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS APPROACH TO ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Anne Neff Van Aertselaer

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Both English for Academic Purposes (EAP and English for Specific Purposes have advanced from the exploration of lexico-grammatical features during the 1980s and 1990s toward a thicker language description which includes not only lexico-grammatical features but also studies of genre-rhetorical features and of the social practices which shape academic texts in different disciplines (Berkenkotter, Huckin and Ackerman, 1991. These latter studies have tended to focus on the conventions particular to specific discourse communities. However, as Bhatia (2002 has pointed out, there is significant overlap in such genres as research abstracts and introduction sections and perhaps in textbook language as well. This paper addresses an area of overlap in the academic writing of Spanish university students in English: the construction of authorial voice by through the use of impersonalization strategies. The analysis presented here shows that Spanish students transfer rhetorical conventions from Spanish into English, particularly in the case of the we strategy and, in the writing of more advanced students, the se passive strategy.

  17. On using verbs appropriately in academic English writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrabrova Valentina Evgenievna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with English action verbs as key elements of academic English writing. Due to cognitive and semantic characteristics, verbs in the predicate function, by contrast with deverbative suffixal nouns and adjectives as parts of nominal predicates, convey the meaning of written message more concisely. The article is provided with verb classifications aimed at systematizing the information about verbs and developing a conscious approach to choosing verbs in the writing process. Syntactic transformation, limitation of passive voice forms, substitution of action verbs for stative verbs, adjectives and nouns entail perfecting the second language student writing skills.

  18. International Student Security and English Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawir, Erlenawati; Marginson, Simon; Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby

    2012-01-01

    "International student security" refers to the international student's maintenance of a stable capacity for self-determining human agency. The article focuses on the role of English-language proficiency in the security of students from English as Foreign Language countries, drawing on evidence from a program of semistructured interviews…

  19. Global Expansion and English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    Demand for higher education is global. As institutions extend opportunities beyond their borders, English language proficiency must be considered. This chapter focuses on considerations related to global expansion, with an emphasis on the role of distance English language courses and the distinct considerations in their development.

  20. Technology and English Language Teaching (ELT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazzemi, Akram; Narafshan, Mehry Haddad

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a try to investigate the attitudes of English language university teachers in Kerman (Iran) toward computer technology and find the hidden factors that make university teachers avoid using technology in English language teaching. 30 university teachers participated in this study. A questionnaire and semi-structured interview were…

  1. Essentials for successful English language teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Thomas S C

    2010-01-01

    Essentials For Successful English Language Teaching is about how we teach English Language Learners (ELLs) and how our ELLs learn. Farrell and Jacobs encourage those involved in teaching English to develop, maintain and rediscover the reasons that led them to take up the profession. They focus on the essentials in teaching the English language that teachers can implement in their instruction so that their students can excel in their learning: Encourage learner autonomy Emphasize the social nature of learning Develop curricular integration, focus on meaning Celebrate diversity Expand thinking s

  2. Bidirectional American Sign Language to English Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Cate, Hardie; Hussain, Zeshan

    2017-01-01

    We outline a bidirectional translation system that converts sentences from American Sign Language (ASL) to English, and vice versa. To perform machine translation between ASL and English, we utilize a generative approach. Specifically, we employ an adjustment to the IBM word-alignment model 1 (IBM WAM1), where we define language models for English and ASL, as well as a translation model, and attempt to generate a translation that maximizes the posterior distribution defined by these models. T...

  3. English as a medium of academic identity: attitudes to using English for research and teaching at Nantes University.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This socio-linguistic study investigates attitudes of French speakers of English to using English for academic purposes. The study is situated within the post-Fioraso Law period (2013), which sees France joining the process described as the ‘internationalisation’ of Higher Education in Europe. This study confirms that rather than encouraging multiple languages in academia, the term ‘internationalisation’ implies ‘Englishisation’ in Europe by contributing to studies which show how English is i...

  4. Contrasting Specific English Corpora: Language Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Carrió Pastor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community has traditionally considered technical English as neutral and objective, able to transmit ideas and research in simple sentences and specialized vocabulary. Nevertheless, global communication and intense information delivery have produced a range of different ways of knowledge transmission. Although technical English is considered an objective way to transmit science, writers of academic papers use some words or structures with different frequency in the same genre. As a consequence of this, contrastive studies about the use of second languages have been increasingly attracting scholarly attention. In this research, we evidence that variation in language production is a reality and can be proved contrasting corpora written by native writers of English and by non-native writers of English. The objectives of this paper are first to detect language variation in a technical English corpus; second, to demonstrate that this finding evidences the parts of the sentence that are more sensitive to variation; finally, it also evidences the non-standardisation of technical English. In order to fulfil these objectives, we analysed a corpus of fifty scientific articles written by native speakers of English and fifty scientific articles written by non-native speakers of English. The occurrences were classified and counted in order to detect the most common variations. Further analysis indicated that the variations were caused by mother tongue interference in virtually all cases, although meaning was only very rarely obscured. These findings suggest that the use of certain patterns and expressions originating from L1 interference should be considered as correct as standard English.La comunidad científica considera al inglés técnico como un tipo de lenguaje neutral y objetivo, capaz de transmitir ideas y hallazgos en frases simples y vocabulario reconocido por los especialistas de ese campo. Sin embargo, la comunicación global y el

  5. English for specific purposes (ESP: characteristics and current tendencies in language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéfanie Fernanda Pistoni Della Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The teaching area of English for Specific Purposes has consolidated itself as a teaching approach focused and oriented to attend specific learners’ needs interested in developing competences that help them to participate in occupational and/or academic contexts meaningfully. One of its branches, English for Academic Purposes, can be considered a current tendency in language teaching due to its aim at focusing on specific communicative needs of members that participate in the academic contexts either conducting research and publishing results or interacting with foreign researchers through the target language. The internalization process of Brazilian universities, the role of English as the language of science and English teaching programs at universities (such as Language without Borders has intensified the proposal of courses for specific purposes, especially for academic purposes, which categorizes itself as a current tendency in English teaching contexts.

  6. Everybody knows English? Language use in the world of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Varantola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will focus on the use of English as a global means of communication in higher education (HE and research. The use of English is taken for granted as a global means of communication in the academic world. Therefore language issues are rarely problematized in science-policy contexts. This article will try to make the language issue visible by addressing aspects of a use of a lingua franca from a historical and pragmatic perspective and discuss its effects on everyday university life in non-Englishspeaking countries.

  7. International English teachers' perceptions of English as an international language

    OpenAIRE

    Altun-Evci, Hatice

    2010-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Bilkent University, 2010. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2010. Includes bibliographical references leaves 117-126. English as an International Language (EIL) and its implications for ELT have been keenly debated throughout the last two decades. Many researchers have in some depth elaborated on the issues of identity and voice, linguistic imperialism, and the importance of non-native speakers and the...

  8. English-language learners’ problem solving in Spanish versus English

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Molina, Marta

    2010-01-01

    To explore the role of language in English Language Learners (ELLs)´ problem solving, we compare the performance of a group of Latino first graders when working in Spanish and in English on two equivalent sets of story problems. We contrast our results with others from previous studies with bilingual and monolinguals children by focusing on students´ performance in problems with the same semantic structure. This comparison leads us to discuss some factors influencing students´ problem solving...

  9. Academic Language in Preschool: Research and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Luna, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Developing and scaffolding academic language is an important job of preschool teachers. This Teaching Tip provides five strategies that extend the topic of academic language by integrating previous research and field-based data into classroom practice.

  10. The Persistence and Functional Impact of English Language Difficulties Experienced by Children Learning English as an Additional Language and Monolingual Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Katie E; Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2017-07-12

    This study explored whether a monolingual-normed English language battery could identify children with English as an additional language (EAL) who have persistent English language learning difficulties that affect functional academic attainment. Children with EAL (n = 43) and monolingual English-speaking children (n = 46) completed a comprehensive monolingual-normed English language battery in Year 1 (ages 5-6 years) and Year 3 (ages 7-8 years). Children with EAL and monolingual peers, who either met monolingual criteria for language impairment or typical development on the language battery in Year 1, were compared on language growth between Year 1 and Year 3 and on attainment in national curriculum assessments in Year 2 (ages 6-7 years). Children with EAL and monolingual peers who met monolingual criteria for language impairment in Year 1 continued to display comparably impaired overall language ability 2 years later in Year 3. Moreover, these groups displayed comparably low levels of academic attainment in Year 2, demonstrating comparable functional impact of their language difficulties. Monolingual-normed language batteries in the majority language may have some practical value for identifying bilingual children who need support with language learning, regardless of the origin of their language difficulties.

  11. Four Language Skills Performance, Academic Achievement, and Learning Strategy Use in Preservice Teacher Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawer, Saad Fathy

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the differences in language learning strategies (LLS) use between preservice teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) and Arabic as a second language (ASL). It also examines the relationship between LLS use and language performance (academic achievement and four language skills) among ASL students. The study made use…

  12. The English Language and Communicability: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is blessed with many indigenous languages that are mainly used in communication, including English as her second language. These languages had never remained static; they develop simultaneously with the developing nature of Nigeria. Communication therefore dominates the various functions performed by ...

  13. Mainstream Teacher Attitudes toward English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekutoski, Cristina Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze data from practicing mainstream K-12 teachers currently enrolled in graduate courses at a large, urban, Midwest university regarding four categories of their attitudes toward English language learners: (a) inclusion of ELLs, (b) the second language acquisition process/language and language…

  14. Building Connections to Literacy Learning among English Language Learners: Exploring the Role of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    English language attainment and literacy acquisition are of significant importance to achieving academic success and college and career readiness in the United States. The rise in evidence-based standards requires concerted efforts by educators to meet the literacy needs of English language learners (ELLs). When collaborating with ELL teachers,…

  15. "Is Everybody Getting It?": Sustained Support for English as a Second Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Paulette A.

    2009-01-01

    As English as Second Language (ESL) students move past their first college year toward degree completion, they may find themselves struggling on their own. This article describes one community college's approach to supporting ESL students throughout their academic career. English as a Second Language Across the Curriculum (ESLAC) provides…

  16. Motivators for Demotivators Affecting English Language Acquisition of Saudi Preparatory Year Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daif-Allah, Ayman Sabry; Alsamani, Abdulaziz Saleh

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the demotivating factors that discourage Preparatory Year Program (PYP) students from learning the English language. It also proposes and tests the effectiveness of a set of academic and administrative approaches on enhancing English language acquisition of 102 Saudi PYP Students taking an EFL summer course in the…

  17. Incorporating English Language Teaching Through Science for K-2 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Therese; Shea, Lauren M.

    2012-06-01

    English learners are faced with the dual challenge of acquiring English while learning academic content through the medium of the new language (Lee et al. in J Res Sci Teach 45(6):726-747, 2008; Stoddart et al. in J Res Sci Teach 39(8):664-687, 2002) and therefore need specific accommodations to achieve in both English and the content areas. Teachers require higher quality and new forms of professional development to learn and meet the needs of their students. This study examines the impact of one professional development model that explicitly embedded language learning strategies into science inquiry lessons. It also demonstrates how teachers involved in the PD program improve their self-efficacy about language instruction embedded in content and how they interpret and implement the methodology.

  18. Course-embedded student support for online English language learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Andrade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an embedded approach to learner support in online English language courses. The support model is based on language acquisition, transactional distance, and self-regulated learning theories. Based on these theories, courses were designed to provide the interaction necessary for academic English language gains, decrease the transactional distance between the teacher and learner, and assist learners in developing the ability to control the factors that affect their learning; in other words, to be self-regulated learners. The latter is critical for those who lack the autonomy needed for successful distance learning. In this paper, three course activities are described and analyzed to demonstrate how the embedded support model responds to the needs of diverse learners and assists them in achieving identified outcomes. The courses were designed for off-site international students enrolled in traditional English-speaking higher education institutions.http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.90

  19. Triadic Scaffolds: Tools for Teaching English Language Learners with Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Meskill

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Active communication with others is key to human learning. This straightforward premise currently undergirds much theory and research in student learning in general, and in second language and literacy learning in particular. Both of these academic areas have long acknowledged communication's central role in successful learning with the exact intricacies of instructional conversations and the forms these take having been the focus of close analysis (Cazden, 1988; Gee, 2001; Nystrand, Gamoran, Kachur, & Prendergast, 1997; Tharp & Galimore, 1991; van Lier, 2000. In this examination of computer-supported classroom discourse, specific forms of instructional conversation employed by a veteran elementary teacher of beginning-level English language learners (ELLs are examined. The focal teacher orchestrates instructional conversations around computers with children whose immediate needs are to learn the English language, specifically the "language of school" and the concomitant social complexities implied in order to participate in mainstream instructional activity. With these goals shaping language and literacy activity, their ESOL (English for speakers of other languages teacher makes use of the computer to capture, motivate, and anchor learner attention to, and render comprehensible the target language they hear and see on and around the computer screen. The anatomy of the activity she orchestrates around the computer and the language she uses to support it -- labeled here as triadic scaffolds -- are the focus of analysis. Forms and functions of triadic discourse (teacher, learner, computer are examined for their potential unique role in second language and literacy instruction.

  20. Secondary English Language Orientation Project: Ministry of Education, Zanzibar. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfit, Ann; Hikmany, H. R. H.

    This report evaluates Zanzibar's Secondary English Language Orientation Project, whose objective is to produce curriculum-based instructional materials in simple English to cover one academic year in preparation for English-medium secondary education. An associated program of teacher training was also examined. The evaluation investigated the…

  1. English in the Chinese foreign language classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

  2. The Growth of English for Academic Communication in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock-Utne, Birgit

    2001-07-01

    This article discusses the danger of subtractive English in higher education in Norway. If the use of a mother tongue as the medium of communication at the highest academic levels ceases, is drastically reduced and replaced through the use of a foreign tongue, we may speak of subtractive learning. If the mother tongue is being replaced by a foreign tongue in academic writing, in research and university level teaching, the mother tongue will stagnate. The vocabulary needed has not been allowed to develop at the highest academic level. The author maintains that the Norwegian language is threatened as an academic language and here discusses the following five phenomena, all contributing to this threat: 1. The increasing use of English words in Norwegian academic, bureaucratic or technological language. 2. The sale of more academic literature in English and stagnation of academic literature in Norwegian. 3. The recruitment of teaching staff who do not speak Norwegian. 4. The growth in Master degree courses taught in English. 5. The financial rewards being given to academic staff publishing in an international language (read: English) instead of in the mother tongue.

  3. AP English language & composition crash course

    CERN Document Server

    Hogue, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    AP English Language & Composition Crash Course - Gets You a Higher Advanced Placement Score in Less Time Crash Course is perfect for the time-crunched student, the last-minute studier, or anyone who wants a refresher on the subject. AP English Language & Composition Crash Course gives you: Targeted, Focused Review - Study Only What You Need to Know Crash Course is based on an in-depth analysis of the AP English Language & Composition course description outline and actual Advanced Placement test questions. It covers only the information tested on the exam, so you can make the most of your valua

  4. The Routledge Dictionary of English Language Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Filled with real examples of the way people use English in different contexts, The Routledge Dictionary of English Language Studies is an indispensable guide to the richness and variety of the English language for both students and the general reader.From abbreviation to zero-article, via fricative and slang, the Dictionary contains over 600 wide ranging and informative entries covering:the core areas of language description and analysis: phonetics and phonology, grammar, lexis, semantics, pragmatics and discoursesociolinguistics, including entries on social and regional variation, stylistic v

  5. Achieving testing for English Language Learners, ready or not?.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sau-Lim Tsang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available School reform efforts across the US have focused on creating systems in which all students are expected to achieve to high standards. To ensure that students reach those standards and to document what students know and can do, schools collect assessment information on students' academic achievement. More information is needed, however, to find out when such assessments are appropriate for English learners and can provide meaningful information about what such learners know and can do. We describe and discuss a study that addresses the question of when it is appropriate to administer content area tests in English to English learners. Drawing on the student database of San Francisco Unified School District, we examined the effect of language demands on the SAT/9 mathematics scores of Chinese-speaking and Spanish-speaking students. Our results showed that while the English language demands of the problem solving subscale affect all students, they have a larger effect on English learners' performance, thus rendering the tests inaccurate in measuring English learners' subject matter achievement. Our results also showed that this effect gradually decreases as students become more proficient in English, taking five to six years for students to reach parity with national norms. These results have important implications for the design of school accountability systems and policies with high-stakes consequences for English learners such as high-school graduation requirements based on standardized tests.

  6. Deflating the "Confucian Heritage Culture" Thesis in Intercultural and Academic English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Shaun

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops an interdisciplinary critical perspective on the concept of "Confucian Heritage Cultures" (CHC), used in intercultural and English language teaching theory to explain the supposed culturally distinct learning habits, expectations and schemas many Asian students bring to academic classrooms in English-speaking…

  7. Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namsook

    2016-01-01

    Drawn on the sociocultural paradigm, I examined teacher-student communication with emphasis on teacher's talk and its role on international students' learning English as a Second Language in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews,…

  8. The Study on "Academic Game"-Oriented English Course Model for Postgraduates in Agricultural Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinrong

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the questionnaire survey on learning motivation and learning needs of postgraduates and their demands and suggestions on English teaching, the paper makes a beneficial exploration on English course model for postgraduates in agricultural universities. Under the guidance of academic game theory, the "language skills+…

  9. Language Ideologies and Standard English Language Policy in Singapore: Responses of a "Designer Immigrant" Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on year-long critical ethnographic study conducted in a Singapore school and examines how the standard English language educational policy is interpreted by a Secondary 3 (Grade 9) female student from China. She is a member of an exclusive group of academically able students who has been carefully recruited by the local…

  10. The Effects of Language on English Language Learners' Music Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pei-Ying Lin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of songs in different languages on English language learners' (ELLs) music preferences. The participants (N = 62) were Chinese graduate students from a state university in the Midwestern United States. The survey contained nine excerpts from popular songs in three languages: Chinese (the…

  11. Reading-Writing Relationships in First and Second Language Academic Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, William; Zhang, Cui

    2016-01-01

    Reading and writing relations, as this concept applies to academic learning contexts, whether as a major way to learn language or academic content, is a pervasive issue in English for academic purposes (EAP) contexts. In many cases, this major link between reading/writing and academic learning is true even though explicit discussions of this…

  12. Collaborative Work and Language Learners' Identities When Editing Academic Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes, Lorena; Meza, Angélica; Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case study that involved three groups of English as a foreign language pre-service teachers at a Colombian private university. Each group attended tutoring sessions during an academic semester. Along these sessions, students were asked to work collaboratively in the editing process of some chapters of their thesis…

  13. The Linguist and the English Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Randolph

    This collection of essays focuses on linguistic investigations of English, both spoken and written. The 12 chapters deal with Charles Dickens' linguistic criticism; eighteenth century prescriptivism; the relevance of language study to the study of Shakespeare; obstacles to the study of Old and Middle English; the contributions of R. G. Latham to…

  14. Transitioning English Language Learners: Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector-Mason, Anestine; Shaewitz, Dahlia; Sherman, Renee; Brown, Delphinia; Salomon, Erika; Bauman, Emily; Mendieta, Yorkmit; Corley, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    On July 17, 2008 the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) awarded a contract to the American Institutes for Research (AIR) to assist OVAE in conducting a descriptive study of instructional and programmatic practices that support the transition of English language learners (TELL) from English as a second…

  15. Developmental Screening Disparities for Languages Other than English and Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuti Rodrigues, Kristine; Hambidge, Simon J; Dickinson, Miriam; Richardson, Douglas B; Davidson, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    Limited English proficiency (LEP) is a known barrier to preventive care. Children from families with LEP face socioeconomic circumstances associated with increased odds of developmental delays and decreased participation in early care and education programs. Little is known about developmental surveillance and screening for children from families who speak languages other than English and Spanish. We sought to compare developmental surveillance and screening at well-child visits (WCVs) by preferred parental language. Using a retrospective cohort (n = 15,320) of children aged 8 to 40 months with ≥2 WCVs from January 1, 2006, to July 1, 2010, in a community health system, 450 children from 3 language groups (150 English, 150 Spanish, and 150 non-English, non-Spanish) were randomly selected. Chart review assessed 2 primary outcomes, developmental surveillance at 100% of WCVs and screened with a standardized developmental screening tool, and also determined whether children were referred for diagnostic developmental evaluation. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Compared to the English-speaking group, the non-English, non-Spanish group had lower odds of receiving developmental surveillance at 100% of WCVs (odds ratio, 0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.2, 0.5) and of being screened with a standardized developmental screening tool (odds ratio, 0.1; 95% confidence interval, 0.1, 0.2). There were no differences between the English- and Spanish-speaking groups. Though underpowered, no differences were found for referral. Improved developmental surveillance and screening are needed for children from families who speak languages other than English and Spanish. Lack of statistically significant differences between English- and Spanish-speaking groups suggests that improved translation and interpretation resources may decrease disparities. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Teaching Pronunciation to Adult English Language Learners. CAELA Network Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaetzel, Kirsten; Low, Ee Ling

    2009-01-01

    Adult English language learners in the United States approach the learning of English pronunciation from a wide variety of native language backgrounds. They may speak languages with sound systems that vary a great deal from that of English. The pronunciation goals and needs of adult English language learners are diverse. These goals and needs…

  17. English language knowledge for secondary teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Alison

    2013-01-01

    If teachers are to successfully develop their students' English language skills it is vital that they overcome any existing lack of confidence and training in grammar and language concepts. Language Knowledge for Secondary Teachers is an accessible book aiming to equip secondary teachers with the knowledge they need to teach language effectively. It clearly explains the essential concepts for language study, introduces the terminology needed for 'talking about language' and shows how this knowledge can be applied to the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. This

  18. WAYS OF DEVELOPING PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmyla Gavrilova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of future specialists into advanced studying of English as the main language of international communication is a relevant problem of modern higher education in Ukraine. This issue relevance is proved by the country's integration into the European educational environment, changes in strategic directions of higher education development in Ukraine, regulations by Ukrainian Government and the Ministry of Education, in particular, the Decree of the President of Ukraine “On Declaring 2016 the Year of English Language in Ukraine”, “Common European Framework on Language Education”. Essential changes which are now taking place in studying foreign languages, especially English, are also associated with the competency paradigm of education that focuses on achieving certain educational results and orienting scientific research of professional pedagogical education in recent years. An important condition for reformatting process of learning a foreign (English language is monitoring future specialists’ academic achievements in this field, particularly future teachers’ ones. The concept “pedagogical monitoring” is interpreted as a system of measures for collecting and analyzing data to study and evaluate the quality of professional training and to make decisions on further improvement of the educational process. The purpose of the article is to highlight and analyze the results of monitoring the level of English of State higher educational establishment “Donbas State Pedagogical University” students and reveal the ways of improving future teachers` English communicative competence. The monitoring stages are assessing the starting level of foreign (English language of students who are not trained in the field of language-related professions using the tests for A2 level standards of Cambridge Educational Syndicate; reformatting the content of learning English at the university: developing and implementing the course

  19. Globalization and English Language Policy in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkgoz, Yasemin

    2009-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that globalization has made a considerable impact on multidimensional aspects of human life including the language policies of many countries. This article examines the adjustment of Turkey's language policy in response to the global influence of English at different levels of Turkish national education, including its…

  20. Meeting Common Core English Language Arts and English Language Development Standards with Character Education Lesson Plans in Alternative Education Grades 9 through 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedel, Joseph M.; Lee, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    This is a case study in which the Character Development and Leadership Program replaced an alternative high school's traditional English language offerings. A triangulated case study used student records, field notes, and interviews of stakeholders to compare the academic year prior to this substitution and the 2 academic years following it. All 3…

  1. Characteristics of an Effective English Language Teacher as Perceived by Iranian Teachers and Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishavan, Homa Babai; Sadeghi, Karim

    2009-01-01

    This study attempted to characterize qualities of an effective English language teacher (EELT) as perceived by Iranian English language teachers and learners. For this purpose, a tailor-made questionnaire was administered to 59 English language teachers and 215 learners of English at universities, high schools and language institutes in Iran. The…

  2. WEBLOGS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING: Students’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juida WAN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The digital explosion of information on the Internet has resulted in a need for a new and up-to-date way for Digital Natives to learn English. Educators have reported numerous benefits of using weblogs in English language learning. This article presents a small scale study on the use of weblogs for English language learning at tertiary level in Malaysia. Twenty six students kept weblogs for a duration of a semester. This study investigated how students perceived the use of weblogs for English language learning. A questionnaire which was made up of both close-ended and open-ended questions was administered at the end of the study. A mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyse the students’ responses to the questionnaire. The study found that students were aware of their audience when they blogged and that they geared their writing towards their audience. In addition, they also interacted with others through the use of the comment feature on their weblogs. Furthermore, the majority of the students enjoyed blogging and found weblogs useful for English language learning. This study found that weblogs are promising interactive tools for English language learning.

  3. Anxiety in English Language Learning: A Case Study of English Language Learners in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Jamilah Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Language anxiety as a specific aspect of language acquisition has occupied a great body of research for the past few decades. In this study, the level of foreign language anxiety among English language learners was investigated. This study was carried out with a quantitative research design using a survey methodology to collect data about the…

  4. Aspects of English Language learning in Tripura

    OpenAIRE

    Majumder, Barnita

    2015-01-01

    Tripura is a hilly state. The community of this state is mostly tribes and Bengalese. The official language is English and Bengali. The Government vernacular medium schools and English medium schools support the use of the mother tongue in classroom. In vernacular medium schools it is obvious that all the subjects are written in Bengali except the subject English. But in English class also the mother tongue is used as a medium of instruction which is a hindrance to the students in the way of ...

  5. Measures for Determining English Language Proficiency and the Resulting Implications for Instructional Provision and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Craig A.; Kenyon, Dorry M.; Boals, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Although numerous English language proficiency (ELP) measures currently exist, many were developed prior to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). These pre-NCLB measures typically focused on social language proficiency, whereas post-NCLB measures are linked to ELP standards and focus on academic language proficiency (ALP). ELP measures are…

  6. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  7. English Language Teachers’ Professional Development and Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mora

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the professional development of two English language teachers in a Mexican language center. In particular, it explores the interplay between professional development, identity and agency, and the part played by English language teaching certificates in all of these. Drawing on a case study methodology, which included the use of a series of three interviews and other qualitative data collection methods, the article demonstrates the intimate and intricate connection between teachers’ identities and their professional development. Education implications for policy makers and practitioners are discussed.

  8. Using Video in the English Language Clasroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amado Vicente

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Video is a popular and a motivating potential medium in schools. Using video in the language classroom helps the language teachers in many different ways. Video, for instance, brings the outside world into the language classroom, providing the class with many different topics and reasons to talk about. It can provide comprehensible input to the learners through contextualised models of language use. It also offers good opportunities to introduce native English speech into the language classroom. Through this article I will try to show what the benefits of using video are and, at the end, I present an instrument to select and classify video materials.

  9. Language Ideologies in a Danish Company with English as a Corporate Language: "It Has to Be English"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    With the spread of English as a global language, concerns have been voiced over the impact of English on local languages. This article presents results from an ethnographic study of language ideologies in a Danish workplace with a particular focus on ideologies of English in relation to the local language and to other foreign languages. In this…

  10. Literature in English Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalovska, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to show that literature can and should be part of foreign language teaching. It argues that adopting language-based approaches to studying literary texts will help foreign language learners to find the way into the text, to become actively involved in the text, to improve their knowledge of the language, and to develop their literary awareness. The application of language-based approaches is illustrated on three extracts from the novel To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woo...

  11. Measuring and Comparing Academic Language Development and Conceptual Understanding via Science Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Margarita; Tong, Fuhui; Irby, Beverly J.; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this quantitative study measured and compared the academic language development and conceptual understanding of fifth-grade economically disadvantaged English language learners (ELL), former ELLs, and native English-speaking (ES) students as reflected in their science notebook scores. Using an instrument they developed, the authors…

  12. Psychometric testing of the English Language Acculturation Scale in first-year nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Attwood, Nathan; Everett, Bronwyn; Weaver, Roslyn; Glew, Paul

    2013-10-01

    This article is a report of the psychometric testing of the five-item English Language Acculturation Scale, an indicator of English language usage as reported by first-year undergraduate nursing students. Nursing students who have English as an additional language can struggle clinically and academically due to low levels of English language proficiency. A self-report screening tool may provide early identification of nursing students at risk of underperformance. Prospective correlational survey design. The study used a prospective, correlational survey design. In 2010 and 2011, 1400 commencing nursing students were surveyed about their English language usage using the English Language Acculturation Scale. In addition to descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and Cronbach's alpha reliabilities, the relationship between English Language Acculturation Scale score and Grade Point Average at the end of first year was computed. Results show good reliability and construct validity of the English Language Acculturation Scale. Principal component analysis yielded only one component in which all five items loaded highly. This was further supported by confirmatory factor analysis, with standardized factor loadings ranging from 0·79 to 0·90. The results also showed strong association between English language use and academic performance; students in the high English Language Acculturation Scale score group were most likely to be in the high Grade Point Average group at the end of first year. Language screening tools can be an important strategy to identify nursing students at risk of underperforming in their studies. The English Language Acculturation Scale has the potential to be a useful brief self-report measure for commencing nursing students. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Research-Based Vocabulary Instruction for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stephanie F.

    2012-01-01

    A major reading-achievement gap exists between English language learners and English-only students. In order for ELLs to experience school success, they must achieve English language proficiency. This article presents why vocabulary acquisition plays the most vital role in ELLs' learning of the English language. Factors include the severity and…

  14. 37 CFR 3.26 - English language requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false English language requirement... English language requirement. The Office will accept and record non-English language documents only if accompanied by an English translation signed by the individual making the translation. [62 FR 53202, Oct. 10...

  15. Home language and English language ability in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we analyse data on language ability collected in a new nationally representative household survey, the National Income Dynamics Study, which captures information on reading and writing ability, both in the individual's home language and in English. Two main findings are that self-assessed reading and ...

  16. Is English Language Really the Appropriate Language for Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the impact of the use of the English language for health mobilization in Calabar Town. It also aimed at establishing the effectiveness of the language used in health mobilization in the town. The study was carried out in Calabar Municipality and Calabar South Local Government Areas of Cross River ...

  17. English Language Learning Strategies Reported by Advanced Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyeon; Heinz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate effective English language learning strategies (LLSs) employed by successful language learners. The participants in this study were 20 student interpreters enrolled in the graduate school of interpretation and translation in Korea. Data on LLSs were collected through unstructured essay writing, a…

  18. Acquisition of Mathematical Language: Suggestions and Activities for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Michelle; Bruna, Katherine Richardson; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe aspects of mathematical language that could be problematic to English-language learners, provide recommendations for teaching English-language learners, and suggest activities intended to foster language development in mathematics. (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. Does Teaching English in Saudi Primary Schools Affect Students’ Academic Achievement in Arabic Subjects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Aljohani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The global trend of introducing second language learning, namely, English, in primary schools is increasing. In Saudi Arabia, where English has never been taught in primary schools, the government to implement English as a second language at the primary level in 2005; however, this generated controversy. Opposition to the learning of English has been based on religious, cultural, and educational arguments. The latter argument consists of claims that learning English at a young age might influence children’s mother tongue development and influence their academic success. This paper investigates the impact of teaching English in Saudi primary schools on students’ achievement in Arabic-language subjects. This quantitative research aims to inform the debate on second language learning in primary schools by studying children’s examination results in the Arabic subject areas of grammar, reading, and writing. The sample consisted of primary school students from years 1 to 6 as well as year 6 students from the last year before (2004 and the first year after (2005 the introduction of English. Student results from four primary schools (two government schools and two private schools were collected and analysed. This study found no indication of a positive or negative impact of learning English on students’ achievement in Arabic subjects. However, private school students who studied English beginning in their first year of school had better results in the Arabic subjects that were the focus of this research. Keywords: second language acquisition, language impact, ESL

  20. A study of the effects of English language proficiency and scientific reasoning skills on the acquisition of science content knowledge of Hispanic English language learners and native English language-speaking students participating in grade 10 science classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Hector Neftali, Sr.

    2000-11-01

    lends support to Cummins' theoretical framework, which indicates that learning science content subject matter requires cognitive academic language proficiency (CALP). The study also indicates that CALP maybe the combination of high order English language proficiency and high levels of reasoning skills. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. The Relationship between Iranian English Language Teachers' and Learners' Gender and Their Perceptions of an Effective English Language Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishavan, Homa Babai

    2010-01-01

    In this study English language teachers and learners engaged in teaching and learning of English in Iranian universities, high schools and private language institutes were asked about characteristics of an effective English language teacher. The aim of the study was to investigate whether male and female teachers and learners of English hold…

  2. Emerging from English as a Foreign Language to English as an International Language within a Changing Global Context: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, Gale W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study eight international scholars and practitioners of English were interviewed in order to understand their viewpoints about how English language teaching is evolving from a role of English as a Foreign Language to one of English as an International Language in this contemporary world in which there are more nonnative…

  3. College teachers' perceptions of English language characteristics that identify English language learning disabled deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, G P; Samar, V J; Parasnis, I

    2000-10-01

    Deaf individuals typically experience English language difficulties at all levels of linguistic knowledge. Hearing individuals with English language learning disabilities (LD) can exhibit the same kinds of English language difficulties as deaf individuals. Although the existence of deaf individuals who also have LD has long been recognized, no definite criteria for identifying them exist, partly because of the confounding effects of deafness and LD on English language development. Despite the confound, previous surveys suggest that teachers believe atypical English-language behavior is a potential diagnostic marker for LD in deaf individuals. In the present study, a survey solicited the intuitions of experienced teachers and tutors of English to deaf college students regarding the degree of difficulty deaf students with and without LD might be expected to have in dealing with 30 specific English language phenomena. Spelling knowledge and a variety of English discourse, lexical syntactic, and morphological phenomena emerged as candidates for further study as potential markers of LD in the deaf population.

  4. Relationship between Language and Concept Science Notebook Scores of English Language Learners and/or Economically Disadvantaged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Margarita; Irby, Beverly J.; Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Tong, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Despite research interest in testing the effects of literacy-infused science interventions in different contexts, research exploring the relationship, if any, between academic language and conceptual understanding is scant. What little research exists does not include English language learners (ELLs) and/or economically disadvantaged (ED) student…

  5. Higher English language skills for CFE

    CERN Document Server

    Firth, Mary M; Mitchell, John

    2015-01-01

    A brand new edition of a bestselling title, updated for the newest Higher English (for CfE) syllabus. We are working with SQA to secure endorsement for this title. This book provides you with the support and advice you will need to succeed in Higher English. By studying literary techniques and with top experts guiding you through and explaining how to use these skills, you will be helped to understand why questions are framed in a particular way and how to answer them in a manner that ensures the highest possible grade. - Become more secure in your knowledge of the English language. - Learn ho

  6. Intercultural Exposure through English Language Teaching: An Analysis of an English Language Textbook in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqie, Shamsun Akhter

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of culture in foreign language textbooks is comparatively a new trend in English Language Teaching (ELT) which is based on the growing consensus that language textbooks should attempt to raise students' awareness of international culture as well as that of their own. Being influenced by this thought, Bangladesh too like many other…

  7. THE RELEVANCE OF LEARNING APPLIED ENGLISH FOR ACADEMICS TO FOSTER PROFESSIONALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Algadrie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Academics who are not competent in communication skills, particularly language skills, will develop less compared to those who are. Communication skills in general and language skills in particular will foster professionalism since professionals will spend less time doing and more time managing as experience grows. Professionalism grows from qualities that can be learned and developed as well as information learned and acquired. Negotiating skills will enable them to win deals more readily. Moreover, internet based realms of communications are mostly English speaking creations, which vary in terms of level of formality and choice of words. In this paper the writer shares her experience in materials preparations and a classroom-centered research done on a group of academics of non-English majors who came to ITS Language Centre to improve their English language competence for career development and further studies.

  8. The English Language in Japan: History, Attitudes, and Functions. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachru, Braj B.; Smith, Larry E.

    1995-01-01

    Introduces this special issue on the English language in Japan, which focuses on the historical phases of the introduction of English, the role of English in the educational system and the media, the contact and convergence of Japanese and English, the functions of English in Japan, and Japanese attitudes toward English. (three references) (MDM)

  9. Language Learning Strategies of English for Specific Purposes Students at a Public University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohamed Ismail Ahamad; Ismail, Yusof; Esa, Zaleha; Muhamad, Ainon Jariah

    2013-01-01

    Studies on strategy research have shown the usefulness and importance of language learning strategies (LLS) for ESL and EFL learners. However, research on content-based learners in relation to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and English for Occupational Purposes (EOP) has yet to be undertaken. This study, therefore, investigated the learning…

  10. Developing Independent Listening Skills for English as an Additional Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Michelle; Velautham, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an action research project to develop online, self-access listening resources mirroring the authentic academic contexts experienced by graduate university students. Current listening materials for English as an Additional Language (EAL) students mainly use Standard American English or Standard British pronunciation, and far…

  11. Relationship between "Form" and "Content" in Science Writing among English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee; Penfield, Randall D.; Buxton, Cory A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: While different instructional approaches have been proposed to integrate academic content and English proficiency for English language learning (ELL) students, studies examining the magnitude of the relationship are non-existent. This study examined the relationship between the "form" (i.e., conventions, organization, and…

  12. Research methods for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Jo

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

  13. The Possibility of English as a Second Language in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Adipramono, Raditya

    2011-01-01

    It is known that there is a general concern for those who must leave their original language and original culture to adjust to the surroundings and mastering a new language. For Indonesian, English is known as first foreign language and not as second language. There are some problems as Indonesian to regard English as second language. This paper is trying to discuss the problems and also the possibility of English as second language in Indonesia.

  14. English Language Teaching in Rural Areas: A Scenario and Problems and Prospects in Context of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Mahroof Hossain

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Language is one of the medium of expressing our ideas, feelings and emotions. And if we think about language in present world then English is one of the most used languages in the world and English is used as a second language in Bangladesh. English is introduced here at the primary level and its inclusion continues till the tertiary level of education. Most of the students of the primary schools in rural areas are weak in English language due to lack of skilled and trained teachers who are familiar to the modern methods and approaches of teaching and lack of materials for teaching in the classroom. Primary level English curriculum implementation is essential in Bangladesh to achieve the set English language competency in the rural areas. Students in the rural areas are performing poorly in English compared to their urban counterparts. Statistics showed that there was a gulf of difference between the facilities enjoyed by rural schools and urban schools. The study explores the challenges of teaching English language in rural areas in context of Bangladesh. This study investigated the factors affecting student’s performance in English language in rural areas. Data were collected using interviews, classroom observation and questionnaire. Result of the study reveals that students were highly motivated to learn English for future expectations such as local and international communication, academic advancement and employment prospects. It also provide a scenario of English teaching system in rural areas of Bangladesh as well as the problems and prospects of English language in perspective of Bangladesh. Keywords: English language, rural areas, education, learning and teaching, competency

  15. Teaching and Learning the Language of Science: A Case Study of Academic Language Acquisition in a Dual Language Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Robin Margaretha

    English language learners (EL) are the fastest growing sub-group of the student population in California, yet ELs also score the lowest on the science section of the California Standardized Tests. In the area of bilingual education, California has dramatically changed its approach to English learners since the passage of Proposition 227 in 1998, which called for most EL instruction to be conducted in English (Cummins, 2000; Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2008). In reality, this means that EL students are often placed in programs that focus on basic language skills rather than rigorous content, meaning that they are not getting access to grade level science content (Lee & Fradd, 1998). As a result, many EL students exit eighth grade without a strong foundation in science, and they continue to score below their English-speaking peers on standardized achievements. While the usefulness of the academic language construct remains controversial (Bailey, 2012), the language used in science instruction is nevertheless often unfamiliar to both EL and English proficient students. The discourse is frequently specialized for discipline-specific interactions and activities (Bailey, 2007; Lemke, 1990). This qualitative case study examined academic language instruction in three middle school science classrooms at a dual language charter school. The goal was to understand how teachers integrate academic language and content for linguistically diverse students. The findings fom this study indicate that targeting language instruction in isolation from science content instruction prohibits students from engaging in the "doing of science" and scientific discourse, or the ability to think, reason, and communicate about science. The recommendations of this study support authentically embedding language development into rigorous science instruction in order to maximize opportunities for learning in both domains.

  16. Language training: English & French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from end of February to end of June 2006 (break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of March to May 2006 (break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from Ma...

  17. ESP AS AN APPROACH OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING IN ITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Susilowati

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available According to National Curriculum Preparation Guideline 2004 – 2009, teaching English in ITS is classified into General Studies ( MKU and distributed into “ Personality Development – Related subject “ ( MPK – Mata Kuliah Pengembangan Kepribadian . However, English as subject has been redundantly placed within the ITS curriculum. While under the curriculum preparation guideline the subject falls into the category of Personality – Development related subjects, the course content involves a significant degree of skills that are required by the students during learning process at ITS. The teaching of English at ITS should therefore be designed to meet the demands for personality development, as well as knowledge and skills improvement. In the attempt of meeting these demands, the English teaching staff have agreed to adopt the ESP approach. The popular principle of English for Specific Purposes ( ESP is “ Tell me what you need English for and I will tell you the English that you need”. This principle suggests that ESP is an approach to language teaching which is oriented to fulfil learners’needs. So teaching English at the tertiary level for non English Department such as in ITS is still mostly concentrated on the need for the capability of reading relevant text books. The teaching of English is focused on the reading skill specialized in relevant text books which will reinforce the mastery of basic vocabulary and grammar because mastering reading skill is determined mostly by those two elements. However, this shift to gives other study skills such as note taking, group discussion, presentation and academic writing.

  18. ENGLISH LOANS IN SWAHILI NEWSPAPER FOOTBALL LANGUAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Josephine Dzahene-Quarshie

    Dzahene-Quarshie: Swahili Football Language. 40 refa arbitrator/ referee referee mwamuzi decision maker referee benchi la ufundi bench of technical technical bench nahodha captain captain. Table 4: Standard Technical Expressions. Swahili labels. Literal Translations. English Equivalent msaada wa kifundi assistance ...

  19. English as Language of Learning and Teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges to preschool teachers in learner's acquisition of. English as Language of Learning and Teaching. Sandra du Plessis and Brenda Louw sandup@discoverymail.co.za; brenda.louW@up.ac.za. Multilingualism in classrooms is currently prompting debate and has signifi- cantly impacted on schooling in South Africa ...

  20. Productive Language Use with IT'S ENGLISH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Jaspers, J.G.M.; Kok, W.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the results of a study in 1989, a new Computer-Assisted Instruction program for foreign language teaching of English has been developed. Main features of this program are the communicative approach, a 70, 000 word dictionary, sound and a syntactic parser.An evaluation study was carried out

  1. "Harry Potter" and the English Language Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatney, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Describes one teacher's success with using "Harry Potter" in a program to teach elementary school English language learners. Provides comprehension strategies incorporated to help learners understand the story. Highlights the importance of creating a classroom environment with a low level of anxiety, the implications of the program, and the value…

  2. Developing an English Language Textbook Evaluation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Hajimohammadi, Reza; Nimehchisalem, Vahid

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the considerations that were taken into account in the development of a tentative English language textbook evaluation checklist. A brief review of the related literature precedes the crucial issues that should be considered in developing checklists. In the light of the previous evaluation checklists the developers created a…

  3. The English Language of the Nigeria Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinwe, Udo Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In the present day Nigeria, the quality of the English language spoken by Nigerians, is perceived to have been deteriorating and needs urgent attention. The proliferation of books and articles in the recent years can be seen as the native outcrop of its received attention and recognition as a matter of discourse. Evidently, every profession,…

  4. Reading Interventions to Support English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Jolene

    2012-01-01

    High stakes assessments conducted in the southwestern United States demonstrate that fewer than 50% of English language learners (ELLs) are achieving proficiency levels in reading fluency. The purpose of this study was to understand if reading interventions using the framework of Samuels's repeated reading (RR) strategy increased student…

  5. An Institutional Approach to English Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Neil; Hicks, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    As the university student body becomes ever more diverse, the place and nature of English language provision is coming under unprecedented scrutiny and is the object of greater regulation. Today, more than ever before, institutions of higher education are being called to account for the way in which they support this diverse population in respect…

  6. English language teaching textbooks content, consumption, production

    CERN Document Server

    Harwood, N

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching textbooks (or coursebooks) play a central role in the life of a classroom. This edited volume contains research-informed chapters focusing on: analysis of textbook content; how textbooks are used in the classroom; and textbook writers' accounts of the materials writing, design, and publishing process.

  7. Second Language Learners' Attitudes towards English Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weimin; Hu, Guiling

    2008-01-01

    This pilot project investigates second language (L2) learners' attitudes towards three varieties of English: American (AmE), British (BrE) and Australian (AuE). A 69-word passage spoken by a female speaker of each variety was used. Participants were 30 Chinese students pursuing Masters or Doctoral degrees in the United States, who listened to each…

  8. "Wh"-Questions in the English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes "wh"-questions in the English Language based mainly on Chomsky's Minimalist Programme of transformational grammar as the theoretical model. The four main objectives of this paper are as follows: first, it undertakes a cross linguistic typological analysis of "wh"-questions and it then discusses the derivation of…

  9. Scaffolding English Language Learners' Reading Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lolita D.

    2011-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) spend a majority of their instructional time in mainstream classrooms with mainstream teachers. Reading is an area with which many ELLs are challenged when placed within mainstream classrooms. Scaffolding has been identified as one of the best teaching practices for helping students read. ELL students in a local…

  10. Cambridge IGCSE english as a second language

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Revised edition for the 2015 syllabus offering the easiest and most cost effective way to teach both the speaking and listening components with one set of books covering two years and free digital material. This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language (0510 and 0511) syllabuses, for first teaching from 2013. ? Prepares students for their exams with a focus on assessed language features, such as inference, opinion and attitude. ? Develops language abilities at an appropriate pace with extra interactive tests on a free CD-ROM. We are working with Cambr

  11. Coding and English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Vance; Verschoor, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    According to Dudeney, Hockly, and Pegrum (2013) coding is a deeper skill subsumed under the four main digital literacies of language, connections, information, and (re)design. Coders or programmers are people who write the programmes behind everything we see and do on a computer. Most students spend several hours playing online games, but few know…

  12. Methods of English language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Козелецька, І.С.

    2013-01-01

    The grammar translation method instructs students in grammar, and provides vocabulary with direct translations to memorize. It was the predominant method in Europe in the 19th century. Most instructors now acknowledge that this method is ineffective by itself. It is now most commonly used in the traditional instruction of the classical languages.

  13. Proficiency in English as a second official language (ESOL) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper first presents a background to English as the international and global language and the second official language as well as the medium of instruction in Lesotho. It further discusses the meaning of proficiency in English and the rationale for teaching and learning English as well as using English as the medium of ...

  14. English, Language Shift and Values Shift in Japan and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This is a comparative study of English language education in Japan and Singapore and the role English plays in both countries. English language education in Japan has not been very effective. Although the communicative approach to teaching English was introduced in the 1980s, schools still use the grammar-translation method and most Japanese do…

  15. Language Training: English & French courses

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from end of February to end of June 2006 (break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of March to May 2006 (break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skil...

  16. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  17. 48 CFR 614.201-70 - Use of English language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of English language... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 614.201-70 Use of English language. Use of English language solicitations and contracts is mandatory unless a deviation has been approved by the...

  18. 19 CFR 122.4 - English language required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false English language required. 122.4 Section 122.4... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.4 English language required. A translation in the English language shall be attached to the original and each copy of any form or document...

  19. 16 CFR 300.7 - English language requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false English language requirement. 300.7 Section... AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.7 English language..., shall appear in the English language. If the product bears any stamp, tag, label, or mark of...

  20. 16 CFR 303.4 - English language requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false English language requirement. 303.4 Section... AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.4 English language requirement. All required information shall be set out in the English language. If the required information...

  1. 16 CFR 301.3 - English language requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false English language requirements. 301.3 Section... AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.3 English language requirements. All..., shall be set out in the English language. If labels, invoices or advertising matter contain any of the...

  2. English Language Education Policy in Colombia and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    English language education policies have attracted the attention of researchers in applied linguistics and English language teaching world-wide in the last few years. Some contend that English language skills are vital if a country is to participate actively in the global economy and individuals are to have access to knowledge for social and…

  3. The indispensable role of the English language in sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous researches and prevalent issues have revealed that the world has indeed become a global world with a dominate language which is the English language. English has become a unifying factor in multilingual multicultural nations. In Nigeria precisely, the English language occupies a unique position and ...

  4. English Language Teaching Through Literature : An Application of English Poetry in the High School English Textbook to the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    濵口, 脩

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this present paper is to review the present state of English poetry in the high school English textbooks in Japan and to propose some practical application of English poems to the English language classroom. Several cases in which English poems are found in actual English high school textbooks are discussed, and then, since there seems to be no explanation of teaching English poems, with some notes of them and of reading English poems in general, some practical suggetions for impro...

  5. Flipping the Classroom for English Language Learners to Foster Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiu-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a structured attempt to integrate flip teaching into language classrooms using a WebQuest active learning strategy. The purpose of this study is to examine the possible impacts of flipping the classroom on English language learners' academic performance, learning attitudes, and participation levels. Adopting a…

  6. Predictors of the Instructional Strategies that Elementary School Teachers Use with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader-Brown, Lucy; Howley, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: According to demographers, the number of English language learners (ELLs) in U.S schools has been increasing and is likely to continue to increase in coming years. For various reasons relating to language acquisition, cultural adjustment, and persistent discrimination, these students tend to experience academic difficulties.…

  7. The History of the English Language Course: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressman, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    The study of the history of the English language can help students become aware of major issues in several academic fields, including history, literature, political science, anthropology, communication, economics, the Arts, and, of course, languages and linguistics. Even though instructors may not have an especially broad background in the…

  8. Semiotic Structure and Meaning Making: The Performance of English Language Learners on Mathematics Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Barnett-Clarke, Carne; Kachchaf, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the performance of English language learners (ELLs) and non-ELLs on Grade 4 and Grade 5 mathematics content knowledge (CK) and academic language (AL) tests. CK and AL items had different semiotic loads (numbers of different types of semiotic features) and different semiotic structures (relative frequencies of different semiotic…

  9. English language-in-education: A lesson planning model for subject ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African learners perform poorly in national and international tests aimed at measuring literacy and numeracy skills. One of the reasons for their performance is a lack of critical academic language skills in English as the Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT). This is noted against the background of previously ...

  10. The Parallel Language Use of Swedish and English: The Question of "Nativeness" in University Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    As a result of internationalisation, many universities in northern Europe have adopted English as a medium of instruction. At the same time, recent language policies have reinforced the importance of the national language(s) in the academic domain. Parallel language use was introduced and institutionalised in order to ensure students' right to…

  11. A whole language assistance programme with English second language pupils

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Ed. (Psychology of Education) As the South African education system is moving towards complete reorganisation and fundamental restructuring, teachers have been forced to take a look at the language being used in their now multilingual classrooms and also at their own teaching of language, as opposed to the teaching of school-based literature. Some teachers see this as a challenge, and with the attention now being paid in the school curriculum to the communicative use of English, are atte...

  12. Manifestation of critical thinking skills in the English textbooks employed by language institutes in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Birjandi, Parviz; Alizadeh, Iman

    2013-01-01

    Scholars in the field of education have unanimously subscribed to the pivotal role of critical thinking in individuals' life in general and their academic life in particular (Bloom, 1956; Ennis, 2003; Dewey, 1933). The thrust of the current study was to investigate the extent to which the books employed for Teaching English as Foreign Language include critical thinking skills. To attain this goal, 3 series of English books, namely, Top notch, Interchange, and English files series utilized by ...

  13. Young English language learners making thinking and language visible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela K Salmon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide teachers with a resource to assist them in understanding the inner workings of young English Language Learners (ELLs and how they externalize their thoughts in either their first or second language. This article not only analyzes how teachers can help children acquire a second language without sacrificing their first language and motivation, but also focuses on language processing in bilingual children through providing an understanding of both the interplay between language and cognition and the role of the environment. Results from an action research project implementing Harvard Project Zero’s Visible Thinking ideas serve as evidence to discuss the benefits of creating a culture of thinking in the classroom to promote additive bilingualism in young children.

  14. The Effect of English Learning Anxiety on Iranian High-School Students’ English Language Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Atef-Vahid; Alireza Fard Kashani

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored English language learning anxiety among 38 third-year high school students in English classrooms and its relationship with overall English achievement. Students’ foreign language anxiety was surveyed and analyzed using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986) [14] and their English achievement was measured through their final standardized English exam administered by the school. The results showed that although ...

  15. Training teachers for English Medium Instruction: lessons from research on second language listening comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ángeles Martín del Pozo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning and EMI (English Medium Instruction practices have outpaced theory and teacher training. There is a need to provide answers to some of the key issues such as the language requirements. This paper aims to show that knowledge from English for Specific Purposes and English for Academic Purposes, fields which have provided effective teaching practices and materials, could now be used in CLIL/EMI. The paper focuses on two of these. First, the issues related to second language academic listening comprehension and, secondly, the findings from research on it and their implications for student / lecturer training and materials design. These implications and suggestions are summarized. The paper concludes providing some language learning resources originally targeted to students but which could become tools for (self training of those teachers who need to update their language skills for CLIL.

  16. Sign-Supported English: Is It Effective at Teaching Vocabulary to Young Children with English as an Additional Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Chloë R.; Hobsbaum, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children who are learning English as an Additional Language (EAL) may start school with smaller vocabularies than their monolingual peers. Given the links between vocabulary and academic achievement, it is important to evaluate interventions that are designed to support vocabulary learning in this group of children. Aims: To evaluate…

  17. Learning Strategies in Alleviating English Writing Anxiety for English Language Learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Pei; Lin, Huey-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized the Oxford Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) and an English writing anxiety scale to examine the relationship between learning strategies and English writing anxiety in 102 university-level English language learners (ELLs) with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in a university in Taiwan. Kruskal Wallis Test…

  18. English, Language Dominance, and Ecolinguistic Diversity Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert; Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove

    2017-01-01

    The chapter analyses how English became dominant and the implications of the expansion of dominant languages for the linguistic and cultural ecology and biodiversity. English has expanded through the imperialist and linguicist policies of the UK, the USA and the World Bank. Key structural...... approach to analysing the relationships between linguistic and other diversities is needed. There is hard data on ecolinguistic impoverishment: diversity of all kinds is seriously endangered. Examples are given of mother-tongue-based multilingual education in Africa and of Nordic policies to maintain...

  19. From Native-like Selections to English Academic Performance: Exploring the Knowledge Base of English Bilinguals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gomari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pawley and Syder (1983 pointed out that idiomatic expressions can be discussed in terms of nativelike selection (NLS, which refers to the ability of the native speaker to express his/her intended meaning using an expression that is not only grammatical but also nativelike. In the current study, Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used to investigate the possible correlations between the variables of language contact (LC, language attitude (LA, and language motivation (LM integrative (Int.M and instrumental (Inst.M, age of L2 onset (AoO, and length of exposure to target language (LoE and English bilinguals’ (EBs knowledge of NLS in an international school—a semi-naturalistic setting. A possible correlation between EB’s NLS scores and their English academic performance (EAP was examined as well. Moreover, multiple regression analysis was conducted to investigate the factors predicting EB’s NLS knowledge. The participants were 281 high school students of mixed gender and ethnicity from an international school in the Philippines. Different questionnaires were used to collect data related to LC, LoE, AoA, LA, and LM. Data concerning NLS knowledge and EAP were gathered using a receptive NLS test together with a standardized English test. The results of the correlation analyses indicated that the variables of LC, LoE, Int.M, and AoO were significantly related to EBs’ knowledge of NLS. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between EB’s knowledge of NLS and their EAP. The results of regression analysis yet revealed that the variables of LC, LA, and Int.M predicted EB’s NLS knowledge. The findings provided pedagogical implications for those involved in EFL/ESL teaching, particularly in international schools.

  20. "English for the Global": Discourses in/of English-Language Voluntourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubiak, Cori

    2012-01-01

    Drawing upon the notion of hyperglobalism and critical perspectives on English as an international language, this study examines the ways in which English language teaching via volunteer tourism (i.e. English-language voluntourism) is represented and legitimated as an altruistic practice among organizational sponsors and in the talk of current and…

  1. Enhancing Students' Performance in the English Language through Literature-in-English in the Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejimola, Amuseghan Sunday; Ojuolape, Momoh Adenike

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the English Language and Literature-in-English in secondary schools in Nigeria. The purpose is to explore and expose the interdependence of the two subjects in enhancing English language competence. Apart from the educational advantages, it is also in the opinion of the writer that language is not only…

  2. Learning through English Language in Early Childhood Education: A Case of English Medium Schools in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalongo, Leopard Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In China the English medium schools are now mushrooming and many parents send their children at very early age. These schools enroll children of pre-school to school age to learn through English as foreign language regardless of their proficiency in the first language. Therefore the study aims at examining the learning English language as a…

  3. Slovene-English Language Contact and Language Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Šabec

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on Slovene - English language contact and the potential language change resulting from it. Both the immigrant context (the U.S. and Canada and Slovenia, where direct and indirect language contact can be observed respectively, are examined from two perspectives: social on the one hand and linguistic on the other. In the case of Slovene Americans and Canadians the emphasis is on language maintenance and shift, and on the relationship between mother tongue preservation and ethnic awareness. The linguistic section examines different types of bilingual discourse (borrowing, code switching, showing how the Slovene inflectional system in particular is being increasingly generalized, simplified and reduced, and how Slovene word order is gradually beginning to resemble that of English. In the case of Slovenia we are witnessing an unprecedented surge in the influence of English on Slovene, especially in the media (both classic and electronic, advertising, science, and the language of the young. This influence will be discussed on a number of levels, such as lexical, syntactic and intercultural, and illustrated by relevant examples.

  4. Foreign Language Planning in Saudi Arabia: Beyond English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Mark; Almansour, Maram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study of foreign language planning in Saudi Arabia. In terms of official policy, the sole foreign language taught in Saudi public schools is English. Therefore, researching foreign languages there is often limited to researching the area of English as a Foreign Language. However, evidence shows that…

  5. English Language Teachers' Attitudes to the Promotion of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... speak English as their first language, with about the same number speaking it as a second language. ... sole official language in spite of the elevation of French as second official language in 1998. The mass failure ... those who deride Nigerian English, can avoid speaking or writing it either consciously or ...

  6. A Study of the Motivational Patterns of Learners of English for Academic and Professional Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrar-ul-Hassan, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Learner motivation is considered a vital factor in second language instruction. An analysis of motivation types and degrees can reveal learners' expectations and learning objectives. The present study analyzes the motivational patterns of a group of English for academic and professional purposes (EAPP) learners while focusing on types and degrees…

  7. Effects of Multicomponent Academic Vocabulary Instruction for English Learners with Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, Sara L.; Douglas, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    We provided a multicomponent academic vocabulary intervention to six English learners with learning difficulties in a fifth-grade general education setting. A multiple probe design across word sets and replicated across students evaluated the effects of the intervention on students' use of expressive language to read and define content-specific…

  8. Challenges of Academic Listening in English: Reports by Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinyan

    2005-01-01

    Academic listening plays an important role in an ESL university student's academic success. Research in EAP has begun to show that ESL students have difficulty in English academic listening at American universities. Chinese students, who are from a different educational system and cultural environment, experience particular challenges in English…

  9. Morphing into Adolescents: Active Word Learning for English-Language Learners and Their Classmates in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2010-01-01

    Many students arrive at middle school without the academic language skills they need to read sophisticated texts with comprehension. In particular, English language learners and students from low-income backgrounds attending underresourced, urban middle schools lack opportunities to learn the thousands of academic words they need to succeed. To…

  10. English Textbooks in Parallel-Language Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Pecorari, D.; Shaw, P.; Irvine, Aileen; Malmstrom, H.

    2011-01-01

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities responded to a questionnaire asking about their experiences with English textbooks. Textbooks written in English were generally unpopular, and the perce...

  11. Internet use in teaching English language

    OpenAIRE

    Ranková Lukasová, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis deals with using the Internet in education in general and in teaching the English language. It consists of a theoretical part, which describes the Internet, a theoretical background for the use of the Internet in educational process, the need for implementation of information education in schools and showcases the current state of problems in terms of availability of literary sources. This part is followed by a practical part, where reader can find links to Web pages, which ...

  12. On Chinese Loan Words from English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yun; Deng, Tianbai

    2009-01-01

    In the recent twenty years, with China's reform and opening policy to the outside world, there is a sharp increase in English loan words in Chinese. On the one hand, it demonstrates that China's soft power has been booming up. But on the other hand, some language pollution in the meanwhile is caused by non-standard use of loan words in Chinese.…

  13. An English language interface for constrained domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    The Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) Jargon Interpreter (MJI) demonstrates an English language interface for a constrained domain. A constrained domain is defined as one with a small and well delineated set of actions and objects. The set of actions chosen for the MJI is from the domain of MSOCC Applications Executive (MAE) Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) directives and contains directives for signing a cathode ray tube (CRT) on or off, calling up or clearing a display page, starting or stopping a procedure, and controlling history recording. The set of objects chosen consists of CRTs, display pages, STOL procedures, and history files. Translation from English sentences to STOL directives is done in two phases. In the first phase, an augmented transition net (ATN) parser and dictionary are used for determining grammatically correct parsings of input sentences. In the second phase, grammatically typed sentences are submitted to a forward-chaining rule-based system for interpretation and translation into equivalent MAE STOL directives. Tests of the MJI show that it is able to translate individual clearly stated sentences into the subset of directives selected for the prototype. This approach to an English language interface may be used for similarly constrained situations by modifying the MJI's dictionary and rules to reflect the change of domain.

  14. Teacher Perfectionism and Iranian English Language Learners’ Motivation and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezvani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Educational psychology has recently reflected a policy shift from focusing on “what goes wrong” in schools, including psychological, physical, and educational disabilities, to recognizing and promoting strengths and positive aspects of students and their environments. Within this scope, some lines of research have examined the extent to which setting personal high standards influences such positive outcomes as educational achievement and high level of motivation. The present study was motivated by the concern that Iranian English language teachers' setting high standards, i.e. perfectionism, may predict English language learners’ motivation and language achievement. Through cluster random sampling, a total of 30 English language teachers with more than one year of experience and 300 elementary English language learners were selected from English Language Institutes in Fars province, Iran. Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism scale and Motivations Underlying English Language Learning questionnaire were used to measure teachers' perfectionism and learners’ language learning motivation, respectively. The learners' final scores in the English courses were collected as a measure of their language learning achievement. The result of simple regression analysis revealed that the teachers' perfectionism did not predict English language learners’ motivation and language achievement. In other words, Iranian English language teachers' perfectionism did not account for any variance in these two variables of interest. Keywords: Perfectionism, Motivation, Language Learning Achievement

  15. Mother-Adolescent Language Proficiency and Adolescent Academic and Emotional Adjustment among Chinese American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lisa L.; Benner, Aprile D.; Lau, Anna S.; Kim, Su Yeong

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of adolescents' and mothers' self-reports of English and heritage language proficiency in youth's academic and emotional adjustment among 444 Chinese American families. Adolescents who were proficient in English tended to exhibit higher reading achievement scores, math achievement scores, and overall GPA. Mothers who…

  16. The Impact of Teachers' Limited English Proficiency on English Second Language Learners in South African Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Norma; Müller, Heléne

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the role of language in teacher education programmes and in children's learning is crucial. This study focuses on the use of English as the language of learning and teaching and its impact on the language development of English second language (ESL) student teachers and ESL learners. Against the background of major theories in…

  17. EXPLORING STAIN PEKALONGAN STUDENTS’ STRATEGIES IN LEARNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Tuti Hastuti

    2014-01-01

    This study explored college students’strategies in learning English language. Two questions were presented. The first question is what strategies are used by the students in learning English language and the second question is how do the students use strategies in learning English language. To answer the first question, 49 college students gave respond on Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) questionnaire. Then, to answer the last question, five students participated in Think Aloud...

  18. The Best of Both Worlds? Towards an English for Academic Purposes/Academic Literacies Writing Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Ursula; Tribble, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This article is a review of two dominant approaches to academic writing instruction in higher education, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), which is used internationally, and Academic Literacies, which has become an influential model in the UK. The review was driven by a concern that Academic Literacies has been mainly focused on the situations…

  19. Gender Differences in Achievement Goals and Performances in English Language and Mathematics of Senior Secondary Schools Students in Borno State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Alice K. J.; Dauda, Bala; Umar, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper investigated gender difference in achievement goals and performance in English Language and Mathematics of senior secondary schools students in Borno State, Nigeria. The study specifically sought to determine gender differences in students' academic performances in English Language, Mathematics and overall academic performance as well as…

  20. Understanding On-Screen Reading Behaviors in Academic Contexts: A Case Study of Five Graduate English-as-a-Second-Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Undoubtedly, new areas of functionality for electronic texts will come to the fore and create new reading habits and expectations for dealing and interacting with text as electronic texts become dominant in the academic world. These new forms of reading will gradually become as natural as the different activities readers now take for granted, such…

  1. An Exploration of Foreign Language Anxiety and English Learning Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perceived to be two important affective variables, anxiety and motivation have been found to be highly correlated to second/foreign language acquisition. In order to examine the relationship between foreign language anxiety, English learning motivation, and performance in English, the present study investigated 980 undergraduate students from three universities in China who answered a 76-item survey. Analyses of the data revealed that (1 the respondents generally did not feel anxious in English and were moderately motivated to learn English, (2 foreign language anxiety and English learning motivation were significantly negatively correlated with each other, and (3 both foreign language anxiety and English learning motivation were significantly correlated with students' performance in English. Among the scales, foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCAS, intrinsic motivation (IntrinM, instrumental motivation (InstruM, fear of being negatively evaluated (FLCAS1, and interest in foreign languages and cultures (IFLC proved to be powerful predictors for the latter.

  2. ENGLISH: THE LANGUAGE OF COMMUNICATION IN TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMION MINODORA OTILIA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has become a success story of modern times. In the past decades the number of people whotravel abroad has grown rapidly. Tourism is a service - sector which has proved to be constant in times of economiccrisis and will continue to grow at a rapid pace in the 21st century. But tourism is an extremely complexendeavour.Communication is vital to its success since it is only through the effective use of communication thattourism marketers can offer to customers cues about world wide experiences.. Unfortunately, with the emphasis onscience and professional subjects, language studies are often neglected in universities. Consequently, English remains adifficult language to master in spite of the fact that the Tourism sector can benefit enormously from it and it can reviveinterest in learning languages .

  3. Cultural Diversity in English Language Teaching: Learners' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinh, Nguyen Duc

    2013-01-01

    The focus of culture in English language teaching (ELT) has traditionally been on the target culture of English speaking countries. However, the new status of English as international language (EIL) has led to significant changes in the practice of teaching and learning culture in ELT. Rather than relying on the paradigm of native speaker…

  4. English Language Teachers' Attitudes to the Promotion of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Against the backdrop of the near-impossibility of attaining a native-like command of the English in a second language situation, which is one of the major factors found to be militating against Nigerian learners of the English language, this study examines the prospects of promoting the Standard Nigerian English to end the ...

  5. An Examination of English Language Proficiency and Achievement Test Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Tammy C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the relationship between grade eight English language proficiency as measured by the ACCESS for ELL's assessment (Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State to State for English Language Learners) and achievement test outcomes on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment, a state mandated…

  6. Evaluation of English Language Textbooks Used in the Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the readability, comprehensibility, availability and the level of integration of English language and Literature in English in the English language textbooks in use in Lagos State junior secondary schools. Three hundred students and 60 teachers were selected from 20 schools in Lagos State.

  7. Ambiguous Aims: English-Language Voluntourism as Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubiak, Cori

    2016-01-01

    "English-language voluntourism" is a practice whereby people from the Global North teach English in the Global South as an alternative form of travel and means of development assistance. As part of a larger, multisited ethnography, I investigate how in-service and former English-language voluntourism program participants frame short-term…

  8. Linking English First Additional Language teaching and learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English as the language of learning, the acquisition of English as second (or even third) language, as well as OBE has been researched before. This study is unique in the way that it addresses the direct influence of the OBE approach on the teaching and learning process in Grade 8 EFAL classrooms. Keywords: English ...

  9. Different Reasons to Play Games in an English Language Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy-Biloon, Julia

    2017-01-01

    English language students at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion (UNAE) in Ecuador tend to have various learning styles and have a hard time being motivated to not only learn, but also remember the correct form of English language being taught in the classroom. It is mandatory for these students to learn English; therefore many do not have…

  10. The Influence of English on British Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    Details the influence of English on British Sign Language (BSL) at the syntactic, morphological, lexical, idiomatic, and phonological levels. Shows how BSL uses loan translations, fingerspellings, and the use of mouth patterns derived from English language spoken words to include elements from English. (Author/VWL)

  11. Predictors and Outcomes of Early vs. Later English Language Proficiency Among English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Tamara; Hair, Elizabeth; Wandner, Laura; McNamara, Michelle; Chien, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The development of English language learners (ELLs) was explored from kindergarten through eighth grade within a nationally representative sample of first-time kindergartners (N = 19,890). Growth curve analyses indicated that, compared to native English speakers, ELLs were rated by teachers more favorably on approaches to learning, self control, and externalizing behaviors in kindergarten and generally continued to grow in a positive direction on these social/behavioral outcomes at a steeper rate compared to their native English-speaking peers, holding other factors constant. Differences in reading and math achievement between ELLs and native English speakers varied based on the grade at which English proficiency is attained. Specifically, ELLs who were proficient in English by kindergarten entry kept pace with native English speakers in both reading and math initially and over time; ELLs who were proficient by first grade had modest gaps in reading and math achievement compared to native English speakers that closed narrowly or persisted over time; and ELLs who were not proficient by first grade had the largest initial gaps in reading and math achievement compared to native speakers but the gap narrowed over time in reading and grew over time in math. Among those whose home language is not English, acquiring English proficiency by kindergarten entry was associated with better cognitive and behavioral outcomes through eighth grade compared to taking longer to achieve proficiency. Multinomial regression analyses indicated that child, family, and school characteristics predict achieving English proficiency by kindergarten entry compared to achieving proficiency later. Results are discussed in terms of policies and practices that can support ELL children’s growth and development. PMID:22389551

  12. Reconsidering Academic Language in Practice: The Demands of Spanish Expository Reading and Students' Bilingual Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to improve educational outcomes for English learners often focus on "academic language," but unfortunately the field lacks a clear, agreed-upon definition of the concept. This article reports on a design research study that focused on students' engagement in one academic practice over several months: reading and discussing…

  13. Analysis of English language textbooks in the light of English as an International Language (EIL): A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Naji Meidani, Elham; Pishghadam, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The global spread of the English language has not only resulted in more non-native speakers than native speakers (Crystal, 1997), but it has even put into question the ownership of the language (Widdowson, 1994; Brumfit, 1995). Therefore, English is recognized as an international language that does not belong to any particular country and is used for global, political, cultural and financial exchange. The following study aimed to find out to what extent English language textbooks demonstrate ...

  14. TEST OF ACADEMIC ENGLISH PROFICIENCY (TAEP: AN EFFORT AGAINST THE NEO-COLONIALISM IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masduki Masduki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neo-colonialism in the modern era no longer emerges physically. Rather, it appears as a mechanism control (Olssen and O‘Neill, 2004 or an influential force. Such control comes in the form of certain products which are aimed for various political or economic purposes. In the realm of language education in Indonesia, especially in the context of English Language and Teaching, certain products such as language testing system have attained a position of dominance. Thus, the tests have been employed by many institutions or organizations in Indonesia to measure nonnatives ability in English by using a standard determined by native speaker of English. In fact, our tracer study discovered that a large number of Indonesian workers communicate in English with non-native speakers of English. Therefore, an appropriate instrument to measure the English proficiency of non-native speakers is badly needed. The present research is aimed at addressing the immediate need. The research discusses the design, development, and the current use of Test of A`cademic English Proficiency (TAEP which is initiated by Language Center of Universitas Muhammadiyah Malang. Since it was legally certified and acknowledged in 2016, TAEP has been used by various institutions and organizations for national and international purposes. Further development and collaboration will conclude this article.

  15. Beliefs of Japanese teachers of English regarding language, language teaching, and language learning

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAI, Hideki; URANO, Ken; SHIOKAWA, Haruhiko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore English teachers' beliefs about language, language teaching, and language learning to answer the research question: What beliefs have been formed through teaching experience? A 28-item questionnaire was administered to 69 junior high school teachers of English in Japan and 69 Japanese-speaking university students. Results showed that the teachers think (a) that grammatical knowledge is not sufficient for communication, (b) that, in reading or writing i...

  16. The Application of Language Learning Strategies and Its Correlation to English Proficiency of the Toefl Preparation Class Students at Lbpp Lia Malang

    OpenAIRE

    KAROLINA, MAYA

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: language learning strategies, students in TOEFL preparation, Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) questionnaireEnglish has become a common requirement in academic and work fields. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is designed to measure English proficiency, such as the abilities to use and understand English. Before taking the TOEFL test, many test takers are recommended to take some preparation by doing some TOEFL exercise or participating in TOEFL class prep...

  17. Optimizing the Defense Language Institute English Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    language ( ESL ) teaching . It received, upon inspection, “outstanding” and “excellent” evaluations. DLIELC instructors have strong training backgrounds...EFL and professional experience teaching ESL /EFL to adults. While ostensibly a reasonable requirement, we find that the rigid application of these...United States—Military relations—Foreign countries. 4. English language—Study and teaching —Foreign speakers — United States. 5. Military assistance

  18. The Future of World Englishes in Language Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean

    2014-01-01

    This article begins by defining "world Englishes" (WEs) and the related paradigm of inner-, outer-, and expanding-circle English(es). The discussion then turns to the central concerns of the WEs and language testing (LT) communities with regard to how English tests can best be constructed to include various WEs by discussing (a) what…

  19. Globalization, English Language Policy, and Teacher Agency: Focus on Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on English teachers in Asia in the context of globalization, the global spread of English and the emergence of English as an "Asian language." It highlights the dilemmas facing these teachers in meeting the growing social demands of English proficiency in a technology-influenced, managerial and neoliberal education…

  20. English Language Education On-Line Game and Brain Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Sun; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Young In; Bae, Su Jin

    2017-01-01

    The HoDoo English game was developed to take advantage of the benefits attributed to on-line games while teaching English to native Korean speakers. We expected to see that the improvements in the subjects' English language abilities after playing the HoDoo English game would be associated with increased brain functional connectivity in the areas…

  1. Implementing the recent curricular changes to English language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... concerning the teaching of English to younger students, as well as their general opinions on English language education. The results indicate divided opinions toward the requirement for English instruction, although the administrators' attitudes toward facilitating English teaching in their schools were generally positive.

  2. 211 English Language, the Nigerian Education System and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English Language, the Nigerian Education System and Human. Development. Juliana Chinwe Njoku http://dx.doi./org/10.4314/ujah.v18i2.12. Abstract. The role English language plays in human development in Nigeria is the focal point of this paper. Basically, language is the most frequently used and the most highly ...

  3. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Khoirul Fuadi

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) for English language learners paradigm and the instructional strategies accompanying it encourage authentic language learning and information literacy. This research focuses on students‘ skills that simultaneously strengthen language acquisition and content knowledge in the classroom. Problem-based Learning incorporates innovative teaching and learning methodologies that are relevant and meaningful, including strategies to teach English in junior-hi...

  4. Language Learning Strategies and English Proficiency of Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.; Tindall, Evie R.; Arroyo, Alan A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between language learning strategy (LLS) preferences and English proficiency among Chinese university students. Oxford's (1990), Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) and an institutional version (ITP) of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) were administered to 168 third-year English…

  5. Professional Development Needs of English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandehroo, Koroush; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the professional development (PD) needs of school English language teachers at Melaka State in Malaysia. With close cooperation with the Department of Language at the Ministry of Education, the whole population of English language teachers had been studied on their types of professional development needs in instructional…

  6. English Textbooks in Parallel-Language Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Diane; Shaw, Philip; Malmstrom, Hans; Irvine, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities…

  7. Challenges of Effective English Language Learning in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors that influence the students. effective learning of the English Language as second language learners, the attitude of students towards the study of the English language, the nature of teacher/student interaction, the methods of teaching and the availability of teaching aids in Nigeria secondary schools are looked ...

  8. English, language shift and identities: a comparison between 'Zulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Within the discussion around potential language shift from indigenous languages to English, the article focusses on the impact of English on language use and identities of Zulu students on the Howard College campus of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban. I move beyond macro explanations and thematise the ...

  9. Using Visual Literacy to Teach Science Academic Language: Experiences from Three Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Jackson, Charlease; Delacruz, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    This original pedagogical study captured three preservice teachers' experiences using visual literacy strategies as an approach to teaching English language learners (ELLs) science academic language. The following research questions guided this study: (1) What are the experiences of preservice teachers' use of visual literacy to teach science…

  10. Comparing Language Use in Oral Proficiency Interviews to Target Domains: Conversational, Academic, and Professional Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Shelley; Laflair, Geoffrey T.; Egbert, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Oral Proficiency Interviews (OPIs) are widely used to measure speaking ability in a second or foreign language. The Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) Speaking Test is an OPI used for academic and professional purposes around the world. However, little research on this or other OPIs has quantitatively compared test takers' speech…

  11. Dynamic Development of Complexity and Accuracy: A Case Study in Second Language Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmawati

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of complexity and accuracy in English as a Second Language (ESL) academic writing. Although research into complexity and accuracy development in second language (L2) writing has been well established, few studies have assumed the multidimensionality of these two constructs (Norris & Ortega, 2009) or…

  12. ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING METHODS –AN OVER VIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. T. Karunakaran; M. Suresh Babu

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the brief history of English language teaching (ELT) methods in general and the type of ELT methods. It also presents the recent research on English language teaching methods and the debates that move towards the post-method pedagogy in second language teaching/learning. The paper deals with the brief summary of the methods and approaches in language teaching from Grammar-translation method to Communicative Language Teaching. It also looks the debate on post-method pedagogy.

  13. English as a Foreign Language Students' Opinions about the Use of English on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    As in many other fields, the Internet has been used for educational purposes, especially for foreign language learning. This study has the main objective to investigate English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students' opinions about the use of English on the Internet. By means of a Likert-type questionnaire dealing with the use of English on the…

  14. English as an Islamic Language: A Case Study of Pakistani English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Ahmar

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will explore the nature of English as it is used in one Muslim country and argue that, far from being a colonizing language, English used in Pakistan reflects Islamic values and embodies South Asian Islamic sensitivities. Through analysis of the current discourses on the politics of the English language and a study of Pakistani…

  15. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Language Variation, English Language Teaching and Language Use: The Case of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jim Yee Him

    2017-01-01

    This study examines Hong Kong major stakeholders' (secondary students, university students, teachers and professionals) perceptions of language variation, English language teaching (ELT) and language use in their everyday communication via a large-scale questionnaire survey (N = 1893). Based on principal components analysis of the questionnaire…

  16. Communicative Approach in Teaching English as a Foreign Language

    OpenAIRE

    Hutauruk, Bertaria Sohnata

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns on the teacher's communicative approach in teaching English as a foreign language which was taken at English department in FKIP UHN Pematangsiantar. The problem of the research is what are teacher's techniques used in teaching English as a foreign language? The writer used some theories related to the Techniques of Teaching English and communicative approach theory as the following: Allen (1965), Abbot (1981), Billow (1961), Byrne (1976), Lado (1979), Larsen (2000),...

  17. The Relative Importance of English versus Spanish Language Skills for Low-Income Latino English Language Learners' Early Language and Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Susan; Metzger, Shari R.; Dowling, Rebecca; Baker, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The association between monolingual children's early language abilities and their later reading performance is well established. However, for English language learners, the pattern of associations between early language skills and later literacy is much less well understood for English language learners. This study examined language predictors of…

  18. A critical review of literature on English language teaching textbook evaluation: What systemic functional linguistics can offer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, from the perspective of language learning as a meaning-making process, presents a critical review of the existing research on how pre-use, in-use, and post-use evaluation has investigated the relationship between English language teaching textbooks’ content and learners’ academic literacy development. The paper shows that previous research on these three types of evaluation examined English language teaching textbooks’ effect on English learners’ academic literacy development in an unprincipled and macro way. The research gap identified in these previous studies calls for an improved textbook evaluation framework that integrates a principled learning theory while simultaneously emphasizing macro-constructs (e.g., context and micro-linguistic features needed for academic literacy development. To this end, this paper proposes a framework informed by Systemic Functional Linguistics-related constructs (e.g., genre, register, meta-meanings, and lexico-grammar system to optimize the evaluation of English language teaching textbook content.

  19. Lecturing in one’s first language or in English as a lingua franca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Bent

    2014-01-01

    and communicative resources available within the institution – is to offer potential directions in the search for the “best practice” of Danish and other non-native English-speaking university teachers who have lately had to switch to English in transmitting their academic expertise to students of the multicultural...... and multilingual classroom. This case study concerns Danish university teachers' spoken discourse and interaction with students in a Danish-language versus English-language classroom. The data are video recordings of classroom interaction at the University of Roskilde, Denmark. The focus is on the relationship...... between linguistic-pragmatic performance and academic authenticity for university teachers teaching courses in both English and Danish, based on recent sociolinguistic concepts such as “persona,” “stylization,” and “authenticity.” The analysis suggests that it is crucial for teachers' ability...

  20. K-12 Student Standards for English Language Arts. Louisiana Student Standards: English Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Louisiana English language arts student standards were created by over one hundred Louisiana educators with input by thousands of parents and teachers from across the state. Educators envisioned what proficient students should know and be able to do to compete in society and focused their efforts on creating standards that would allow them to…

  1. Teaching English in English, "In Principle": The National Foreign Language Curriculum for Japanese Senior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Gregory Paul

    2014-01-01

    Research in language-in-education policy and planning (LEP) rarely examines how language teachers negotiate official policy statements on teaching methodologies. In this study, I investigate the current upper secondary school foreign language national curriculum in Japan that requires English classes to be conducted in English, implemented since…

  2. Genre and Second-Language Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The term "genre" first came into the field of second-language (L2) writing and, in turn, the field of English for specific purposes (ESP) in the 1980s, with the research of John Swales, first carried out in the UK, into the introduction section of research articles. Other important figures in this area are Tony Dudley-Evans, Ann Johns…

  3. Development of semantic processes for academic language in foundation phase EAL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heila Letitia Jordaan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely acknowledged that language competence is central to educational success, primarily because literacy is inherently a language based activity. Vocabulary knowledge specifically, plays an important role in the acquisition of reading comprehension skills. Language in education practice in South Africa is currently highly controversial as the implementation of home language or bilingual instruction policies has not been achieved in many schools. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of language skills in foundation phase English Additional Language (EAL learners attending schools where English is the language of learning and teaching. A three year longitudinal investigation of the acquisition of processes underlying language for academic purposes was undertaken using the semantic subtests of the Developmental Evaluation of Language Variation Criterion Referenced Edition (Seymour, Roeper, and De Villiers, 2003. The results indicated that the majority of EAL learners improved with increased exposure to English in the academic environment and by the time they were in grade 3, were performing at a higher level than English First Language learners in grade 2. However, the effects of this protracted period of development on literacy attainment should be investigated. The significant individual variation in the learners’ performance has implications for assessment and instruction of EAL learners and for the collaborative role of teachers and speech language therapists in the education system.

  4. Development of semantic processes for academic language in foundation phase EAL learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirim, Giselle; Jordaan, Heila; Kallenbach, Amy; Rijhumal, Meera

    2010-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that language competence is central to educational success, primarily because literacy is inherently a language-based activity. Vocabulary knowledge specifically plays an important role in the acquisition of reading comprehension skills. Language in education practice in South Africa is currently highly controversial, as the implementation of home language or bilingual instruction policies has not been achieved in many schools. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of language skills in foundation phase English Additional Language (EAL) learners attending schools where English is the language of learning and teaching. A 3-year longitudinal investigation of the acquisition of some of the processes underlying language for academic purposes was undertaken using the semantics subtests of the Developmental Evaluation of Language Variation Criterion Referenced Edition (Seymour, Roeper & De Villiers, 2003). The results indicated that the majority of EAL learners improved with increased exposure to English in the academic environment and by the time they were in grade 3, were performing at a higher level than English First Language learners in grade 2. However, the effects of this protracted period of development on literacy attainment should be investigated. The significant individual variation in the learners' performance has implications for assessment and instruction of EAL learners and for the collaborative role of teachers and speech language therapists in the education system.

  5. Factors Predicting Academic Success in Second and Third Language among Russian-Speaking Immigrant Students Studying in Israeli Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Orly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors predicting academic proficiency (AP), the specialised domains required for performing academic tasks, among Russian speaking (L1) immigrants currently studying Hebrew as a second language (L2) and English as a third language (L3) in Israeli schools. Specifically, the study examined the…

  6. Working with patients for whom English is a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    'Therapists or clinicians need to be creative and flexible when working with patients for whom English is a second language, but they do not necessarily need to have the ability to speak the patient's first language'.

  7. Phonological skills in English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Alyse; Goldstein, Brian A; Gilhool, Amanda; Paradis, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the English phonological skills of English language learners (ELLs) over 5 time points. Sound class accuracy, whole-word accuracy, percentage of occurrence of phonological patterns, and sociolinguistic correlational analyses were investigated in 19 ELLs ranging in age from 5;0 (years;months) to 7;6. Accuracy across all samples was over 90% for all sound classes except fricatives and increased for all sound classes across time. Whole-word accuracy was high and increased across time. With the exception of cluster reduction, stopping, and final consonant deletion, the frequency of occurrence for phonological patterns was less than or equal to 5% at every time point. Sociolinguistic variables such as age of arrival, age of exposure, and age were significantly related to phonological skills. The results were consistent with the hypotheses outlined in Flege's (1995) speech learning model in that the phonological skills of ELLs increased over time and as a function of age of arrival and time. Thus, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also should expect phonological skills in ELLs to increase over time, as is the case in monolingual children. SLPs can use the longitudinal and connected-speech results of this study to interpret their assessments of the phonological skills of ELLs.

  8. Language Training : English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  9. Manufacturing Industry Employers’ Perception of Graduates’ English Language Skills Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjet Kaur Mehar Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proficiency in English language skills among graduates that create advantages for the organization is preferred by prospective employers as one of the main criteria for employability.  This article provides an overview of undergraduates in higher education and also workplace literacy from the perspective of the employers in the manufacturing industry. The result from the research demonstrates that Malaysian manufacturing industry employers perceive that the graduate employees’ English language proficiency skills are still below their expectations. Therefore, this study recommends that there is a need for intervention into language teaching to improve the English language syllabus level of English proficiency at primary, secondary and tertiary level. At the same time, emphasis on the importance of English in everyday use should be inculcated without neglecting the national language of Malaysia.  This will ensure that the teaching of English will be in line with globalization and current workplace demands.

  10. English Language Learning Strategies Used by University Students: A Case Study of English and Business English Major at Suan Sunandha Rajabhat in Bangkok

    OpenAIRE

    Pranee Pathomchaiwat

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this research are 1) to study English language learning strategies used by the fourth-year students majoring in English and Business English, 2) to study the English language learning strategies which have an affect on English learning achievement, and 3) to compare the English language learning strategies used by the students majoring in English and Business English. The population and sampling comprise of 139 university students of the Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University. Rese...

  11. Difficulties in Metaphor Comprehension Faced by International Students Whose First Language Is Not English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlemore, Jeannette; Chen, Phyllis Trautman; Koester, Almut; Barnden, John

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a study on metaphor comprehension by the international students whose first language is not English, while attending undergraduate lectures at a British university. Study participants identified words or multiword items that they found difficult in extracts from four academic lectures, and they interpreted metaphors from those…

  12. Complaints and Troubles Talk about the English Language Skills of International Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    International students have continued to be the focus of simplistic stereotyping in media discourse where they are frequently identified as one of the forces behind declining academic standards in Australian universities. Their English language skills, in particular, have continued to be the focus of debate both in the mainstream media and in…

  13. Latino English Language Learners: Bridging Achievement and Cultural Gaps between Schools and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Mary Ellen; Masewicz, Sophia; Vogel, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study grounded in critical inquiry and cultural-ecological theory explores barriers to academic achievement for Latino English language learners (ELLs). Parents and teachers were purposefully selected from a rural school district in the Rocky Mountain region to participate in focus group interviews. Findings included barriers…

  14. Changes to English as an Additional Language Writers' Research Articles: From Spoken to Written Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyalan, Aylin; Mumford, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The process of writing journal articles is increasingly being seen as a collaborative process, especially where the authors are English as an Additional Language (EAL) academics. This study examines the changes made in terms of register to EAL writers' journal articles by a native-speaker writing centre advisor at a private university in Turkey.…

  15. The Effect of Using Some Democratic Practices on the University Students' Attitudes towards English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the democratic practices that can be followed in the EFL university classes and investigating their effect on the students' attitude towards the English language learning at the postgraduate level. A democratic practices list was identified. These practices were followed in EFL classes all the academic year…

  16. Supporting the Persuasive Writing Practices of English Language Learners through Culturally Responsive Systemic Functional Linguistic Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the potential of Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL) pedagogy to support English language learners (ELLs) in enhancing their meaning making potential as they engage in persuasive writing practices within academic contexts. The dissertation results from a teacher action research project in which the…

  17. Promoting College Access among Latina/o English Language Learners: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Pérusse, Rachelle; Rojas, Eliana D.

    2015-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), Latina/o English language learners (ELL students) are less likely to complete high school and attend college compared to their White non-Latina/o peers. Numerous factors affect Latina/o ELL students' academic achievement, including insufficient resources, acculturation issues, attitudinal…

  18. Research and Teaching: The Pairing of a Science Communications and a Language Course to Enrich First-Year English Language Learners' Writing and Argumentation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Ashley J.; Shaw, Amber; Fox, Joanne A.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how English-language learners' writing evolved during a first-year seminar in science course aimed at developing students' argumentation skills. We highlight how a science communications course was paired with a weekly academic English course in the context of a highly coordinated and enriched first-year experience program…

  19. THE COMPARISONS AND CONTRASTS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND MALAY LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri Latiff Azmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available English and Malay languages are categorized as popular languages in the world. However, both languages underwent different history and composition. This study investigates the languages in terms of history, phonology, loanwords, grammar, morphology and semantics. The purposes of studying the comparisons and contrasts of both languages are not only to analyze the uniqueness of the languages but also to identify the process of understanding the languages especially the view of second language learners. It is found that two languages come from different background; somehow they share similar characteristics such as the vowels sounds, loanwords and semantics. However, the learners face difficulty in learning both languages especially in pronunciations and spelling.

  20. Language Ideologies in a Danish Company with English as a Corporate Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    language and to other foreign languages. In this international company, conflicting ideologies construct the local language Danish on the one hand as the natural language in Denmark, but as unimportant compared to English on the other hand. English is constructed as prestigious and powerful in contrast...

  1. Which Methodology Works Better? English Language Teachers' Awareness of the Innovative Language Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether English language teachers were aware of the innovative language learning methodologies in language learning, how they made use of these methodologies and the learners' reactions to them. The descriptive survey method was employed to disclose the frequencies and percentages of 175 English language teachers'…

  2. Literature review: issues surrounding education of English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Liza Lai Shan

    2005-07-01

    Examined in this article are the challenges faced by English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students. Nursing faculties need to address these challenges to meet the increasing diversity of the health care system. A key concern is the ability of ESL nursing students to communicate effectively in English. The Cummins model for English language acquisition provides a template for ESL nursing students to bridge this communication barrier. The literature suggests some particular needs of ESL nursing students can be met through modification of nursing programs. Further research into factors affecting the quality of nursing education for ESL students is warranted. A quantitative analysis is required to see if there exists a positive correlation between improved English language acquisition and academic success by ESL nursing students.

  3. Social action in Nigerian English language poetry: A linguistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is important to note that language plays an essential role in the production of poetry. This is even more so in Nigeria where the art of poetry is mostly practiced in the English Language, a language that is the arrowhead of our colonial heritage. This is why the changes or variations in usage of this language have become a

  4. Math Instruction Is Not Universal: Language-Specific Pedagogical Knowledge in Korean/English Two-Way Immersion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wona; Lee, Jin Sook

    2017-01-01

    Two-Way Immersion (TWI) programs have demonstrated positive outcomes in students' academic achievement in English, yet less is known about content teaching and learning in the non-English language in these programs. This study uses math instruction as a lens to identify pedagogical strategies and challenges in the teaching of math in Korean to…

  5. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Al Asmari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD to improve teacher quality and to meet the changing needs of the students. To uncover the perceptions and practices of professional development in Saudi Arabia, a survey was conducted at Taif University English Language Centre. The sample consisted of 121 English language teachers from various countries and having varied educational and academic experiences. The survey comprised items relevant to learning approaches, concept of professional development, perceptions and feedback on CPD. The respondents supported lifelong learning and experiential learning leading towards learner centered approach. They perceived the CPD as a challenge to their existing knowledge and classroom practice. However, they expressed their concerns regarding indigenization of activities in CPDs, institutional support in conducting classroom activities, and follow up activities.  Keywords: Professional development, Teacher perception, ELT in Saudi Arabia

  6. Learning difficulties or learning English difficulties? Additional language acquisition: an update for paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Vanessa; Rhodes, Anthea; Paxton, Georgia

    2014-03-01

    Australia is a diverse society: 26% of the population were born overseas, a further 20% have at least one parent born overseas and 19% speak a language other than English at home. Paediatricians are frequently involved in the assessment and management of non-English-speaking-background children with developmental delay, disability or learning issues. Despite the diversity of our patient population, information on how children learn additional or later languages is remarkably absent in paediatric training. An understanding of second language acquisition is essential to provide appropriate advice to this patient group. It takes a long time (5 years or more) for any student to develop academic competency in a second language, even a student who has received adequate prior schooling in their first language. Refugee students are doubly disadvantaged as they frequently have limited or interrupted prior schooling, and many are unable to read and write in their first language. We review the evidence on second language acquisition during childhood, describe support for English language learners within the Australian education system, consider refugee-background students as a special risk group and address common misconceptions about how children learn English as an additional language. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Assessing students' English language proficiency during clinical placement: A qualitative evaluation of a language framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, Caroline; Rogan, Fran

    2015-06-01

    The increase in nursing students for whom English is an additional language requires clinical facilitators to assess students' performance regarding clinical skills, nursing communication and English language. However, assessing language proficiency is a complex process that is often conflated with cultural norms and clinical skills, and facilitators may lack confidence in assessing English language. This paper discusses an evaluation of a set of guidelines developed in a large metropolitan Australian university to help clinical facilitators make decisions about students' English language proficiency. The study found that the guidelines were useful in helping facilitators assess English language. However, strategies to address identified language problems needed to be incorporated to enable the guidelines to also be used as a teaching tool. The study concludes that to be effective, such guidelines need embedding within a systematic approach that identifies and responds to students who may be underperforming due to a low level of English language proficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Even Math Requires Learning Academic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    ELLs need to practice using the language in their speech. Teachers can ask students to restate the definition in their own words and provide opportunities for students to use academic vocabulary in discussions. Chunking (instead of teaching inch in isolation, also teach foot, centimeter, and yard) helps students develop their schema and mentally…

  9. Errors and Learning/Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language: an Exercise in Grammaticology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nava

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite ‘pendulum swings’ and ‘revolutions’ throughout the history of language teaching, the association of errors and grammar (of one’s native language or of a second/foreign language has been a constant concern of language professionals as well as the subject of academic interest in linguistics, second language acquisition and grammaticology. Grammar books are ideally suited to the investigation of how perceptions about errors, along with associated notions such as those of grammaticality, acceptability and correctness, have changed throughout the centuries. While much academic interest has been devoted to the analysis of English pedagogical grammar books (and usage manuals aimed at native speakers (‘prescriptive’ grammar books and usage manuals, cf. Peters 2006, very little is known about English pedagogical grammar books for non-native speakers, particularly those published in the 20th and 21st centuries. A recent development within the realm of pedagogical grammaticography has been the genre of pedagogical grammar books specifically aimed at teachers of English as a second or foreign language (Nava 2008. Grammar books such as Celce Murcia and Larsen Freeman (1999 have the express purpose of presenting English grammar drawing on research in linguistics and second language acquisition that is thought to be relevant to the practical business of teaching grammar to second/foreign language learners. In this contribution, after identifying a few key issues in the way the notion of ‘error’ has been conceived of in linguistics, second language acquisition and grammar writing, I will present a study of how a selection of pedagogical grammar books for English language teachers view and operationalize errors.

  10. Teaching English Language Learners: Recommendations for Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    Some teachers are justifiably concerned that primary-age students who continue to use their native language skills might hamper their acquisition of English literacy. After all, isn't time spent in writing in the first language time that could have been spent writing in English? Many other teachers agree conceptually with the notion that…

  11. Cognitive Correlates of Vocabulary Growth in English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Fataneh; Geva, Esther

    2011-01-01

    This study modeled vocabulary trajectories in 91 English language learners (ELLs) with Punjabi, Tamil, or Portuguese home languages, and 50 English monolinguals (EL1) from Grades 1 to 6. The concurrent and longitudinal relationships between phonological awareness and phonological short-term memory and vocabulary were examined. ELLs underperformed…

  12. HISTORY OF ENGLISH, PART TWO. LANGUAGE CURRICULUM IV, STUDENT VERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    A DISCUSSION OF THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE WAS CONTINUED (PART 1 IS ED 010 823) TO GIVE THE 10TH-GRADE STUDENT AN ACCURATE PICTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AT AN IMPORTANT STAGE IN ITS DEVELOPMENT. THE TIME CHOSEN WAS THE 17TH CENTURY, AND THE EXAMPLE WAS SHAKESPEARE'S "JULIUS CAESAR." THIS PLAY WAS CHOSEN AS AN EXAMPLE BECAUSE…

  13. Instructional Models and Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughamian, Ani C.; Rivera, Mabel O.; Francis, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This publication seeks to offer educators and policy-makers guidance on strategies that have been effective in instructing English language learners (ELLs). The authors begin by outlining key contextual factors that decision-makers should take into account when making instructional choices for English language learners, then follow with a brief…

  14. 48 CFR 615.205-70 - Use of English language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of English language. 615.205-70 Section 615.205-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CONTRACTING... Information 615.205-70 Use of English language. The requirements of DOSAR 614.201-70 also apply when...

  15. Colonization and English Ideologies in India: A Language Policy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Usree

    2017-01-01

    A language policy document on English teaching asserted that in India, "the colonial origins [of English are] now forgotten or irrelevant" (NCERT 2006: 1). Using data obtained in the course of a longitudinal ethnographic investigation into the language and literacy practices of young multilingual boys living at an "anathashram"…

  16. English as the Language of International Business Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Alison

    2007-01-01

    In teaching business communication, instructors usually can take for granted that English is the language of business communication in a globalised world. Even in a multicultural and multilinguistic country such as Malaysia, the assumption that English is the language to use is shared by those who manage programs, those who teach, and students.…

  17. Sheltered Instruction for English Language Learners: Insights and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Ana H.; da Luz Fontes, Ana Areas; Kephart, Kerrie; Blume, María

    2013-01-01

    The authors report on an exploratory pilot project implemented in a large city on the U.S.-Mexico border. The project focuses on a curricular design in a secondary school where beginning-level English as a second language students are taught English language arts in Spanish. The researchers sought to determine whether these students made greater…

  18. English Language Education in Jordan: Some Recent Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabahba, Mohammad Madallh; Pandian, Ambigapathy; Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to map out the status of English language teaching (ELT) as practised in the Arab World and, specifically, in Jordan today. The study also aims to bring into focus significant issues that need to be addressed in ELT in the Arab World. This paper presents a review of the current status of English language education,…

  19. (ESP) As a Modern Trend in English Language Teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English Language Teaching (ELT) has come a long way, moving from grammatical or linguistic approach to communicative approach (which ESP is all about). This study looked into the origin, and development of ELT, the concept of English for specific purposes (ESP) as an approach to language teaching, and the ...

  20. Multilingualism in the English-Language Classroom: Pedagogical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of whether TESOL should clearly articulate a set of pedagogical principles that challenge the assumption that English language teaching (ELT) should be conducted monolingually through English. This "monolingual principle" emphasizes instructional use of the target language (TL) to the exclusion of students' home…

  1. Students' Evaluation of Their English Language Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizatulliza, M.; Kiely, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of English language teaching and learning, there is a long history of investigating students' performance while they are undergoing specific learning programmes. This research study, however, focused on students' evaluation of their English language learning experience after they have completed their programme. The data were gathered…

  2. Cuban Voices: A Case Study of English Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven John

    2016-01-01

    This case study uses qualitative research methods and a postcolonial paradigm to listen to the voices of Cuban teacher educators describing how they educate and prepare English language teachers in Cuba. English language teacher education in Cuba includes features that are considered innovative, contemporary and good practice in the Western world.…

  3. Denials of Racism in Canadian English Language Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Trevor; Thurrell, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    This critical discourse analysis examines denials of racism in descriptions of Canada and Canadians from English language textbooks. Denials of racism often accompany racist and nationalist discourse, preempting observations of racism. The study finds that in representations of Canada or Canadians, English language texts minimize and downplay…

  4. Types of Language Learning Strategies Used by Tertiary English Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuin, Tan Khye; Kaur, Sarjit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the types of language learning strategies used by 73 English majors from the School of Humanities in Universiti Sains Malaysia. Using questionnaires adopted from Oxford's (1990) Strategy Inventory of Language Learning (SILL) and focus group interviews, the study also examined the English major students' perceptions of using…

  5. Social Class in English Language Education in Oaxaca, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gopar, Mario E.; Sughrua, William

    2014-01-01

    This article explores social class in English-language education in Oaxaca, Mexico. To this end, first, we discuss social class in Mexico as related to coloniality; second, for illustration, the paper presents the authors' own social-class analysis as language educators in Oaxaca; third, we discuss how social class impacts English education…

  6. Reforms in the Policy of English Language Teaching in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Radzuwan A. B.; Abdul Rahman, Shireena Basree; Yunus, Kamariah

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews reforms related to English language teaching in the Malaysian education system. It begins by tracing the history of Malaysia as a former British colony which has had significant influences on the status of English in the country. Then, it reviews the key educational reforms which have mainly centred on language policy, thus…

  7. English Language Teaching in South America: Policy, Preparation and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi-Stein, Lía D., Ed.; Maggioli, Gabriel Díaz, Ed.; de Oliveira, Luciana C., Ed.

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates new English language policies and initiatives which have been introduced and implemented across Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela. Chapters are organized around three themes. Chapters in the first section critically examine newly-implemented English language policies, as well as factors that…

  8. Collaborative Teaching from English Language Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Hanife; Yildirim, Tugba

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative teaching, a significant concept in the field of English language teaching, involves teachers in sharing expertise, decision-making, lesson delivery, and assessment. It is a common practice for instructors in many schools and universities where English is taught as a foreign/second language (EFL/ESL) in intensive programs or…

  9. Communicative English Language Teaching in Egypt: Classroom Practice and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mona Kamal; Ibrahim, Yehia A.

    2017-01-01

    Following a "mixed methods" approach, this research is designed to examine whether teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Egypt's public schools matches the communicative English language teaching (CELT) approach. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 50 classroom observations, 100 questionnaire responses from…

  10. The influence of language family on academic performance in Year 1 and 2 MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Collette; Canny, Ben; Lindley, Jennifer; Rajan, Ramesh

    2010-08-01

    Generally, in most countries around the world, local medical students outperform, in an academic sense, international students. In an endeavour to understand if this effect is caused by language proficiency skills, we investigated academic differences between local and international MBBS students categorised by native language families. Data were available and obtained for medical students in their first and second years of study in 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006. Information on social demographics, personal history and language(s) spoken at home was collected, as well as academic assessment results for each student. Statistical analysis was carried out with a dataset pertaining to a total of 872 students. Local students performed better than international students in first- (p language family and origin in the first year (p international students only, there was a main effect for language in the second year (p students from Sino-Tibetan language family backgrounds obtaining higher mean scores than students from English or Indo-European language family backgrounds. Our results confirmed that, overall, local students perform better academically than international students. However, given that language family differences exist, this may reflect acculturation rather than simply English language skills.

  11. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Young English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Neris, Mirza J.; Jackson, Carla Wood; Goldstein, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether English-only vocabulary instruction or English vocabulary instruction enhanced with Spanish bridging produced greater word learning in young Spanish-speaking children learning English during a storybook reading intervention while considering individual language characteristics. Method: Twenty-two…

  12. English Camp: A Language Immersion Program in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugasken, Kris; Harris, Jacqueline A.

    2009-01-01

    A summer English camp language immersion program, which began in 2003, provided instruction by native English speakers to Thai college students via collaboration between Prince of Songkla University in Thailand and Ball State University in Indiana, USA. During this program, Thai students were exposed to English formally through classroom…

  13. Using Dictionaries in Teaching English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleeva, Gulnara Kh.; Safiullina, Gulshat R.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the problem of mastering new vocabulary at the English language classes. The brief review of the bilingual English-Russian printed and electronic Dictionaries used at the practical classes of English for the students of the first and second courses of the Germanic Philology Department of Kazan Federal University. The method…

  14. Language shift and apparent standardisation in Early Modern English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knooihuizen, Remco

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that language-shift varieties of English tend to be relatively close to Standard English (Trudgill and Chambers 1991: 2–3). An often- used explanation for this is that Standard English was acquired in schools by the shifting population (Filppula 2006: 516). In this paper, I

  15. Japanese Elementary School Teachers and English Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    "Foreign language activities" (English) officially began in Japanese elementary schools in April 2011. Since that starting date, and despite insufficient knowledge and preparation, classroom teachers have been required to instruct in English. They also have been required to team-teach with native-English-speaking assistant language…

  16. Cognitive Contributions to Plurilithic Views of English and Other Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic views of languages predominate in linguistics, applied linguistics, and everyday discourse. The World Englishes, English as a Lingua Franca, and Critical Applied Linguistics frameworks have gone some way to counter the myth, highlighting the iniquities it gives rise to for global users and learners of English. Here, I propose that…

  17. Teaching English in English : A preliminary study into nonnative English-speaking teachers' decision in using English as the language of instruction

    OpenAIRE

    大藪, 加奈

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with nonnative English-speaking teachers’ choice of English as the language of instruction. It maps actual and theoretical frameworks that need considering when conducting such a research. Two viewpoints on “English worthy of instruction” are presented, current data on nonnative English-speaking teachers’ English lessons are discussed, situations that affect teachers’ choice of language, and theoretical frameworks useful for the analysis are examined.

  18. Bilingual Pre-Service Teachers Grapple with the Academic and Social Role of Language in Mathematics Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosario Zavala, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Effectively engaging students in mathematics discourse is challenging, especially in a language other than the one in which you learned mathematics. Teachers must manage the academic as well as social function of language. In Spanish-English bilingual classrooms in the U.S., changing the language of instruction to Spanish may not be enough to…

  19. The Cummins model: a framework for teaching nursing students for whom English is a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriam-Yago, K; Yoder, M; Kataoka-Yahiro, M

    1999-04-01

    The health care system requires nurses with the language ability and the cultural knowledge to meet the health care needs of ethnic minority immigrants. The recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of English as a Second Language (ESL) students are essential to provide the workforce to meet the demands of the multicultural community. Yet, ESL students possess language difficulties that affect their academic achievement in nursing programs. The application of the Cummins Model of language proficiency is discussed. The Cummins Model provides a framework for nursing faculty to develop educational support that meets the learning needs of ESL students.

  20. Teaching English to Engineers: Between English Language Teaching and Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Irina-Ana Drobot

    2016-01-01

    Teaching English to Engineers is part of English for Specific Purposes, a domain which is under the attention of English students especially under the current conditions of finding jobs and establishing partnerships outside Romania. The paper will analyse the existing textbooks together with the teaching strategies they adopt. Teaching English to Engineering students can intersect with domains such as psychology and cultural studies in order to teach them efficiently. Textbooks for students o...

  1. Pronunciation and phonetics a practical guide for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This engaging, succinct text is an introduction to both phonetics and phonology as applied to the teaching of pronunciation to English language learners. Section 1 selectively covers the main areas of phonetics and phonology, without going into any area in more depth than the average English language teacher requires or that the average English language teacher trainee can handle. Section 2 focuses on practical issues related to learners and how they learn languages, and what represents good practice in terms of classroom activities for pronunciation—including aspects such as targets, motiva

  2. TEACHING WRITING IN ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Purna Wijaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at describing about teaching writing in English as a foreign Language. The reasons for teaching writing to students of English as a Foreign language include reinforcement, language development, learning style and the most importantly, writing as skill in its own right. Like many other aspects of English language teaching, the type of writing that students should do, will depend on their age, interest and level. These include writing post cards, letters of various kinds, filling in forms such as job applications, writing narrative compositions, report, newspaper and magazine article. The result showed that the students’ success of writing such matters absolutely depend on their motivations.

  3. On using verbs appropriately in academic English writing

    OpenAIRE

    Khrabrova Valentina Evgenievna

    2016-01-01

    The article is concerned with English action verbs as key elements of academic English writing. Due to cognitive and semantic characteristics, verbs in the predicate function, by contrast with deverbative suffixal nouns and adjectives as parts of nominal predicates, convey the meaning of written message more concisely. The article is provided with verb classifications aimed at systematizing the information about verbs and developing a conscious approach to choosing verbs in the writing proces...

  4. Unscrambling jumbled sentences: An authentic task for English language assessment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Lanteigne

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jumbled sentence items in language assessment have been criticized by some authors as inauthentic. However, unscrambling jumbled sentences is a common occurrence in real-world communication in English as a lingua franca. Naturalistic inquiry identified 54 instances of jumbled sentence use in daily life in Dubai/Sharjah, where English is widely used as a lingua franca. Thus it is seen that jumbled sentence test items can reflect real-world language use. To evaluate scrambled sentence test items, eight test item types developed from one jumbled sentence instance (“Want taxi Dubai you?” were analyzed in terms of interactivity and authenticity. Items ranged from being completely decontextualized, non-interactive, and inauthentic to being fully contextualized, interactive, and authentic. To determine appropriate assessment standards for English tests in schools in this region, the English language standards for schools and English language requirements for university admission in the UAE were analyzed. Schools in Dubai/Sharjah use Inner Circle English varieties of English (e.g., British or American English as the standard for evaluation, as well as non-native-English-speaker varieties (e.g., Indian English(es. Also, students applying to English-medium universities in the UAE must meet the required scores on standardized English tests including the IELTS and TOEFL. Standards for evaluation of communication in English involving tasks of jumbled sentences in classroom tests must reflect the language learning goals of the school and community. Thus standards for classroom assessment of English in Dubai/Sharjah are determined by local schools’ and universities’ policies.

  5. "You Don't Say What You Know, Only What You Can": The Perceptions and Practices of Senior Spanish Academics Regarding Research Dissemination in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Llantada, Carmen; Plo, Ramon; Ferguson, Gibson R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to an expanding literature on the challenges non-Anglophone academics confront in disseminating their research in English, the dominant language of international scientific communication. Drawing on a corpus of interviews with senior Spanish academics, who remain a relatively little researched academic community…

  6. Language Ability of Young English Language Learners: Definition, Configuration, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this study I examined the dimensionality of the latent ability underlying language use that is needed to fulfill the demands young learners face in English-medium instructional environments, where English is used as the means of instruction for teaching subject matters. Previous research on English language use by school-age children provided…

  7. TYPES OF LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES USED BY TERTIARY ENGLISH MAJORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAN KHYE CHUIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the types of language learning strategies used by 73 English majors from the School of Humanities in Universiti Sains Malaysia. Using questionnaires adopted from Oxford’s (1990 Strategy Inventory of Language Learning (SILL and focus group interviews, the study also examined the English major students’ perceptions of using language learning strategies while learning English. The results revealed that the English majors were generally high users of all six types of language learning strategies. The English majors were reported to use metacognitive strategies the most. The least preferred strategies among the English majors were memory strategies. Some of the students’ perceptions were positive as they perceived that language learning strategies developed their language competency and required a conscious and deliberate effort. Conversely, some negative perceptions illustrate that students had low awareness of language learning strategies and they believed that language learning strategies did not develop language competency and the usage did not require conscious effort. Research in this field should not cease from exploration in order to contribute towards the development of self-regulated language learners who have problem solving skills and are able to take control of their learning process.

  8. Cultural Dimensions of Feedback at an Australian University: A Study of International Students with English as an Additional Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Richard; Miller, Julia

    2015-01-01

    International students with English as an additional language face transitional challenges when entering a new academic culture. One such challenge involves optimising feedback to help foster their academic development, bearing in mind that feedback is not a culturally neutral entity (Nazif, A., Biswas, D., & Hilbig, R. (2004-2005). Towards an…

  9. Adult English Language Instruction in the 21st Century. Issues in Preparing Adult English Language Learners for Success Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; Florez, MaryAnn Cunningham

    This book provides educators and education policy makers a picture of where the field of teaching adult English language learners is today in order to build a more effective delivery system for the future. It places adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) in the broader context of the U.S. education system (K-12 and adult education), then…

  10. Prereferral Process with Latino English Language Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities: Perceptions of English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlis, Emily; Xu, Yaoying

    2016-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) teachers on the prereferral process for Latino English language learners (ELLs). Using Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological approach, qualitative data were collected through interviews with four ESL teachers. Analyses of the data indicated that the ESL teachers used research-based…

  11. 3rd grade English language learners making sense of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Enrique; Otero, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive body of research that supports scientific inquiry and argumentation as cornerstones of physics learning, these strategies continue to be virtually absent in most classrooms, especially those that involve students who are learning English as a second language. This study presents results from an investigation of 3rd grade students' discourse about how length and tension affect the sound produced by a string. These students came from a variety of language backgrounds, and all were learning English as a second language. Our results demonstrate varying levels, and uses, of experiential, imaginative, and mechanistic reasoning strategies. Using specific examples from students' discourse, we will demonstrate some of the productive aspects of working within multiple language frameworks for making sense of physics. Conjectures will be made about how to utilize physics as a context for English Language Learners to further conceptual understanding, while developing their competence in the English language.

  12. English Language Teaching: phonetics, phonology and auditory processing contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Letícia Maria Martins; Feniman, Mariza Ribeiro; Carvalho, Fernanda Ribeiro Pinto de; Lopes-Herrera, Simone Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    interrelation of phonetics, phonology and auditory processing in English Language Teaching. to determine whether prior contact with English phonetics favors general learning of this language (L2), i.e. second language, in Portuguese speakers; to verify performance of these individuals in an auditory processing test prior to and after being taught L2. participants of the study were eight college students who had only studied English in high school. These participants were divided into two groups: control group - were only enrolled in English classes; experimental group - were enrolled in English phonetic classes prior to their enrollment in English classes. Participants were submitted to an auditory processing test and to an oral test in English (Oral Test) prior to and after the classes. Data were analyzed in the same way, i.e. prior to and after the classes. these were expressed statistically by T-Student's test. Analyses indicated no difference in performance between groups. Scores indicated better performance of the control group for answering questions in English in the Oral Test. The experimental group had better performance in the auditory processing test after being enrolled to English phonetic classes and English course. prior basic knowledge of English did not enhance general learning (improvement in pronunciation) of the second language, however, it improved the ability of temporal processing in the used test.

  13. Culturally competent teaching strategies for Asian nursing students for whom English is a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, M; Abriam-Yago, K

    1997-01-01

    Asian nursing students for whom English is a second language have unique educational needs. These educational issues have not been addressed in the literature. The dynamic changes in the delivery of health care today and in the nursing profession have rapidly changed the academic and clinical requirements of nursing students and sometimes placed them at a disadvantage. This paper presents culturally competent teaching strategies specific to helping English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) Asian nursing students become active learners in their nursing programs.

  14. Facilitating vocabulary acquisition of young English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Neris, Mirza J; Jackson, Carla Wood; Goldstein, Howard

    2010-07-01

    This study examined whether English-only vocabulary instruction or English vocabulary instruction enhanced with Spanish bridging produced greater word learning in young Spanish-speaking children learning English during a storybook reading intervention while considering individual language characteristics. Twenty-two Spanish-speaking children learning English (ages 4-6) who participated in a summer education program for migrant families were randomly assigned to receive 2 weeks of each instruction: (a) word expansions in English or (b) English readings with word expansions in Spanish. Researcher-created measures of target vocabulary were administered, as were English and Spanish standardized measures of language proficiency and vocabulary. Results revealed significant improvement in naming, receptive knowledge, and expressive definitions for those children who received Spanish bridging. Spanish expansions produced the greatest gains in the children's use of expressive definitions. Initial language proficiency in both languages was found to affect participants' gains from intervention, as those with limited skills in both languages showed significantly less vocabulary growth than those with strong skills in Spanish. Additional benefits to using Spanish expansions in vocabulary instruction were observed. Future research should explore additional ways of enhancing the vocabulary growth of children with limited skills in both languages in order to support and strengthen the child's first language and promote second language acquisition.

  15. Using Flipped Learning Model in Teaching English Language among Female English Majors in Majmaah University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelshaheed, Bothina S. M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effect of using Flipped Learning Model in teaching English language among female English majors in Majmaah University on their achievement in two different English courses and identifying their feelings and satisfaction about flipping their classes. The study used a pre-post test design and included two…

  16. English as a "Global Language" in China: An Investigation into Learners' and Teachers' Language Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lin; Block, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues related to language beliefs held by teachers and students of English in China; namely, the status of English, the learners' expectations of English and the focus of English teaching and learning in China. These beliefs are examined in the context of globalization and China's ever-deepening integration into the global…

  17. Removing obstacles for African American English-speaking children through greater understanding of language difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Barbara Zurer; Conner, Tracy; Jackson, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Language difference among speakers of African American English (AAE) has often been considered language deficit, based on a lack of understanding about the AAE variety. Following Labov (1972), Wolfram (1969), Green (2002, 2011), and others, we define AAE as a complex rule-governed linguistic system and briefly discuss language structures that it shares with general American English (GAE) and others that are unique to AAE. We suggest ways in which mistaken ideas about the language variety add to children's difficulties in learning the mainstream dialect and, in effect, deny them the benefits of their educational programs. We propose that a linguistically informed approach that highlights correspondences between AAE and the mainstream dialect and trains students and teachers to understand language varieties at a metalinguistic level creates environments that support the academic achievement of AAE-speaking students. Finally, we present 3 program types that are recommended for helping students achieve the skills they need to be successful in multiple linguistic environments.

  18. Effect of Balanced Math Instruction on Math Performance of Grade 1 and Grade 2 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Gary Scott

    2017-01-01

    Research affirmed that instructional strategies that promote English Language Learners' (ELLs) Academic Language Proficiency (ALP) are essential in the primary grades for ELLs to succeed in school. This quantitative causal-comparative study relied on the premise of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and addressed to what extent Balanced Math…

  19. Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs, Attitudes, Knowledge Base, and Practices in Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The research centered on secondary mathematics teachers' beliefs, attitudes, knowledge base, and practices in meeting the academic and language needs of English language learners. Using socio-cultural theory and social practice theory to frame the study, the research design employed a mixed methods approach incorporating self-reported surveys,…

  20. The Effect of Cultural Background Knowledge on Learning English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effect of cultural background knowledge on learning English Language. It also aims to investigate if there are significant differences between subjects' performance in reading comprehension according to sex and general ability in English (GAE. The study aims at answering the following questions: 1 . To what extent is the effect of cultural background knowledge on subjects' performance in reading comprehension? 2 . What is the difference in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge? 3. What is the differenc e between subjects' performance in reading comprehension texts which are loaded with American culture and their general ability in English. ? The population of th is study consisted of all first - year students majoring in English at Hebron University in th e first semester of the academic year 2011/2012. They were 600. The sample of the study consisted of 60 subjects, males and females divided into four groups, two experimental and two controlled. The researcher followed the experimental method. Means, stand ard deviations and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were calculated by using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: 1. There are statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cu ltural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge . 2 . There are no statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. 3. Subjects' GAE revealed that there are significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. In the light of the results of th e study, the researcher recommends the

  1. Supporting Early Oral Language Skills for English Language Learners in Inner City Preschool Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie E.; Stuart, Morag; King, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Background: A significant number of children now enter formal education in England with reduced levels of proficiency in oral language. Children who come from disadvantaged backgrounds and who are English language learners (ELL) are at risk of limited oral language skills in English which impacts on later educational achievement. Aims: This paper…

  2. English Language Teachers' Perceptions on Knowing and Applying Contemporary Language Teaching Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucuoglu, Esen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the perceptions of English language teachers teaching at a preparatory school in relation to their knowing and applying contemporary language teaching techniques in their lessons. An investigation was conducted of 21 English language teachers at a preparatory school in North Cyprus. The SPSS statistical…

  3. Investigating the Perceptions of Pakistani English Language Learners on Language Learning Anxiety in EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasreen; Memon, Shumaila

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study aims to investigate the perceptions of English Language Learners on Language learning Anxiety in EFL classroom. Participants of the study were 145 Intermediate level students of different public colleges of Hyderabad, Sindh who are learning English as a foreign language. The data was collected through the modified form of…

  4. English for Specific Purposes and Academic Literacies: Eclecticism in Academic Writing Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lisa; Kaufhold, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Academic Literacies and English for Specific Purposes perspectives on the teaching of academic writing tend to be positioned as dichotomous and ideologically incompatible. Nonetheless, recent studies have called for the integration of these two perspectives in the design of writing programmes in order to meet the needs of students in the…

  5. Would There Be One Standard English as the Global Language?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienneke Indra Dewi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Article intends to investigate whether there is the possibility of having English as a global language used all over the world with one variety only. One variety of English will reduce the miscommunication among people speaking English. The research was conducted by library research by looking at the requirements of a global language, its spread in the world, and the related problems. The results show that English has fulfilled the requirements of a global language looking from its history and the spread of its speakers. However, it has a lot of varieties in either English speaking countries or in the developing countries where English functions as a second and foreign language. The varieties are found not only in the pronunciation, but in the vocabulary and grammar as well. Usually the native languages play an important role in these varieties. All these facts indicate that English might become a global language. However, having one variety of English still needs a long time to go.

  6. Learning through an Aboriginal Language: The Impact on Students' English and Aboriginal Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usborne, Esther; Peck, Josephine; Smith, Donna-Lee; Taylor, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Aboriginal communities across Canada are implementing Aboriginal language programs in their schools. In the present research, we explore the impact of learning through an Aboriginal language on students' English and Aboriginal language skills by contrasting a Mi'kmaq language immersion program with a Mi'kmaq as a second language program. The…

  7. English language use, health and mortality in older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jennifer J; Sheffield, Kristin M

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if English language use is associated with smoking, diabetes, hypertension, limitations in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and 12-year mortality in older Mexican Americans. Using data from a cohort of 3,050 Mexican Americans aged 65 years and older, we examined prevalence of 4 health indicators and survival over 12 years of follow-up by English language use. English language use is associated with increased odds of hypertension in men, independent of nativity and sociodemographic control variables. Among women, English language use is associated with lower odds of ADL limitations and increased odds of smoking. The associations for women were partially explained by occupational status and nativity. After adjusting for health conditions, sociodemographics, and nativity, English language use was associated with increased mortality among men. Interaction terms revealed that for both men and women, higher English language use was associated with mortality for respondents with the highest level of income only. English language use is a predictor of health and mortality in older Mexican Americans separate from country of birth.

  8. The Long Agony of English as a World Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acierno, Maria Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This paper wants to examine the present communicative situation in our global world, and consequently the position occupied by the English language as the main means of interaction. I do not intend to make any realistic prediction, but my purpose is only to evaluate the spread of this language and the emergence of other languages according to both…

  9. Comparing Local and International Chinese Students' English Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Margreat Aloysious; Ganesen, Sree Nithya

    2012-01-01

    According to Horwitz (1987) learners' belief about language learning are influenced by previous language learning experiences as well as cultural background. This study examined the English Language Learning Strategies between local and international Chinese students who share the same cultural background but have been exposed to different…

  10. The English Language as a Panacea for National Integration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If these social interactions are to yield positive and visible results, culminating in growth and development of the individuals and the nation in general, they must be done via a language devoid of mutual suspicion, distrust, hatred and insecurity. To this extent, the English language, which is the only language in Nigeria that ...

  11. Communication Strategies in English as a Second Language (ESL) Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Lidya Ayuni

    2013-01-01

    Communication is important for people around the world. People try to communicate to other people around the globe using language. In understanding the differences of some languages around the world, people need to learn the language of other people they try to communicate with, for example Indonesian people learn to acquire English. In the…

  12. The Nature of Spanish versus English Language Use at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branum-Martin, Lee; Mehta, Paras D.; Carlson, Coleen D.; Francis, David J.; Goldenberg, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Home language experiences are important for children's development of language and literacy. However, the home language context is complex, especially for Spanish-speaking children in the United States. A child's use of Spanish or English likely ranges along a continuum, influenced by preferences of particular people involved, such as parents,…

  13. The "Kasha" Syndrome: English Language Teaching in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Caughey, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the current state of consciousness in the language teaching field, as it changes from a Soviet era of restricted resources to a potpourri of English language input from every corner of the planet. Language teaching in the Soviet system promoted a prescriptive "correct/incorrect" dichotomy; it privileged British over…

  14. The Use of Academic Words in the Analytical Writing of Secondary English Learners and Native English Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cons, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the following research question: How do secondary English learners (ELs) and Re-designated fluent English proficient students (RFEPs) use academic words in analytical writing in comparison to native English speakers (NESs)? It highlights previously overlooked differences in academic word use in the writing of students who are…

  15. THE BASIC SPECIFICITY OF THE ABILITY OF VARIED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CURRICULUMS TO ENHANCE ENGLISH LEARNERS' CAPACITY TO DEVELOP NECESSARY SKILLS TO COMMUNICATE USING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wayne Hendershot; Nutprapha K. Dennis; Suchada Chaiwiwattrakul; Ratirot Phiphitphakdee

    2017-01-01

    Inasmuch as the goal of teaching English to non-native English speakers should be focused on enhancing English learners’ ability to develop skills necessary for efficient and effective use of the English language in communication within their daily lives as well as within the context of educational, employment, governmental, and business related issues, the materials and resources used by the teacher to provide said English learners with enhanced ability to develop necessary skills for the us...

  16. Phonology in English language teaching an international approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pennington, Martha C

    2014-01-01

    Phonology in English Language Teaching is an introductory text, specifically directed at the needs of language teachers internationally. Combining an overview of English phonology with structured practical guidance, this text shows how phonology can be applied in the classroom.An introductory chapter provides the philosophical framework, followed by separate chapters on the phonology of consonants, vowels and prosody. As well as presenting core material on English phonology, the book explores the relationship of orthography to the English sound system from a historical and a pre

  17. How Do Binus University Undergraduate Students Value English in the General, Academic, and ELT Context?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad B. Asmani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Article  explored the issues of the reasons and ways Indonesian undergraduate students taking English subjects at Binus University valued English, particularly in relation to its roles and influences as the dominant language and as the world’s lingua franca, and how these could give impacts on the ELT (English Language Teaching purposes at Binus University. The study used the quantitative approach to find out the pattern of the ways they valued English in the general, academic and ELT contexts. The analysis of the quantitative results showed that there was a tendency that non-computer students value English relatively higher than computer students in terms of linguistically imperialistic ideas and macroacquisition views, while English itself tended to be respected by all students for both reasons of material/non-material benefits as well as international influences. In summary, teacher resources, teaching techniques, curriculum design, material content and assessment format should put these findings into consideration so as to make the best teaching methodology for ELT practices at Binus University. 

  18. Different approaches to teaching English as a second language

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Pedraza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays teaching and learning English as a second language is becoming more important than ever. This emphasis is due, to some extent, to the lack of work vacancies in Spain and the necessity of Spanish people to learn the English language properly. Having the ability to speak and understand the English language at a good level is thought of as beneficial as a way of either improving an individual’s curriculum with a qualification or certificate, or simply as a way of aiding that individual ...

  19. Botswana English: Implications for English Language Teaching and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe

    2011-01-01

    Concerted efforts to characterise Botswana English (BE), though still referred to as "a variety in development", have validated its existence. However, the teaching and assessment of English in the high schools do not seem to have responded to the development of this variety. This paper discusses the viability of using Standard British…

  20. Tense Marking in the English Narrative Retells of Dual Language Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusewski, Svenja; Rojas, Raúl

    2017-07-26

    This longitudinal study investigated the emergence of English tense marking in young (Spanish-English) dual language learners (DLLs) over 4 consecutive academic semesters, addressing the need for longitudinal data on typical acquisition trajectories of English in DLL preschoolers. Language sample analysis was conducted on 139 English narrative retells elicited from 39 preschool-age (Spanish-English) DLLs (range = 39-65 months). Growth curve models captured within- and between-individual change in tense-marking accuracy over time. Tense-marking accuracy was indexed by the finite verb morphology composite and by 2 specifically developed adaptations. Individual tense markers were systematically described in terms of overall accuracy and specific error patterns. Tense-marking accuracy exhibited significant growth over time for each composite. Initially, irregular past-tense accuracy was higher than regular past-tense accuracy; over time, however, regular past-tense marking outpaced accuracy on irregular verbs. These findings suggest that young DLLs can achieve high tense-marking accuracy assuming 2 years of immersive exposure to English. Monitoring the growth in tense-marking accuracy over time and considering productive tense-marking errors as partially correct more precisely captured the emergence of English tense marking in this population with highly variable expressive language skills. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5176942.

  1. Using Focus Group Methodology to Understand International Students' Academic Language Needs: A Comparison of Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Flaitz, Jeffra

    2005-01-01

    Assessing students' language needs is the indispensable first step in EAP (English for Academic Purposes) curriculum development. In this article, we report a portion of the results from a needs assessment study whose ultimate purpose was to inform curriculum development in EAP contexts. We used the focus group methodology to examine learner needs…

  2. Understanding the Academic Procrastination Attitude of Language Learners in Turkish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekleyen, Nilüfer

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of academic procrastination has long been the subject of attention among researchers. However, there is still a paucity of studies examining language learners since most of the studies focus on similar participants such as psychology students. The present study was conducted among students trying to learn English in the first year…

  3. The Effect of English Learning Anxiety on Iranian High-School Students’ English Language Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Atef-Vahid

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored English language learning anxiety among 38 third-year high school students in English classrooms and its relationship with overall English achievement. Students’ foreign language anxiety was surveyed and analyzed using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986 [14] and their English achievement was measured through their final standardized English exam administered by the school. The results showed that although some students felt extremely confident and relaxed, however, one-third of the
    students experienced moderate to high-anxiety levels while learning the English language in class. Correlational analysis revealed that the total FLCAS scores had a significantly moderate negative correlation (r=-.0586, p<.01 with the total final English exams scores of the participants. Anxiety was also analyzed according to the four different variables of anxiety (communication anxiety, test anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, English classroom anxiety which were measured by the FLCAS. The results of the Pearson correlational analysis indicated that English achievement was modestly correlated with all four anxiety variables (p<0.01. Of the four types of anxiety, English Classroom anxiety had the highest correlational value. Finally, possible anxiety provoking factors
    leading to these findings are examined and discussed, and some pedagogical implications are proposed.

  4. Commentary: Motivation for Learning Languages Other than English in an English-Dominant World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of recent research on language learning motivation has reportedly focused on English as a target language, typically in relatively homogeneous, secondary and postsecondary "foreign language" settings. How applicable, then, are the theories and findings undergirding that research to our understanding of the contemporary…

  5. EXPLORING STAIN PEKALONGAN STUDENTS’ STRATEGIES IN LEARNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Hastuti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explored college students’strategies in learning English language. Two questions were presented. The first question is what strategies are used by the students in learning English language and the second question is how do the students use strategies in learning English language. To answer the first question, 49 college students gave respond on Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL questionnaire. Then, to answer the last question, five students participated in Think Aloud Protocol (TAP sessions. The data analysis from SILL questionnaire showed that the students were medium user of strategies in learning English language. The strategies then ranked from social strategies, followed by metacognitive, cognitive, affective, compensation, and memory strategies at the latter posi- tion. Then, to find out how the students use strategies in learning English language, think aloud protocol (TAP sessions presented that the students made use of three major strategies in learning English language cognitive strategies, metacognitive strategies, and compensation strategies. These three strategies were used by the students in three different activities (understanding reading passage, dealing with unfamiliar words or phrases and self-awareness as the study was limited to reading skills. In conclusion, the students made use of different strategies when doing particular task given to them. At this point, students in some ways have the ability to learn by themselves, that is by using strategies as lecturers cannot always facilitate students’ learning, especially when lecturers teach large classes.

  6. On Becoming an African-Asian English Academic at Rhodes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    canberry

    culture, the literary elite held the respon si bility of upholding 'the language, the changing idiom, upon which ... to Africa's Dionysus'.8 Butler supported cultural self-consciousness on the part of the English ... they belong to.12. ON BE COMING AN AF RICAN-ASIAN ENG LISH AC A DEMIC AT RHODES UNI VER SITY. 99 ...

  7. Students of Today Changing English Language Studies of Yesterday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Vodopija-Krstanović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, concern has been expressed as to whether English Language Studies are in tune with the wider social, political, technological and economic trends, and the latest developments in applied linguistics and English language education. In line with these views, the aim of this study is to explore – by means of interviews with 25 English majors from the University of Rijeka – the students’ expectations with respect to the skills and competencies (to be developed in their course of English studies, their relevance to the job market, as well as the teaching approaches and methods used to reach these learning outcomes. By comparing and contrasting the emerging educational trends triggered by the Bologna Process with primary data collected in our interviews, we focus on the implications that our results might have in terms of introducing changes to traditional English Language Studies educational paradigms.

  8. The Effectiveness of Electronic Mind Maps in Developing Academic Achievement and the Attitude towards Learning English among Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaser, Afaf M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the effect of using electronic Mind Maps on the academic achievement of the fifth-grade primary female students in the English language curriculum compared to the traditional teaching method adopted in the teacher's guide. It also aimed to indicate the attitudes of the fifth-grade female students towards the use…

  9. IDEOLOGY AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING: RELATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Tainá Almeida Alves Martins; Diógenes Cândido de Lima

    2015-01-01

    Under the assertion that all discourse has political essence, being ideological by nature, in this paper we discuss concepts of ideology and its relation to English language (EL) teaching. For language is the mediator of ideologies, there is no way to see language teaching as a neutral exercise, rather as a politicized practice. In this article, the concept of ideology and its relationship to language and discourse are initially elucidated. For this, we make use of Bakhtin, Foucault and Fa...

  10. STUDENTS’ PERSONALITY TRAITS AND LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN ENGLISH

    OpenAIRE

    Juanito P. Tandoc Jr.; Ma. Victoria Tandoc – Juan

    2014-01-01

    The study looked into the concept of personality traits and choice of language learning strategies as major influences in the success of learning a second language. More specifically, it investigated university students’ personality traits and language learning strategies towards learning English language. A total of 230 college students took part in this research study. The measuring instruments used were the Manchester Personality Questionnaire Version 14 (MPQ) and for the ...

  11. Double Threshold in bi- and multilingual contexts: Preconditions for positive language influence in English as an additional language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eLechner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bi- and multilingualism has been shown to have positive effects on the attainment of third and additional lan-guages. These effects, however, depend on the type of bi- and multilingualism and the status of the languages involved (Cenoz 2003; Jessner 2006. In this explorative trend study, we revisit Cummins’ Threshold Hypothesis (1979, claiming that bilingual children must reach certain levels of attainment in order to a avoid academic deficits and b allow bilingualism to have a positive effect on their cognitive development and academic attain-ment. To this end, we examine the attainment of English as an academic language of 16-year-old school children from Hamburg (n=52. Our findings support the existence of thresholds for literacy attainment. We argue that language external factors may override positive effects of bilingualism. In addition, these factors may compensate negative effects attributable to low literacy attainment in German and the heritage languages. We also show that low attainment levels in migrant children’s heritage languages preempt high literacy attainment in additional languages.

  12. A Case for Improved Reading Instruction for Academic English Reading Proficiency

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    Glenn Ole Hellekjær

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the academic reading proficiency in English of 217 senior level Norwegian upper secondary school students who upon graduation are considered qualified for higher education. Testing with an International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic Reading Module revealed that two thirds of the 178 respondents with ordinary EFL courses did not achieve the equivalent of the IELTS Band 6 score minimum that is usually required for admission to British and Australian universities. In comparison, two thirds of a sample of 39 respondents with a single, sheltered Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL subject achieved a Band 6 score or better. Closer analysis indicates that the poor test scores can be attributed to weaknesses in current English as a Foreign Language (EFL instruction where reading is neglected, where students do not learn to adjust how they read to reading purpose, and where they do not learn how to handle unfamiliar words to avoid disrupting the reading process. The article ends with suggestions on how to improve EFL instruction, in Norway and elsewhere.

  13. Mutual Word Borrowings between the English and the Spanish Languages

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    Aliya Rinatovna Ismagilova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary world witnesses growing popularity of foreign languages learning and their role in the modern society. The article is devoted to the problem of mutual borrowings from English and Spanish languages. The aim of the article is to investigate new tendencies in the English words borrowings, their establishment in the Spanish language and the other way round. The Spanish language is one of the most widespread languages in the world and it is a native language for different nationalities. On the other hand, English has borrowed quite a lot of Spanish words as well. The mutual enrichment of the languages makes the process of language teaching specific and it is important in the modern process of globalization where languages are the main resource of international cooperation. The article contains both theoretical and practical materials dedicated to the investigation of this problem. This article may be useful for a wide range of readers, students, scientists, linguists in the study of modern Spanish and English languages.

  14. A Development English Language Learning Management Strategies Model to Enhance Communicative Competence for High School Students

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    Thitiya Ruennakarn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives for this research are to 1 build a development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students 2 study the results of using the model. A target group is seven English teachers in Pibulwittayalai School and the sample for studying the results of model to students are ten English club students in Pibulwittayalai School.The research tools are focus group discussion forms, communication plans, English skills evaluation forms, communicative competence test, communicative competence evaluation forms and 21st century skills evaluation forms. This model is examined by connoisseurship.The statistics for analyzing data are frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and Wilcoxon test. The results of the research were as follows: 1. The development English language learning management strategies model to enhance communicative competence for high school students had4components ; 1 SWOT–Analysis, 2 strategy development, 3 strategy assessment and 4 strategy adjustment.This model had 6 strategies such as 1 genius academic strategy 2 English through AEC 3 English through World Class 4 enhancing for genius academic in communication with foreigners 5 enhancing English through world class standard and 6 enhancing for potential in English skills learning through world class standard. These were merged as only one strategy as “ Development of students’ potential for communication”. 2. The results of using the model comprised of 2.1 The results to teachers were teachers could analyze SWOT- analysis for determining strength, weakness,opportunity and threat about English language learning management, received guideline and could appropriately and efficiently construct strategies of English language learning management to enhance communicative competence. 2.2 The results to students: The students had 4 English skills, such as listening,speaking, reading and writing. It was

  15. New Ways of Using Video Technology in English Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliacci, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Examines the different uses of video technologies in English language teaching, including content and instructional presentation, planning for instruction, designing tasks for students, assessment, and using new technologies. (Author/VWL)

  16. English as a Second Language Techniques in Developmental Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Zohara; Buchanan, Harriette Cuttino

    1980-01-01

    Offers successful teaching techniques from the English as a Second Language classroom that should be useful in remedial writing instruction. Emphasizes building student self-esteem and leading the student through drills and composition exercises at an individualized pace. (RL)

  17. The Influence on Chinese Language from Postcolonial English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    From the point of view on postcolonial theories, this paper explores English language's influence on normal Chinese and Hong Kong Chinese, and concludes the advantage and disadvantage of this phenomenon.

  18. Differentiating Instruction in Mathematics for the English Language Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrey, Deandrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematics teachers need to provide explicit language instruction for students learning English. By differentiating instruction in mathematics, teachers can plan and provide instruction in mathematics with the goal of providing access to all students. (Contains 1 table and 4 figures.)

  19. Communication Strategies in English as a Second Language (ESL Context

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    Lidya Ayuni Putri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication is important for people around the world. People try to communicate to other people around the globe using language. In understanding the differences of some languages around the world, people need to learn the language of other people they try to communicate with, for example Indonesian people learn to acquire English. In the context that English in Indonesia is considered as a foreign language, it causes the learners of English in Indonesia understand not only the language but also the culture. Foreign language learners may encounter various communication problems when their interlanguage is limited. In order to convey their messages and remain in a conversation until their communication goal is achieved, ESL (English as a Second Language learners need to employ communication strategies, which have been defined generally as devices used by second language learners to overcome perceived barriers to achieving specific communication goals (Færch & Kasper, 1983. In order to avoid certain miscommunication, the teacher of English in Indonesia should also give their learners the understanding of communication strategies.

  20. Bridging the language gap: Exploring science teachers' dual role as teachers of content and English literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Suzanne C.

    Responsibility for educating English language learners is increasingly falling on the shoulders of content specialists at the secondary level, as students are mainstreamed into classes. Therefore, providing these students an opportunity to achieve academic success depends largely on the quality of mainstream instruction (Cornell, 1995). Most teachers receive little or no preparation in how to work with English language learners. In my study, I address the instructional issues confronting three white, monolingual English-speaking middle school science teachers who must meet the demands of an increasing English language learner population. Specifically, this study explores teacher beliefs and enactment of reform-oriented science and sheltered instructional approaches to develop English language learners scientific and English literacy skills. I also explore the relationships that exist between these two dynamics in an effort to determine the extent to which teachers take on a dual role as teachers promoting English language and science proficiency. Using a participant observation case study method and my adaptation of Schwab's commonplaces heuristic, I analyzed the relationship between teacher beliefs, milieu, subject matter, and enactment in bridging the language gap in the science classroom for English language learners. The most noteworthy finding of this study was the significant role of milieu in enacting lessons that bridge the language gap and foster the development of English language learners science and English literacy skills. The findings suggest that greater attention be given to helping teachers establish a relationship-driven classroom milieu. You can provide all kinds of courses or professional learning experiences to improve teachers' instructional practices, but they must also recognize the importance of establishing relationships with their students; the coursework they take will not supplant the need to foster a warm and safe environment for all