WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic engagement types

  1. Academic Engagement and Commercialisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkmann, Markus; Tartari, Valentina; McKelvey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    A considerable body of work highlights the relevance of collaborative research, contract research, consulting and informal relationships for university–industry knowledge transfer. We present a systematic review of research on academic scientists’ involvement in these activities to which we refer......, and pursued by academics to access resources supporting their research agendas. We conclude by identifying future research needs, opportunities for methodological improvement and policy interventions....

  2. Relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Minnaert, Alexander

    The relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement of 777 Grade 6 children located in 41 learning environments was explored. Questionnaires were used to tap learning environment perceptions of children, their academic engagement, and their ethnic-cultural

  3. Purpose of Engagement in Academic Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtinger, Einat; Kaplan, Avi

    2011-01-01

    "Academic self-regulation" refers to the self-generated, reflective, and strategic engagement in academic tasks (Zimmerman, 2000). Self-regulation is crucial for academic success, particularly in higher education, where students are required to take increased responsibility for their learning and where the diversity of courses and activities may…

  4. [Academic achievement, engagement and burnout among first year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez H, Paula; Pérez V, Cristhian; Parra P, Paula; Ortiz M, Liliana; Matus B, Olga; McColl C, Peter; Torres A, Graciela; Meyer K, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Stress may affect the sense of wellbeing and academic achievement of university students. To assess the relationship of academic engagement and burnout with academic achievement among first year medical students. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student and Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey (MBI-SS) were applied to 277 first year medical students of four universities. Their results were correlated with the grades obtained in the different courses. Moderately high engagement and low burnout levels were detected. There was a high level of satisfaction with studies and a moderate exhaustion level. Academic achievement was associated with the degree of engagement with studies but not with burnout. Conglomerate analysis detected a group of students with high levels of wellbeing, characterized by high levels of academic engagement and low burnout. Other group had moderate levels of engagement and lack of personal fulfilment. Other group, identified as extenuated, had high levels of personal exhaustion and depersonalization. Finally the disassociated group had a low academic engagement, low emotional exhaustion, high levels of depersonalization and lack of personal fulfillment. Academic achievement is associated with the level of engagement with studies but not with burnout.

  5. Student Engagement and Academic Performance in the Colombian University Context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineda-Báez, Clelia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increase in Latin America of Higher Education coverage, grave dropout problems persist that question the role of educational experiences to foster students’ academic engagement. This study was carried out in Colombia and sought to establish the relationship between the five benchmarks that compose academic engagement and the academic performance of a group of Colombian university students. The transversal and correlational study used the Spanish version of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE that measures students’ level of participation in five dimensions: Academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and supportive campus environment and its relationship to academic performance. The findings of 1906 students from 7 universities indicate that there are statistically significant, but weak correlations between the items that compose the benchmarks and students’ academic performance, which lead to reflect upon key aspects to strengthen the education experiences offered to university students.

  6. The association between academic engagement and achievement in health sciences students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Educational institutions play an important role in encouraging student engagement, being necessary to know how engaged are students at university and if this factor is involved in student success point and followed. To explore the association between academic engagement and achievement. Methods Cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 304 students of Health Sciences. They were asked to fill out an on-line questionnaire. Academic achievements were calculated using three types of measurement. Results Positive correlations were found in all cases. Grade point average was the academic rate most strongly associated with engagement dimensions and this association is different for male and female students. The independent variables could explain between 18.9 and 23.9% of the variance (p < 0.05) in the population of university students being analyzed. Conclusions Engagement has been shown to be one of the many factors, which are positively involved, in the academic achievements of college students. PMID:23446005

  7. Should Students Engaged to Their Study? (Academic Burnout and School-Engagement among Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Arlinkasari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inability to deal with lectures efficiently leads students vulnerable to academic burnout. Burnout contributes to the high dropout rate among students, and this phenomenon has occurred on several universities in Indonesia. To overcome these problems, students should generate the feelings, attitudes and positive attitude towards the academic demands, or known as school engagement. School involvement is a predictor of students’ dropout rate. This study aims to analyze the dropout problem in many private universities in Jakarta by examining the psychological variables: academic burnout and school engagement. 208 students from some private university in Jakarta participated and fulfilled two questionnaires: academic burnout and school engagement that has been modified to suit the college setting. Correlation of the variables showed r= - 0.399 (p = 0.000. This means that school engagement plays a role in reducing academic burnout among students. These findings contribute a reference for academic counseling to support the decreasing of students’ dropout rate.

  8. Sexual Harassment, Self Esteem and Academic Engagement as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the extent to which sexual harassment, self-esteem, and academic engagement predict academic success of female secondary school students in Gondar city. Correlational design was employed to answer the research questions raised. Respondents were 366 female ...

  9. Sense of Community and Academic Engagement in the Seminary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuorji, JohnBosco Chika; Ifeagwazi, Chuka Mike; Nwonyi, Sampson Kelechi; Ujoatuonu, Ikechukwu V. N.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the associations of sense of community (SOC) and academic engagement in a seminary. The seminarians (N = 300) completed the Classroom Sense of Community Inventory (CSCI)-School Form, and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Version. Results showed that a perception that the seminary provided a positive learning community for…

  10. Academic goals, student homework engagement, and academic achievement in Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eValle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be a general consensus in the literature that doing homework is beneficial for students. Thus, the current challenge is to examine the process of doing homework to find which variables may help students to complete the homework assigned. To address this goal, a path analysis model was fit. The model hypothesized that the way students engage in homework is explained by the type of academic goals set, and it explains the amount of time spend on homework, the homework time management, and the amount of homework done. Lastly, the amount of homework done is positively related to academic achievement. The model was fit using a sample of 535 Spanish students from the last three courses of elementary school (aged 9 to 13. Findings show that: (a academic achievement was positively associated with the amount of homework completed, (b the amount of homework completed was related to the homework time management, (c homework time management was associated with the approach to homework; (d and the approach to homework, like the rest of the variables of the model (except for the time spent on homework, was related to the student's academic motivation (i.e., academic goals.

  11. Adaptability, Engagement and Academic Achievement at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Holliman, Andrew J.; Martin, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    University entry is a time of great change for students. The extent to which students are able to effectively navigate such change likely has an impact on their success in university. In the current study, we examined this by way of adaptability, the extent to which students' adaptability is associated with their behavioural engagement at…

  12. Social networking in Bangladesh: Boon or curse for academic engagement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouri Dey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of social networking services (SNSs users in Bangladesh is increasing at an accelerating rate. There are many who argue that SNS usage is destroying the students’ future by diminishing their academic engagement. The authors aim to investigate whether there is any relationship between students’ academic performance and their SNS usage. The study chose Facebook as a representative of SNSs because this is the most popular platform for online social connectivity and conducted a survey regarding the usage of Facebook among students of Business Administration from three private Bangladeshi private universities. The research results show that Facebook can be used for at least 21 academic tasks or goals and that these can be grouped into six major factors. Moreover, students opine that their online socializing does not reduce their study time, instead it helps them get the latest study related information, sharing courses, class schedules etc. After running a regression analysis, the authors conclude that the students’ level of engagement with the academic life through Facebook does not influence their academic results. The reason for this insignificant relation between academic results and academic engagement through SNSs may be due to the non-diversified course curriculum, the traditional way of delivering lectures and evaluating, limited study materials, non-receptiveness to technology-based learning etc. However, the authors propose to include SNSs as a study tool as it is a popular media and to conduct further research to better understand the effective way of using it in the education system.

  13. Social networking in Bangladesh: Boon or curse for academic engagement?

    OpenAIRE

    Mouri Dey; Ali Arshad Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    The number of social networking services (SNSs) users in Bangladesh is increasing at an accelerating rate. There are many who argue that SNS usage is destroying the students’ future by diminishing their academic engagement. The authors aim to investigate whether there is any relationship between students’ academic performance and their SNS usage. The study chose Facebook as a representative of SNSs because this is the most popular platform for online social connectivity and conducted a survey...

  14. The academic rewards of socially-oriented happiness: Interdependent happiness promotes academic engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datu, Jesus Alfonso D; King, Ronnel B; Valdez, Jana Patricia M

    2017-04-01

    Interdependent happiness has been found to be positively associated with optimal psychological outcomes in collectivist cultures. However, the association between interdependent happiness and key academic outcomes has remained unexplored. The current study examined the association of interdependent happiness with key academic outcomes such as autonomous motivation, engagement, and achievement using both cross-sectional (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) approaches. Study 1 revealed that interdependent happiness positively predicted academic engagement (partly) via autonomous motivation. Study 2 showed that prior interdependent happiness positively predicted subsequent academic engagement even after controlling for autoregressor effects. In addition, reciprocal associations among the key variables were found. Taken together, results of the two studies suggest that interdependent happiness plays an adaptive role in the academic context especially in a collectivist cultural setting. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Academic Satisfaction at University: The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquijo, Itziar; Extremera, Natalio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The present study examined the mediating role of academic engagement in the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic satisfaction when controlling for sociodemographic variables and other classic constructs such as conscientiousness and personality traits. Method: The sample included 203 university students (140…

  16. Engaging Academic Staff in Transnational Teaching: The Job Satisfaction Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Danny; McGill, Tanya; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Transnational education (TNE) is an important facet of the international education learning and teaching landscape. Ensuring academics are positively engaged in TNE is a challenging but necessary issue for this form of educational provision if the risks inherent in TNE are to be successfully mitigated. This article explores job satisfaction for…

  17. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  18. Academic performance and student engagement in level 1 physics undergraduates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M M; McVitie, S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.casey@physics.gla.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    At the beginning of academic year 2007-08, staff in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow started to implement a number of substantial changes to the administration of the level 1 physics undergraduate class. The main aims were to improve the academic performance and progression statistics. With this in mind, a comprehensive system of learning support was introduced, the main remit being the provision of an improved personal contact and academic monitoring and support strategy for all students at level 1. The effects of low engagement with compulsory continuous assessment components had already been observed to have a significant effect on students sitting in the middle of the grade curve. Analysis of data from the 2007-08 class showed that even some nominally high-achieving students achieved lowered grades due to the effects of low engagement. Nonetheless, academic and other support measures put in place during 2007-08 played a part in raising the passrate for the level 1 physics class by approximately 8% as well as raising the progression rate by approximately 10%.

  19. ADOLESCENT WORK INTENSITY, SCHOOL PERFORMANCE, AND ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E; Bachman, Jerald G

    2010-07-01

    Teenagers working over 20 hours per week perform worse in school than youth who work less. There are two competing explanations for this association: (1) that paid work takes time and effort away from activities that promote achievement, such as completing homework, preparing for examinations, getting help from parents and teachers, and participating in extracurricular activities; and (2) that the relationship between paid work and school performance is spurious, reflecting preexisting differences between students in academic ability, motivation, and school commitment. Using longitudinal data from the ongoing national Monitoring the Future project, this research examines the impact of teenage employment on school performance and academic engagement during the 8th, 10th, and 12th grades. We address issues of spuriousness by using a two-level hierarchical model to estimate the relationships of within-individual changes in paid work to changes in school performance and other school-related measures. Unlike prior research, we also compare youth school performance and academic orientation when they are actually working in high-intensity jobs to when they are jobless and wish to work intensively. Results indicate that the mere wish for intensive work corresponds with academic difficulties in a manner similar to actual intensive work.

  20. The academic engagement of intellectually challenged learners in inclusive schools: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonti Zelma Mokobane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on significant findings from research into facilitating the engagement of differently-abled learners in inclusive schools. The study was conducted at one of the schools considered to be a model of inclusive education in a semi-urban area located in the northern part of Tshwane, Gauteng Province, South Africa. The purpose of the study is to explore academic engagement of intellectually challenged learners in inclusive schools and to suggest strategies that can improve their effective engagement. The design type is a qualitative single case study. Data presented was obtained by means of focus group and one-on-one interviews with educators and learners. Data was analysed following the spiral method of Creswell. Findings revealed that even through their frustrations educators do make positive strides in engaging the intellectually challenged learners in inclusive classes, and the findings are relevant for developing strategies necessary for improving this. Teachers indicated that they use various strategies of engaging learners in academic activities, such as giving immediate feedback, but there was no consistency in using the strategy. There should be consistency when using strategies, so that they can yield positive results

  1. Opening the Black Box: Conceptualizing Community Engagement From 109 Community-Academic Partnership Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed M; Maurana, Cheryl; Nelson, David; Meister, Tim; Young, Sharon Neu; Lucey, Paula

    2016-01-01

    This research effort includes a large scale study of 109 community-academic partnership projects funded by the Healthier Wisconsin Partnership Program (HWPP), a component of the Advancing a Healthier Wisconsin endowment at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The study provides an analysis unlike other studies, which have been smaller, and/or more narrowly focused in the type of community-academic partnership projects analyzed. To extract themes and insights for the benefit of future community-academic partnerships and the field of community-engaged research (CEnR). Content analysis of the final reports submitted by 109 community-academic partnership projects awards within the time frame of March 2005 to August 2011. Thirteen themes emerged from the report analysis: community involvement, health accomplishments, capacity building, sustainability, collaboration, communication, best practices, administration, relationship building, clarity, adjustment of plan, strategic planning, and time. Data supported previous studies in the importance of some themes, and provided insights regarding how these themes are impactful. The case analysis revealed new insights into the characteristics of these themes, which the authors then grouped into three categories: foundational attributes of successful community-academic partnership, potential challenges of community-academic partnerships, and outcomes of community-academic partnerships. The insights gained from these reports further supports previous research extolling the benefits of community-academic partnerships and provides valuable direction for future partners, funders and evaluators in how to deal with challenges and what they can anticipate and plan for in developing and managing community-academic partnership projects.

  2. Structural Modeling on the Relationship between Basic Psychological Needs, Academic Engagement, and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maralani, Farnaz Mehdipour; Lavasani, Masoud Gholamali; Hejazi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Some of the key issues in educational psychology are the way of students' engagement at school, controlling anxiety, and academic achievement. In line with that, the purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between variables that are basic psychological needs, academic engagement, and test anxiety with regard to structural…

  3. Possible Link between Medical Students' Motivation for Academic Work and Time Engaged in Physical Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise results in an active well-being. It is likely that students' engagement in physical exercise keeps them motivated to perform academic endeavors. This study aimed to assess the relation of time engaged in physical exercise with medical students' motivation for academic work. Prospectively, 296 second-year medical students…

  4. Work Personality, Work Engagement, and Academic Effort in a Group of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between the variables of work engagement, developmental work personality, and academic effort in a sample of college students. This study provides evidence for the hypothesized positive relationship between academic effort, engagement, and work personality. When gender was controlled, the Work Tasks…

  5. Teacher Support and Math Engagement: Roles of Academic Self-Efficacy and Positive Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru-De; Zhen, Rui; Ding, Yi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jia; Jiang, Ronghuan; Xu, Le

    2018-01-01

    The current study assessed 869 elementary school students in China using self-report questionnaires, to examine the multiple mediating effects of academic self-efficacy and positive academic emotions (enjoyment and relief) in the relations between teacher support and academic engagement (cognitive, behavioural and emotional aspects) within a math…

  6. School Engagement for Academically At-Risk Students: A Participatory Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Nadia; Due, Clemence

    2015-01-01

    While past literature has explored school engagement in older students, there is less research for younger children specifically, and very little which engages children themselves in the research process. This paper provides insight into school engagement for academically at-risk students in the second year of school through a participatory…

  7. Satisfaction and Academic Engagement among Undergraduate Students: A Case Study in Istanbul University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Ozge Özaslan Caliskan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic engagement used to refer to the extent to which students identify with and value schooling outcomes, and participate in academic and non-academic school activities. This study aims to investigate the academic engagement and satisfaction from the school among the university students. The data is taken from the undergraduate students in School of Transportation & Logistics in Istanbul University. We used a questionnaire that consisted of two parts. First part of the questionnaire is about to measure the students’ academic engagement that is improved by Schaufeli et al. Second part of the questionnaire is about to measure the students’ satisfaction from the school. K-means cluster analysis is used to determine two groups of students, group the students in to two clusters based on their school satisfaction scores. We named these two groups as “satisfied” and “unsatisfied” students. Secondly we investigate the relationships between the satisfaction scores and the academic engagement. By means of T Test we investigate whether the academic engagement differs between the clusters that are determined according to the students’ satisfaction scores. Finally we found that academic engagement differs according to the identified clusters.

  8. Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement. Report 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, Christine; Gray, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement was to examine the characteristics of schools with a low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) from all jurisdictions that were identified to be making a difference to student academic and to identify the key drivers and characteristics of…

  9. Effects of a Classroom Intervention on Academic Engagement of Elementary School Students with Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatham, Lychelle

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of anxiety reduction on academic engagement for eight students experiencing significant anxiety in grades three through five. All participating students showed high anxiety levels that appeared to be impacting performance on at least one academic task in the classroom, according to teacher report. Student…

  10. Understanding Change in Higher Education as Bricolage: How Academics Engage in Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvel, Séverine

    2013-01-01

    The engagement of academics in organizational change in higher education institutions is generally understood as involving a wide range of behaviors, and previous studies have situated academics' actions at various points along a continuum between passivity and pro-activity. This article complements this approach by asking how--rather than in…

  11. Lessons from Star Trek: Engaging Academic Staff in the Internationalisation of the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsed, Craig; Green, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    One consequence of globalisation is the demand on academics to better prepare students for work and life in an interconnected world through curriculum internationalisation. Many academics are hesitant, resistant, or ill-prepared to engage with curriculum internationalisation. This paper explores how this can be addressed by reconfiguring the way…

  12. A Comparative Study of Student Engagement, Satisfaction, and Academic Success among International and American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Nadia; Starobin, Soko S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between student engagement, student satisfaction, and the academic success of international and American students using 2008 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) data. It was found that international students scored slightly higher than American students on enriching educational experiences and…

  13. An Examination of Academic Burnout versus Work Engagement among Taiwanese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Shen

    2012-01-01

    The author attempted to examine how Taiwanese junior high school students' perfectionistic tendencies and achievement goals were related to their academic burnout versus work engagement, and to determine differences in the indicators of burnout versus engagement among students with different subtypes of perfectionism. A total of 456 eighth-grade…

  14. Student Engagement and Academic Performance in Mexico: Evidence and Puzzles from PISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christopher C.; García, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between student engagement--with teachers and schools--and academic performance in Mexico. It uses hierarchical linear models and data from the OECD 2003 PISA study to examine the relative importance of engagement in comparison to other educational inputs--school and family characteristics--as predictors of…

  15. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  16. The Unwritten Rules of Engagement: Social Class Differences in Undergraduates' Academic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, April

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown social class differences in undergraduate engagement, yet we know little about the reasons for these differences. Drawing on interviews and participant observation with undergraduates at an urban, public comprehensive university, this ethnographic study investigates the academic engagement strategies of students from different…

  17. The college journey and academic engagement: how metaphor use enhances identity-based motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Mark J; Oyserman, Daphna; Keefer, Lucas A; Smith, George C

    2014-05-01

    People commonly talk about goals metaphorically as destinations on physical paths extending into the future or as contained in future periods. Does metaphor use have consequences for people's motivation to engage in goal-directed action? Three experiments examine the effect of metaphor use on students' engagement with their academic possible identity: their image of themselves as academically successful graduates. Students primed to frame their academic possible identity using the goal-as-journey metaphor reported stronger academic intention, and displayed increased effort on academic tasks, compared to students primed with a nonacademic possible identity, a different metaphoric framing (goal-as-contained-entity), and past academic achievements (Studies 1-2). This motivating effect persisted up to a week later as reflected in final exam performance (Study 3). Four experiments examine the cognitive processes underlying this effect. Conceptual metaphor theory posits that an accessible metaphor transfers knowledge between dissimilar concepts. As predicted in this paradigm, a journey-metaphoric framing of a possible academic identity transferred confidence in the procedure, or action sequence, required to attain that possible identity, which in turn led participants to perceive that possible identity as more connected to their current identity (Study 4). Drawing on identity-based motivation theory, we hypothesized that strengthened current/possible identity connection would mediate the journey framing's motivating effect. This mediational process predicted students' academic engagement (Study 5) and an online sample's engagement with possible identities in other domains (Study 6). Also as predicted, journey framing increased academic engagement particularly among students reporting a weak connection to their academic possible identity (Study 7).

  18. Engagement Patterns of High and Low Academic Performers on Facebook Anatomy Pages

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffar, Akram Abood; Eladl, Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies have investigated how students use and respond to social networks in the educational context as opposed to social use. In this study, the engagement of medical students on anatomy Facebook pages was evaluated in view of their academic performance. High performers contributed to most of the engagements. They also had a particular preference for higher levels of engagement. Although the students were deeply involved in the educational element of the pages, they continued to a...

  19. Are mothers’ and fathers’ parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults’ academic engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Emily A.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2017-01-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students (N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers’ and fathers’ parenting style, parent-offspring relationship quality, academic attitudes, academic behaviors, and academic performance. Emerging adults with more permissive mothers viewed grades as less important than emerging adults with less permissive mothers. Mothers’ authoritarian parenting, mothers’ permissive parenting, and relationship quality with father were differentially related to academic engagement depending on emerging adults’ gender. Both mothers’ and fathers’ parenting characteristics may impact the academic engagement of emerging adults via past parenting behaviors and current quality of the parent-offspring relationship, despite decreased physical proximity of emerging adults and their parents. PMID:28529398

  20. Are mothers' and fathers' parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults' academic engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Emily A; Lefkowitz, Eva S

    2017-06-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students ( N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers' and fathers' parenting style, parent-offspring relationship quality, academic attitudes, academic behaviors, and academic performance. Emerging adults with more permissive mothers viewed grades as less important than emerging adults with less permissive mothers. Mothers' authoritarian parenting, mothers' permissive parenting, and relationship quality with father were differentially related to academic engagement depending on emerging adults' gender. Both mothers' and fathers' parenting characteristics may impact the academic engagement of emerging adults via past parenting behaviors and current quality of the parent-offspring relationship, despite decreased physical proximity of emerging adults and their parents.

  1. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  2. Moderate-to-vigorous physically active academic lessons and academic engagement in children with and without a social disadvantage : a within subject experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J.; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background: Integration of physical active academic lessons in the school curriculum may be an innovative way to improve academic outcomes. This study examined the effect of physically active academic lessons (Fit en Vaardig op school) on academic engagement of socially disadvantaged children and

  3. Peer Observation of Teaching: Enhancing Academic Engagement for New Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Conor; O'Loughlin, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to uncover key motivations, barriers and outcomes associated with first-time users of peer observation of teaching within an Irish higher level academic context. Following preliminary research, a peer observation process was piloted on five self-selected peer observation faculty pairs involving peer observation training and…

  4. Influence of the motivational class climate on adolescents’ school engagement and their academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchor GUTIÉRREZ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific literature provides empirical evidence on the relationship between school engagement and numerous important variables of the adolescents’ educational context. The school engagement has been related, among other important constructs, with burnout of both teachers and students, school performance, satisfaction with the school, behavioral disruption, goal orientation and motivational climate in the classroom. Because of it, the aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between perceived motivational class climate and students’ academic achievement, with school engagement acting as a mediator. A sample of 2028 teenagers completed various instruments to measure the perception of motivational climate, perceived basic psychological needs satisfaction, perceived autonomy support provided by the teacher, and academic achievement. The data were analyzed using a structural equation model with observed variables (path analysis. The results have shown a significant relationship between motivational climate and school engagement, and of this with academic achievement. It should also be highlighted the direct relationship of perceived competence and perceived autonomy support with perception of academic success. Of the three variables to be predicted (Portuguese and Mathematics marks and Academic success, the largest percentage of variance explained was the one of academic success. The results are discussed within the framework of achievement goal theory, the self-determined motivation, and in terms of contributing practical issues to adolescents’ teaching-learning process.

  5. Creating and sustaining an academic-practice Partnership Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schoon, Patricia M; Brueshoff, Bonnie L

    2017-11-01

    Public health clinical educators and practicing public health nurses (PHNs) are experiencing challenges in creating meaningful clinical learning experiences for nursing students due to an increase in nursing programs and greater workload responsibilities for both nursing faculty and PHNs. The Henry Street Consortium (HSC), a collaborative group of PHNs and nursing faculty, conducted a project to identify best practices for public health nursing student clinical learning experiences. Project leaders surveyed HSC members about preferences for teaching-learning strategies, facilitated development of resources and tools to guide learning, organized faculty/PHN pilot teams to test resources and tools with students, and evaluated the pilot team experiences through two focus groups. The analysis of the outcomes of the partnership engagement project led to the development of the Partnership Engagement Model (PEM), which may be used by nursing faculty and their public health practice partners to guide building relationships and sustainable partnerships for educating nursing students. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fief and Benefice Feudalism. Two Types of Academic Autonomy in US Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Oliver; Beyer, Stephanie; Münch, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we apply Max Weber's ideal types of fief and benefice feudalism to elite and non-elite chemistry departments in the USA. We develop a theoretical analogy of academic feudalism in regard to three dimensions: power relations, engagement with companies, and the impact of structural changes on the autonomy of scholars. We use a mixed…

  7. Engagement Patterns of High and Low Academic Performers on Facebook Anatomy Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abood Jaffar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have investigated how students use and respond to social networks in the educational context as opposed to social use. In this study, the engagement of medical students on anatomy Facebook pages was evaluated in view of their academic performance. High performers contributed to most of the engagements. They also had a particular preference for higher levels of engagement. Although the students were deeply involved in the educational element of the pages, they continued to appreciate the inherent social element. The profound engagement of the high performers indicated a consistency between Facebook use in the educational context and better student performance. At the same time, the deeper engagement of high performers refutes the opinion that Facebook use is a distractor. Instead, it supports the notion that Facebook could be a suitable platform to engage students in an educational context.

  8. Engagement Patterns of High and Low Academic Performers on Facebook Anatomy Pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Akram Abood; Eladl, Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies have investigated how students use and respond to social networks in the educational context as opposed to social use. In this study, the engagement of medical students on anatomy Facebook pages was evaluated in view of their academic performance. High performers contributed to most of the engagements. They also had a particular preference for higher levels of engagement. Although the students were deeply involved in the educational element of the pages, they continued to appreciate the inherent social element. The profound engagement of the high performers indicated a consistency between Facebook use in the educational context and better student performance. At the same time, the deeper engagement of high performers refutes the opinion that Facebook use is a distractor. Instead, it supports the notion that Facebook could be a suitable platform to engage students in an educational context.

  9. A Card-Sorting Activity to Engage Students in the Academic Language of Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Robert C; Jasti, Chandana; Hug, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    The activity described in this article is designed to provide biology students with opportunities to engage in a range of academic language as they learn the discipline-specific meanings of the terms "drug," "poison," "toxicant," and "toxin." Although intended as part of an introductory lesson in a comprehensive unit for the high school level, this approach to teaching academic language can be adapted for use with older or younger students and can be modified to teach other terms.

  10. The Potential for Using Gamification in Academic Libraries in Order to Increase Student Engagement and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Walsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the potential benefits of using gamification techniques to increase student engagement with library resources. It outlines the link between student use of library resources and academic achievement, and suggests that gamification has to potential to increase usage of resources, which may also increase academic achievement. Some early findings from an implementation of a gamification project, Lemontree, are also discussed in which students reported increased usage of library resources and their acceptance of gamification techniques in Higher Education.

  11. Burnout and work engagement of academics in higher education institutions: effects of dispositional optimism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Nicolene; Rothmann, Sebastiaan; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among dispositional optimism, job demands and resources, burnout, work engagement, ill health and organizational commitment of South African academic staff in higher education institutions. A cross-sectional survey design was used, with stratified random samples (N = 595) taken of academics in South African higher education institutions. The results confirmed that job demands and a lack of job resources contributed to burnout, whereas job resources contributed to work engagement. Dispositional optimism had a strong direct effect on perceptions of job resources as well as strong indirect effects (via job resources) on burnout, work engagement, ill health and organizational commitment. The results of this study extend the dual-process model of burnout and engagement by demonstrating the strong effects of dispositional optimism on the constructs in the model. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The role of academic institutions in leveraging engagement and action on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Palca, J.

    2016-12-01

    Growing global concern over the impact of climate change places climate scientists at the forefront of communicating risks, impacts, and adaptation strategies to non-scientists. Academic institutions can play a leadership role in providing support, incentives, and structures that encourage scientific engagement on this, and other, complex societal and scientific issues. This presentation will focus on `best practices' in supporting university scientists in communicating their science and engaging in thoughtful dialogue with decision makers, managers, media, and public audiences. For example, institutions that can provide significant administrative support for science communication (press officers, training workshops) may decrease barriers between academic science and public knowledge. Additionally, financial (or similar) support in the form of teaching releases and institutional awards can be utilized to acknowledge the time and effort spent in engagement. This presentation will feature examples from universities, professional societies and other institutions where engagement on climate science is structurally encouraged and supported.

  13. Differential impacts of participation in organized activities and maltreatment types on adolescent academic and socioemotional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonyoung; Mihalec-Adkins, Brittany; Mishra, Aura A; Christ, Sharon L

    2018-04-01

    Participation in organized activities has been largely regarded as beneficial for academic and socioemotional development for adolescents, but the impacts of various types of organized activities for adolescents at risk for maltreatment have been rarely tested. In this study, we investigated the differential impacts of five types of maltreatment exposure (physical maltreatment, sexual maltreatment, neglect, other type, and multiple types) on the associations between four types of organized activities (mentored groups, art and music clubs, sport clubs, and academic clubs) and academic and socioemotional development (school engagement, delinquency, depressive symptoms, and trauma symptoms) of adolescents who were investigated by Child Protective Services (CPS) for maltreatment exposure. Data came from a national, longitudinal sample of 790 adolescents in contact with CPS in the U.S. After controlling for demographic characteristics of participants and prior levels of each outcome, multiple linear regression models were fitted to the data with interactions between the organized activities and the maltreatment types. The main findings of this study included: 1) adolescents who participated in mentored groups, sport clubs, and academic clubs reported higher levels of school engagement; 2) adolescents who participated in academic clubs reported fewer depressive symptoms; 3) adolescents who participated in art and music clubs reported more trauma symptoms compared to non-participants; and 4) the effects of participation in mentored groups on delinquency and trauma symptoms differed by maltreatment type. These results indicate both possible benefits and risks of organized activity participation for adolescents with certain maltreatment exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Date With Academic Literacies: Using Brief Conversation to Facilitate Student Engagement With Academic Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The argument that de-contextualized deficit approaches to academic literacies were ineffective (Lea, 2004; Northedge, 2003), has led to expectations that New Zealand Higher Education institutions embed academic literacies within programmes and courses (Tertiary Education Commission, 2010). This paper reports on the use of a teaching and learning…

  15. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  16. Parent Involvement and Academic Outcomes among Urban Adolescents: Examining the Role of School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Aryn M.; Wehrspann, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which parent involvement in education was directly and indirectly (via school engagement) related to academic outcomes in an effort to more fully understand the school experiences of urban adolescents. Participants (80% racial/ethnic minority; n = 108) were in grades 6, 7 or 8. In the Fall and subsequent…

  17. Relationship of Peer Mentoring to Academic Success and Social Engagement for First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brenda O.

    2013-01-01

    A correlational explanatory research design examined the relationship between peer mentoring, academic success and social engagement of first year college students participating in a peer mentoring program at a research one university in the southeastern United States. One hundred thirty-eight participants from the peer mentoring program responded…

  18. Engaging College Science Students and Changing Academic Achievement with Technology: A Quasi-Experimental Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Adam C.; Jaffee, David; Miller, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Can modern, computer-based technology engage college students and improve their academic achievement in college? Although numerous examples detail technology's classroom uses, few studies empirically examine whether technologically oriented pedagogical changes factually lead to positive outcomes among college students. In this pilot study, we used…

  19. Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as Predictor of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Ashrafi, Ghulam Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as predictors of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level. We used analytical model and conclusive research approach to conduct study and survey method for data collection. We selected 369 students using multistage sampling technique from three…

  20. Peers' Perceived Support, Student Engagement in Academic Activities and Life Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimzadeh, Rezvan; Besharat, Mohammad-Ali; Khaleghinezhad, Seyed Ali; Ghorban Jahromi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships among peers' perceived support, life satisfaction, and student engagement in academic activities. Three hundred and fifteen Iranian students (172 boys and 143 girls) who were studying in one suburb of Tehran participated in this study. All participants were asked to complete Peers' Perceived Support scale…

  1. Online Academic Integrity: An Examination of MBA Students' Behavioral Intent of Engaging in Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rashad A.

    2017-01-01

    With the proliferation of online graduate enrollment by 35.7% from 2003 to 2014, the literature indicates the number of reported academic integrity cases is on the rise. A quantitative correlational study was used to determine which determinants, if any, had a relationship to the behavioral intent to engage in plagiarism among MBA students…

  2. Dealing with Plagiarism in the Academic Community: Emotional Engagement and Moral Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehviläinen, Sanna; Löfström, Erika; Nevgi, Anne

    2018-01-01

    This article deals with the demands that plagiarism places on academic communities, and with the resources staff possess in dealing with these demands. It is suggested that plagiarism ought to be placed in the context of network of intertwining communities (scholarly, pedagogical and administrative), to which participants are engaged to a…

  3. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  4. Exploring the Effects of Authentic Leadership on Academic Optimism and Teacher Engagement in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulophas, Dhirapat; Hallinger, Philip; Ruengtrakul, Auyporn; Wongwanich, Suwimon

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: In the context of Thailand's progress towards education reform, scholars have identified a lack of effective school-level leadership as an impeding factor. The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a theoretical model of authentic leadership effects on teacher academic optimism and work engagement. Authentic leadership was…

  5. Impact of Latino Parent Engagement on Student Academic Achievement: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araque, Juan Carlos; Wietstock, Cathy; Cova, Heather M.; Zepeda, Steffanie

    2017-01-01

    The current pilot study examines the impact of the "Ten Education Commandments for Parents" program on (1) new immigrant Latino parents' knowledge of the U.S. public education system, (2) parent engagement, and (3) their children's academic achievement. Utilizing a pre-experimental, pre- and post-test research design, four schools with…

  6. Accreditation and Educational Quality: Are Students in Accredited Programs More Academically Engaged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James S.; Cole, Shu T.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a great deal of debate regarding the value of program accreditation. Two research questions guided this study: 1) are students enrolled in accredited parks, recreation, and leisure programs more academically engaged than students enrolled in non-accredited programs, and 2) do students enrolled in accredited parks, recreation, and…

  7. Relationships between Parenting Practices, Social Engagement, Academic Competency, and High School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrossian, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parenting practices, social engagement, academic competency, and high school dropout. The study revealed students whose parents practiced Reactive Communication along with students that exhibited Truancy and Disciplinary Issues were more likely to drop out. Conversely, students…

  8. Promoting the Academic Engagement and Success of Black Male Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul C.; Hines, Erik M.; Kelly, Darren D.; Williams, Derick J.; Bagley, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a qualitative look at the factors associated with the academic engagement and success of Black male student-athletes in high school. The research team employed a thematic analysis to examine semi-structured interviews conducted with two successful Black male student-athletes, along with their principal,…

  9. The Effects of Academic Programs and Institutional Characteristics on Postgraduate Civic Engagement Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, Terry T.; McKitrick, Sean A.

    2013-01-01

    While monetary benefits from higher education are extensive, there appears to be an absence of empirical evidence on how higher education contributes to civic engagement behavior after college. This study investigated the relationship between college characteristics of students completing a bachelor's degree, such as academic programs and…

  10. PUBLICATION ACTIVITY AND ITS ROLE IN ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT OF HEI ACADEMIC STAFF (RUSSIAN PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Ardashkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyze and summarize the Russian best practices of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the professional activity of the academic staff; to identify the role of motivational factors as a method to manage and control the publication activity of the academic staff.Methods. The authors address the methodology of comprehensive research based on the method of document analysis, comparative analysis, and method of secondary use of sociological and psychological data.Results and scientific novelty concludes in presenting Russian and international best practices generalized on using the publication activity to assess the engagement of HEI (Higher Educational Institution academic staff; the most appropriate formats of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the research component of the academic staff engagement are defined. Degree of reliability of this criterion is shown – its strengths and shortcomings. The conclusion is drawn on need of the essential changes in management of publication activity affecting both professional and motivational spheres of scientific and pedagogical staff. The most acceptable options of measurement of staff work efficiency of this category are formulated.Practical significance. The research outcomes can be the corpus for designing the assessment method for the professional engagement of the academic staff.

  11. Measuring Diversity and Inclusion in Academic Medicine: The Diversity Engagement Survey (DES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Sharina D.; Jordan, C. Greer; Allison, Jeroan J.; Fink Ogawa, Lisa M.; Castillo-Page, Laura; Conrad, Sarah; Nivet, Marc A.; Plummer, Deborah L.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To produce a physician and scientific workforce capable of delivering high quality, culturally competent health care and research, academic medical centers must assess their capacity for diversity and inclusion and respond to identified opportunities. Thus, the Diversity Engagement Survey (DES) is presented as a diagnostic and benchmarking tool. Method The 22-item DES connects workforce engagement theory with inclusion and diversity constructs. Face and content validity were established based on decades of previous work to promote institutional diversity. The survey was pilot tested at a single academic medical center and subsequently administered at 13 additional academic medical centers. Cronbach alphas assessed internal consistency and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) established construct validity. Criterion validity was assessed by observed separation in scores for groups traditionally recognized to have less workforce engagement. Results The sample consisted of 13,694 individuals at 14 medical schools from across the U.S. who responded to the survey administered between 2011– 2012. The Cronbach alphas for inclusion and engagement factors (range: 0.68 to 0.85), CFA fit indices, and item correlations with latent constructs, indicated an acceptable model fit and that questions measured the intended concepts. DES scores clearly distinguished higher and lower performing institutions. The DES detected important disparities for black, women, and those who did not have heterosexual orientation. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the DES is a reliable and valid instrument for internal assessment and evaluation or external benchmarking of institutional progress in building inclusion and engagement. PMID:26466376

  12. The Mediating Effects of Student Engagement on the Relationships between Academic Disciplines and Learning Outcomes: An Extension of Holland's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.; Smart, John C.; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the relationships among students' academic majors, levels of engagement, and learning outcomes within the context of Holland's person-environment theory of vocational and educational behavior. The study focused on the role of student engagement as a mediating agent in the relationships between academic majors and student…

  13. Harsh parenting and academic achievement in Chinese adolescents: Potential mediating roles of effortful control and classroom engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingzhong; Deng, Xueli; Du, Xiuxiu

    2018-04-01

    This study examined (a) the potential mediating roles of effortful control and classroom engagement in the association between harsh parenting and adolescent academic achievement, and (b) the potential moderating role of gender. Sixth through eighth graders in rural China (n=815, mean age=12.55years) reported on harsh parenting, effortful control, and classroom engagement. Parents also reported on each other's harsh parenting. Academic achievement was assessed by students' test scores and teacher-rated academic performance. Results of structural equation modeling revealed gender differences in patterns of association among the model variables. Harsh parenting was negatively and directly associated with academic achievement for both boys and girls. It was also negatively and indirectly associated with academic achievement via effortful control and classroom engagement sequentially, forming a common indirect "path" for boys and girls. The indirect negative effect of harsh parenting on boys' academic achievement was mainly realized through the mediator of effortful control, whereas this same indirect effect for girls was mainly realized through the mediator of classroom engagement. Jointly, effortful control and classroom engagement precipitates more indirect effects for boys than for girls in the association between harsh parenting and academic achievement. The discussion analyzes the potential "paths" from harsh parenting to adolescent academic achievement, as well as gender differences in these "paths." The current study has implications for teachers and parents eager to improve students' classroom engagement and academic achievement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Influence of academic procrastination and personality types on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the influence of academic procrastination and personality types on the academic achievement and efficacy of In-school adolescents in Ibadan, Oyo state. Two hundred participants were randomly selected from four schools in Akinyele Local Government area of Oyo state. Multiple regression analysis ...

  15. Personality Type and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Arul A. S.; Lawrence, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality is the man. The successful living of an individual, as a man, depends to a large extent on the academic achievement of that individual, as a student. This article attempts to find out personality type, academic achievement of secondary school students and relationship between them by selecting a sample of 300 secondary school students…

  16. Sex Differences in Workplace Satisfaction and Engagement of Academic Pathologists: Opportunities to Enhance Faculty Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Lyons, Mary Lipscomb; Thor, Ann; Dandar, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    There is attrition of women across professorial ranks in academic pathology. Women are underrepresented as leaders; 15.4% of academic pathology departments are chaired by women, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). To identify areas for targeted interventions that can advance academic and leadership development of women faculty by examining (1) sex differences in career satisfaction in US medical school pathology departments participating in the AAMC's Faculty Forward Engagement Survey, and (2) findings from a survey of the Association of Pathology Chairs (APC). The AAMC Faculty Forward Engagement Survey data are from 14 US medical schools participating in the 2011-2012 survey. Pathologists' response rate was 66% (461 of 697). To investigate sex differences, t tests and χ(2) analyses were used. The APC survey, administered to academic department chairs, had a 55% response rate (104 of 189). According to the Faculty Forward Engagement Survey, women report more time in patient care and less time in research. Women consider formal mentorship, feedback, and career advancement more important than men do and are less satisfied with communication and governance. The APC survey shows that 20% to 40% of nonchair department leaders are women. More than half of chairs report satisfaction with the sex diversity of their departmental leaders. Opportunities exist for department chairs and professional organizations to create targeted interventions to support career satisfaction, recruitment, retention, and career and leadership development for women in academic pathology. Although chairs report satisfaction with diversity within department leadership, responses of women faculty indicate there is work to be done to grow more women leaders.

  17. Understanding the psychology of seeking support to increase Health Science student engagement in academic support services. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Francis Hoyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing student engagement within higher education academic support services is a constant challenge. Whilst engagement with support is positively associated with successful retention, and non-engagement connected to attrition, the most vulnerable students are often the least likely to engage. Our data has shown that Health Science students are reluctant to engage with academic support services despite being made aware of their academic deficiencies. The “psychology of seeking support” was used as a lens to identify some of the multifaceted issues around student engagement. The School of Health Sciences made attendance at support courses compulsory for those students who were below the benchmark score in a post entrance literacy test. Since the policy change was implemented, there has been a 50% reduction in the fail rate of “at risk” students in a core literacy unit. These findings are encouraging and will help reduce student attrition in the long term.

  18. Effects of Academic and Non-Academic Instructional Approaches on Preschool English Language Learners' Classroom Engagement and English Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    This research compared the relative impact of different preschool activities on the development of bilingual students' English-language skills. The study investigated whether bilingual preschool children would engage more, and use more of their second language (English), during free-play (non-academic) versus teacher-structured (academic)…

  19. Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Forms' (UWES-SF) Adaptation to Turkish, Validity and Reliability Studies, and the Mediator Role of Work Engagement between Academic Procrastination and Academic Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapri, Burhan; Gündüz, Bülent; Akbay, Sinem Evin

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to complete the adaptation, validity and reliability studies of the long (17 items) and short (9 items) forms of UWES-SF. The secondary goal of this study is to study the mediating role of work engagement between academic procrastination and academic responsibility in high school students. The study group consists…

  20. How do nurse academics value and engage with evidence-based practice across Australia: Findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2016-06-01

    Integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into undergraduate education and preparing future nurses to embrace EBP in clinical practice becomes paramount in today's complex and evolving healthcare environment. The role that EBP plays in the practical lives of nursing students will depend on the degree to which it is promoted by academics, how it is incorporated into courses and its application to clinical setting. Hence, nursing academics play a crucial role in influencing its integration into curricula. Drawn from a larger doctoral study, this paper presents findings discussing how nurse academics value and engage with EBP. Grounded theory was employed to explore processes used by nursing academics while incorporating EBP into teaching and learning practices. Twenty-three academics across Australian universities were interviewed. Nine were also observed while teaching undergraduate students. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. In keeping with the tenets of grounded theory, data collection and analysis continued until theoretical saturation was reached. In total, four categories emerged. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Valuing and Engaging with EBP. How nursing academics valued and engaged with EBP was closely associated with meanings they constructed around understanding it, attitudes and commitment to implementation while teaching and working clinically. Different opinions also existed in regard to what actually constituted EBP. However, they engaged with and valued EBP by keeping themselves up-to-date, being involved in research activities, using evidence in teaching, therefore leading by example. Participants identified a number of barriers influencing their engagement with EBP including heavy workloads, limited time, lack of commitment within their schools, lack of confidence with teaching EBP, and complexity of EBP application. Faculty clinical practice, committed academics, workload

  1. Effects of the Performance Management Context on Australian Academics' Engagement with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the context of increased demands for excellence in all areas, academic promotion and tenure is now directly linked to achievement of measurable outputs in all areas of performance. In a work environment characterised by high workloads, competing expectations and reduced resources, academics must increasingly demonstrate active engagement with…

  2. Investigating a New Model of Time-Related Academic Behavior: Procrastination and Timely Engagement by Motivational Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K.

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of time-related academic behavior (i.e., procrastination and timely engagement) in the academic context. Specifically, this study aimed to build a new model for understanding these behaviors in a motivational framework by using motivational orientation to frame these…

  3. General Education Teachers' Ratings of the Academic Engagement Level of Students Who Read Braille: A Comparison with Sighted Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Julie A.; Lewis, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    English and language arts teachers of braille-reading students in general education classes rated these students' academic engagement and the academic achievement of low- and average-achieving sighted students in the same classrooms. The braille readers were found to be statistically similar to the low-achieving students with regard to effort,…

  4. Adolescent Academic Achievement and School Engagement: An Examination of the Role of School-Wide Peer Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Alicia Doyle; Lerner, Richard M.; Leventhal, Tama

    2013-01-01

    During adolescence, peer groups present an important venue for socializing school-related behaviors such as academic achievement and school engagement. While a significant body of research emphasizes the link between a youth's immediate peer group and academic outcomes, the current manuscript expands on this idea, proposing that, in addition to…

  5. The Role of Personal Best (PB) and Dichotomous Achievement Goals in Students' Academic Motivation and Engagement: A Longitudinal Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Elliot, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the role of prior personal best goals in predicting subsequent academic motivation and engagement. A total of 1160 high school students participated in a longitudinal survey study exploring the extent to which personal best and mastery and performance (dichotomous) achievement goals predict students' academic motivation and…

  6. Therapy Dogs in Academic Libraries: A Way to Foster Student Engagement and Mitigate Self-Reported Stress during Finals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck; McDevitt, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    More and more modern academic libraries are turning to student engagement activities designed to welcome students into Academia, join a community of scholars, and avail themselves of the full range of resources and services that a university library can provide. One unusual, but inexpensive and highly effective method of engaging students is…

  7. Affordances, Barriers, and Motivations: Engagement in Research Activity by Academics at the Research-Oriented University in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quy; Klopper, Christopher; Smith, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    The importance of academics undertaking research and publishing their research results is emphasised by universities. Engagement in research is recognised as an effective means to increase a university's profile. This study applied a qualitative approach to explore affordances, barriers, and motivations towards the engagement in research…

  8. Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction as a Predictor of Work Engagement among Academic Staff in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were…

  9. The Impact of Classroom-Based Meditation Practice on Cognitive Engagement, Mindfulness and Academic Performance of Undergraduate College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napora, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the potential of classroom-based meditation practice as a tool to facilitate learning. Moreover, the impact of meditation on cognitive engagement, mindfulness and academic performance of undergraduate college students was investigated. Additionally, the relationships between mindfulness and cognitive engagement, and between…

  10. [How medical students perform academically by admission types?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Keumho; Hur, Yera; Kim, Ji-Ha

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of selecting students whom are capable for medical education and to become a good doctor, not enough studies have been done in the category. This study focused on analysing the medical students' academic performance (grade point average, GPA) differences, flunk and dropout rates by admission types. From 2004 to 2010, we gathered 369 Konyang University College of Medicine's students admission data and analyzed the differences between admission method and academic achievement, differences in failure and dropout rates. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), ordinary least square, and logistic regression were used. The rolling students showed higher academic achievement from year 1 to 3 than regular students (p dropout rate by admission types, regular admission type students showed higher drop out rate than the rolling ones which demonstrates admission types gives significant effect on flunk or dropout rates in medical students (p students tend to show lower flunk rate and dropout rates and perform better academically. This implies selecting students primarily by Korean College Scholastic Ability Test does not guarantee their academic success in medical education. Thus we suggest a more in-depth comprehensive method of selecting students that are appropriate to individual medical school's educational goal.

  11. Peer relationships and adolescents' academic and non-academic outcomes: same-sex and opposite-sex peer effects and the mediating role of school engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Gregory Arief D; Martin, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    The literature has documented theoretical/conceptual models delineating the facilitating role of peer relationships in academic and non-academic outcomes. However, the mechanisms through which peer relationships link to those outcomes is an area requiring further research. The study examined the role of adolescents' perceptions of their relationships with same-sex and opposite-sex peers in predicting their academic performance and general self-esteem and the potentially mediating role of school engagement in linking these perceived peer relationships with academic and non-academic outcomes. The sample comprised 1,436 high-school students (670 boys, 756 girls; 711 early adolescents, 723 later adolescents). Self-report measures and objective achievement tests were used. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was performed to test the hypothesized model and its invariance across gender and age groups. Perceived same-sex peer relationships yielded positive direct and indirect links with academic performance and general self-esteem. Perceived opposite-sex peer relationships yielded positive direct and indirect links with general self-esteem and an indirect positive link with academic performance, but mediation via school engagement was not as strong as that of perceived same-sex peer relationships. These findings generalized across gender and age groups. Adolescents' same-sex and opposite-sex peer relationships seem to positively impact their academic performance and general self-esteem in distinct ways. It appears that school engagement plays an important role in mediating these peer relationship effects, particularly those of same-sex peer relationships, on academic and non-academic functioning. Implications for psycho-educational theory, measurement, and practice are discussed. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Academic Performance and Type of Early Childhood Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This is one of the few studies that estimates the effects of type of childhood care on academic achievement at higher grade levels by linking day care registers and educational registers. We use entire birth cohorts of ethnic Danish children, enrolled in either center based day care or family day...

  13. Adolescents' Perceptions of the Economy: Its Association with Academic Engagement and the Role of School-Based and Parental Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy E; Liang, Belle; Bravo, Diamond Y; Price, Maggi; Polk, Whitney; Perella, John; Savitz-Romer, Mandy

    2018-05-01

    In the context of widespread media coverage of economic problems, un- and under-employment, and overwhelming student loan debt, youth are making sense of the prospects of getting a job and value of education. Further, they are assessing the implications of the job market in curtailing or enhancing their future success. School-based and familial relationships may support students in making sense of the job market. The current study focuses on how youth view the economy, its association with academic engagement, and how parental and school-based relationships shape views of the job market and their impact on academic engagement. With an ethnically diverse sample of high school students (N = 624; 54% female), perceptions of the job market were tested as mediators and moderators of the relations between school-based relationships and parenting on academic engagement. Using structural equation modeling, job market pessimism mediated the relation between school-based relationships and engagement. School-based relationships and parenting practices moderated the relation between job market pessimism and academic engagement. At high levels of parental and school support, interpreted as increased centrality and salience of academic success, there was a stronger negative association between job market pessimism and academic engagement. This set of findings indicates that high school students are thinking about the job market in ways that impact their engagement in school. These findings extend theories that have focused on the job market and the likelihood of dropping out of school or enrolling in post-secondary education. These findings are significant because just staying in school is not enough to succeed. With increased emphasis on college and career readiness, students are required to be more planful and purposeful during high school in order to succeed in the job market.

  14. Creating Flexible and Sustainable Work Models for Academic Obstetrician-Gynecologists Engaged in Global Health Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rose; Boatin, Adeline; Farid, Huma; Luckett, Rebecca; Neo, Dayna; Ricciotti, Hope; Scott, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    To describe various work models for obstetrics and gynecology global health faculty affiliated with academic medical centers and to identify barriers and opportunities for pursuing global health work. A mixed-methods study was conducted in 2016 among obstetrics and gynecology faculty and leaders from seven academic medical institutions in Boston, Massachusetts. Global health faculty members were invited to complete an online survey about their work models and to participate in semistructured interviews about barriers and facilitators of these models. Department chairs and residency directors were asked to participate in interviews. The survey response rate among faculty was 65.6% (21/32), of which 76.2% (16/21) completed an interview. Five department leaders (45.5% [5/11]) participated in an interview. Faculty described a range of work models with varied time and compensation, but only one third reported contracted time for global health work. The most common barriers to global health work were financial constraints, time limitations, lack of mentorship, need for specialized training, and maintenance of clinical skills. Career satisfaction, creating value for the obstetrics and gynecology department, and work model flexibility were the most important facilitators of sustainable global health careers. The study identified challenges and opportunities to creating flexible and sustainable work models for academic obstetrics and gynecology clinicians engaged in global health work. Additional research and innovation are needed to identify work models that allow for sustainable careers in global women's health. There are opportunities to create professional standards and models for academic global health work in the obstetrics and gynecology specialty.

  15. The effects of academic literacy instruction on engagement and conceptual understanding of biology of ninth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Susan C.

    Academic language, discourse, vocabulary, motivation, and comprehension of complex texts and concepts are keys to learning subject-area content. The need for a disciplinary literacy approach in high school classrooms accelerates as students become increasing disengaged in school and as content complexity increases. In the present quasi-experimental mixed-method study, a ninth-grade biology unit was designed with an emphasis on promoting academic literacy skills, discourse, meaningful constructivist learning, interest development, and positive learning experiences in order to learn science content. Quantitative and qualitative analyses on a variety of measures completed by 222 students in two high schools revealed that those who received academic literacy instruction in science class performed at significantly higher levels of conceptual understanding of biology content, academic language and vocabulary use, reasoned thought, engagement, and quality of learning experience than control-group students receiving traditionally-organized instruction. Academic literacy was embedded into biology instruction to engage students in meaning-making discourses of science to promote learning. Academic literacy activities were organized according the phases of interest development to trigger and sustain interest and goal-oriented engagement throughout the unit. Specific methods included the Generative Vocabulary Matrix (GVM), scenario-based writing, and involvement in a variety of strategically-placed discourse activities to sustain or "boost" engagement for learning. Traditional instruction for the control group included teacher lecture, whole-group discussion, a conceptual organizer, and textbook reading. Theoretical foundations include flow theory, sociocultural learning theory, and interest theory. Qualitative data were obtained from field notes and participants' journals. Quantitative survey data were collected and analyzed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to

  16. Engaging students and faculty: implications of self-determination theory for teachers and leaders in academic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Lyness, Jeffrey M; Lurie, Stephen J; Ward, Denham S; Mooney, Christopher J; Lambert, David R

    2013-01-01

    Background Much of the work of teachers and leaders at academic health centers involves engaging learners and faculty members in shared goals. Strategies to do so, however, are seldom informed by empirically-supported theories of human motivation. Discussion This article summarizes a substantial body of motivational research that yields insights and approaches of importance to academic faculty leaders. After identification of key limitations of traditional rewards-based (i.e., incentives, or ...

  17. Psychological distress in health sciences college students and its relationship with academic engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Liébana-Presa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of psychological distress and its relationship with academic engagement (absorption, dedication and vigor, sex and degree among students from four public universities. Method: A non-experimental,comparative correlational, quantitative investigation without intervention. Study population: 1840 nursing and physical therapy students. The data collection tool used was a questionnaire. Results: A 32.2% prevalence of psychological distress was found in the subjects; a correlation between vigor and psychological distress was found for all of the subjects and also for women. High absorption and dedication scores and low psychological distress scores predicted higher vigor scores. Conclusion: The risk of psychological distress is high, especially for women. Women seem to have a higher level of psychological distress than men. Vigor, energy and mental resilience positively influence psychological distress and can be a vehicle for better results during the learning and studying process.

  18. Engaging Students in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class Using an Academically Focused Social Media Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Andy; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    There are many reasons for an instructor to consider using social media, particularly in a large introductory course. Improved communications can lessen the sense of isolation some students feel in large classes, and students may be more likely to respond to faculty announce-ments in a form that is familiar and comfortable. Furthermore, many students currently establish social media sites for their classes, without the knowledge or participation of their instructors. Such "shadow" sites can be useful, but they can also become distributors of misinformation, or venues for inappropriate or disruptive discussions. CourseNetworking (CN) is a social media platform designed for the academic environment. It combines many features common among learning management systems (LMS's) with an interface that looks and feels more like Facebook than a typical academic system. We have recently begun using CN as a means to engage students in an introductory calculus-based mechanics class, with enrollments of 150-200 students per semester. This article presents basic features of CN, and details our initial experiences and observations.

  19. Selected engagement factors and academic learning outcomes of undergraduate engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Patricia J.

    The concept of student engagement and its relationship to successful student performance and learning outcomes has a long history in higher education (Kuh, 2007). Attention to faculty and student engagement has only recently become of interest to the engineering education community. This interest can be attributed to long-standing research by George Kuh's, National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) at the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. In addition, research projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Academic Pathway Study (APS) at the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE) and the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE), Measuring Student and Faculty Engagement in Engineering Education, at the National Academy of Engineering. These research studies utilized the framework and data from the Engineering Change study by the Center for the Study of Higher Education, Pennsylvania State, that evaluated the impact of the new Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) EC2000 "3a through k" criteria identify 11 learning outcomes expected of engineering graduates. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent selected engagement factors of 1. institution, 2. social, 3. cognitive, 4. finance, and 5. technology influence undergraduate engineering students and quality student learning outcomes. Through the descriptive statistical analysis indicates that there maybe problems in the engineering program. This researcher would have expected at least 50% of the students to fall in the Strongly Agree and Agree categories. The data indicated that the there maybe problems in the engineering program problems in the data. The problems found ranked in this order: 1). Dissatisfaction with faculty instruction methods and quality of instruction and not a clear understanding of engineering majors , 2). inadequate Engineering faculty and advisors availability especially applicable

  20. Observed Lesson Structure during the First Year of Secondary Education: Exploration of Change and Link with Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components are found, that between class and over…

  1. Observed lesson structure during the first year of secondary education : Exploration of change and link with academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components

  2. Predicting Early Adolescents' Academic Achievement, Social Competence, and Physical Health from Parenting, Ego Resilience, and Engagement Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jodi; Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; O'Brien, T. Caitlin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined ego resilience and engagement coping as mediators of the relationships between supportive and controlling parenting practices and early adolescents' academic achievement, social competence, and physical health. Participants were 240 predominantly Mexican American early adolescents, their parents, and their teachers. There were…

  3. Factors Affecting Burnout and School Engagement among High School Students: Study Habits, Self- Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Filiz; Tuzgol Dost, Meliha; Cetin, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' levels of burnout and school engagement with respect to academic success, study habits, and self-efficacy beliefs. The data were gathered during the 2011-2012 school year from 633 students attending six high schools located in Ankara, Turkey. The analyses were conducted on responses from 605 students. The…

  4. Academic Coping, Friendship Quality, and Student Engagement Associated with Student Quality of School Life: A Partial Least Square Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, Lei Mee; Razak, Nordin Abd

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine an untested research model that explains the direct- and indirect influences of Academic Coping, Friendship Quality, and Student Engagement on Student Quality of School Life. This study employed the quantitative-based cross-sectional survey method. The sample consisted of 2400 Malaysian secondary Form Four students…

  5. On being grateful and kind : Results of two randomized controlled trials on study-related emotions and academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweneel, Else|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314006516; Le Blanc, Pascale M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125591225; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073779563

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large amount of research attention to engagement as well as positive psychology in a general context, there have been few attempts to increase academic well-being by means of positive psychological interventions. This article tests the potential of positive psychological interventions to

  6. On being grateful and kind : results of two randomized controlled trials on study-related emotions and academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweneel, A.P.E.; Le Blanc, P.M.; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large amount of research attention to engagement as well as positive psychology in a general context, there have been few attempts to increase academic well-being by means of positive psychological interventions. This article tests the potential of positive psychological interventions to

  7. The Effects of Autonomy Support versus Psychological Control and Work Engagement versus Academic Burnout on Adolescents' Use of Avoidance Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Shen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among Taiwanese ninth graders' perceptions of autonomy support versus psychological control in the classroom context, work engagement versus academic burnout, and their avoidance of help seeking as well as self-handicapping behaviors. Four hundred and thirty-five ninth-grade Taiwanese students completed a…

  8. Gender Matters, Too: The Influences of School Racial Discrimination and Racial Identity on Academic Engagement Outcomes among African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavous, Tabbye M.; Rivas-Drake, Deborah; Smalls, Ciara; Griffin, Tiffany; Cogburn, Courtney

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among racial identity, school-based racial discrimination experiences, and academic engagement outcomes for adolescent boys and girls in Grades 8 and 11 (n = 204 boys and n = 206 girls). The authors found gender differences in peer and classroom discrimination and in the impact of earlier and later discrimination…

  9. Peer interactions and academic engagement of youth with developmental disabilities in inclusive middle and high school classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W; Sisco, Lynn G; Brown, Lissa; Brickham, Dana; Al-Khabbaz, Zainab A

    2008-11-01

    We examined the peer interactions and academic engagement of 23 middle and high school students with developmental disabilities within inclusive academic and elective classrooms. The extent to which students with and without disabilities interacted socially was highly variable and influenced by instructional format, the proximity of general and special educators, and curricular area. Peer interactions occurred more often within small group instructional formats, when students were not receiving direct support from a paraprofessional or special educator, and in elective courses. Academic engagement also varied, with higher levels evidenced during one-to-one or small group instruction and when in proximity of general or special educators. Implications for designing effective support strategies for students with autism and/or intellectual disability within general education classrooms are discussed.

  10. Twenty Percent of the Variance between Students in Academic Engagement Is Explained by Grade Level, Gender, Family Affluence, Anxiety, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Gabrielle; McQuay, Jocelyn; Blackstaffe, Anita; Perry, Rosemary; Hawe, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what contributes to academic engagement is important to effectively support students. This study examines the relationship between sociodemographic factors, anxiety, social support, and academic engagement in elementary and junior high school students. Students in grades 5-9 (N = 1,904) completed self-reports measuring academic…

  11. Engagement in Learning after Errors at Work: Enabling Conditions and Types of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes; Mulder, Regina H.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses two research questions concerning nurses' engagement in social learning activities after errors at work. Firstly, we investigated how this engagement relates to nurses' interpretations of the error situation and perceptions of a safe team climate. The results indicate that the individual estimation of an error as relevant to…

  12. Class Collective Efficacy and Class Size as Moderators of the Relationship between Junior Middle School Students’ Externalizing Behavior and Academic Engagement: A Multilevel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement, and tested the possibility of class collective efficacy and class size moderating this relationship. Data were collected from 28 Chinese classrooms (N = 1034 students; grades 7, 8, and 9 with student reports. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test all hypotheses and results revealed a negative relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement; class collective efficacy was also significantly related to academic engagement. Additionally, class collective efficacy and class size moderated the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement: For students in a class with high collective efficacy or small size (≤30 students, the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement was weaker than for those in a class with low collective efficacy or large size (≥43 students. Results are discussed considering self-regulatory mechanisms and social environment theory, with possible implications for teachers of students’ learning provided.

  13. Black, White, and Biracial Students' Engagement at Differing Institutional Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.; BrckaLorenz, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Within this study, the authors are interested in engagement practices for Black students, White students, and the mixed-race college student population at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and non-HBCUs. The authors asked the following research questions: How does engagement compare for Black, White, and biracial students with…

  14. Moderate-to-vigorous physically active academic lessons and academic engagement in children with and without a social disadvantage: a within subject experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W; Bosker, Roel J; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2015-04-19

    Integration of physical active academic lessons in the school curriculum may be an innovative way to improve academic outcomes. This study examined the effect of physically active academic lessons (Fit en Vaardig op school) on academic engagement of socially disadvantaged children and children without this disadvantage. In addition, the relationship between lesson time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity and academic engagement was examined. From four elementary schools, 86 children who participated in the 22-weeks intervention were recruited (23 socially disadvantaged children). Academic engagement was determined by observing time-on-task during three classroom observation moments (start, midway and end observation). Every moment consisted of lesson observations after intervention lessons (post-intervention) and after regular classroom lessons (post-control). Differences in time-on-task between socially disadvantaged children and children without this disadvantage were analyzed using independent samples t-test. Differences between post-intervention and post-control observations were analyzed using multilevel analysis. Heart rate monitors measured the lesson time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity. The relationship between percentage of moderate to vigorous physical activity during the intervention lessons and time-on-task was analyzed by calculation of partial correlations. Time-on-task of socially disadvantaged children was lower than that of children without this disadvantage, differences were significant at the start post-control (t(65) = 2.39, p < 0.05) and post-intervention (t(71) = 2.75, p < 0.05) observation and at the midway post-control (t(68) = 2.45, p < 0.05) observation. Multilevel analysis showed that the time-on-task of all children was significantly higher during post-intervention in comparison with post-control lessons (ES = 0.41). No significant difference was found at the start observation, but

  15. Gender matters, too: the influences of school racial discrimination and racial identity on academic engagement outcomes among African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavous, Tabbye M; Rivas-Drake, Deborah; Smalls, Ciara; Griffin, Tiffany; Cogburn, Courtney

    2008-05-01

    The authors examined relationships among racial identity, school-based racial discrimination experiences, and academic engagement outcomes for adolescent boys and girls in Grades 8 and 11 (n = 204 boys and n = 206 girls). The authors found gender differences in peer and classroom discrimination and in the impact of earlier and later discrimination experiences on academic outcomes. Racial centrality related positively to school performance and school importance attitudes for boys. Also, centrality moderated the relationship between discrimination and academic outcomes in ways that differed across gender. For boys, higher racial centrality related to diminished risk for lower school importance attitudes and grades from experiencing classroom discrimination relative to boys lower in centrality, and girls with higher centrality were protected against the negative impact of peer discrimination on school importance and academic self-concept. However, among lower race-central girls, peer discrimination related positively to academic self-concept. Finally, socioeconomic background moderated the relationship of discrimination with academic outcomes differently for girls and boys. The authors discuss the need to consider interactions of individual- and contextual-level factors in better understanding African American youths' academic and social development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Burnout, work engagement and sense of coherence in female academics in higher-education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adéle Bezuidenhout

    2010-11-01

    Research purpose: This research was conducted from a salutogenic paradigm, seeking to find ways of avoiding the negative consequences of burnout and contributing towards the positive experience of work engagement for the female academic. The research also explored the effect of the individual academic’s sense of coherence (SOC on her experience of burnout and work engagement. Research design, approach and method: The research was quantitative in nature. A psychometric instrument was sent to all the permanently employed female academics at Unisa and Tshwane University of Technology (TUT, measuring their levels of burnout, work engagement and SOC. The completed questionnaires were statistically analysed. Main findings: The findings included average levels of burnout, with definite signs that the experience of burnout is on the increase. The cynicism sub-dimension of burnout showed increased levels, work engagement scores were just above average and SOC scores were low. Practical/managerial implications: This article offers a psychological interpretation of the variables in the target group. The article contributes towards the body of research studies conducted from a positive psychological paradigm and, specifically, on the female gender. Contribution/value-add: The main recommendations are that university management needs to take cognisance of the alarming symptoms of burnout present in the population under discussion. Strategies are recommended to address these and to nurture work engagement.

  17. Engaging a Wider Community: The Academic Library as a Center for Creativity, Discovery, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Academic libraries have reported long-term declines in circulation, reference transactions, reserves, and in-house library materials usage. Increasingly, libraries are perceived as being less critical to the academic enterprise. Are these trends irreversible? Perhaps public libraries and some innovative academic libraries can provide us with some…

  18. Classroom Observations of Students with and without ADHD: Differences across Types of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, Rosemary E. Vile; DuPaul, George J.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Volpe, Robert J.; Cleary, Kristi S.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the behaviors related to academic engagement exhibited by students with ADHD during instruction in math and reading. A total of 155 students (92 ADHD, 63 recruited controls) in grades 1 through 4 participated in the study. Results revealed that students with ADHD exhibited statistically significant lower rates of…

  19. Academic motivation, self-concept, engagement, and performance in high school: key processes from a longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jasmine; Liem, Gregory Arief D; Martin, Andrew J; Colmar, Susan; Marsh, Herbert W; McInerney, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The study tested three theoretically/conceptually hypothesized longitudinal models of academic processes leading to academic performance. Based on a longitudinal sample of 1866 high-school students across two consecutive years of high school (Time 1 and Time 2), the model with the most superior heuristic value demonstrated: (a) academic motivation and self-concept positively predicted attitudes toward school; (b) attitudes toward school positively predicted class participation and homework completion and negatively predicted absenteeism; and (c) class participation and homework completion positively predicted test performance whilst absenteeism negatively predicted test performance. Taken together, these findings provide support for the relevance of the self-system model and, particularly, the importance of examining the dynamic relationships amongst engagement factors of the model. The study highlights implications for educational and psychological theory, measurement, and intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Engaging students and faculty: implications of self-determination theory for teachers and leaders in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Jeffrey M; Lurie, Stephen J; Ward, Denham S; Mooney, Christopher J; Lambert, David R

    2013-11-11

    Much of the work of teachers and leaders at academic health centers involves engaging learners and faculty members in shared goals. Strategies to do so, however, are seldom informed by empirically-supported theories of human motivation. This article summarizes a substantial body of motivational research that yields insights and approaches of importance to academic faculty leaders. After identification of key limitations of traditional rewards-based (i.e., incentives, or 'carrots and sticks') approaches, key findings are summarized from the science of self-determination theory. These findings demonstrate the importance of fostering autonomous motivation by supporting the fundamental human needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. In turn, these considerations lead to specific recommendations about approaches to engaging autonomous motivation, using examples in academic health centers. Since supporting autonomous motivation maximizes both functioning and well-being (i.e., people are both happier and more productive), the approaches recommended will help academic health centers recruit, retain, and foster the success of learners and faculty members. Such goals are particularly important to address the multiple challenges confronting these institutions.

  1. Future Time Orientation Predicts Academic Engagement among First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmanshof, Louise; Zimitat, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Background: Enhancing student engagement is considered an important strategy for improving retention. Students' Time Perspective is an under-researched factor that may significantly influence student engagement. Aims: This study examines interrelationships between elements of student engagement and relationship with Time Perspective. We propose…

  2. (No) Harm in Asking: Class, Acquired Cultural Capital, and Academic Engagement at an Elite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony Abraham

    2016-01-01

    How do undergraduates engage authority figures in college? Existing explanations predict class-based engagement strategies. Using in-depth interviews with 89 undergraduates at an elite university, I show how undergraduates with disparate precollege experiences differ in their orientations toward and strategies for engaging authority figures in…

  3. Gender Inequalities in Transnational Academic Mobility and the Ideal Type of Academic Entrepreneur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemann, Regula Julia

    2010-01-01

    Based on a study on academic career paths of PhD graduates in Switzerland, this paper is concerned with the individual and institutional factors that affect transnational academic mobility in the postdoctoral period. It will be argued that the institutionalisation of geographic mobility in academic career paths through research funding…

  4. Binge drinking and academic performance, engagement, aspirations, and expectations: a longitudinal analysis among secondary school students in the COMPASS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Karen A; Qian, Wei; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-11-01

    The longitudinal relationship between binge drinking and academic engagement, performance, and future aspirations and expectations was examined among a cohort of secondary school students. In separate multinomial generalized estimating equations models, linked data from Year 1 (Y1: 2012-2013), Year 2 (Y2: 2013-2014), and Year 3 (Y3: 2014-2015) of the COMPASS study (N = 27 112) were used to test the relative likelihood of responses to seven academic indices when binge drinking was initiated in varying frequencies, adjusting for gender, grade, race/ethnicity, tobacco use, and the individual mean of the predictor and all time-varying covariates. Among students who had never engaged in binge drinking at baseline, those who reported regular binge drinking at follow-up were relatively less likely to complete their homework, attend class, and value and achieve high grades, with more frequent binge drinking at follow-up generally resulting in larger relative risk ratios. Interestingly, shifting from "never" to "rare/sporadic" binge drinking one to two years later resulted in an increased relative risk of wanting to pursue all levels of postsecondary education. Beginning binge drinking on a "monthly" basis also increased the likelihood of college/ trade or bachelor degree ambitions, relative to high school, but not graduate/professional pathways; while degree aspirations were not associated with initiating weekly binge drinking. Results suggest students who initiate binge drinking have poor school performance and engagement, which may interfere with achieving their future academic goals. This study reinforces the reasons substance use prevention should be considered an academic priority, as such efforts may also prove beneficial for educational achievement.

  5. Binge drinking and academic performance, engagement, aspirations, and expectations: a longitudinal analysis among secondary school students in the COMPASS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Patte

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The longitudinal relationship between binge drinking and academic engagement, performance, and future aspirations and expectations was examined among a cohort of secondary school students. Methods: In separate multinomial generalized estimating equations models, linked data from Year 1 (Y1: 2012-2013, Year 2 (Y2: 2013-2014, and Year 3 (Y3: 2014-2015 of the COMPASS study (N = 27 112 were used to test the relative likelihood of responses to seven academic indices when binge drinking was initiated in varying frequencies, adjusting for gender, grade, race/ethnicity, tobacco use, and the individual mean of the predictor and all time-varying covariates. Results: Among students who had never engaged in binge drinking at baseline, those who reported regular binge drinking at follow-up were relatively less likely to complete their homework, attend class, and value and achieve high grades, with more frequent binge drinking at follow-up generally resulting in larger relative risk ratios. Interestingly, shifting from “never” to “rare/sporadic” binge drinking one to two years later resulted in an increased relative risk of wanting to pursue all levels of postsecondary education. Beginning binge drinking on a “monthly” basis also increased the likelihood of college/trade or bachelor degree ambitions, relative to high school, but not graduate/professional pathways; while degree aspirations were not associated with initiating weekly binge drinking. Conclusions: Results suggest students who initiate binge drinking have poor school performance and engagement, which may interfere with achieving their future academic goals. This study reinforces the reasons substance use prevention should be considered an academic priority, as such efforts may also prove beneficial for educational achievement.

  6. Relationship among academic engagement, burnout and student perceptions of curriculum delivery in Speech and Language Therapy Students from University of Concepcion, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaria, Rocio; Carmona, Lorena; Perez, Cristhian; Parra, Paula

    2017-09-01

    To relate engagement and academic burnout with curriculum evaluation among speech therapy students. This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted at the end of the first academic semester for each level and at the end of a theoretical class in order to ensure the maximum participation rate at the University of Concepción, Concepción, Chile, and comprised students of a speech and language therapy programme.Curriculum evaluation scale, academic engagement and academic burnout questionnaires were used. STATA SE 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 200 participants, 157(78.50%) were women and 43(21.50%) men. The overall mean age was 20.81±2.15 years (range: 18-30 years). Emotional burnout was inversely correlated with the evaluation of teaching and evaluation methods, distribution of fields, teaching team and achievement of objectives (pburnout and higher levels of academic engagement.

  7. Aligning the goals of community-engaged research: why and how academic health centers can successfully engage with communities to improve health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, Lloyd; Cook, Jennifer; Ahmed, Syed M; Yonas, Michael A; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2012-03-01

    Community engagement (CE) and community-engaged research (CEnR) are increasingly viewed as the keystone to translational medicine and improving the health of the nation. In this article, the authors seek to assist academic health centers (AHCs) in learning how to better engage with their communities and build a CEnR agenda by suggesting five steps: defining community and identifying partners, learning the etiquette of CE, building a sustainable network of CEnR researchers, recognizing that CEnR will require the development of new methodologies, and improving translation and dissemination plans. Health disparities that lead to uneven access to and quality of care as well as high costs will persist without a CEnR agenda that finds answers to both medical and public health questions. One of the biggest barriers toward a national CEnR agenda, however, are the historical structures and processes of an AHC-including the complexities of how institutional review boards operate, accounting practices and indirect funding policies, and tenure and promotion paths. Changing institutional culture starts with the leadership and commitment of top decision makers in an institution. By aligning the motivations and goals of their researchers, clinicians, and community members into a vision of a healthier population, AHC leadership will not just improve their own institutions but also improve the health of the nation-starting with improving the health of their local communities, one community at a time.

  8. Tutoring Styles That Encourage Learner Satisfaction, Academic Engagement, and Achievement in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo Eun; Shin, Jae-Han

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to find which tutoring styles significantly predict learners' satisfaction with an e-learning service, academic involvement, and academic achievement. The tutoring styles included subject expert, facilitator, guider, and administrator. In this study, 818 Korean sixth-grade students (ages 11-12 years), enrolled in the…

  9. Identification with Academics, Intrinsic/Extrinsic Motivation, and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Cognitive Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher O.; Greene, Barbara A.; Mansell, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Examined were several theoretically important relations among motivational characteristics of students that are malleable, or changeable with intervention. The motivational construct identification with academics, which includes perceptions of belonging and valuing within an academic context, was investigated along with intrinsic/extrinsic…

  10. Promoting Student Engagement with Academic Literacy Feedback: An Institute Wide Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Ann; Delahunt, Brid; Fox, Claire; Maguire, Moira; O'Connor, Lorna; Ward, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    The transition to Higher Education, while often exciting, is demanding for many students. Successful transition necessitates learning the conventions of scholarly conversation, including how to read and create work in an academic context. Knowledge of academic literacy practices is an important part of this process but these discourses and…

  11. Academic Leadership Forum on Faculty Workload, Engagement, and Development. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    WCET, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A select group of academic officers and deans from institutions (all sectors) whose programs are primarily online and whose teaching faculty differ considerably from traditional faculty participated in the Academic Leadership Forum, October 26, 2011, held in conjunction with WCET's (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies') Annual Meeting.…

  12. Gender inequalities in transnational academic mobility and the ideal type of academic entrepreneur

    OpenAIRE

    Leemann, Regula Julia

    2010-01-01

    Based on a study on academic career paths of PhD graduates in Switzerland, this paper is concerned with the individual and institutional factors that affect transnational academic mobility in the postdoctoral period. It will be argued that the institutionalisation of geographic mobility in academic career paths through research funding institutions and universities have gendering and stratifying effects. Complex formations related to gender, partnership, children, and dual-career constellatio...

  13. The Influence of Academic Autonomous Motivation on Learning Engagement and Life Satisfaction in Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    A total of 418 adolescents completed the Revised Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student, the Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Based on self-determination theory, this study examines the relationship between academic autonomous motivation, basic psychological needs…

  14. Academics and Social Networking Sites: Benefits, Problems and Tensions in Professional Engagement with Online Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Katy; Weller, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The web has had a profound effect on the ways people interact, with online social networks arguably playing an important role in changing or augmenting how we connect with others. However, uptake of online social networking by the academic community varies, and needs to be understood. This paper presents an independent, novel analysis of a large-scale dataset published by Nature Publishing Group detailing the results of a survey about academics use of online social networking services. An ope...

  15. Liaisons as Sales Force: Using Sales Techniques to Engage Academic Library Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brief Liaison librarians are assuming a wide variety of new roles that serve their institutions’ students, staff, and faculty. An essential foundation of these new roles is the ability to engage with the liaison’s user community. These engagement skills are not necessarily natural or innate, nor are they skills that most liaison librarians have had an opportunity to learn and develop. This article adapts a practical selling framework for the liaison context with examples that demonstrate how this framework can lead to improved communication, engagement, and problem-solving with liaison user communities.

  16. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lases, Lenny S. S.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether workengaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision

  17. Point, Click, and Cheat: Frequency and Type of Academic Dishonesty in the Virtual Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber-McEwen, Donna; Wiseley, Phillip; Hoggatt, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Students who feel disconnected from others may be prone to engage in deceptive behaviors such as academic dishonesty. George and Carlson (1999) contend that as the distance between a student and a physical classroom setting increases, so too would the frequency of online cheating. The distance that exists between faculty and students through the…

  18. Emotional Creativity as predictor of intrinsic motivation and academic engagement in university students: The mediating role of positive emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO AMUTIO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emotional creativity implies experiencing a complex emotional life, which is becoming increasingly necessary in societies that demand innovation and constant changes. This research studies the relation of emotional creativity as a dispositional trait with intrinsic motivation and academic engagement.Methods: A sample of 428 university Chilean students, 36.5% men and 63.5% women, with ages from 18 to 45 years old (M = 20,37 DT = 2,71. Additionally, the mediating function of class-related positive emotions in this relation is explored.Results: The obtained data indicate that developing high levels of dispositional emotional creativity enhances the activation of positive emotions, such as gratitude, love and hope, in the classroom. Furthermore, emotional creativity predicts intrinsic motivation and academic engagement of university students by the experience of positive emotions. Conclusion: These results compel us to be aware of the importance that university students in their early years can understand the complexity of the emotional processes they undergo. A greater control of these emotions would allow students to maintain higher levels of interest in their studies at the different educational stages and to avoid the risk of school failure.

  19. The flipped classroom: A learning model to increase student engagement not academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masha Smallhorn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A decrease in student attendance at lectures both nationally and internationally, has prompted educators to re-evaluate their teaching methods and investigate strategies which promote student engagement. The flipped classroom model, grounded in active learning pedagogy, transforms the face-to-face classroom. Students prepare for the flipped classroom in their own time by watching short online videos and completing readings. Face-to-face time is used to apply learning through problem-solving with peers. To improve the engagement and learning outcomes of our second year cohort, lectures were replaced with short online videos and face-to-face time was spent in a flipped classroom. The impact of the flipped classroom was analysed through surveys, attendance records, learning analytics and exam data before and after the implementation of the flipped classroom. Results suggest an increase in student engagement and a positive attitude towards the learning method. However, there were no measurable increases in student learning outcomes.

  20. The Relationship between Engagement in Cocurricular Activities and Academic Performance: Exploring Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacherman, Avi; Foubert, John

    2014-01-01

    The effects of time spent in cocurricular activities on academic performance was tested. A curvilinear relationship between hours per week spent involved in cocurricular activities and grade point average was discovered such that a low amount of cocurricular involvement was beneficial to grades, while a high amount can potentially hurt academic…

  1. Minimally Verbal School-Aged Children with Autism: Communication, Academic Engagement and Classroom Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Kathryne Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Minimally verbal school aged children with autism (MVSACwA) receive the bulk of their behavioral and academic support in schools yet we know little about the environments to which they are exposed. This population of children has often been excluded from studies and thus, underrepresented in current data on autism. As increasing numbers of…

  2. How to Be Engaging: Recreational Reading and Readers' Advisory in the Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Heather

    2012-01-01

    While recreational reading material was once an integral part of the academic library collection and librarians were seen as guides in reading development for students, this has not been the case in the last 50 years. Fiscal constraints have forced library professionals to make choices so that leisure reading material has not been viewed as a high…

  3. Academics and Social Networking Sites: Benefits, Problems and Tensions in Professional Engagement with Online Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katy; Weller, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The web has had a profound effect on the ways people interact, with online social networks arguably playing an important role in changing or augmenting how we connect with others. However, uptake of online social networking by the academic community varies, and needs to be understood. This paper presents an independent, novel analysis of a…

  4. Middle School Learning, Academic Emotions and Engagement as Precursors to College Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Maria Ofelia Clarissa Z.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation research focuses on assessing student behavior, academic emotions, and knowledge within a middle school online learning environment, and analyzing potential effects on students' interests and choices related to decisions about going to college. Using students' longitudinal data ranging from their middle school, to high school, to…

  5. The Effect of "Here and Now" Learning on Student Engagement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Gavin; Govind, Rahul; Bucic, Tania; Chylinski, Mathew; Dolan, Rebecca; van Esch, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Commitment, persistence and effort have long been considered critical components for an individual's academic success. Yet, according to the old proverb, two heads are better than one and collaborative learning may yield greater benefits than what might be achieved by an individual. Because of this, collaborative learning has been labelled a…

  6. Engaging indigenous and academic knowledge on bees in the Amazon: implications for environmental management and transdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, Simone; Stepp, John Richard; Ballester, Wemerson C

    2016-06-20

    This paper contributes to the development of theoretical and methodological approaches that aim to engage indigenous, technical and academic knowledge for environmental management. We present an exploratory analysis of a transdisciplinary project carried out to identify and contrast indigenous and academic perspectives on the relationship between the Africanized honey bee and stingless bee species in the Brazilian Amazon. The project was developed by practitioners and researchers of the Instituto Socioambiental (ISA, a Brazilian NGO), responding to a concern raised by a funding agency, regarding the potential impact of apiculture development by indigenous peoples, on the diversity of stingless bee species in the Xingu Park, southern Brazilian Amazon. Research and educational activities were carried out among four indigenous peoples: Kawaiwete or Kaiabi, Yudja or Juruna, Kīsêdjê or Suyá and Ikpeng or Txicão. A constructivist qualitative approach was developed, which included academic literature review, conduction of semi-structured interviews with elders and leaders, community focus groups, field walks and workshops in schools in four villages. Semi-structured interviews and on-line surveys were carried out among academic experts and practitioners. We found that in both indigenous and scientific perspectives, diversity is a key aspect in keeping exotic and native species in balance and thus avoiding heightened competition and extinction. The Africanized honey bee was compared to the non-indigenous westerners who colonized the Americas, with whom indigenous peoples had to learn to coexist. We identify challenges and opportunities for engagement of indigenous and scientific knowledge for research and management of bee species in the Amazon. A combination of small-scale apiculture and meliponiculture is viewed as an approach that might help to maintain biological and cultural diversity in Amazonian landscapes. The articulation of knowledge from non

  7. Adolescent Same-Sex Attraction and Academic Outcomes: The Role of School Attachment and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

    2007-11-01

    Schools create environments in which some sexual feelings, behaviors, and relationships are stigmatized, and this may have negative consequences for adolescents with nonheterosexual romantic attractions. This stigma can lead them to withdraw and disengage from school at a critical time of preparation for adulthood, which can compromise opportunities for future success. Previous research has demonstrated that sexual minority youth report greater levels of school-related problems, including a weaker sense of attachment to school and more trouble with teachers and peers. This lack of social integration is likely to affect their educational success. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the newly collected Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement study provide the first opportunity to fully explore whether and to what extent same-sex attracted youth enter adulthood with an educational disadvantage. In this study, we examine (1) whether same-sex attracted adolescents have lower levels of academic success, (2) if their lower academic success is explained by a lack of social integration at school, and (3) whether these relationships differ for boys and girls. Results suggest that same-sex attracted students, particularly boys, do suffer academically, and that this is in part a result of school-related problems and risk factors such as emotional distress and substance use; however, a great deal of the disadvantage fails to be explained by these factors. Additionally, while same-sex attracted boys show poorer academic performance, same-sex attracted girls do not, suggesting that gender may shape how sexual minority youth experience and respond to marginalizing school environments.

  8. Vocational and Academic Education and Political Engagement: The Importance of the Educational Institutional Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werfhorst, H.G.

    It is hardly disputed that educational institutions carry responsibility for the education of democratic citizens through the enhancement of civic and political engagement. Despite the wealth of studies on civic and citizenship education, scholars have not yet examined the relevance of national

  9. Passion and Motivation for Studying: Predicting Academic Engagement and Burnout in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeber, Joachim; Childs, Julian H.; Hayward, Jennifer A.; Feast, Alexandra R.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the dualistic model of passion has investigated harmonious and obsessive passion in many domains. However, few studies have investigated passion for studying and the role passion for studying plays in student engagement and well-being. The present study investigated the relationships between harmonious and obsessive passion for…

  10. Vocational and Academic Education and Political Engagement: The Importance of the Educational Institutional Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werfhorst, Herman G.

    2017-01-01

    It is hardly disputed that educational institutions carry responsibility for the education of democratic citizens through the enhancement of civic and political engagement. Despite the wealth of studies on civic and citizenship education, scholars have not yet examined the relevance of national educational institutional factors. This study…

  11. Meaningful Engagement in Facebook Learning Environments: Merging Social and Academic Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Lin, Chun-Fu C.; Yu, Wei-Chieh W.; Wu, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of different learning environments between interactive Facebook instructional method and non-Facebook instructional method for undergraduate students. Two outcome dimensions were measured: student grades and learning engagement. A pre-test-posttest control group experimental design was used. The experimental…

  12. Using Technologies to Support the Social and Academic Engagement of Young People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Owen M.

    2017-01-01

    Situated in the larger questions of how to support the educational engagement and positive psychosocial development of young people with cancer, the purpose of this exploratory study was to address gaps in the literature and build understanding of how young people use digital and Internet-connected technologies in ways that support their social…

  13. Teacher recommended academic and student engagement strategies for learning disabled students: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Bethel C.

    There has been a push towards the education of students with Learning Disabilities in inclusive educational settings with their non-disabled peers. Zigmond (2003) stated that it is not the placement of students with disabilities in general education setting alone that would guarantee their successes; instead, the strategies teachers use to ensure that these children are being engaged and learning will enable them become successful. Despite the fact that there are several bodies of research on effective teaching of students with learning disabilities, special education teachers continue to have difficulties concerning the appropriate strategies for promoting student engagement and improving learning for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings (Zigmond, 2003). This qualitative study interviewed and collected data from fifteen high performing special education teachers who were employed in a Southern state elementary school district to uncover the strategies they have found useful in their attempts to promote student engagement and attempts to improve student achievement for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings. The study uncovered strategies for promoting engagement and improving learning outcomes for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive classrooms. The findings showed that in order to actually reach the students with learning disabilities, special education teachers must go the extra miles by building rapport with the school communities, possess good classroom management skills, and become student advocates.

  14. Developing Recreation, Leisure, and Sport Professional Competencies through Practitioner/Academic Service Engagement Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Jennifer; Schaumleffel, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of many universities is to prepare students for professional careers, especially in the applied field of recreation, leisure, and sport (Smith, O'Dell, & Schaumleffel, 2002). While some universities continue to use traditional knowledge-transfer methods to accomplish this goal, others have developed service engagement projects that…

  15. "Innovation" institutes in academic health centers: enhancing value through leadership, education, engagement, and scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Farmer, Steven A; Akman, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    In the next decade, the biggest change in medicine in the United States will be the organizational transformation of the delivery system. Organizations-including academic health centers-able to achieve better outcomes for less will be the financial winners as new payment models become more prevalent. For medical educators, the question is how to prepare the next generation of physicians for these changes. One solution is the development of new "innovation" or "value" institutes. Around the nation, many of these new institutes are focused on surmounting barriers to value-based care in academic health centers, educating faculty, house staff, and medical students in discussions of cost-conscious care. Innovation institutes can also lead discussions about how value-based care may impact education in environments where there may be less autonomy and more standardization. Quality metrics will play a larger role at academic health centers as metrics focus more on outcomes than processes. Optimizing outcomes will require that medical educators both learn and teach the principles of patient safety and quality improvement. Innovation institutes can also facilitate cross-institutional discussions to compare data on utilization and outcomes, and share best practices that maximize value. Another barrier to cost-conscious care is defensive medicine, which is highly engrained in U.S. medicine and culture. Innovation institutes may not be able to overcome all the barriers to making medical care more cost-conscious, but they can be critical in enabling academic health centers to optimize their teaching and research missions while remaining financially competitive.

  16. A thesis on fire : Studies of work engagement, Type A behavior and burnout

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson Hallberg, Ulrika

    2005-01-01

    The overall address of the present thesis is the relationship between being ‘on fire’ and burning out. More specifically, the thesis focused largely on two representations of involvement in work (work engagement and Type A behavior) and their respective relationships to burnout. Another pervasive theme was construct validity in assessing burnout and work engagement. These themes were addressed in four empirical studies, conducted in a sample of health-care workers (Study I) and a sample of in...

  17. The flipped classroom: A learning model to increase student engagement not academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Masha Smallhorn

    2017-01-01

    A decrease in student attendance at lectures both nationally and internationally, has prompted educators to re-evaluate their teaching methods and investigate strategies which promote student engagement. The flipped classroom model, grounded in active learning pedagogy, transforms the face-to-face classroom. Students prepare for the flipped classroom in their own time by watching short online videos and completing readings. Face-to-face time is used to apply learning through problem-solving w...

  18. Behavioural, Academic and Neuropsychological Profile of Normally Gifted Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descheemaeker, M.-J.; Ghesquiere, P.; Symons, H.; Fryns, J. P.; Legius, E.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study the neuropsychological, academic and social-emotional profiles were examined in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) children. Subjects: 17 NF1 children (ages 7-11) with NF1 without serious medical problems and with a full scale IQ (FSIQ) above 70. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), academic tests and an…

  19. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  20. Are mothers��� and fathers��� parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults��� academic engagement?

    OpenAIRE

    Waterman, Emily A.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2016-01-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students (N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers��� and fathers��� parenting style,...

  1. Peer-tutoring in academic writing: the infectious nature of engagement

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Íde; Cleary, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Students often struggle with writing as they are unaware of the process of writing and of strategies and skills to help them write well. They often focus on the product of writing rather than engaging with the process of writing. However, it is in the process of writing, and in the discovery of that process, that learning happens (Murray 1973, Emig 1977, Berlin 1982). It is thought that the inductive, non-intrusive model of student peer-tutoring practiced at the Regional ...

  2. A Novel Approach for Engaging Academia in Collaborative Projects with NASA through the X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Gattuso, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge, currently in its sixth year of execution, provides university students with the opportunity to be on the forefront of innovation. The X-Hab Challenge, for short, is designed to engage and retain students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). NASA identifies necessary technologies and studies for deep space missions and invites universities from around the country to develop concepts, prototypes, and lessons learned that will help shape future space missions and awards seed funds to design and produce functional products of interest as proposed by university teams according to their interests and expertise. Universities propose on a variety of projects suggested by NASA and are then judged on technical merit, academic integration, leveraged funding, and outreach. The universities assemble a multi-discipline team of students and advisors that invest months working together, developing concepts, and frequently producing working prototypes. Not only are students able to gain quality experience, working real world problems that have the possibility of be implemented, but they work closely with subject matter experts from NASA who guide them through an official engineering development process.

  3. Public health program planning logic model for community engaged type 2 diabetes management and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph F

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes remains a growing epidemic with widening health inequity gaps in disease management, self-management knowledge, access to care and outcomes. Yet there is a paucity of evaluation tools for community engaged interventions aimed at closing the gaps and improving health. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (the Community Guide) developed by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two healthcare system level interventions, case management interventions and disease management programs, to improve glycemic control. However, as a public health resource guide for diabetes interventions a model for community engagement is a glaringly absent component of the Community Guide recommendations. In large part there are few evidence-based interventions featuring community engagement as a practice and system-level focus of chronic disease and Type 2 diabetes management. The central argument presented in this paper is that the absence of these types of interventions is due to the lack of tools for modeling and evaluating such interventions, especially among disparate and poor populations. A conceptual model emphasizing action-oriented micro-level community engagement is needed to complement the Community Guide and serve as the basis for testing and evaluation of these kinds of interventions. A unique logic model advancing the Community Guide diabetes recommendations toward measureable and sustainable community engagement for improved Type 2 diabetes outcomes is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Self-Monitoring with Guided Goal Setting to Increase Academic Engagement for a Student with Autism in an Inclusive Classroom in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Wang, Jie; Lee, Gabrielle T.; Luke, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether using self-monitoring with guided goal setting was effective in increasing academic engagement for a student with autism who frequently displayed disruptive behaviors in an inclusive classroom in China. A 9-year-old male student with autism participated in this study. A changing criterion…

  5. Predictors of Academic Performance and School Engagement--Integrating Persistence, Motivation and Study Skills Perspectives Using Person-Centered and Variable-Centered Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Dias, Paulo; Vaz, Filipa Machado; Vaz, Joao Machado

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for the integration of various theoretical perspectives on academic performance, especially the theories on educational persistence, and motivational theories. Recent models of students' engagement with school incorporate different dimensions of students, family and school. However, some authors are arguing that academic…

  6. Making and Molding Identity in Schools: Student Narratives on Race, Gender, and Academic Engagement. SUNY Series, Power, Social Identity, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ann Locke

    This book focuses on the relationship between ethnic and racial identity and academic engagement, examining in particular the role that schools and classrooms play in shaping this relationship. It examines the lives of students to ask how they conceptualize and assert their ethnic and racial identities across varied curricular settings. The case…

  7. Does Self-Determination Predict the School Engagement of Four Different Motivation Types in Adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufelder, Diana; Regner, Nicola; Drury, Kate; Eid, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of inter-individual differences in scholastic motivation, this study examined if self-determination predicts the school engagement of four different motivation types (MT) in a large sample of adolescent students (N = 1088) from Brandenburg, Germany: (1) peer-dependent MT, (2) teacher-dependent MT, (3)…

  8. Psychological Type and Preferences in the Academic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    INTJ Perceiving ISTP ISFP INFP INTP EXTRA VERSION Perceiving ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP Judging ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ (Kroeger and Thuesen, 1992: 44) (Note: In...significant relationships between the components of an individual’s psychological type and cognitive style, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator...nature and addressed the following question: What are the relationships between the preferences as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and

  9. Modeling Academic Dishonesty: The Role of Student Perceptions and Misconduct Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter; Bisping, Timothy O.; Patron, Hilde; Roskelley, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore academic misconduct in various forms and consider the role of student perceptions. They gather data from students in introductory economics courses regarding 31 types of misconduct. They estimate the relevance of various determinants of misconduct, acknowledging that they may vary across misconduct type and that students'…

  10. Anxiety type modulates immediate versus delayed engagement of attention-related brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; De Leon, Angeline A; Bredemeier, Keith; Heller, Wendy; Engels, Anna S; Warren, Stacie L; Crocker, Laura D; Sutton, Bradley P; Miller, Gregory A

    2013-09-01

    Background Habituation of the fear response, critical for the treatment of anxiety, is inconsistently observed during exposure to threatening stimuli. One potential explanation for this inconsistency is differential attentional engagement with negatively valenced stimuli as a function of anxiety type. Methods The present study tested this hypothesis by examining patterns of neural habituation associated with anxious arousal, characterized by panic symptoms and immediate engagement with negatively valenced stimuli, versus anxious apprehension, characterized by engagement in worry to distract from negatively valenced stimuli. Results As predicted, the two anxiety types evidenced distinct patterns of attentional engagement. Anxious arousal was associated with immediate activation in attention-related brain regions that habituated over time, whereas anxious apprehension was associated with delayed activation in attention-related brain regions that occurred only after habituation in a worry-related brain region. Conclusions Results further elucidate mechanisms involved in attention to negatively valenced stimuli and indicate that anxiety is a heterogeneous construct with regard to attention to such stimuli.

  11. "It Felt Like Violence": Indigenous Knowledge Traditions and the Postcolonial Ethics of Academic Inquiry and Community Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Joseph P

    2017-12-01

    In a 2014 presentation at an academic conference featuring an American Indian community audience, I critically engaged the assumptions and commitments of Indigenous Research Methodologies. These methodologies have been described as approaches and procedures for conducting research that stem from long-subjugated Indigenous epistemologies (or "ways of knowing"). In my presentation, I described a Crow Indian religious tradition known as a skull medicine as an example of an indigenous way of knowing, referring to a historical photograph of a skull medicine bundle depicted on an accompanying slide. This occasioned consternation among many in attendance, some of whom later asserted that it was unethical for me to have presented this information because of Indigenous cultural proscriptions against publicizing sacred knowledge and photographing sacred objects. This ethical challenge depends on enduring religious sensibilities in Northern Plains Indian communities, as embedded within a postcolonial political critique concerning the accession of sacred objects by Euro-American collectors during the early 20th century. I complicate these ethical claims by considering competing goods that are valued by community psychologists, ultimately acknowledging that the associated ethical challenge resists resolution in terms that would be acceptable to diverse constituencies. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  12. Emotional Creativity as Predictor of Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Engagement in University Students: The Mediating Role of Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Xavier; Amutio, Alberto; Mendoza, Michelle; Da Costa, Silvia; Miranda, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional creativity (EC) implies experiencing a complex emotional life, which is becoming increasingly necessary in societies that demand innovation and constant changes. This research studies the relation of EC as a dispositional trait with intrinsic motivation (IM) and academic engagement (AE). A sample of 428 university Chilean students, 36.5% men and 63.5% women, with ages from 18 to 45 years-old (M = 20.37; DT = 2.71). Additionally, the mediating function of class-related positive emotions in this relation is explored. The obtained data indicate that developing high levels of dispositional EC enhances the activation of positive emotions, such as gratitude, love and hope, in the classroom. Furthermore, EC predicts IM and AE of university students by the experience of positive emotions. These results compel us to be aware of the importance that university students can understand the complexity of the emotional processes they undergo. A greater control of these emotions would allow students to maintain higher levels of interest in their studies at the different educational stages and to avoid the risk of school failure.

  13. A Comparative Study of International Student Engagement and Success Based on Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Institutional Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gareth Carlington

    2013-01-01

    The study examined international students' engagement and success using NSSE 2007 data. The sample consisted of 1996 first years and 2,158 seniors. These students were compared by race/ethnicity, gender, and institutional type. The study found that students' engagement differed by race/ethnicity as well as type of institution. The null hypotheses…

  14. Academic Engagment Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyberspace * Cyber Attack on Critical Private Infrastructure * Leveraging Counter Threat Network * Defense Ideology Countering Criminal and Drug Trafficking Organizations in the Cyber Domain Dark Web Narcotics in the Cyber Domain Drug / Counter-Drug * Center of Gravity Analysis of Drug Trafficking

  15. Posts, pics, or polls? Which post type generates the greatest engagement in a Facebook physical activity intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edney, Sarah; Looyestyn, Jemma; Ryan, Jillian; Kernot, Jocelyn; Maher, Carol

    2018-04-05

    Social networking websites have attracted considerable attention as a delivery platform for physical activity interventions. Current evidence highlights a need to enhance user engagement with these interventions to actualize their potential. The purpose of this study was to determine which post type generates the most engagement from participants and whether engagement was related to change in physical activity in an intervention delivered via Facebook. Subgroup analysis of the intervention condition of a randomized controlled trial was conducted. The group moderator posted a new message to the private Facebook group each day of the program. The Facebook posts (n = 118) were categorized into the following types: moderator-initiated running program, multimedia, motivational, opinion polls, or discussion question and participant-initiated experience shares, or questions. Four metrics were used to measure volume of engagement with each post type, "likes," "comments," "poll votes," and "photo uploads." One-way ANOVA was used to determine whether engagement differed by post type and an independent samples t-test to determine differences in engagement between moderator and participant-initiated posts. Pearson correlation was used to examine associations between total engagement and change in physical activity. Engagement varied by post type. Polls elicited the greatest engagement (p ≤ .01). The most common form of engagement was "likes," and engagement was higher for moderator-initiated rather than participant-initiated posts (mean = 8.0 [SD 6.8] vs. 5.3 [SD 3.2]; p ≤ .01). Total engagement with the Facebook group was not directly associated with change in physical activity (r = -.13, p = .47). However, engagement was associated with compliance with the running program (r = .37, p = .04) and there was a nonsignificant positive association between compliance and change in physical activity (r = .32, p = .08). Posts requiring a simple response generated the most

  16. Can student engagement serve as a motivational resource for academic coping, persistence, and learning during late elementary and early middle school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Ellen A; Pitzer, Jennifer R; Steele, Joel S

    2016-12-01

    How children and youth deal with academic challenges and setbacks can make a material difference to their learning and school success. Hence, it is important to investigate the factors that allow students to cope constructively. A process model focused on students' motivational resources was used to frame a study examining whether engagement in the classroom shapes students' academic coping, and whether coping in turn contributes to subsequent persistence on challenging tasks and learning, which then feed back into ongoing engagement. In fall and spring of the same school year, 880 children in 4th through 6th grades and their teachers completed measures of students' engagement and disaffection in the classroom, and of their re-engagement in the face of obstacles and difficulties; students also reported on 5 adaptive and 6 maladaptive ways of academic coping; and information on a subset of students' classroom grades was collected. Structural analyses, incorporating student-reports, teacher-reports, and their combination, indicated that the model of motivational processes was a good fit for time-ordered data from fall to spring. Multiple regressions examining each step in the process model also indicated that it was the profile of coping responses, rather than any specific individual way of coping, that was most centrally connected to changes in engagement and persistence. Taken together, findings suggest that these internal dynamics may form self-perpetuating cycles that could cement or augment the development of children's motivational resilience and vulnerability across time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, Benjamin; Perin, Višnja

    2016-01-01

    Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics.

  18. An adaptive approach to family-centered intervention in schools: linking intervention engagement to academic outcomes in middle and high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Connell, Arin; Dishion, Thomas J

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the impact of an adaptive approach to family intervention in public schools on academic outcomes from age 11 to 17. Students were randomly assigned to the three-session Family Check-Up (FCU), which is designed to motivate change in parenting practices by using an assessment-driven approach and strengths-based feedback. All services were voluntary, and approximately 25% of the families engaged in the FCU. Compared with matched controls, adolescents whose parents received the FCU maintained a satisfactory GPA into high school, and intervention engagement was associated with improved attendance. The highest-risk families were the most likely to engage in the family-centered intervention, suggesting the efficacy of integrating supportive services to families in the context of other schoolwide approaches to promote the success and achievement of vulnerable students.

  19. No difference in the intention to engage others in academic transgression among medical students from neighboring countries: a cross-national study on medical students from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đogaš, Varja; Donev, Doncho M; Kukolja-Taradi, Sunčana; Đogaš, Zoran; Ilakovac, Vesna; Novak, Anita; Jerončić, Ana

    2016-08-31

    To asses if the level of intention to engage others in academic transgressions was comparable among medical students from five schools from neighboring Southern-European countries: Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia; and medical students from western EU studying at Split, Croatia. Five medical schools were surveyed in 2011, with ≥87% of the targeted population sampled and a response rate of ≥76%. Students' intention to engage a family member, friend, colleague, or a stranger in academic transgression was measured using a previously validated the Intention to Engage Others in Academic Transgression (IEOAT) questionnaire and compared with their intention to ask others for a non-academic, material favor. Data on students' motivation measured by Work Preference Inventory scale, and general data were also collected. Multiple linear regression models of the intention to engage others in a particular behavior were developed. The most important determinants of the intention to engage others in academic transgression were psychological factors, such as intention to ask others for a material favor, or students' motivation (median determinant's β of 0.18, P≤0.045 for all), whereas social and cultural factors associated with the country of origin were either weak (median β of 0.07, P≤0.031) or not relevant. A significant proportion of students were aware of the ethical violations in academic transgressions (P≤0.004 for all transgressions), but a large proportion of students also perceived academic cheating as a collective effort and were likely to engage people randomly (P≤0.001 for all, but the most severe transgression). This collective effort was more pronounced for academic than non-academic behavior. Culture differences among neighboring Southern-European countries were not an important determinant of the intention to engage others in academic cheating.

  20. Motivation Matters? The Relationship among Different Types of Learning Motivation, Engagement Behaviors and Learning Outcomes of Undergraduate Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tzu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand predictors of different learning outcomes among various student background characteristics, types of learning motivation and engagement behaviors. 178 junior students were surveyed at a 4-year research university in Taiwan. The scales of motivation, engagement and perceived learning outcomes were adapted…

  1. Types and delivery of emotional support to promote linkage and engagement in HIV care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook CL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Christa L Cook,1 Shantrel Canidate,2 Nicole Ennis,3 Robert L Cook4 1Department of Family, Community, and Health System Science, College of Nursing, 2Social and Behavioral Science, College of Public Health and Health Profession, 3Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: Despite recommendations for early entry into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care, many people diagnosed with HIV delay seeking care. Multiple types of social support (ie, cognitive, emotional, and tangible are often needed for someone to transition into HIV care, but a lack of emotional support at diagnosis may be the reason why some people fail to stay engaged in care. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify how people living with HIV conceptualized emotional support needs and delivery at diagnosis. Method: We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data from 27 people living with HIV, many of whom delayed entry into HIV care. Results: Participants described their experiences seeking care after an HIV diagnosis and identified components of emotional support that aided entry into care – identification, connection, and navigational presence. Many participants stated that these types of support were ideally delivered by peers with HIV. Conclusion: In clinical practice, providers often use an HIV diagnosis as an opportunity to educate patients about HIV prevention and access to services. However, this type of social support may not facilitate engagement in care if emotional support needs are not met. Keywords: linkage to care, engagement in care, social support, qualitative

  2. When daily planning improves employee performance: The importance of planning type, engagement, and interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Michael R; Weinhardt, Justin M; Brodsky, Andrew; Tangirala, Subrahmaniam; DeVoe, Sanford E

    2018-03-01

    Does planning for a particular workday help employees perform better than on other days they fail to plan? We investigate this question by identifying 2 distinct types of daily work planning to explain why and when planning improves employees' daily performance. The first type is time management planning (TMP)-creating task lists, prioritizing tasks, and determining how and when to perform them. We propose that TMP enhances employees' performance by increasing their work engagement, but that these positive effects are weakened when employees face many interruptions in their day. The second type is contingent planning (CP) in which employees anticipate possible interruptions in their work and plan for them. We propose that CP helps employees stay engaged and perform well despite frequent interruptions. We investigate these hypotheses using a 2-week experience-sampling study. Our findings indicate that TMP's positive effects are conditioned upon the amount of interruptions, but CP has positive effects that are not influenced by the level of interruptions. Through this study, we help inform workers of the different planning methods they can use to increase their daily motivation and performance in dynamic work environments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Collective school-type identity: predicting students' motivation beyond academic self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Michel; Hannover, Bettina

    2011-06-01

    In Germany, according to their prior achievement students are tracked into different types of secondary school that provide profoundly different options for their future educational careers. In this paper we suggest that as a result, school tracks clearly differ in their social status or reputation. This should translate into different collective school-type identities for their students, irrespective of the students' personal academic self-concepts. We examine the extent to which collective school-type identity systematically varies as a function of the school track students are enrolled in, and the extent to which students' collective school-type identity makes a unique contribution beyond academic self-concept and school track in predicting scholastic motivation. In two cross-sectional studies a measure of collective school-type identity is established and applied to explain motivational differences between two school tracks in Berlin. In Study 1 (N = 39 students) the content of the collective school-type identity is explored by means of an open format questionnaire. Based on these findings a structured instrument (semantic differential) to measure collective school-type identity is developed. In Study 2 (N = 1278 students) the assumed structure with four subscales (Stereotype Achievement, Stereotype Motivation, Stereotype Social, and Compensation) is proved with confirmatory factor analysis. This measure is used to compare the collective school-type identity across school tracks and predict motivational outcomes. Results show large differences in collective school-type identity between students of different school tracks. Furthermore, these differences can explain motivational differences between school tracks. Collective school-type identity has incremental predictive power for scholastic motivation, over and above the effects of academic self-concept and school track.

  4. Combining University Student Self-Regulated Learning Indicators and Engagement with Online Learning Events to Predict Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Abelardo; Han, Feifei; Ellis, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated learning theories are used to understand the reasons for different levels of university student academic performance. Similarly, learning analytics research proposes the combination of detailed data traces derived from technology-mediated tasks with a variety of algorithms to predict student academic performance. The former approach…

  5. Development and Validation of a 2 x 2 Model of Time-Related Academic Behavior: Procrastination and Timely Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K.; Cho, YoonJung; Steele, Misty R.; Bridges, Stacey L.

    2013-01-01

    Procrastination is an educational concern for classroom instructors because of its negative psychological and academic impacts on students. However, the traditional view of procrastination as a unidimensional construct is insufficient in two regards. First, the construct needs to be viewed more broadly as time-related academic behavior,…

  6. Body Image of Highly Trained Female Athletes Engaged in Different Types of Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glapa, Agata; Banio, Adrianna; Firek, Wiesław; Ingarden, Anna; Malchrowicz-Mośko, Ewa; Markiewicz, Paweł; Płoszaj, Katarzyna; Ingarden, Mateusz; Maćkowiak, Zuzanna

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in body image across different types of sports in highly trained female athletes. Methods 242 female individuals, aged 13–30 years (M = 20.0, SD = 4.5), representing aesthetic sports (n = 56) and nonaesthetic sports (n = 186), were recruited from different sports clubs in Poland. Body image, BMI, age, the level of competition attained, and the training background of participants were recorded. Results One-way ANOVA showed differences in the body image of athletes engaged in different types of sport (F(11,230) = 4.10, p sport explained 7.1% (β = –0.263, p sporting activities at an early stage. PMID:29662894

  7. How to engage type-2 diabetic patients in their own health management: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Libreri, Chiara; Bosio, Claudio A

    2014-06-25

    Patient engagement (PE) is increasingly regarded as a key factor in the improvement of health behaviors and outcomes in the management of chronic disease, such as type 2 diabetes. This article explores (1) the reasons for disengagement of diabetic patients and their unique subjective attitudes from their experience and (2) the elements that may hinder PE in health management. 29 Type-2 uncontrolled diabetes patients were asked to keep a one-week diary related to their experience of disease management, according to the narrative inquiry qualitative approach. They were interviewed to ascertain reasons for PE. The elicited narratives were subjected to interpretive content analysis. The findings suggest that patients give meaning to their diabetes and its management through a complex frame of subjective experiential dimensions (cognitive/thinking, behavioral/conative and emotional/feeling), which have an impact on the spheres of daily life that are considered to be crucial in the management of diabetes (diet, physical activity, therapy, doctor-patient relationship) for each patient. These results suggest that PE develops along a continuum featuring four subsequent phases (blackout, arousal, adhesion, eudaimonic project). Several unmet needs related to the different phases of the PE continuum were discovered and illuminated possible types of support. Our findings appear to confirm some features of PE detected by previous research, such as a behavioral component. We were also able to shed light on the synergic roles played by other subjective dimensions of patient experience (the cognitive/thinking and the emotional/feeling components) in orienting PE towards the care process. The article suggests a possible framework to deeply understand the PE process useful to orient really attuned actions to support it. These results suggest the importance of developing patient engagement assessment tools that are more firmly grounded in the individual patient experience.

  8. Health Care Transition for Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Stakeholder Engagement for Defining Optimal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica S; Aroian, Karen; Schifano, Elizabeth; Milkes, Amy; Schwindt, Tiani; Gannon, Anthony; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Research on the transition to adult care for young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) emphasizes transition readiness, with less emphasis on transition outcomes. The relatively few studies that focus on outcomes use a wide variety of measures with little reliance on stakeholder engagement for measure selection. This study engaged multiple stakeholders (i.e., young adults with T1D, parents, pediatric and adult health care providers, and experts) in qualitative interviews to identify the content domain for developing a multidimensional measure of health care transition (HCT) outcomes. The following constructs were identified for a planned measure of HCT outcomes: biomedical markers of T1D control; T1D knowledge/skills; navigation of a new health care system; integration of T1D into emerging adult roles; balance of parental involvement with autonomy; and "ownership" of T1D self-management. The results can guide creation of an initial item pool for a multidimensional profile of HCT outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Assessment of the relationship between the engagement in leisure time and academic motivation among the students of faculty of education

    OpenAIRE

    SARI, Ihsan; CETIN, Mehmet; KAYA, Erdi; GULLE, Mahmut; KAHRAMANOĞLU, Recep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between leisure time motivation and academic motivation among the students who studied at the Faculty of Education of Mustafa Kemal University. 260 students (Xyears: 21.29±2.11) constituted the sample of the study. For the analyses of the data; Leisure Motivation Scale and Academic Motivation Scale were employed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation test and regression analysis. According to the ...

  10. Mixed methods study of engagement in behaviors to prevent type 2 diabetes among employees with pre-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullgren, Jeffrey T; Knaus, Megan; Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig; Heisler, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Many employers use screenings to identify and recommend modification of employees' risk factors for type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about how often employees then engage in recommended behaviors and what factors influence engagement. We examined the frequency of, facilitators of, and barriers to engagement in recommended behaviors among employees found to have pre-diabetes during a workplace screening. We surveyed 82 University of Michigan employees who were found to have pre-diabetes during a 2014 workplace screening and compared the characteristics of employees who 3 months later were and were not engaged in recommended behaviors. We interviewed 40 of these employees to identify the facilitators of and barriers to engagement in recommended behaviors. 3 months after screening, 54% of employees with pre-diabetes reported attempting to lose weight and getting recommended levels of physical activity, had asked their primary care provider about metformin for diabetes prevention, or had attended a Diabetes Prevention Program. These employees had higher median levels of motivation to prevent type 2 diabetes (9/10 vs 7/10, pmotivation and social and external supports. Key barriers were lack of motivation and resources, and competing demands. Most employees found to have pre-diabetes through a workplace screening were engaged in a recommended preventive behavior 3 months after the screening. This engagement could be enhanced by optimizing motivation and risk perception as well as leveraging social networks and external supports.

  11. Typical Intellectual Engagement, Big Five Personality Traits, Approaches to Learning and Cognitive Ability Predictors of Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Monsen, Jeremy; Ahmetoglu, Gorkan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Both ability (measured by power tests) and non-ability (measured by preference tests) individual difference measures predict academic school outcomes. These include fluid as well as crystalized intelligence, personality traits, and learning styles. This paper examines the incremental validity of five psychometric tests and the sex and…

  12. Do Teachers Equate Male and Masculine with Lower Academic Engagement? How Students' Gender Enactment Triggers Gender Stereotypes at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyder, Anke; Kessels, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Girls presently outperform boys in overall academic success. Corresponding gender stereotypes portray male students as lazy and troublesome and female students as diligent and compliant. The present study investigated whether these stereotypes impact teachers' perceptions of students and whether students' visible enactment of their gender at…

  13. Accelerating Literacy for Diverse Learners: Classroom Strategies That Integrate Social/Emotional Engagement and Academic Achievement, K-8. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Socorro G.; Kavimandan, Shabina K.; Perez, Della R.; Wessels, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates that the culturally responsive teaching strategies outlined in this book accelerate literacy, language development, and academic growth for students in grades K-8, particularly for English language learners. Completely revised and updated, this bestselling resource speaks to the social-emotional needs of learners and helps…

  14. Assessing the Roles of Student Engagement and Academic Emotions within Middle School Computer- Based Learning in College-Going Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Maria Ofelia Z.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation research focuses on assessing student behavior, academic emotions, and knowledge from a middle school online learning environment, and analyzing their potential effects on decisions about going to college. Using students' longitudinal data ranging from their middle school, to high school, to postsecondary years, I leverage…

  15. Form One Students' Engagement with Computer Games and Its Effect on Their Academic Achievement in a Malaysian Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eow, Yee Leng; Wan Ali, Wan Zah bte; Mahmud, Rosnaini bt.; Baki, Roselan

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to address the association between computer games and students' academic achievement. The exceptional growth in numbers of children playing computer games, the uneasiness and incomplete understanding foundation when starting the discussion on computer games have stimulated this study to be conducted. From a survey…

  16. Clinical and academic profile of children with specific learning disorder-mixed type: An Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Specific learning disorder (SLD in the past decade has gained recognition as a disabling condition among children by parents and teachers in India. However, there are still gaps in knowledge about its clinical presentation and understanding. Therefore, the present study was planned to evaluate the clinical and academic profile of children with SLD. Methods: The sample comprised 30 children with their age range between 7 and 12 years with a diagnosis of SLD-mixed type. All children were assessed through specifically designed structured pro forma for clinical details (i.e., nature of birth, developmental milestones, and comorbidities and academic history (i.e., history of failure, promoted in next class, repetition in the class, school change, etc. and SLD-comprehensive battery. Results: The mean age of the participants was 9.6 years (standard deviation [SD] = 1.5. 76.7% of participants were male and their mean years of education was 4.7 (SD = 1.5. Thirty percent of children had a history of delayed developmental milestones in terms of speech (16.7%, walking (6.7% and in speech and walking (6.7%, 23% of children had comorbid conditions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder/attention-deficit disorder. Thirty percent of children repeated classes in their academic career. Conclusions: A significant number of children had delayed milestones and other problems. Moreover, it is important to understand the clinical and academic profile in the cultural context so that early identification and intervention can be planned.

  17. How Cognitive Engagement Fluctuates during a Team-Based Learning Session and How It Predicts Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I.; Schmidt, Henk G.; Rajalingam, Preman; Hao, Joey Wong Ying; Canning, Claire Ann; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Low-Beer, Naomi

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to report findings of two studies that attempted to find answers to the following questions: (1) What are the levels of cognitive engagement in TBL?; (2) Are there differences between students who were more exposed to TBL than students who were less exposed to TBL?; (3) To which extent does cognitive engagement…

  18. Building Capacity for Civic Learning and Engagement: An Emerging Infrastructure in the Academic Arts and Humanities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, Donna; Huber, Mary Taylor

    2015-01-01

    American higher education has always articulated a civic mission as part of its purpose: colleges and universities educate students for life in a democratic society and provide that society with citizens who ensure that it thrives in turn. This essay maps the development of a national infrastructure for civic learning and engagement in American…

  19. A multidisciplinary guided practical on type I diabetes engaging students in inquiry-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingueneau, M; Chaix, A; Scotti, N; Chaix, J; Reynders, A; Hammond, C; Thimonier, J

    2015-12-01

    In the present article, we describe a 3-day experimental workshop on type I diabetes aimed at helping high school students to understand how fundamental research on glycemia regulation contributes to the development of scientific knowledge and therapeutic strategies. The workshop engaged students in open-ended investigations and guided experiments. Each class was divided into three or four groups, with each group working with a trained doctoral student or postdoctoral fellow. During an initial questioning phase, students observed slides depicting the glycemia of individuals in various situations. Students identified hyperglycemic individuals relative to the average glycemia of the displayed population. Students were asked to devise a treatment for these diabetics. They quickly realized that they couldn't experiment on patients and understood the need for laboratory models. Each group gave ideas of experiments to perform. We then explained, taking into account their propositions, the protocols students could execute to address one of the following questions: Which criteria must an animal model of diabetes fulfill? How do pancreatic cells maintain glycemia? Is there a way to produce an insulin protein similar to the one released by human pancreatic cells? We used two different evaluation metrics of the workshop: a questionnaire filled out by the students before and after the workshop and a poster produced by students at the end of the workshop. We found that this educational approach successfully improved student awareness and understanding of the scientific reasoning and research process. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  20. Types and Influence of Social Support on School Engagement of Young Survivors of Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas, Anne-Marie; Jutras, Sylvie; Bigras, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe and explore the influence of social support on the school engagement of young survivors of pediatric leukemia. Fifty-three young Quebecers, previously diagnosed and treated for leukemia, completed a questionnaire measuring their school engagement and participated in an interview focusing on the support offered…

  1. The relationship between parenting types and older adolescents' personality, academic achievement, adjustment, and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, L H; Schwarz, J C

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine Baumrind's T3 conceptual framework using a multiple informant design and an older adolescent population. With 178 college students and their families as participants, the present study found many of the predicted relations between parents' child-rearing style (Authoritative, Democratic, Nondirective, Nonauthoritarian-Directive, Authoritarian-Directive, and Unengaged) and their adolescent children's behavior in the 4 domains assessed: personality, adjustment, academic achievement, and substance use. The differences between parenting types on the criterion measures were not as large as reported in Baumrind's study, and significant effects were predominantly due to the poor scores from children with Unengaged and Authoritarian-Directive parents. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the Authoritative parenting type, the utility of using a typology, and areas for future research.

  2. The Influence of Motivational Regulation Strategies on Online Students' Behavioral, Emotional, and Cognitive Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghoon; Yun, Heoncheol

    2018-01-01

    Providing effective motivational support is a critical determinant of a successful online distance learning experience for students in higher education. In this study, we examined how students' academic level and use of 8 motivational regulation strategies influence 3 types of student engagement: behavioral engagement, emotional engagement, and…

  3. Explaining emotional exhaustion and work engagement : The role of job demands-resources and Type D personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Tooren, M.; Rutte, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to show that Type D personality—a personality trait characterized by high levels of negative affectivity and high levels of social inhibition—can explain a significant amount of variance in emotional exhaustion and work engagement above and beyond the variance

  4. Spirited Leadership and the Struggle for the Soul of Headteachers: Differentiating and Balancing Nine Types of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckcock, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This article is written from the perspective of a practicing headteacher as a contribution to the theory and practice of spiritual leadership in education. By using a conceptual map derived from personality type theory it seeks to articulate several distinct facets of spirited leadership, intended to denote what engages, enlivens and enlightens…

  5. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, debate on women in academic science has been extended to academics' engagement with industry. We suggest that women tend to engage less in industry collaboration than their male colleagues of similar status. We argue that differences are mitigated by the presence of other women and by s...

  6. Development of the system for academic training of personnel engaged in nuclear material protection, control and accounting in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: National safeguards on nuclear materials (NM) non-proliferation in any country are provided by a system of special measures on NM management (legal regulation, organizing, scientific and technical measures and tools) as well as by a professional culture of people working with NM (non-proliferation culture). The fundamental attribute of any culture, and the non-proliferation culture also, is an availability of a system for reproduction of the specialists - carriers of this culture. Saying about national safeguards systems, one of the key components for existence and development of such a system in Russia is a creation and advancement of the system for specialists training in areas of NM non-proliferation and NM safe management. Unfortunately, when developing and improving the special measures of national safeguards, the specialists reproduction system is often forgotten. A lack of well-skilled specialists is retarding development of national safeguards now. Under today's conditions in Russia, this lack of specialists can become a serious obstacle for resolving the non-proliferation problem in the nearest future. Establishing the fact is a necessary and important step towards definition of long-term strategy for development of nuclear power industry in Russia. The specialists reproduction is a complex multi-level problem. Solution of the problem as applied to nuclear non-proliferation safeguards can be found through creating the academic system of training, re-training and qualification upgrade of appropriate specialists basing upon the training principles, traditions and approaches established in our country. Today we have only the first successful results in resolving aforementioned problems. The present paper is devoted to discussion of general problems for MPC and A specialists training in Russia as well as to discussion on development of the MPC and A Engineering Degree Program at MEPhI. Main attention in the present paper is focused at discussing the

  7. Does academic assessment system type affect levels of academic stress in medical students? A cross-sectional study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress among medical students induced by academic pressures is on the rise among the student population in Pakistan and other parts of the world. Our study examined the relationship between two different systems employed to assess academic performance and the levels of stress among students at two different medical schools in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: A sample consisting of 387 medical students enrolled in pre-clinical years was taken from two universities, one employing the semester examination system with grade point average (GPA scores (a tiered system and the other employing an annual examination system with only pass/fail grading. A pre-designed, self-administered questionnaire was distributed. Test anxiety levels were assessed by The Westside Test Anxiety Scale (WTAS. Overall stress was evaluated using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. Results: There were 82 males and 301 females while four did not respond to the gender question. The mean age of the entire cohort was 19.7±1.0 years. A total of 98 participants were from the pass/fail assessment system while 289 were from the GPA system. There was a higher proportion of females in the GPA system (85% vs. 59%; p<0.01. Students in the pass/fail assessment system had a lower score on the WTAS (2.4±0.8 vs. 2.8±0.7; p=0.01 and the PSS (17.0±6.7 vs. 20.3±6.8; p<0.01, indicating lower levels of test anxiety and overall stress than in students enrolled in the GPA assessment system. More students in the pass/fail system were satisfied with their performance than those in the GPA system. Conclusion: Based on the present study, we suggest governing bodies to revise and employ a uniform assessment system for all the medical colleges to improve student academic performance and at the same time reduce stress levels. Our results indicate that the pass/fail assessment system accomplishes these objectives.

  8. The Impacts of Different Types of Workload Allocation Models on Academic Satisfaction and Working Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Iris

    2009-01-01

    Increasing demands on academic work have resulted in many academics working long hours and expressing dissatisfaction with their working life. These concerns have led to a number of faculties and universities adopting workload allocation models to improve satisfaction and better manage workloads. This paper reports on a study which examined the…

  9. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  10. Doctoral Students’ Experiences of Feeling (or not) Like an Academic

    OpenAIRE

    Esma Emmioglu Sarikaya; Lynn McAlpine; Cheryl Amundsen

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: This paper examined the balance and meaning of two types of experiences in the day-to-day activity of doctoral students that draw them into academia and that move them away from academia: ‘feeling like an academic and belonging to an academic community;’ and ‘not feeling like an academic and feeling excluded from an academic community.’ Background: As students navigate doctoral work, they are learning what is entailed in being an academic by engaging with their peers and mor...

  11. Long-term engagement with a mobile self-management system for people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Naoe; Arsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-03-27

    In a growing number of intervention studies, mobile phones are used to support self-management of people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is difficult to establish knowledge about factors associated with intervention effects, due to considerable differences in research designs and outcome measures as well as a lack of detailed information about participants' engagement with the intervention tool. To contribute toward accumulating knowledge about factors associated with usage and usability of a mobile self-management application over time through a thorough analysis of multiple types of investigation on each participant's engagement. The Few Touch application is a mobile-phone-based self-management tool for patients with T2DM. Twelve patients with T2DM who have been actively involved in the system design used the Few Touch application in a real-life setting from September 2008 until October 2009. During this period, questionnaires and semistructured interviews were conducted. Recorded data were analyzed to investigate usage trends and patterns. Transcripts from interviews were thematically analyzed, and the results were further analyzed in relation to the questionnaire answers and the usage trends and patterns. The Few Touch application served as a flexible learning tool for the participants, responsive to their spontaneous needs, as well as supporting regular self-monitoring. A significantly decreasing (Pmanual entry; intuitive and informative feedback; and rich learning materials, especially about foods. Many grounded design implications were identified through a thorough analysis of results from multiple types of investigations obtained through a year-long field trial of the Few Touch application. The study showed the importance and value of involving patient-users in a long-term trial of a tool to identify factors influencing usage and usability over time. In addition, the study confirmed the importance of detailed analyses of each participant

  12. Team Clinic: An Innovative Group Care Model for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes-Engaging Patients and Meeting Educational Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berget, Cari; Lindwall, Jennifer; Shea, Jacqueline J; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Anderson, Barbara J; Cain, Cindy; Raymond, Jennifer K

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot was to implement an innovative group care model, "Team Clinic", for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and assess patient and provider perspectives. Ninety-one intervention patients and 87 controls were enrolled. Ninety-six percent of intervention adolescents endorsed increased support and perceived connecting with peers as important. The medical providers and staff also provided positive feedback stating Team Clinic allowed more creativity in education and higher quality of care. Team Clinic may be a promising model to engage adolescents and incorporate education and support into clinic visits in a format valued by patients and providers.

  13. Interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affect and externalising behaviour in young children with type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivienne Chisholm

    Full Text Available Mother-child interactions around a shared activity have been shown to play a key role in the development of young children's capacity to interact cooperatively with others. This evidence is particularly germane to type 1 diabetes (T1D management in younger children where cooperation with parental treatment efforts is crucial for treatment success and where maternal distress and child behavioural problems are risk factors for treatment management, biomedical and psychological outcomes. In 49 4-to-8 year old children with T1D, we investigated whether the association between maternal affect and child problematic behaviour is mediated by mother-child interactions in the context of a T1D-relevant collaborative problem-solving activity. Mothers completed standardised measures of maternal and child psychological adjustment and interacted with their children in the problem-solving activity, analysed for quality of interpersonal engagement based on evaluations of maternal (sensitivity and cognitive stimulation and dyadic (joint attention and warmth behaviours. Mediation analyses confirmed the hypothesis that interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affective state and child behavioural problems. Specifically, more negative maternal affect is associated with lower levels of interpersonal engagement; these less engaged interactions in turn are associated with more behavioural problems in children. These findings are consistent with research involving typically developing children. The implications of our findings are twofold. First, in the context of psychological adjustment to T1D, maternal affect and mother-child interactions are 2 potential targets for interventions which promote cooperative interactions. Second, understanding and caring for children at biological risk requires attention to developmental psychology theory and method; in particular, research addressing parent-child cooperation carries both conceptual and clinical

  14. Interpersonal Engagement Mediates the Relation between Maternal Affect and Externalising Behaviour in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Vivienne; Gonzalez, Andrea; Atkinson, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Mother-child interactions around a shared activity have been shown to play a key role in the development of young children’s capacity to interact cooperatively with others. This evidence is particularly germane to type 1 diabetes (T1D) management in younger children where cooperation with parental treatment efforts is crucial for treatment success and where maternal distress and child behavioural problems are risk factors for treatment management, biomedical and psychological outcomes. In 49 4-to-8 year old children with T1D, we investigated whether the association between maternal affect and child problematic behaviour is mediated by mother-child interactions in the context of a T1D-relevant collaborative problem-solving activity. Mothers completed standardised measures of maternal and child psychological adjustment and interacted with their children in the problem-solving activity, analysed for quality of interpersonal engagement based on evaluations of maternal (sensitivity and cognitive stimulation) and dyadic (joint attention and warmth) behaviours. Mediation analyses confirmed the hypothesis that interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affective state and child behavioural problems. Specifically, more negative maternal affect is associated with lower levels of interpersonal engagement; these less engaged interactions in turn are associated with more behavioural problems in children. These findings are consistent with research involving typically developing children. The implications of our findings are twofold. First, in the context of psychological adjustment to T1D, maternal affect and mother-child interactions are 2 potential targets for interventions which promote cooperative interactions. Second, understanding and caring for children at biological risk requires attention to developmental psychology theory and method; in particular, research addressing parent-child cooperation carries both conceptual and clinical relevance. PMID

  15. School Engagement, Risky Peers, and Student-Teacher Relationships as Mediators of School Violence in Taiwanese Vocational versus Academically Oriented High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Astor, Ron Avi

    2011-01-01

    Educational tracking based on academic ability accounts for different school dynamics between vocational versus academically-oriented high schools in Taiwan. Many educational practitioners predict that the settings of vocational schools and academic schools mediate school violence in different ways. Alternatively, some researchers argue the actual…

  16. Variation in Patients' Travel Times among Imaging Examination Types at a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Liang, Yu; Duszak, Richard; Recht, Michael P

    2017-08-01

    Patients' willingness to travel farther distances for certain imaging services may reflect their perceptions of the degree of differentiation of such services. We compare patients' travel times for a range of imaging examinations performed across a large academic health system. We searched the NYU Langone Medical Center Enterprise Data Warehouse to identify 442,990 adult outpatient imaging examinations performed over a recent 3.5-year period. Geocoding software was used to estimate typical driving times from patients' residences to imaging facilities. Variation in travel times was assessed among examination types. The mean expected travel time was 29.2 ± 20.6 minutes, but this varied significantly (p travel times were shortest for ultrasound (26.8 ± 18.9) and longest for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (31.9 ± 21.5). For magnetic resonance imaging, travel times were shortest for musculoskeletal extremity (26.4 ± 19.2) and spine (28.6 ± 21.0) examinations and longest for prostate (35.9 ± 25.6) and breast (32.4 ± 22.3) examinations. For computed tomography, travel times were shortest for a range of screening examinations [colonography (25.5 ± 20.8), coronary artery calcium scoring (26.1 ± 19.2), and lung cancer screening (26.4 ± 14.9)] and longest for angiography (32.0 ± 22.6). For ultrasound, travel times were shortest for aortic aneurysm screening (22.3 ± 18.4) and longest for breast (30.1 ± 19.2) examinations. Overall, men (29.9 ± 21.6) had longer (p travel times than women (27.8 ± 20.3); this difference persisted for each modality individually (p ≤ 0.006). Patients' willingness to travel longer times for certain imaging examination types (particularly breast and prostate imaging) supports the role of specialized services in combating potential commoditization of imaging services. Disparities in travel times by gender warrant further investigation. Copyright

  17. Measuring preschool learning engagement in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Simone E; Calkins, Susan D; Leerkes, Esther M

    2018-03-01

    Learning engagement is a critical factor for academic achievement and successful school transitioning. However, current methods of assessing learning engagement in young children are limited to teacher report or classroom observation, which may limit the types of research questions one could assess about this construct. The current study investigated the validity of a novel assessment designed to measure behavioral learning engagement among young children in a standardized laboratory setting and examined how learning engagement in the laboratory relates to future classroom adjustment. Preschool-aged children (N = 278) participated in a learning-based Tangrams task and Story sequencing task and were observed based on seven behavioral indicators of engagement. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity for a behavioral engagement factor composed of six of the original behavioral indicators: attention to instructions, on-task behavior, enthusiasm/energy, persistence, monitoring progress/strategy use, and negative affect. Concurrent validity for this behavioral engagement factor was established through its associations with parent-reported mastery motivation and pre-academic skills in math and literacy measured in the laboratory, and predictive validity was demonstrated through its associations with teacher-reported classroom learning behaviors and performance in math and reading in kindergarten. These associations were found when behavioral engagement was observed during both the nonverbal task and the verbal story sequencing tasks and persisted even after controlling for child minority status, gender, and maternal education. Learning engagement in preschool appears to be successfully measurable in a laboratory setting. This finding has implications for future research on the mechanisms that support successful academic development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Student Engagement with a Flipped Classroom Teaching Design Affects Pharmacology Examination Performance in a Manner Dependent on Question Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Som; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Short, Jennifer L.; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Larson, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between student engagement with the key elements of a flipped classroom approach (preparation and attendance), their attitudes to learning, including strategy development, and their performance on two types of examination questions (knowledge recall and providing rational predictions when faced with novel scenarios). Methods. This study correlated student engagement with the flipped classroom and student disposition to learning with student ability to solve novel scenarios in examinations. Results. Students who both prepared for and attended classes performed significantly better on examination questions that required analysis of novel scenarios compared to students who did not prepare and missed classes. However, there was no difference for both groups of students on examination questions that required knowledge and comprehension. Student motivation and use of strategies correlated with higher examination scores on questions requiring novel scenario analysis. Conclusion. There is a synergistic relationship between class preparation and attendance. The combination of preparation and attendance was positively correlated to assessment type; the relationship was apparent for questions requiring students to solve novel problems but not for questions requiring knowledge or comprehension. PMID:29302082

  19. Student Engagement with a Flipped Classroom Teaching Design Affects Pharmacology Examination Performance in a Manner Dependent on Question Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul J; Naidu, Som; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Short, Jennifer L; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Larson, Ian C

    2017-11-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between student engagement with the key elements of a flipped classroom approach (preparation and attendance), their attitudes to learning, including strategy development, and their performance on two types of examination questions (knowledge recall and providing rational predictions when faced with novel scenarios). Methods. This study correlated student engagement with the flipped classroom and student disposition to learning with student ability to solve novel scenarios in examinations. Results. Students who both prepared for and attended classes performed significantly better on examination questions that required analysis of novel scenarios compared to students who did not prepare and missed classes. However, there was no difference for both groups of students on examination questions that required knowledge and comprehension. Student motivation and use of strategies correlated with higher examination scores on questions requiring novel scenario analysis. Conclusion. There is a synergistic relationship between class preparation and attendance. The combination of preparation and attendance was positively correlated to assessment type; the relationship was apparent for questions requiring students to solve novel problems but not for questions requiring knowledge or comprehension.

  20. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  1. Student Engagement: Rhetoric and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Paula; Corbin, Lillian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in higher education literature and policy on the concepts of student engagement and disengagement. While most academic writings recognise the significance of student engagement, they have tended to concentrate on it in relation to academic activities. Increasingly, universities are "cascading" down…

  2. Autonomous, Controlled, and Amotivated Types of Academic Motivation: A Person-Oriented Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratelle, Catherine F.; Guay, Frederic; Vallerand, Robert J.; Larose, Simon; Senecal, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated students' profiles regarding autonomous, controlled, and amotivated regulation and tested whether profile groups differed on some academic adjustment outcomes. Studies 1 and 2 performed on high school students revealed 3 profiles: (a) students with high levels of both controlled motivation and amotivation but low levels of…

  3. Love moderates the relationship between partner type and condom use among women engaging in transactional vaginal sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexis M; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Hensel, Devon J; Wiehe, Sarah E; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Wagner, Karla D

    2016-04-01

    Background Relationship characteristics and day-to-day variation in affective state have been associated with HIV risk behaviour. However, no research has assessed the impact of these factors on event-level condom use among women engaging in transactional sex. Twenty-six women engaging in transactional sex were enrolled in a prospective study of their sexual health. They completed diaries about multi-level predictors of condom use during vaginal sex twice, daily. Over 4 weeks, 18 participants reported 87 paid/traded vaginal intercourse events. Of these, 51.7% were condom protected. The majority of paid/traded events (81.5%) occurred with a non-romantic partner. After controlling for partner type, feeling in love on a given day was associated with higher odds of condom use during paid/traded sexual events, while having sex on the weekend and at night were associated with lower odds of condom use (all P≤0.05). There was a significant interaction between being in love and using condoms during transactional sex (Plove and 40% (4/10) when love was reported. In sexual events with non-romantic partners, the frequency of condom use was 43.8% (14/32) when women did not report love and 59.5% (22/37) when love was reported. Women were less likely to report protected sex with romantic partners and more likely to report protected sex with non-romantic partners when they are in love. Interventions focusing on the link between day-to-day variation in affective state on condom use may help women with risk management across partner types.

  4. Comparison of tree types of models for the prediction of final academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Gasar

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available For efficient prevention of inappropriate secondary school choices and by that academic failure, school counselors need a tool for the prediction of individual pupil's final academic achievements. Using data mining techniques on pupils' data base and expert modeling, we developed several models for the prediction of final academic achievement in an individual high school educational program. For data mining, we used statistical analyses, clustering and two machine learning methods: developing classification decision trees and hierarchical decision models. Using an expert system shell DEX, an expert system, based on a hierarchical multi-attribute decision model, was developed manually. All the models were validated and evaluated from the viewpoint of their applicability. The predictive accuracy of DEX models and decision trees was equal and very satisfying, as it reached the predictive accuracy of an experienced counselor. With respect on the efficiency and difficulties in developing models, and relatively rapid changing of our education system, we propose that decision trees are used in further development of predictive models.

  5. The Chlamydia type III secretion system C-ring engages a chaperone-effector protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris E Spaeth

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, specialized chaperones bind to secreted effector proteins and maintain them in a partially unfolded form competent for translocation by type III secretion systems/injectisomes. How diverse sets of effector-chaperone complexes are recognized by injectisomes is unclear. Here we describe a new mechanism of effector-chaperone recognition by the Chlamydia injectisome, a unique and ancestral line of these evolutionarily conserved secretion systems. By yeast two-hybrid analysis we identified networks of Chlamydia-specific proteins that interacted with the basal structure of the injectisome, including two hubs of protein-protein interactions that linked known secreted effector proteins to CdsQ, the putative cytoplasmic C-ring component of the secretion apparatus. One of these protein-interaction hubs is defined by Ct260/Mcsc (Multiple cargo secretion chaperone. Mcsc binds to and stabilizes at least two secreted hydrophobic proteins, Cap1 and Ct618, that localize to the membrane of the pathogenic vacuole ("inclusion". The resulting complexes bind to CdsQ, suggesting that in Chlamydia, the C-ring of the injectisome mediates the recognition of a subset of inclusion membrane proteins in complex with their chaperone. The selective recognition of inclusion membrane proteins by chaperones may provide a mechanism to co-ordinate the translocation of subsets of inclusion membrane proteins at different stages in infection.

  6. Content Generation and Social Network Interaction within Academic Library Facebook Pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Ginna Gauntner

    2014-01-01

    The use of Facebook to share resources and engage patrons continues to gain acceptance within academic libraries. While many studies have analyzed the types of content academic libraries share on Facebook, there has not yet been a full examination of how this content is generated. This article examined the posting methods, the user responses, and…

  7. Passion for Academics and Problematic Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Alexander T; Razon, Selen; Saville, Bryan K; Tokac, Umit; Judge, Lawrence W

    2017-01-01

    According to the Dualistic Model of Passion (39), passion entails valuing, liking, and spending time on an activity. The Dualistic Model also posits two types of passion for activities: harmonious passion (individual voluntarily engages in the activity) and obsessive passion (individual is compelled to engage in the activity). The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible links between college students' passion for academic activities and problematic health behaviors including smoking, excessive drinking, exercise addiction, disordered eating, and sleepiness, which is a possible indicator of sleep deprivation. Participants (n = 502) completed a survey gauging passion type and health behaviors. Regression analyses revealed obsessive passion for academic activities was positively associated with scores on measures of excessive drinking (β = .15, p= .008), exercise addiction (β = .19, ppassion for academic activities, in contrast, was negatively associated with excessive drinking behavior (β = -.16, p = .002) and sleep deprivation (β = -.13, p = .007) but was not associated with exercise addiction (β = .002, p = .97) and disordered eating (β = -.04, p = .37). These findings provide further support for the Dualistic Model of Passion. Students who are obsessively passionate about their academic activities are more likely to engage in poor health behaviors and, in turn, may experience greater negative outcomes than students who are harmoniously passionate about their academics.

  8. Motivation and Engagement across the Academic Life Span: A Developmental Construct Validity Study of Elementary School, High School, and University/College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    From a developmental construct validity perspective, this study examines motivation and engagement across elementary school, high school, and university/college, with particular focus on the Motivation and Engagement Scale (comprising adaptive, impeding/maladaptive, and maladaptive factors). Findings demonstrated developmental construct validity…

  9. College Seniors' Plans for Graduate School: Do Deep Approaches Learning and Holland Academic Environments Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ribera, Amy K.; Nelson Laird, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which college seniors' plans for graduate school are related to their tendency to engage in deep approaches to learning (DAL) and their academic environments (majors) as classified by Holland type. Using data from the National Survey of Student Engagement, we analyzed responses from over 116,000 seniors attending…

  10. Interaction between examination type, anxiety state, and academic achievement in college science; an action-oriented research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri; Ben-Chaim, David

    The trait anxiety profile of future science teachers, as well as their preferences concerning types of examinations in science and mathematics, have been surveyed prior to the administration - within the various science courses - of several traditional and nontraditional types of examinations and the assessment of students' state anxieties as well as their respective performance, i.e., their academic achievements. Our major findings are that(a)Our students prefer by far examinations in which the emphasis is on understanding and analyzing rather than on knowing and remembering, that the use of any relevant material during the examinations be permitted, and that the time duration be practically unlimited (e.g., take-home-type examinations).(b)Students' state anxiety correlates with the type of the examination, with a tendency towards somewhat higher anxiety for females. The preferred types of examinations reduce test anxiety significantly, and result in higher grades accordingly.(c)The reduction of anxiety and the improvement in achievements as a function of the examination type are far more significant for low achievers compared with medium and high achievers.(d)Although teachers are aware of the student preferences, they persist in giving their students their own pet-type examinations.These results are discussed in terms of the implications for upgrading both science education and college student testing and assessment mechanisms.

  11. TYPES OF ACADEMIC INTERNET-RESOURCES FOR IT STUDENTS’ INDIVIDUAL WORK MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Glazunova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Individual work is one of the main forms of organization of academic process for students of IT specialties. Main practical professionally oriented skills and abilities are retained only due to students’ hard individual work while doing tasks in programming, algorithmization, designing etc. development of effective academic resources will help students to work individually as well as comfortable ways of delivering such materials with the help of Internet guarantees enhancing the quality of studies. Information and educational resources for independent work of students today are one of the most effective means. The technique of creating and using these tools requires constant research through the rapid development of new information technologies. The present article describes the most effective tools and technologies for creating online resources for self-study of IT students, grounded methods of their use in the educational process. The most commonly used tools for formal and informal components of independent work are identified: professionally-oriented sites, massive open online courses, blogs programmers professionally groups on social networks, news sites, and so on. Studies show a significant improvement of independent work of students on the study material by using video tutorials.

  12. Below the Surface: The Relationship among Different Types of Motivation, Engagement, and Performance of Undergraduate Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tzu-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among learning motivation, engagement behaviors, and performance of undergraduate students. 178 junior students are surveyed from five colleges at a four-year research university in Taiwan. The scales of motivation, engagement, and perceived learning outcomes are adapted from the…

  13. Relating mentor type and mentoring behaviors to academic medicine faculty satisfaction and productivity at one medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollen, S Lynn; Bland, Carole J; Center, Bruce A; Finstad, Deborah A; Taylor, Anne L

    2014-09-01

    To examine relationships among having formal and informal mentors, mentoring behaviors, and satisfaction and productivity for academic medicine faculty. In 2005, the authors surveyed full-time faculty at the University of Minnesota Medical School to assess their perceptions of variables associated with job satisfaction and productivity. This analysis focused on perceptions of mentoring as related to satisfaction with current position and productivity (articles published in peer-reviewed journals [article production] and role as a primary investigator [PI] or a co-PI on a grant/contract). Of 615 faculty, 354 (58%) responded. Satisfied faculty were not necessarily productive, and vice versa. Outcomes differed somewhat for mentor types: Informal mentoring was more important for satisfaction, and formal mentoring was more important for productivity. Regardless of mentor type, the 14 mentoring behaviors examined related more to satisfaction than productivity. Only one behavior-serves as a role model-was significantly, positively related to article production. Although participants reported that formal and informal mentors performed the same mentoring behaviors, mentees were more satisfied or productive when some behaviors were performed by formal mentors. The results emphasize the importance of having both formal and informal mentors who perform mentoring behaviors associated with satisfaction and productivity. The results provide a preliminary indication that mentor types and specific mentoring behaviors may have different effects on satisfaction and productivity. Despite the differences found for some behaviors, it seems that it is more essential that mentoring behaviors be performed by any mentor than by a specific type of mentor.

  14. The Relation between Elementary Students' Recreational and Academic Reading Motivation, Reading Frequency, Engagement, and Comprehension: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Rosseel, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates the need to further examine the dimensions of reading motivation. A clear theoretical basis is necessary for conceptualizing reading motivation and considering contextual differences therein. The present study develops and validates the SRQ-Reading Motivation, a questionnaire measuring recreational and academic reading…

  15. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  16. Engaging Ocean Grads As Interdisciplinary Professional Problem Solvers: Why Preparing Our Future Ocean Leaders Means Inspiring Them to Look Beyond Their Academic Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, L. H.; Erickson, A.

    2016-02-01

    Academic learning and research experiences alone cannot prepare our emerging ocean leaders to take on the challenges facing our oceans. Developing solutions that incorporate environmental and ocean sciences necessitates an interdisciplinary approach, requiring emerging leaders to be able to work in collaborative knowledge to action systems, rather than on micro-discipline islands. Professional and informal learning experiences can enhance graduate marine education by helping learners gain the communication, collaboration, and innovative problem-solving skills necessary for them to interact with peers at the interface of science and policy. These rich experiences can also provide case-based and hands-on opportunities for graduate learners to explore real-world examples of ocean science, policy, and management in action. However, academic programs are often limited in their capacity to offer such experiences as a part of a traditional curriculum. Rather than expecting learners to rely on their academic training, one approach is to encourage and support graduates to seek professional development beyond their university's walls, and think more holistically about their learning as it relates to their career interests. During this session we discuss current thinking around the professional learning needs of emerging ocean leaders, what this means for academic epistemologies, and examine initial evaluation outcomes from activities in our cross-campus consortium model in Monterey Bay, California. This innovative model includes seven regional academic institutions working together to develop an interdisciplinary ocean community and increase access to professional development opportunities to better prepare regional ocean-interested graduate students and early career researchers as future leaders.

  17. Relationships between academic performance, SES school type and perceptual-motor skills in first grade South African learners: NW-CHILD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, A E; Barhorst, R; Twisk, J W R

    2014-05-01

    Perceptual-motor skills contribute to a variety of basic learning skills associated with normal academic success. This study aimed to determine the relationship between academic performance and perceptual-motor skills in first grade South African learners and whether low SES (socio-economic status) school type plays a role in such a relationship. This cross-sectional study of the baseline measurements of the NW-CHILD longitudinal study included a stratified random sample of first grade learners (n = 812; 418 boys and 394 boys), with a mean age of 6.78 years ± 0.49 living in the North West Province (NW) of South Africa. The Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration-4 (VMI) was used to assess visual-motor integration, visual perception and hand control while the Bruininks Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, short form (BOT2-SF) assessed overall motor proficiency. Academic performance in math, reading and writing was assessed with the Mastery of Basic Learning Areas Questionnaire. Linear mixed models analysis was performed with spss to determine possible differences between the different VMI and BOT2-SF standard scores in different math, reading and writing mastery categories ranging from no mastery to outstanding mastery. A multinomial multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between a clustered score of academic performance and the different determinants. A strong relationship was established between academic performance and VMI, visual perception, hand control and motor proficiency with a significant relationship between a clustered academic performance score, visual-motor integration and visual perception. A negative association was established between low SES school types on academic performance, with a common perceptual motor foundation shared by all basic learning areas. Visual-motor integration, visual perception, hand control and motor proficiency are closely related to basic academic skills

  18. Process Evaluation of the Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus PULSE Program Randomized Controlled Trial: Recruitment, Engagement, and Overall Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Elroy J; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Young, Myles D; Callister, Robin

    2017-07-01

    Men are underrepresented in weight loss and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) prevention studies. To determine the effectiveness of recruitment, and acceptability of the T2DM Prevention Using LifeStyle Education (PULSE) Program-a gender-targeted, self-administered intervention for men. Men (18-65 years, high risk for T2DM) were randomized to intervention ( n = 53) or wait-list control groups ( n = 48). The 6-month PULSE Program intervention focused on weight loss, diet, and exercise for T2DM prevention. A process evaluation questionnaire was administered at 6 months to examine recruitment and selection processes, and acceptability of the intervention's delivery and content. Associations between self-monitoring and selected outcomes were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation. A pragmatic recruitment and online screening process was effective in identifying men at high risk of T2DM (prediabetes prevalence 70%). Men reported the trial was appealing because it targeted weight loss, T2DM prevention, and getting fit, and because it was perceived as "doable" and tailored for men. The intervention was considered acceptable, with men reporting high overall satisfaction (83%) and engagement with the various components. Adherence to self-monitoring was poor, with only 13% meeting requisite criteria. However, significant associations were observed between weekly self-monitoring of weight and change in weight ( r s = -.47, p = .004) and waist circumference ( r s = -.38, p = .026). Men reported they would have preferred more intervention contact, for example, by phone or email. Gender-targeted, self-administered lifestyle interventions are feasible, appealing, and satisfying for men. Future studies should explore the effects of additional non-face-to-face contact on motivation, accountability, self-monitoring adherence, and program efficacy.

  19. Predicting the Academic Achievement of First-Year, Pre-Service Teachers: The Role of Engagement, Motivation, ATAR, and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurf, Gerald; Croft-Piggin, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Australian universities are enrolling a larger and more diverse undergraduate student population. Counter to this trend, several states have developed plans to restrict entrance into the teaching profession. This study investigates the role of engagement, motivation, Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR), and emotional intelligence in the…

  20. Evaluation of a High-Engagement Teaching Program for STEM Graduate Students: Outcomes of the Future Academic Scholars in Teaching (FAST) Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Vergara, Claudia E.; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Campa, Henry, III.

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions prepare future faculty members for multiple roles, including teaching. However, teaching professional development programs for graduate students vary widely. We present evaluation data from a high engagement program for STEM doctoral students. We analyzed the impact on three cohorts of participants over three academic…

  1. Making the connection: The role of social and academic school experiences in students' emotional engagement with school in post-secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, L.; Oort, F.J.; Karsten, S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the emotional engagement with school of a diverse sample of 909 students in post-secondary vocational education in the Netherlands. Using multilevel regression analysis, we assess the role of students' background characteristics and school experiences, and their interaction, in

  2. Students' Approaches to Groupwork in a Blended Course, Associations with Perceptions of the Online Environment and Academic Achievement--When Is Learning Engaged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    University teachers provided first year Arts students with hundreds of cinematic images online to analyse as a key part of their predominantly face-to-face undergraduate course. This qualitative study investigates the extent to which the groups engaged in learning involving their analysis of the images and how this was related to their perception…

  3. The Effects of the Working on the Work Framework, an Action Plan for Teachers, on Student Engagement, Teacher Commitment, and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, Laurie Christenberry

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the implementation of the Working on the Work (WOW) framework in an elementary school in Northwest Georgia. The researcher examined the effectiveness of the WOW framework on teacher commitment, teacher training, student engagement, and student achievement. The researcher used quantitative and qualitative research methods to…

  4. Why Do Academics Use Academic Social Networking Sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Pieterse, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Academic social-networking sites (ASNS) such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate are becoming very popular among academics. These sites allow uploading academic articles, abstracts, and links to published articles; track demand for published articles, and engage in professional interaction. This study investigates the nature of the use and the…

  5. Patient engagement impacts glycemic management with vildagliptin and vildagliptin/metformin (single pill) regimens in type 2 diabetes mellitus (the GLORIOUS study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Michel; Van Gaal, Luc; Rézette, Ingrid; Daci, Evis; MacDonald, Karen; Denhaerynck, Kris; Vancayzeele, Stefaan; De Meester, Lut; Clemens, Andreas; Yee, Brian; Abraham, Ivo

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the real-world effectiveness of vildagliptin and vildagliptin/metformin, combined with patient engagement, on glycemic outcomes. Patient engagement included both clinicians' engaging patients through education and counseling; and patients' self-engagement through disease awareness, lifestyle changes, and medication adherence. Prospective, observational, open-label, multi-center, pharmacoepidemiologic study of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients treated de novo with vildagliptin or vildagliptin/metformin. Data were collected at baseline (treatment initiation), 105±15d, and ≥145d. The evaluable sample included 896 mainly male (58%), overweight (mean±SD BMI=30.3±5.4kg/m 2 ), in later middle age (mean±SD age=64±11years) patients. Over the three visits, mean(±SD) HbA1c levels declined from 8.1%(±1.0) to 7.3%(±1.0) to 7.2%(±0.9); HbA1c control rates rose from 7% to 36% to 43%. Mean±SD FPG levels decreased from 170(±49) to 141(±41) to 139(±42)mg/dL; control rates increased from 12% to 39% to 43% (all pmanagement of T2DM, especially if part of a treatment program with active patient engagement by clinicians and empowered patients. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contributions of psychological needs, self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and achievement goals to academic engagement and exhaustion in Canadian medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Babenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To investigate the contributions of psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness and coping strategies (self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and achievement goals to engagement and exhaustion in Canadian medical students. Methods This was an observational study. Two hundred undergraduate medical students participated in the study: 60.4% were female, 95.4% were 20–29 years old, and 23.0% were in year 1, 30.0% in year 2, 21.0% in year 3, and 26.0% in year 4. Students completed an online survey with measures of engagement and exhaustion from the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory–student version; autonomy, competence, and relatedness from the Basic Psychological Needs Scale; self-compassion from the Self-Compassion Scale–short form; leisure-time exercise from the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire; and mastery approach, mastery avoidance, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals from the Achievement Goals Instrument. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed. Results The need for competence was the strongest predictor of student engagement (β= 0.35, P= 0.000 and exhaustion (β= −0.33, P= 0.000. Students who endorsed mastery approach goals (β= 0.21, P= 0.005 and who were more self-compassionate (β= 0.13, P= 0.050 reported greater engagement with their medical studies. Students who were less self-compassionate (β= −0.32, P= 0.000, who exercised less (β= −0.12, P= 0.044, and who endorsed mastery avoidance goals (β= 0.22, P= 0.003 reported greater exhaustion from their studies. Students’ gender (β= 0.18, P= 0.005 and year in medical school (β= −0.18, P= 0.004 were related to engagement, but not to exhaustion. Conclusion Supporting students’ need for competence and raising students’ awareness of self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and mastery approach goals may help protect students from burnout-related exhaustion and enhance their engagement with their medical school

  7. Contributions of psychological needs, self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and achievement goals to academic engagement and exhaustion in Canadian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Oksana; Mosewich, Amber; Abraham, Joseph; Lai, Hollis

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) and coping strategies (self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and achievement goals) to engagement and exhaustion in Canadian medical students. This was an observational study. Two hundred undergraduate medical students participated in the study: 60.4% were female, 95.4% were 20-29 years old, and 23.0% were in year 1, 30.0% in year 2, 21.0% in year 3, and 26.0% in year 4. Students completed an online survey with measures of engagement and exhaustion from the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory-student version; autonomy, competence, and relatedness from the Basic Psychological Needs Scale; self-compassion from the Self-Compassion Scale-short form; leisure-time exercise from the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire; and mastery approach, mastery avoidance, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals from the Achievement Goals Instrument. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed. The need for competence was the strongest predictor of student engagement (β= 0.35, P= 0.000) and exhaustion (β= -0.33, P= 0.000). Students who endorsed mastery approach goals (β= 0.21, P= 0.005) and who were more self-compassionate (β= 0.13, P= 0.050) reported greater engagement with their medical studies. Students who were less self-compassionate (β= -0.32, P= 0.000), who exercised less (β= -0.12, P= 0.044), and who endorsed mastery avoidance goals (β= 0.22, P= 0.003) reported greater exhaustion from their studies. Students' gender (β= 0.18, P= 0.005) and year in medical school (β= -0.18, P= 0.004) were related to engagement, but not to exhaustion. Supporting students' need for competence and raising students' awareness of self-compassion, leisure-time exercise, and mastery approach goals may help protect students from burnout-related exhaustion and enhance their engagement with their medical school studies.

  8. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the debate about the marginality of women in academic science has been extended to academics’ engagement with industry and their commercial efforts. Analyzing multi-source data for a large sample of UK physical and engineering scientists and employing a matching technique, this s...

  9. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Meertens, Laurent; Chazal, Maxime; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Zamborlini, Alessia; Despres, Philippe; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Amara, Ali

    2016-02-09

    The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D stands as a "gold standard" for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E) protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation. The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D is one of the safest and most effective live virus vaccines ever developed. The molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of 17D are poorly understood. 17D was generated by serially passaging the virulent Asibi strain in vertebrate tissues. Here we examined the entry mechanisms engaged by YFV Asibi and the 17D vaccine. We found the two viruses use different entry

  10. The Motivating Function of Healthcare Professional in eHealth and mHealth Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Patients and the Mediating Role of Patient Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guendalina Graffigna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available eHealth and mHealth interventions for type 2 diabetes are emerging as useful strategies to accomplish the goal of a high functioning integrated care system. However, mHealth and eHealth interventions in order to be successful need the clear endorsement from the healthcare professionals. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 93 Italian-speaking type 2 diabetes patients and demonstrated the role of the perceived ability of healthcare professionals to motivate patients’ initiative in improving the level of their engagement and activation in type 2 diabetes self-management. The level of type 2 diabetes patients’ activation resulted also in being a direct precursor of their attitude to the use of mHealth and eHealth. Furthermore, patient engagement has been demonstrated to be a mediator of the relationship between the perceived ability of healthcare professionals in motivating type 2 diabetes patients and patients’ activation. Finally, type 2 diabetes patients adherence did not result in being a direct consequence of the frequency of mHealth and eHealth use. Patient adherence appeared to be directly influenced by the level of perceived healthcare professionals ability of motivating patients’ autonomy. These results offer important insights into the psychosocial and organizational elements that impact on type 2 diabetes patients’ activation in self-management and on their willingness to use mHealth and eHealth devices.

  11. The Motivating Function of Healthcare Professional in eHealth and mHealth Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Patients and the Mediating Role of Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Menichetti, Julia

    2016-01-01

    eHealth and mHealth interventions for type 2 diabetes are emerging as useful strategies to accomplish the goal of a high functioning integrated care system. However, mHealth and eHealth interventions in order to be successful need the clear endorsement from the healthcare professionals. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 93 Italian-speaking type 2 diabetes patients and demonstrated the role of the perceived ability of healthcare professionals to motivate patients' initiative in improving the level of their engagement and activation in type 2 diabetes self-management. The level of type 2 diabetes patients' activation resulted also in being a direct precursor of their attitude to the use of mHealth and eHealth. Furthermore, patient engagement has been demonstrated to be a mediator of the relationship between the perceived ability of healthcare professionals in motivating type 2 diabetes patients and patients' activation. Finally, type 2 diabetes patients adherence did not result in being a direct consequence of the frequency of mHealth and eHealth use. Patient adherence appeared to be directly influenced by the level of perceived healthcare professionals ability of motivating patients' autonomy. These results offer important insights into the psychosocial and organizational elements that impact on type 2 diabetes patients' activation in self-management and on their willingness to use mHealth and eHealth devices.

  12. Engaging Students in Online Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egendal, Jeppe Michael

    This study investegates how the educational design of online study activities affects students’ social and academic engagement in connection to their study? The study uses a hermenutical approach, using recordings of online sessions of student collaborations and interviews with students as methods...... for understanding student engagement...

  13. Student Engagement in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    2018-01-01

    Using large scale survey data, I document substantial differences in behavioural engagement (defined as involvement in academic and social activities, cooperative participation in learning, and motivation and effort) and emotional engagement levels (defined as a sense of belonging and well-being at school) between students with and without special…

  14. Group conflict and faculty engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In educational settings, substantial scholarly interest has focused on student engagement as an antecedent for educational development and positive school outcomes. Very limited research, however, has focused on the engagement of academic staff members. This may be a crucial oversight because...

  15. Merits and demerits of engaging in athletic, academic and part-time job roles among university student-athletes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Motoki; Ebara, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Masataka

    2011-12-01

    Although role conflict management is necessary for the prevention of dropout from participation in sports, little has been known about it, especially regarding Japanese university student-athletes. Hence, this study examined the aspects of merit and demerit involved in their performances of academic, athletic, part-time job, family and human relationship roles. The merits and demerits were evaluated using the theoretical concepts of negative spillover (NSP), positive spillover (PSP), compensation and segmentation. In the research, a total of 108 participants (63 males, 45 females) described information about their multiple roles in the Multiple Roles Map (MRM) form. NSP with high frequency rates (3rd quartile) showed demerit that negative condition in athletic and part-time job roles tended to disturb performance of other roles (male ≥ 17.5%, female ≥ 15.6%). The results of PSP showed merit that positive condition in the athletic, part-time job and academic roles contributes to accomplishment of good performance in other roles (male ≥ 19.0%, female ≥ 17.8%). Compensation indicated that negative conditions in the roles were compensated by satisfaction in the human relationships and family roles and private time (male ≥ 9.5%, female ≥ 11.1%). The family role was segmented from other roles (male ≥ 71.4%, female ≥ 68.9%). Sharing these findings will be effective in helping to solve role conflict problems of university student-athletes in Japan.

  16. Spousal overprotection is indirectly associated with poorer dietary adherence for patients with type 2 diabetes via diabetes distress when active engagement is low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew D; Anderson, Jared R; Walker, Ann; Wilcox, Allison; Lewis, Virginia L; Robbins, David C

    2015-05-01

    The current study sought to explore the indirect association of spousal overprotection on patient dietary adherence through the mechanism of diabetes distress and whether the link between overprotection and diabetes distress was moderated by spouse active engagement. Participants were 117 married couples in which one member had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and were recruited from a patient registry at a Midwestern (USA) medical centre. Data were gathered from spouses and patients through a self-report survey instrument. The research questions were answered with structural equation modelling using the latent moderated structural equations (LMS) approach and dyadic data analytic procedures. Overprotection was associated with reduced dietary adherence indirectly via increased diabetes distress only at low levels of active engagement. The proposed model also proved superior when compared to two plausible alternatives. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the nuanced associations among the different ways spouses cope with illness to achieve better diabetes outcomes and the mechanisms responsible for linking coping and dietary adherence. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Spousal coping behaviour can influence dietary adherence among patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, positively and negatively. Spouses simultaneously engage in different ways of coping with partner illness, but little is known about the interactive nature of coping styles or possible mechanisms that might link coping with illness outcomes. What does this study add? Spousal overprotection is only associated with reduced patient dietary adherence when spouses are also engaging in low levels of active engagement. Diabetes distress is an important mechanism linking spousal coping with patient dietary adherence. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Perceived Personality Traits and Types of Teachers and Their Relationship to the Subjective Well-Being and Academic Achievements of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of the perceived types of teachers (liked, disliked and neutral) with the subjective well-being and academic success of their students, and to determine how students come to categorize their liked, disliked and neutral teachers considering the Big-Five Personality Model. The quantitative…

  18. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  19. Academic Freedom: Its Nature, Extent and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Academic freedom does not refer to freedom to engage in any speech act, but to freedom to hold any belief and espouse it in an appropriately academic manner. This freedom belongs to certain institutions, rather than to individuals, because of their academic nature. Academic freedom should be absolute, regardless of any offence it may on occasion…

  20. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  1. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    understanding of science to those of public engagement with science and technology (PEST), and the histories, or genealogies, of such models. Data from two qualitative studies-a case study of one of the United Kingdom'ssix Beacons for Public Engagement and a study of contract research staff-are used......This article uses data from two U.K. studies in order to explore the meanings attached to public engagement. It focuses on two issues of importance to contemporary discussions of science communication: the degree to which there has been a smooth transition, in practice, from models of public...... to characterize the ways in which U.K. academic communities understand PEST. It is argued that engagement is construed as multiple, relational, and outcomes oriented, with seven key outcomes ranging from better research to empowered individuals. These differences are traced to personal and professional...

  2. Why We Need to Question the Democratic Engagement of Adolescents in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isolde De Groot

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 21st century, academics in various disciplines have stressed the need to address democratic deficits in Europe as well as lacunae in the citizenship development of European youth. In this article we explore the value of various types of democratic engagement for strengthening the democratic character of local and international communities throughout Europe. To this end, we present our democratic engagement typology and its derivation from empirical and conceptual research, and discuss several strengths and limitations of each type of engagement. We also explain the additive value of our typology in relation to existing engagement typologies, and conclude that in order to vitalize democratic communities, local and (international communities and institutions also need to cultivate a thick type of democratic engagement among European youth.

  3. A Study on the Prevalence and Correlates of Academic Dishonesty in Four Undergraduate Degree Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Anthony Mujer Quintos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With college students from four different disciplines representing the humanities as well as the natural, mathematical, and social sciences as respondents, this study determined the degree of prevalence and correlates of academic dishonesty among students. A survey questionnaire about the respondents’ personal characteristics and their frequency of engagement in academic dishonesty during one whole academic year (two semesters was used as the research instrument. A Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks test was used to determine which between cheating on examinations, quizzes and/or exercises and cheating on papers and/or projects was committed more often. Spearman’s Rank Correlation tests were conducted to determine significant correlations between the students’ characteristics and academic dishonesty. The study found that within an academic year, nine out of ten students have engaged in at least one act of academic dishonesty. Furthermore, students engaged in more types of academic cheating on papers/projects than on exams/quizzes/exercises. The most prevalent form of academic dishonesty was connivance through the sharing between students of answers and questions to an exam/quiz/exercise that a student has taken before and the others are just about to take. Cheating on papers/projects was committed more often than on exams/quizzes/exercises for all degree programs except for mathematical science students. Only two variables, (1 perception of one’s classmates’ and peers’ frequency of academic cheating and (2 frequency of academic cheating during high school, have moderately strong positive correlations with academic dishonesty. The attitude that academic cheating is never justified, on the other hand, was found to have a moderately strong negative correlation with academic dishonesty

  4. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the debate about the marginality of women in academic science has been extended to academics’ engagement with industry and their commercial efforts. Analyzing multi-source data for a large sample of UK physical and engineering scientists and employing a matching technique...... the presence of women in the local work setting and their wider discipline, and the institutional support for women’s careers in their organization. We explore the implications of these findings for policies to support women’s scientific and technical careers and engagement with industry....

  5. The effects of different types of video modelling on undergraduate students’ motivation and learning in an academic writing course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariet Raedts

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study extends previous research on observational learning in writing. It was our objective to enhance students’ motivation and learning in an academic writing course on research synthesis writing. Participants were 162 first-year college students who had no experience with the writing task. Based on Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory we developed two videos. In the first video a manager (prestige model elaborated on how synthesizing information is important in professional life. In the second video a peer model demonstrated a five-step writing strategy for writing up a research synthesis. We compared two versions of this video. In the explicit-strategy-instruction-video we added visual cues to channel learners’ attention to critical features of the demonstrated task using an acronym in which each letter represented a step of the model’s strategy. In the implicit-strategy-instruction-video these cues were absent. The effects of the videos were tested using a 2x2 factorial between-subjects design with video of the prestige model (yes/no and type of instructional video (implicit versus explicit strategy instruction as factors. Four post-test measures were obtained: task value, self-efficacy beliefs, task knowledge and writing performances. Path analyses revealed that the prestige model did not affect students’ task value. Peer-mediated explicit strategy instruction had no effect on self-efficacy, but a strong effect on task knowledge. Task knowledge – in turn – was found to be predictive of writing performance.

  6. Why We Need to Question the Democratic Engagement of Adolescents in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Isolde; Veugelers, Wiel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, academics in various disciplines have stressed the need to address democratic deficits in Europe as well as lacunae in the citizenship development of European youth. In this article we explore the value of various types of democratic engagement for strengthening the democratic character of local and…

  7. Why we need to question the democratic engagement that adolescents in Europe develop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I. de; Veugelers, W.

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, academics in various disciplines have stressed the need to address democratic deficits in Europe as well as lacunae in the citizenship development of European youth. In this article we explore the value of various types of democratic engagement for

  8. Using Clickers to Facilitate Interactive Engagement Activities in a Lecture Room for Improved Performance by Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Hofman, Adriaan; Naidoo, Ari; Winnips, Koos

    2014-01-01

    What impact can interactive engagement (IE) activities using clickers have on students' motivation and academic performance during lectures as compared to attending traditional types of lectures? This article positions the research on IE within the comprehensive model of educational effectiveness and Gagné's instructional events model. For the…

  9. The relationship between school type and academic performance at medical school: a national, multi-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumwenda, Ben; Cleland, Jennifer A; Walker, Kim; Lee, Amanda J; Greatrix, Rachel

    2017-08-31

    Differential attainment in school examinations is one of the barriers to increasing student diversity in medicine. However, studies on the predictive validity of prior academic achievement and educational performance at medical school are contradictory, possibly due to single-site studies or studies which focus only on early years' performance. To address these gaps, we examined the relationship between sociodemographic factors, including school type and average educational performance throughout medical school across a large number of diverse medical programmes. This retrospective study analysed data from students who graduated from 33 UK medical schools between 2012 and 2013. We included candidates' demographics, pre-entry grades (adjusted Universities and Colleges Admissions Service tariff scores) preadmission test scores (UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and Graduate Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT)) and used the UK Foundation Programme's educational performance measure (EPM) decile as an outcome measure. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent relationship between students' background characteristics and EPM ranking. Students from independent schools had significantly higher mean UKCAT scores (2535.1, SD=209.6) than students from state-funded schools (2506.1, SD=224.0, pschools came into medical school with significantly higher mean GAMSAT scores (63.9, SD=6.9) than students from state-funded schools (60.8, SD=7.1, pschools were almost twice as likely (OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.73) to finish in the highest rank of the EPM ranking than those who attended independent schools. This is the first large-scale study to examine directly the relationship between school type and overall performance at medical school. Our findings provide modest supportive evidence that, when students from independent and state schools enter with similar pre-entry grades, once in medical school, students from state-funded schools are likely to outperform students

  10. Student Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conduit, Jodie; Karpen, Ingo; Farrelly, Francis

    2017-01-01

    system (the university), the narrow service system (the course), and the individual dyadic level of engagement (the student-lecturer interaction). These findings could be further considered and empirically tested in other engagement contexts (e.g. employee engagement, customer engagement).......Universities are seeking to actively and strategically manage student engagement through providing opportunities for students to interact and engage with the institution on a range of levels and in different ways. However, this increasingly complex and multi-layered nature of student engagement...... within a tertiary education environment is not well understood. Through qualitative focus groups and a series of interviews with undergraduate and postgraduate students, this study explores and articulates the cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social dimensions of engagement that depict the nature...

  11. The complexity of obesity in U.K. adolescents: relationships with quantity and type of technology, sleep duration and quality, academic performance and aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, T; Hosseini-Araghi, M; Bishop, J; Yao, G L; Thomas, G N; Taheri, S

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary technology and multiple device use may link to increased body mass index (BMI). The sleep-obesity relationship is inconsistent in adolescents. Sleep duration and quality may have crucial connections to obesity development, particularly in adolescents where sleep alterations are common. Elevated BMI in adolescents may influence academic performance and aspiration, but data are limited. The objectives of this study was to assess the linear associations between BMI z-score and (i) quantity/type of technology used; (ii) sleep quantity/quality and (iii) academic performance/aspiration. Consenting adolescents (n = 624; 64.9% girls, aged 11-18 years) were recruited. The Schools Sleep Habits Survey and Technology Use Questionnaire were administered. Objective measures of height/weight were obtained. Quantity of technology was positively associated with BMI z-score β = 0.10, P sleep duration and sleep onset latency were related to BMI z-score, β = -0.24, P academic performance, β = -0.68, P sleep hygiene in adolescents could be an achievable intervention for attenuating obesity with potentially positive effects on academic performance. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  12. Comics, Copyright and Academic Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Deazley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the extent to which UK-based academics can rely upon the copyright regime to reproduce extracts and excerpts from published comics and graphic novels without having to ask the copyright owner of those works for permission. In doing so, it invites readers to engage with a broader debate about the nature, demands and process of academic publishing.

  13. High school dropouts: interactions between social context, self-perceptions, school engagement, and student dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Anna-Mária; Roberts, Greg

    2012-08-01

    Research suggests that contextual, self-system, and school engagement variables influence dropping out from school. However, it is not clear how different types of contextual and self-system variables interact to affect students' engagement or contribute to decisions to dropout from high school. The self-system model of motivational development represents a promising theory for understanding this complex phenomenon. The self-system model acknowledges the interactive and iterative roles of social context, self-perceptions, school engagement, and academic achievement as antecedents to the decision to dropout of school. We analyzed data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002-2004 in the context of the self-system model, finding that perception of social context (teacher support and parent support) predicts students' self-perceptions (perception of control and identification with school), which in turn predict students' academic and behavioral engagement, and academic achievement. Further, students' academic and behavioral engagement and achievement in 10th grade were associated with decreased likelihood of dropping out of school in 12th grade. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. High school dropouts: Interactions between social context, self-perceptions, school engagement, and student dropout☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Anna-Mária; Roberts, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that contextual, self-system, and school engagement variables influence dropping out from school. However, it is not clear how different types of contextual and self-system variables interact to affect students’ engagement or contribute to decisions to dropout from high school. The self-system model of motivational development represents a promising theory for understanding this complex phenomenon. The self-system model acknowledges the interactive and iterative roles of social context, self-perceptions, school engagement, and academic achievement as antecedents to the decision to dropout of school. We analyzed data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002–2004 in the context of the self-system model, finding that perception of social context (teacher support and parent support) predicts students’ self-perceptions (perception of control and identification with school), which in turn predict students’ academic and behavioral engagement, and academic achievement. Further, students’ academic and behavioral engagement and achievement in 10th grade were associated with decreased likelihood of dropping out of school in 12th grade. PMID:22153483

  15. Good, better, engaged? The effect of company-initiated customer engagement behavior on shareholder value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, Sander F.M.; van Doorn, Jenny; Verhoef, Peter C.

    In today’s connected world, customer engagement behaviors are very important. Many companies launch initiatives to stimulate customer engagement. However, despite evidence that customer engagement behavior also matters to share-holders, academic research on the firm value consequences of customer

  16. The Effects of Different Types of Environmental Noise on Academic Performance and Perceived Task Difficulty in Adolescents With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batho, Lauren P; Martinussen, Rhonda; Wiener, Judith

    2015-07-28

    To examine the effects of environmental noises (speech and white noise) relative to a no noise control condition on the performance and difficulty ratings of youth with ADHD (N = 52) on academic tasks. Reading performance was measured by an oral retell (reading accuracy) and the time spent reading. Writing performance was measured through the proportion of correct writing sequences (writing accuracy) and the total words written on an essay. Participants in the white noise condition took less time to read the passage and wrote more words on the essay compared with participants in the other conditions, though white noise did not improve academic accuracy. The participants in the babble condition rated the tasks as most difficult. Although white noise appears to improve reading time and writing fluency, the findings suggest that white noise does not improve performance accuracy. Educational implications are discussed. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  17. The impact of online brand community type on consumer's community engagement behaviors: consumer-created vs. marketer-created online brand community in online social-networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doohwang; Kim, Hyuk Soo; Kim, Jung Kyu

    2011-01-01

    The current study proposed and tested a theoretical model of consumers' online brand community engagement behaviors, with particular attention given to online brand community type (consumer vs. marketer-created). By integrating attribution and social identity theories, this study investigated the causal linkages between intrinsic motives of altruism, social identification motivations, and online brand community engagement behaviors. The results showed that consumers' online brand community engagement intentions were indirectly influenced by the different types of communities through different levels of consumers' attributions to intrinsic motives of altruism. This study also found that, in the attribution processes, consumers' intrinsic motives of altruism motivated them to identify themselves socially with the online communities they join. Finally, this study demonstrated that the intrinsic motives of altruism and social identification motivations provided strong social incentives to motivate consumers to engage in subsequent online brand community behaviors.

  18. The Type VI Secretion System Engages a Redox-Regulated Dual-Functional Heme Transporter for Zinc Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Meiru; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Bing; Zhao, Chao; Kang, Yiwen; Bai, Haonan; Wei, Dawei; Zhu, Lingfang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Tao G; Shen, Xihui

    2017-07-25

    The type VI secretion system was recently reported to be involved in zinc acquisition, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that Burkholderia thailandensis T6SS4 is involved in zinc acquisition via secretion of a zinc-scavenging protein, TseZ, that interacts with the outer membrane heme transporter HmuR. We find that HmuR is a redox-regulated dual-functional transporter that transports heme iron under normal conditions but zinc upon sensing extracellular oxidative stress, triggered by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond. Acting as the first line of defense against oxidative stress, HmuR not only guarantees an immediate response to the changing environment but also provides a fine-tuned mechanism that allows a gradual response to perceived stress. The T6SS/HmuR-mediated active zinc transport system is also involved in bacterial virulence and contact-independent bacterial competition. We describe a sophisticated bacterial zinc acquisition mechanism affording insights into the role of metal ion transport systems. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence, Motives, and Views of Academic Dishonesty in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Balbuena

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Academic dishonesty in educational institutions is a cause for concern at present. In this paper, the prevalence and severity of various types of dishonest academic behaviors were determined based on the experiences and perceptions of college students. Self-reports on reasons for engaging in a type of cheating or plagiarism were also collected and analyzed to identify certain themes. Findings suggest that cheating on exams and homework is still prevalent, students view these dishonest behaviors as ordinary school acts, and their actions are a product of several factors – teacher’s and student’s incompetence, unfavorable environment, and lenient imposition of school policy. Certain ethical dilemmas were deduced from the results of the study, such as the varying perceptions on the morality of unfair academic manners and the relative importance of deceit over success.

  20. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Fernandez-Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation.

  1. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  2. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  3. Transnational television audiences and modes of engagement: studying audience engagement as a set of experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keinonen, Heidi; Jensen, Pia Majbritt; Esser, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Audience engagement is attracting increasing attention in various academic disciplines. Recently, the industry- and technology-oriented conceptualizations of engagement have been challenged by a more audience-oriented understanding. This article aims at contributing to the development of a more...... nuanced audience-oriented approach. First, we make a theoretical argument by bringing various key theories together and, second, we present an empirical contribution by analysing audience engagement as a set of experiences. Our analysis builds on the empirical material produced by conducting two rounds...... and ritualistic engagement, ludic engagement. We also discovered that audiences at times get disengaged or opt to actively resist engagement....

  4. Administering an Academic Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Donald W.; Sperry, John B.

    1986-01-01

    Clarifies the possible forms of leadership taken by the administrator of an academic department. Discusses such elements as authoritarian leadership, faculty consensus, power and responsibility, input factors, types of decision making, faculty recruiting, and authoritarian versus democratic approach. (CT)

  5. Effects of Type A Personality and Leisure Ethic on Chinese College Students' Leisure Activities and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping

    In an earlier laboratory experiment using university students in the United States, Tang and Baumeister (1984) examined the effects of the Leisure Ethic, Type A personality, and task labels on subjects' task performance. The results showed that the interaction between Leisure Ethic endorsement and task label was significant among Type A…

  6. Game Engagement Theory and Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the benefits of computer game-based learning is the ability of certain types of game to engage and motivate learners. However, theories of learning and engagement, particularly in the sphere of higher education, typically fail to consider gaming engagement theory. In this article, the author examines the principles of engagement from games…

  7. Consideration of Insulin Pumps or Continuous Glucose Monitors by Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: Stakeholder Engagement in the Design of Web-Based Decision Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Hirschfeld, Fiona; Miller, Louis; Izenberg, Neil; Dowshen, Steven A; Taylor, Alex; Milkes, Amy; Shinseki, Michelle T; Bejarano, Carolina; Kozikowski, Chelsea; Kowal, Karen; Starr-Ashton, Penny; Ross, Judith L; Kummer, Mark; Carakushansky, Mauri; Lyness, D'Arcy; Brinkman, William; Pierce, Jessica; Fiks, Alexander; Christofferson, Jennifer; Rafalko, Jessica; Lawson, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the stakeholder-driven design, development, and testing of web-based, multimedia decision aids for youth with type 1 diabetes who are considering the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring and their parents. This is the initial phase of work designed to develop and evaluate the efficacy of these decision aids in promoting improved decision-making engagement with use of a selected device. Qualitative interviews of 36 parents and adolescents who had previously faced these decisions and 12 health care providers defined the content, format and structure of the decision aids. Experts in children's health media helped the research team to plan, create, and refine multimedia content and its presentation. A web development firm helped organize the content into a user-friendly interface and enabled tracking of decision aid utilization. Throughout, members of the research team, adolescents, parents, and 3 expert consultants offered perspectives about the website content, structure, and function until the design was complete. With the decision aid websites completed, the next phase of the project is a randomized controlled trial of usual clinical practice alone or augmented by use of the decision aid websites. Stakeholder-driven development of multimedia, web-based decision aids requires meticulous attention to detail but can yield exceptional resources for adolescents and parents contemplating major changes to their diabetes regimens. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  9. Impatience versus achievement strivings in the Type A pattern: Differential effects on students' health and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Janet T.; Helmreich, Robert L.; Pred, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    Psychometric analyses of college students' responses to the Jenkins Activity Survey, a self-report measure of the Type A behavior pattern, revealed the presence of two relatively independent factors. Based on these analyses, two scales, labeled Achievement Strivings (AS) and Impatience and Irritability (II), were developed. In two samples of male and female college students, scores on AS but not on II were found to be significantly correlated with grade point average. Responses to a health survey, on the other hand, indicated that frequency of physical complaints was significantly correlated with II but not with AS. These results suggest that there are two relatively independent factors in the Type A pattern that have differential effects on performance and health. Future research on the personality factors related to coronary heart disease and other disorders might more profitably focus on the syndrome reflected in the II scale than on the Type A pattern.

  10. Bioethics and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the events surrounding his attempts to lecture on the subject of euthanasia in West Germany in June 1989. Singer, who defends the view that active euthanasia for some newborns with handicaps may be ethically permissible, had been invited to speak to professional and academic groups. Strong public protests against Singer and his topic led to the cancellation of some of his engagements, disruptions during others, and harrassment of the German academics who had invited him to speak. These incidents and the subject of euthanasia became matters of intense national debate in West Germany, but there was little public or academic support for Singer's right to be heard. Singer argues that bioethics and bioethicists must have the freedom to challenge conventional moral beliefs, and that the events in West Germany illustrate the grave danger to that freedom from religious and political intolerance.

  11. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  12. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J; Koziol, Deloris E

    2013-01-01

    The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (Pinformation-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources.

  13. Engaging with Islamic Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Islamic patterns were a regular feature in mathematics classrooms, and probably still feature in many wall displays. However, as part of the learning process, these ancient designs appear to have lost any significant contemporary appeal. Here, the power of software is engaged to bring the construction of Islamic type patterns up to date. Forget…

  14. Engaging People who Drive Execution and Organizational Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ologbo C. Andrew; Saudah Sofian

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The construct of employee engagement had gained much reputation in recent years among reputable management and human resources consulting firms. Though there is an increasing contributions of few academic research on the construct of employee engagement yet there is a shortage of academic studies on the construct. This gap had made the construct an interesting area of research. Approach: The purpose of this study is to test a model of the drivers of employee engagement on t...

  15. Academic Achievement and the Self-Image of Adolescents with Diabetes Mellitus Type-1 And Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkolahti, Ritva; Ilonen, Tuula

    2005-01-01

    A total of 69 adolescents, 21 with diabetes mellitus type-1 (DM), 24 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 24 controls matched for sex, age, social background, and living environment, were compared by means of their school grades and the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire. The ages of the children at the time of the diagnosis of the disease and its…

  16. Workplace engagement and workers' compensation claims as predictors for patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Jonathon; Baqai, Waheed; Witters, Dan; Harter, Jim; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Kanitkar, Kirti; Pappas, James

    2012-12-01

    Demonstrate the relationship between employee engagement and workplace safety for predicting patient safety culture. Patient safety is an issue for the U.S. health-care system, and health care has some of the highest rates of nonfatal workplace injuries. Understanding the types of injuries sustained by health-care employees, the type of safety environment employees of health-care organizations work in, and how employee engagement affects patient safety is vital to improving the safety of both employees and patients. The Gallup Q survey and an approved, abbreviated, and validated subset of questions from the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture were administered to staff at a large tertiary academic medical center in 2007 and 2009. After controlling for demographic variables, researchers conducted a longitudinal, hierarchical linear regression analysis to study the unique contributions of employee engagement, changes in employee engagement, and employee safety in predicting patient safety culture. Teams with higher baseline engagement, more positive change in engagement, fewer workers' compensation claims, and fewer part-time associates in previous years had stronger patient safety cultures in 2009. Baseline engagement and change in engagement were the strongest independent predictors of patient safety culture in 2009. Engagement and compensation claims were additive and complimentary predictors, independent of other variables in the analysis, including the demographic composition of the workgroups in the study. A synergistic effect exists between employee engagement and decreased levels of workers' compensation claims for improving patient safety culture. Organizations can improve engagement and implement safety policies, procedures, and devices for employees with an ultimate effect of improving patient safety culture.

  17. Work and organisation engagement : Aligning research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farndale, E.; Beijer, S.E.; van Veldhoven, M.J.P.M.; Kelliher, C.; Hope Hailey, V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, work engagement has been the domain of academics whilst organisation engagement has been the focus of practice. The purpose of this paper is to address the growing divide by exploring the construct clarity and discriminant validity of work and organisation engagement simultaneously,

  18. Situating Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias

    Our mobile phone is with us at all times. Habitually, we pick it up in the morning and carry it around on our daily routes and routines. Increasingly, we use it to locate ourselves and the things and people around us. With ubiquitous computing, technology is moving into the very fabric of our....... First, situationally appropriate forms of engagement that align well with citizens’ own conceptions are necessary in order to provide relevance and meaning of issues in the moment. Second, situated engagement requires a technological setup which facilitates the co-location of people, place...... with sophisticated prototypes in the wild. It proposes walkshops as a technique for collaborative exploration within actual outdoor environments and the use of field trials as part of an iterative design process in order to look ahead toward use practices that are still in the making....

  19. Outcomes after 18 months of eliglustat therapy in treatment-naïve adults with Gaucher disease type 1: The phase 3 ENGAGE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K; Lukina, Elena; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Shankar, Suma P; Baris, Hagit; Ghosn, Marwan; Mehta, Atul; Packman, Seymour; Pastores, Gregory; Petakov, Milan; Assouline, Sarit; Balwani, Manisha; Danda, Sumita; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Ortega, Andres; Gaemers, Sebastiaan J M; Tayag, Regina; Peterschmitt, M Judith

    2017-11-01

    Eliglustat, an oral substrate reduction therapy, is a first-line treatment for adults with Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) who are poor, intermediate, or extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers (>90% of patients). In the primary analysis of the Phase 3 ENGAGE trial (NCT00891202), eliglustat treatment for 9 months resulted in significant reductions in spleen and liver volumes and increases in hemoglobin concentration and platelet count compared with placebo. We report 18-month outcomes of patients who entered the trial extension period, in which all patients received eliglustat. Of 40 trial patients, 39 entered the extension period, and 38 completed 18 months. Absolute values and percent change over time were determined for spleen and liver volume, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, bone mineral density, bone marrow burden, and Gaucher disease biomarkers. For patients randomized to eliglustat in the double-blind period, continuing treatment with eliglustat for 9 more months resulted in incremental improvement of all disease parameters. For patients randomized to placebo in the double-blind period, eliglustat treatment during the 9-month, open-label period resulted in significant decrease of spleen and liver volumes and significant increase of hemoglobin and platelets, with a similar rate of change to patients who had received eliglustat in the double-blind period. Eliglustat treatment was also associated with improvement in bone marrow burden score, bone mineral density, and established biomarkers of Gaucher disease, including reduction of the bioactive lipid, glucosylsphingosine. These findings underscore the efficacy of eliglustat in treatment-naïve patients. Eliglustat was well-tolerated, and there were no new safety concerns with longer-term exposure. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Triple Nexus: Improving STEM Teaching through a Research-Public Engagement-Teaching Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, E.; McArthur, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this Reflection on Practice we propose a triple nexus of research, public engagement and teaching that could provide a new pathway for academic developers to enable greater engagement in learning and teaching issues from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) academics. We argue that the public engagement activities demanded…

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Portuguese Version of the Student Engagement Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Machado Vaz, Filipa; Dias, Paulo C.; Petracchi, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Student engagement is an emergent research domain in educational psychology, as research increasingly supports the connection between academic achievement, school-related behaviours, and student engagement. In spite of the important role of student engagement in academic achievement across cultures, little is known about the cross-cultural…

  2. Engaging Siblingships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva; Palludan, Charlotte; Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by sociological and anthropological family studies, our point of departure is that there is neither a given nor an unequivocal prototype of sibling relationships. On the basis of qualitative interviews, dialogues and filmed observations of everyday life, we investigate how children...... and young people in contemporary Denmark engage emotionally in sibling relationships. It emerges that siblingships inevitably involve frictions in various forms. In the article, we analyse the impact frictions have on social relations and discuss how such dynamics in sibling relationships both reflect...

  3. Academic-Business Cooperations in Biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Lee N.; Lotz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Academic scientists are under increasing pressure to engage in more commercially"relevant" research, through either patenting and licensing research results, or research cooperations. This paper seeks to add to our understanding of academic-business collaborations (contract research, joint resear...

  4. The Challenges of OER to Academic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Tom; Holding, Richard; Howell, Anna; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which Open Educational Resources (OER) reflect the values of its institutional provider depends on questions of economics and the level of support amongst its academics. For project managers establishing OER repositories, the latter question--how to cultivate, nurture and maintain academic engagement--is critical. Whilst…

  5. Doing Academic Writing Differently: A Feminist Bricolage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handforth, Rachel; Taylor, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    This article emerged as the product of a collaboration between two individuals at different stages of our academic careers, one a beginning researcher and the other a senior academic. Written as an experimental "bricolage", the article weaves together two main threads to chart our engagements with feminist research and with writing…

  6. A Sustainability Education Academic Development Framework (SEAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Academic development is one means of reorientating education within higher education (HE) to include sustainability principles. This paper identifies the requirements of academic development programmes that will provide educators with the skills to engage students in the ideas of sustainability and sustainable development. In order to determine…

  7. The measurement of employee engagement in government institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, N.; Ledimo, O.

    2016-01-01

    Employee engagement has consistently been rated as one of the top issues on chief executive officers’ lists of priorities and is a main focus of attention of both academics and human resources practitioners. A number of studies focus on employee engagement in the private sector, however there are relatively fewer studies that focus on employee engagement in government institutions. The aim of this study was twofold: Firstly, the validity and reliability of the employee engagement instrument f...

  8. Academic dishonsty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study attempted to investigate students' self reported academic dishonesty in Ethiopian ... university programs can play a key role in ... serious problem in establishing academic ... and Rocha 2006); Asian-Pacific, ... and self-adjustment mediates the ..... In my suggestion, it is better that ..... Comparative and International.

  9. Achievement, Engagement, and Behavior Outcomes of Youth at Risk Following a Pre-Eighth-Grade Summer Academic Enrichment Program and Participation in a School-Wide, School Year Long, Ownership, Mastery, and Grading Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alati, David K.

    2011-01-01

    No significant differences in beginning eighth-grade pretest compared to ending eighth-grade posttest California Achievement Test Normal Curve Equivalent Scores were found for youth at risk who completed a pre-eighth-grade summer academic enrichment program where comparisons for reading vocabulary t(19) = 0.46, p = 0.33 (one-tailed), d = 0.107,…

  10. Doctoral Students’ Experiences of Feeling (or not Like an Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Emmioglu Sarikaya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper examined the balance and meaning of two types of experiences in the day-to-day activity of doctoral students that draw them into academia and that move them away from academia: ‘feeling like an academic and belonging to an academic community;’ and ‘not feeling like an academic and feeling excluded from an academic community.’ Background: As students navigate doctoral work, they are learning what is entailed in being an academic by engaging with their peers and more experienced academics within their community. They are also personally and directly experiencing the rewards as well as the challenges related to doing academic work. Methodology\t: This study used a qualitative methodology; and daily activity logs as a data collection method. The data was collected from 57 PhD students in the social sciences and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields at two universities in the UK and two in Canada. Contribution: The current study moves beyond the earlier studies by elaborating on how academic activities contribute/hinder doctoral students’ sense of being an academic. Findings: The participants of the study generally focused on disciplinary/scholarly rather than institutional/service aspects of academic work, aside from teaching, and regarded a wide range of activities as having more positive than negative meanings. The findings related to both extrinsic and intrinsic factors that play important roles in students’ experiences of feeling (or not like academics are elaborated in the study. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors should encourage their students to develop their own support networks and to participate in a wide range of academic activities as much as possible. Supervisors should encourage students to self-assess and to state the activities they feel they need to develop proficiency in. Future Research: More research is needed to examine the role of teaching in doctoral

  11. The Potential for Altmetrics to Measure Other Types of Impact in Scientific Production: Academic and Social Impact Dynamics in Social Media and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricato, João de Melo; Vilan Filho, Jayme Leiro

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Altmetrics is an area under construction, with a potential to study the impacts of academic products from social media data. It is believed that altmetrics can capture social and academic impacts, going beyond measures obtained using bibliometric and scientometric indicators. This research aimed to analyse aspects, characteristics…

  12. Relationships between academic performance, SES school type and perceptual-motor skills in first grade South African learners: NW-CHILD study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pienaar, A.E.; Barhorst, R.; Twisk, J.W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Perceptual-motor skills contribute to a variety of basic learning skills associated with normal academic success. This study aimed to determine the relationship between academic performance and perceptual-motor skills in first grade South African learners and whether low SES

  13. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Key words: academic libraries, open access, research, researchers, technology ... European commission (2012) reports that affordable and easy access to the results ...

  14. Work engagement in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagliotti, L Antoinette

    2012-06-01

      This article is a report of an analysis of the concept of work engagement. Background.  Work engagement is the central issue for 21st century professionals and specifically for registered nurses. Conceptual clarity about work engagement gives empirical direction for future research and a theoretical underpinning for the myriad studies about nurses and their work environment.   Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis was used. Nursing, business, psychology and health sciences databases were searched using Science Direct, CINAHL, OVID, Academic One File, ABI INFORM and PsycINFO for publications that were: written in English, published between 1990 and 2010, and described or studied work engagement in any setting with any population.   Work engagement is a positive, fulfilling state of mind about work that is characterized by vigour, dedication and absorption. Trust (organizationally, managerially and collegially) and autonomy are the antecedents of work engagement. The outcomes of nurses' work engagement are higher levels of personal initiative that are contagious, decreased hospital mortality rates and significantly higher financial profitability of organizations.   When work engagement is conceptually removed from a transactional job demands-resources model, the relational antecedents of trust and autonomy have greater explanatory power for work engagement in nurses. Untangling the antecedents, attributes and outcomes of work engagement is important to future research efforts. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Study engagement and burnout profiles among Finnish higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Salmela-Aro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A person-oriented approach was applied to identify profiles of study engagement and burnout (i.e., exhaustion, cynicism, inadequacy in higher education in a large and representative sample of 12,394 higher education students at different phases of their studies in universities and polytechnics in Finland. Four profiles were identified: Engaged (44%, engaged-exhausted (30% inefficacious (19% and burned-out (7%. The engaged students had the most positive engagement accompanied with the least burnout symptoms compared to other groups. The engaged-exhausted students experienced emotional exhaustion simultaneously with academic engagement. The inefficacious group had heightened experience of inadequacy as a student. The burned-out students showed very high cynicism and inadequacy and very low academic engagement compared to the other groups. Of these groups, the engaged students tended to be in the earlier stages in their studies, whereas the burned-out and inefficacious students had been studying the longest. The pattern suggests that students starting out with high engagement and that burnout becomes more common later in the academic career. Supporting demands-resources model, the covariates reflecting the demands were higher and those reflecting resources were lower among the burned-out and inefficacious students compared to the engaged students.

  16. Academic Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H C Felix

    2017-01-01

    Alternative modes of academic publication. What it is: Page for the dissemination of academic papers in alternative formats. Aimed at the diffusion of the idea of open publication, or open access publication, a branch of open science, a multidisciplinary movement that seeks to modify the paradigm of knowledge production that centralizes it and prevents its spreading. Historically, Western tradition has become firmly rooted in the free dissemination of knowledge among peers. However, the c...

  17. Engaging stakeholder networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, A. [CoreRelation Consulting Inc., Delta, BC (Canada)]|[Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Laberge, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Management philosophies concerning stakeholder engagement were reviewed. This presentation provided guidelines for managers working from a sustainability value creation framework who wish to develop more effective ways to engage with stakeholders and high stakes issues that cross political, social and organizational boundaries. It was suggested that conflicts over resources, the demand for participation and the increasing power of Non-Governmental Organizations have all contributed to the increased need for stakeholder engagement. A review of different types of stakeholders was provided. Earlier strategies of managing stakeholders were examined, in which externalities such as environmental cost were not accounted for. By contrast, the emerging management philosophy presented here stressed a recognition that long term survival relied on the good health of external and internal environments. Core business strategies were discussed with reference to core values. It was suggested that a longer term focus, inclusiveness, and integration were beneficial to businesses as a whole. A case study of Clayoquot Sound was presented. The concept of social capital was examined. Individual and collective learning were evaluated. A model for engaging stakeholder networks was presented as well as a step by step procedural guide, which included the creation of a solid foundation; organizational alignment; strategy; the importance of asking questions; trust building; evaluation; and renewal. Challenges to stakeholder engagement included finding resources; ensuring consistency; patience; a tendency in business to measure success in short term payoffs; and maintaining a stakeholder perspective. It was concluded that the benefits of a sustainability value creation framework for businesses far outweighed any initial disadvantages. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. Academic Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Daniela ZECA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Marketing is an investment in a future dominated by The Forth Industrial Revolution and Globalization and not an expense. This aspect will basically alter our way to teach and to learn. In its dimensions, arguably changes will be like anything we has seen before. We try to assess how will be all unfold but, anyway, academic field response at this challenge should be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders both public and private sectors, because these changes herald upheaval of whole organizations. The educational service is a special one, delivered today but with effects in the future, the future of the individual, the future of generation, the future of nations. The educational service policy adapted to the requirements of time, brings to the front the opportunity of academic marketing. To analyze demand in a professional way, to measure trends and correlated university programs with the forecast demand for jobs, it is the subject. In the case of academic education, we are talking also about cost, distribution and promotion policies, but being a special service we also discuss about ethic boundaries. This work is an open chapter focusing studies on academic megamarketing, the work keeping up with the pace of change, students enrolment mobility, overtakes job market, and an imposed win-win-win formula, applied for students, local community and academic field.

  19. Academic Work and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Reading current accounts of higher education demonstrates the flux and damage of rapid neoliberal changes to the type and conduct of academic work. Opening the Times Higher Education magazine on the 28 April 2011 shows articles about cuts in staffing and undergraduate provision in England, concerns about the quality of for-profit higher education…

  20. Beyond the Classroom Wall: Community Engagement Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Lai, Shu-Chuan; Wang, Chao-Min

    2016-01-01

    This study (n = 11) examined active community-school collaborative classes using sociocultural constructivist approaches over an academic year in an early childhood institute. A semi-formal interview was conducted to describing how the early childhood teachers and community members worked collaboratively to develop community engagement activities…

  1. Supporting Academic Language Development in Elementary Science: A Classroom Teaching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Karl Gerhard

    Academic language is the language that students must engage in while participating in the teaching and learning that takes place in school (Schleppegrell, 2012) and science as a content area presents specific challenges and opportunities for students to engage with language (Buxton & Lee, 2014; Gee, 2005). In order for students to engage authentically and fully in the science learning that will take place in their classrooms, it is important that they develop their abilities to use science academic language (National Research Council, 2012). For this to occur, teachers must provide support to their students in developing the science academic language they will encounter in their classrooms. Unfortunately, this type of support remains a challenge for many teachers (Baecher, Farnsworth, & Ediger, 2014; Bigelow, 2010; Fisher & Frey, 2010) and teachers must receive professional development that supports their abilities to provide instruction that supports and scaffolds students' science academic language use and development. This study investigates an elementary science teacher's engagement in an instructional coaching partnership to explore how that teacher planned and implemented scaffolds for science academic language. Using a theoretical framework that combines the literature on scaffolding (Bunch, Walqui, & Kibler, 2015; Gibbons, 2015; Sharpe, 2001/2006) and instructional coaching (Knight, 2007/2009), this study sought to understand how an elementary science teacher plans and implements scaffolds for science academic language, and the resources that assisted the teacher in planning those scaffolds. The overarching goal of this work is to understand how elementary science teachers can scaffold language in their classroom, and how they can be supported in that work. Using a classroom teaching experiment methodology (Cobb, 2000) and constructivist grounded theory methods (Charmaz, 2014) for analysis, this study examined coaching conversations and classroom

  2. Embedding the Scholarship of Engagement at a Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Patrick A.; Else, Fabienne C.; Smith, Kylie M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite receiving growing international recognition and regard, the scholarship of engagement remains undervalued internally at academic institutions, especially in relation to career development and academic promotion. This form of scholarship presents difficulties relating to evaluation, assessment, and evidencing that are not generally present…

  3. Does Sedentary Behavior Predict Academic Performance in Adolescents or the Other Way Round? A Longitudinal Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizandra, Jorge; Devís-Devís, José; Pérez-Gimeno, Esther; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Peiró-Velert, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether adolescents' time spent on sedentary behaviors (academic, technological-based and social-based activities) was a better predictor of academic performance than the reverse. A cohort of 755 adolescents participated in a three-year period study. Structural Equation Modeling techniques were used to test plausible causal hypotheses. Four competing models were analyzed to determine which model best fitted the data. The Best Model was separately tested by gender. The Best Model showed that academic performance was a better predictor of sedentary behaviors than the other way round. It also indicated that students who obtained excellent academic results were more likely to succeed academically three years later. Moreover, adolescents who spent more time in the three different types of sedentary behaviors were more likely to engage longer in those sedentary behaviors after the three-year period. The better the adolescents performed academically, the less time they devoted to social-based activities and more to academic activities. An inverse relationship emerged between time dedicated to technological-based activities and academic sedentary activities. A moderating auto-regressive effect by gender indicated that boys were more likely to spend more time on technological-based activities three years later than girls. To conclude, previous academic performance predicts better sedentary behaviors three years later than the reverse. The positive longitudinal auto-regressive effects on the four variables under study reinforce the 'success breeds success' hypothesis, with academic performance and social-based activities emerging as the strongest ones. Technological-based activities showed a moderating effect by gender and a negative longitudinal association with academic activities that supports a displacement hypothesis. Other longitudinal and covariate effects reflect the complex relationships among sedentary behaviors and academic performance and the

  4. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages.

  5. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fill...... some of the gaps. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was directed electronically towards expatriate academics occupying regular positions in science faculty departments in universities in northern Europe. Findings – Results showed that job clarity was the dominating job factor with strong...... relationships with all of the five investigated work outcome variables, work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and time to proficiency. Job conflict and job freedom had an association with some of the work outcome variables but not with all of them. Neither workload nor job...

  6. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so......This doctoral thesis explores the key transnational institutions of European law academia and their role in the creation of a constitutional legal practice in the European Community from 1961 to 1993. Consisting of three case studies, it investigates the transnational federation gathering...

  7. Scaffolding student engagement via online peer learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M M; Bates, S P; Galloway, K W; Galloway, R K; Hardy, J A; Kay, A E; Kirsop, P; McQueen, H A

    2014-01-01

    We describe one aspect of a UK inter-institutional project wherein an online tool was used to support student generation of multiple choice questions. Across three universities and in five modules in physics, chemistry and biology, we introduced the PeerWise online system as a summative assessment tool in our classes, the desire being to increase student engagement, academic attainment and level of cognitive challenge. Engagement with the system was high with many students exceeding the minimum requirements set out in the assessment criteria. We explore the nature of student engagement and describe a working model to enable high-impact student-learning and academic gain with minimal instructor intervention. (paper)

  8. Socially responsible investment engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessling, T.; Buijter, Bas; Freeman, R.E.; Kujala, J.; Sachs, S.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores engagement in socially responsible investment (SRI) processes. More specifically, it researches the impact of shareholder salience on the success of engagement activities. The research question asks: What is the relationship between shareholder salience and engagement effort

  9. Exploring the academic invisible web

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The Invisible Web is often discussed in the academic context, where its contents (mainly in the form of databases) are of great importance. But this discussion is mainly based on some seminal research done by Sherman and Price (2001) and Bergman (2001), respectively. We focus on the types of Invisible Web content relevant for academics and the improvements made by search engines to deal with these content types. In addition, we question the volume of the Invisible Web as stated by Bergman. Ou...

  10. Process into Products: Supporting Teachers to Engage Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the need for novice teachers to receive exposure and experiences related to family engagement as part of their academic preparation to better facilitate their actual parent involvement practices. In a graduate-level parent involvement in education course, early childhood educators had an opportunity to engage in a variety of…

  11. Comparing Community College Student and Faculty Perceptions of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn-Carter, Darian

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare faculty and student perceptions of "student engagement" at a mid-Atlantic community college to determine the level of correlation between student experiences and faculty practices in five benchmark areas of student engagement: "academic challenge, student-faculty interaction,…

  12. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  13. Student Engagement and Classroom Variables in Improving Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Young

    2005-01-01

    The study explored how much student engagement and classroom variables predicted student achievement in mathematics. Since students were nested within a classroom, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was employed for the analysis. The results indicated that student engagement had positive effects on student academic growth per month in math after…

  14. Young Children Playing Together: A Choice of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Babs

    2018-01-01

    This article highlights the findings of an empirical research project, using an ethnographic approach, taking place over one academic year. It investigates the different forms of engagement that children may present, when acting in free play situations in a nursery in NW England, without direct adult intervention. This range of engagement includes…

  15. Staying on Track for High School Graduation: Promoting Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Karen E.; Christenson, Sandra L.

    2009-01-01

    Students' engagement at school has emerged as a critical factor across hundreds of dropout prevention and recovery programs in the United States. By supporting and improving academic, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional engagement, we can mitigate the risk of dropping out. This article describes the history of school dropout, predictors of…

  16. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jayakumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried out to find out the possible relationship between schooling background and academic achievement of agriculture students. The students admitted in Adhiparasakthi Agricultural College, Kalavai, Vellore between 1999 and 2009 formed the subjects of the study. Findings of the study revealed that determinants like gender, type of school and stream of education had a significant role in the academic achievement of the students. Medium of instruction in HSC did influence the academic achievement but not significantly. It was also found that students who performed well in their HSC did perform well in their undergraduate programme also. This confirms that previous educational outcomes are the most important indicators of student’s future achievement and schooling background has a significant role in academic achievement of students.

  17. Engaging Students Emotionally: The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Predicting Cognitive and Affective Engagement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Rebecca; Egan, Arlene; Hyland, Philip; Maguire, Phil

    2017-01-01

    Student engagement is a key predictor of academic performance, persistence and retention in higher education. While many studies have identified how aspects of the college environment influence engagement, fewer have specifically focused on emotional intelligence (EI). In this study, we sought to explore whether EI could predict cognitive and/or…

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  19. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  20. Academic Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  1. Accessing Fellow Academics as Research Participants: Constraints, Collegiality, and “Academic Citizenship”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyan Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss some constraints and implications in accessing fellow academics as research participants, a topic that has rarely been addressed thus far in the literature. I will point out that a lack of cooperation from fellow academics may defeat our research purposes, and will survey some studies involving U.S., European, and Chinese academics as research participants to illustrate education researchers’ efforts to work with fellow academics against the odds. By referencing my personal experience of engaging with Chinese academics, I will then discuss the role of personal contacts in research and reflect upon various constraints in accessing fellow academics as research participants. I will suggest that, when we do participate in a fellow researcher’s project, the incentive is a desire to support our peers in the spirit of “academic citizenship.”

  2. Engaging EFL Students in E-Books Using Reader-Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Chia

    2015-01-01

    E-book reading is generally considered suboptimal because people engaging in e-book reading tend to browse through digital texts. As a result, studies concerning students' e-book preference in academic contexts have shown that students less prefer using e-books than hardcopy books when engaging in academic reading which is considered intensive…

  3. The Effect of Job Resources on Work Engagement: A Study on Academicians in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunel, Mustafa C.; Kocak, Omer Erdem; Cankir, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Conducting research and publishing these research papers in academic journals is an accepted norm in the academic world. Previous studies prove that work engagement is a significant predictor of performance. Herein, the relationship between work engagement, which is assumed as a substitute for performance, and job resources is examined. At least…

  4. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Billig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artículo sugiere que esta época es la mejor y peor para la labor académica. La mejor en cuanto hay más publicaciones académicas que nunca. Y la peor porque sobra mucho de estas publicaciones. Trabajando en las condiciones competitivas del capitalismo académico, los académicos se sienten en la necesidad de continuar publicando, independientemente de que tengan algo que decir. Las presiones de publicar continuamente y promover la propia perspectiva se reflejan en la manera en la que los científicos sociales están escribiendo. Y es que los académicos utilizan un lenguaje técnico basado en sustantivos, con una precisión menor a la del lenguaje ordinario. Los estudiantes de postgrado han sido educados en esta manera de escribir como una condición previa a iniciarse en las ciencias sociales. Así, la naturaleza misma del capitalismo académico no sólo determina las condiciones en las que los académicos trabajan, sino que también afecta su manera de escribir.


    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scientists are writing. Academics use a noun-based technical language, which is less precise than ordinary language. Postgraduates are taught this way of writing as a precondition for entering the social sciences. In this way, the nature of academic capitalism not only determines the conditions under which academics are working but it affects the way that they are writing.

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SATISFACTION WITH LIFE AND EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Vorina

    2013-01-01

    Modern organizations need dedicated employees who are engaged with their work. The theme of employee engagement has generated a great deal of attention among many human resource practitioners and academic researchers across the world. In this paper we present an analysis the relationship between satisfaction with life and employee engagement in a casual sample of 1006 respondents in Slovenia. Based on multipla linear regression analysis, we found that relation betwe...

  6. Data-informed nudges for student engagement and success

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Jason; Leichtweis, Steve; Liu, Danny; Blumenstein, Marion; Richards, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    Student engagement has never mattered more in college and university education. While the problem of low engagement and underachievement may differ greatly depending on learning contexts their relationship is well-established. Increasingly, digital technologies have allowed teachers to utilize actionable insights gleaned from data about learner engagement and performance to influence students’ choices on regulating their learning behaviour towards academic success. In this context, we apply t...

  7. A Coaching by Telephone Intervention for Veterans and Care Team Engagement (ACTIVATE): A study protocol for a Hybrid Type I effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddone, Eugene Z; Damschroder, Laura J; Gierisch, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren; Fagerlin, Angela; Sanders, Linda; Sparks, Jordan; Turner, Marsha; May, Carrie; McCant, Felicia; Curry, David; White-Clark, Courtney; Juntilla, Karen

    2017-04-01

    A large proportion of deaths and many illnesses can be attributed to three modifiable risk factors: tobacco use, overweight/obesity, and physical inactivity. Health risk assessments (HRAs) are widely available online but have not been consistently used in healthcare systems to activate patients to participate in prevention programs aimed at improving lifestyle behaviors. The goal of this study is to test whether adding telephone-based coaching to use of a comprehensive HRA increases at-risk patients' activation and enrollment into a prevention program compared to HRA use alone. Participants were randomized to either complete an HRA alone or in conjunction with a telephone coaching intervention. To be eligible Veterans had to have at least one modifiable risk factor (current smoker, overweight/obese, or physically inactive). The primary outcome is enrollment and participation in a prevention program by 6months. Secondary outcomes include change in a Patient Activation Measure and Framingham Risk Score. This study is the first to test a web-based health risk assessment coupled with a health coaching intervention within a large healthcare system. Results from this study will help the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implement its national plan to include comprehensive health risk assessments as a tool to engage Veterans in prevention. The results will also inform health systems outside VHA who seek to implement Medicare's advisement that health risk assessment become a mandatory component of care under the Affordable Care Act. © 2016.

  8. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  9. Retreating academics: creating spaces for the scholarship of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , this paper explores particular spaces created to support academic engagement in the scholarship of teaching and learning: the space of writing retreats. The metaphor of 'tapestry' is used to capture the development of a complex conceptual ...

  10. New directions for academic liaison librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Aimed at practitioners and students of librarianship, this book is about interesting and unusual practical projects currently being run by academic liaison librarians. It shows how liaison librarians can extend their roles beyond the established one of information literacy teaching and showcases areas in which they can engage in collaborative ventures with academic and administrative staff. Designed to excite and inspire, New Directions for Academic Liaison Librarians demonstrates the potential of the liaison role and emphasises the need for flexibility, imagination and initiative in those who

  11. Take care of well-being: how facilitators and engagement predict performance of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Martínez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The interest in developing a high quality educational system requires constant research of the variables involved in the teaching-learning process. Among these variables, social and academic facilitators are important because there is empirical evidence about their positive relationship with engagement, commitment, self-efficacy, happiness and satisfaction in the academic context. Moreover, the psychological well-being of university students (i.e., engagement showed to positively affect future academic success. In line, the aim of this study is twofold. First, the relevance of social and university academic facilitators was analyzed depending on the faculty of belonging. Second, the effect of social (e.g., Good relationship with classmates and academic facilitators (e.g., Updated website with new information and easily accessible as well as academic engagement on academic performance (i.e., GPA was tested. The sample consisted of 965 University students. The ANOVAs’ results showed the existence of statistically significant differences in social and university academic facilitators among the different faculties.  Regression analyses demonstrated that social (but not university’s facilitators and academic engagement were positively related to academic performance. Additionally, the interaction between social facilitators and academic engagement was positively related to academic performance.  The effect was also significant when controlling for gender and faculty. The identification of different facilitators allows to develop different activities depending on the faculty, as well as leading to the optimization of teaching-learning process. Moreover, academic facilitators do not affect academic performance. From a practical view, it means that specific interventions can be implemented during the course so that students’ social facilitators and engagement increase.

  12. The survey of academic libraries

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Survey of Academic Libraries, 2014-15 Edition looks closely at key benchmarks for academic libraries in areas such as spending for books and e-books, deployment and pay rates for student workers, use of tablet computers, cloud computing and other new technologies, database licensing practices, and much more. The study includes detailed data on overall budgets, capital budgets, salaries and materials spending, and much more of interest to academic librarians and their suppliers. Data in this 200+ page report is broken out by size and type of library for easy benchmarking.

  13. Facebook use, personality characteristics and academic performance: A correlational study

    OpenAIRE

    Sapsani, Georgia; Tselios, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The present paper examines the relationship between the students personality, use of social media and their academic performance and engagement. In specific, the aim of this study is to examine the relationship of students facebook (fb) use and personality characteristics using the Big Five Personality Test with (a) student engagement, (b) time spent preparing for class, (c) time spent in co-curricular activities and (d) academic performance. Results illustrate that fb time was significantly ...

  14. How Motivation Influences Student Engagement: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sitwat; Zyngier, David

    2012-01-01

    The authors use Ryan and Deci's (2000) Self-Determination Theory (SDT) to better understand how student motivation and engagement are linked combined with Schlechty's Student Engagement Continuum to analyse the impact of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on students' different engagement types. The study seeks to understand which type of…

  15. Beyond Marks: New Tools to Visualise Student Engagement via Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badge, Joanne L.; Saunders, Neil F. W.; Cann, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence shows that engaged students perform better academically than disinterested students. Measurement of engagement with education is difficult and imprecise, especially in large student cohorts. Traditional measurements such as summary statistics derived from assessment are crude secondary measures of engagement at best and do not provide…

  16. The Meaning of Student Engagement and Disengagement in the Classroom Context: Lessons from Organisational Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwant, Paul T.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the popularity of student engagement and, by association, student disengagement, the academic literature is unclear about the meaning of these terms. This review extends existing conceptual studies of student engagement by offering clear definitions and conceptualisations of both student engagement and disengagement in the classroom…

  17. Test Anxiety and Academic Procrastination Among Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Nicole

    Test anxiety may cause nursing students to cope poorly with academic demands, affecting academic performance and attrition and leading to possible failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®). Test-anxious nursing students may engage academic procrastination as a coping mechanism. The Test Anxiety Inventory and the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students were administered to 202 prelicensure nursing students from diploma, associate, and baccalaureate nursing programs in southwestern Pennsylvania. Statistically significant correlations between test anxiety and academic procrastination were found. The majority of participants reported procrastinating most on weekly reading assignments. Students with higher grade point averages exhibited less academic procrastination.

  18. Three cases of engaged research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod

    2015-01-01

    frameworks for the way in which children and youngsters engage in creative practices emphasizing collective co-creation. Theoretically, the article is based on the concept of engaged scholarship (Van de Ven 2007), Practice as Research (Nelson 2013), and types of partnership (King 1998) all of which......The article is a case study of three different applied research projects analyzing and discussing the relationship between practice and research. The three projects are all arts projects occupied with participation in different forms: Theatre Talk is an audience development project conducted...... contribute to the analysis of the relationship, purpose, and outcomes of the relationship between practice and research....

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  20. What Is Student Engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groccia, James E.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter reviews the history and various definitions of student engagement and proposes a multidimensional model from which one can develop a variety of engagement opportunities that lead to a rich and challenging higher education experience.

  1. Student Diligence and Student Diligence Support: Predictors of Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Christon G.

    The purpose of this study was to examine ways in which students can become academically engaged and satisfied with their academic experience. A correlational study, using the survey method, was used to describe in quantitative terms, the degree of the relationships between student diligence, student support systems, other related factors, and…

  2. An Examination of Academic Coping among Taiwanese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Shen

    2015-01-01

    The author explored the relations among Taiwanese eighth-grade students' satisfactions of the basic psychological needs (i.e., the needs for competence, relatedness, and autonomy), engagement versus disengagement coping with academic stress, self-regulated learning, and academic burnout. Three hundred and ninety-six eighth-grade Taiwanese students…

  3. Physical Education and Academic Performance in Urban African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to examine urban African American girls' participation in physical education and its association with academic performance. One hundred eighty four participants completed questionnaires assessing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and learning engagement in physical education while their academic performance was based…

  4. The Relationship between Academic Dishonesty and Unethical Business Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Randi L.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the relationship between the range and severity of academic dishonesty during undergraduate studies and that of dishonesty engaged in during employment revealed that subjects (n=60) who admitted to a wide range of academic dishonesty also admitted a wide range of work-related dishonesty. (Author/JOW)

  5. Is past academic productivity predictive of radiology resident academic productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Stephanie K; Fitzgerald, James T; Boyse, Tedric D; Cohan, Richard H

    2002-02-01

    The authors performed this study to determine whether academic productivity in college and medical school is predictive of the number of publications produced during radiology residency. The authors reviewed the records of 73 radiology residents who completed their residency from 1990 to 2000. Academic productivity during college, medical school, and radiology residency, other postgraduate degrees, and past careers other than radiology were tabulated. The personal essay attached to the residency application was reviewed for any stated academic interest. Residents were classified as being either previously productive or previously unproductive. Publication rates during residency and immediately after residency were compared for the two groups. For the productive residents, a correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between past frequency of publication and type of previous activity. Least-squares regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between preresidency academic productivity, advanced degrees, stated interest in academics, and other careers and radiology residency publications. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of articles published by those residents who were active and those who were not active before residency (P = .21). Only authorship of papers as an undergraduate was weakly predictive of residency publication. These selected measures of academic productivity as an undergraduate and during medical school are not helpful for predicting publication during residency. There was no difference in publication potential between those residents who were academically productive in the past and those who were not.

  6. Engagement with physics across diverse festival audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph; Stanley, Jessica; Davis, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Science shows provide a method of introducing large public audiences to physics concepts in a nonformal learning environment. While these shows have the potential to provide novel means of educational engagement, it is often difficult to measure that engagement. We present a method of producing an interactive physics show that seeks to provide effective and measurable audience engagement. We share our results from piloting this method at a leading music and arts festival as well as a science festival. This method also facilitated the collection of opinions and feedback directly from the audience which helps explore the benefits and limitations of this type of nonformal engagement in physics education.

  7. The Social Rewards of Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Political interest is a crucial precursor to political engagement, but little is known about how to stimulate greater interest. The article explores the role social motives have in generating interest. A laboratory experiment is used in which it is possible to manipulate beliefs about the social...... rewards of political engagement as well as external efficacy beliefs. Across two types of measures for political interest (self-reports and revealed preferences), connecting political engagement with social rewards led to substantial increases in political interest. Moreover, these effects were...... particularly strong among individuals with low levels of external efficacy. Ultimately, the data provide clear evidence that political interest can be positively stimulated with social rewards mobilisation techniques and that it is rooted in beliefs about the potential motives pursuable through politics...

  8. University student’s engagement: development of the University Student Engagement Inventory (USEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Maroco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Student engagement is a key factor in academic achievement and degree completion, though there is much debate about the operationalization and dimensionality of this construct. The goal of this paper is to describe the development of an psycho-educational oriented measure – the University Student Engagement Inventory (USEI. This measure draws on the conceptualization of engagement as a multidimensional construct, including cognitive, behavioural and emotional engagement. Participants were 609 Portuguese University students (67 % female majoring in Social Sciences, Biological Sciences or Engineering and Exact Sciences. The content, construct and predictive validity, and reliability of the USEI were tested. The validated USEI was composed of 15 items, and supported the tri-factorial structure of student engagement. We documented evidence of adequate reliability, factorial, convergent and discriminant validities. USEI’s concurrent validity, with the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Survey, and the predictive validity for self-reported academic achievement and intention to dropout from school were also observed.

  9. SOCIAL MEDIA AND CLASSROOM ENGAGEMENT: STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Malissa Maria Mahmud; Chandra Reka Ramachandiran; Othman Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of the last 15 years or so, social media have shown many facets—from connecting people on a global-scale, to penetrating aspects of lives which otherwise might have remained private or limited to a small audience. In the realm of education, social media have also begun to infiltrate the academic world by influencing and shaping students’ perceptions and influencing learning engagement. With millions of students and teachers simultaneously active on social networks, it is signi...

  10. Students Engaged in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Emad A.; Groccia, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Engaging students in learning is a basic principle of effective undergraduate education. Outcomes of engaging students include meaningful learning experiences and enhanced skills in all learning domains. This chapter reviews the influence of engaging students in different forms of active learning on cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skill…

  11. Socially Embedded Academic Emotions in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Henrika; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Piertarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2018-01-01

    School is a central arena for a wide amount of emotions. Previous research on academic emotions has, however, mainly focused on achievement, engagement and teaching, situated in classroom. The social embeddedness, as well as different learning environments of school, continue to be neglected in the research literature. Our study focuses on…

  12. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  13. Perceptions of EFL Students toward Academic Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Oktay; Harputlu, Leyla

    2014-01-01

    In this study, data were collected using a modified version of Mokhtari and Sheorey's (2002) Survey of Reading Strategies (SORS). Results suggest that Turkish EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students at the graduate level, while engaged in academic reading, are aware of almost all effective reading strategies, though each one is not used…

  14. Academic Dishonesty of Undergraduates: Methods of Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Michelle; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of engagement in academic dishonesty among undergraduate students at a large urban college and also explored the use of traditional cheating methods and contemporary cheating methods to determine various forms of cheating, the number of times students cheat, and the number of ways students cheat. The sample was…

  15. Crossing Uncertain Terrain: Messages from Male Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keamy, Ron Kim

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, comments made by a group of senior male academics in Australian universities about their leadership behaviours, are considered. Whereas the majority of the men in the study spoke about gender relations, and sometimes feminism in their workplaces, only two of the men engaged in discourses of gender and/or feminism, as well as…

  16. Nudging Academic Science into the Public Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Researchers can be reluctant to work with fellow academics outside their disciplines or to engage the public in their research. Some will even hesitate to work with departmental colleagues or their own students if they perceive a disciplinary gap. Many of today's pressing social concerns, however, demand interdisciplinary solutions and benefit…

  17. Citizen expectations of 'academic entrepreneurship' in health research: public science, practical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona A; Painter-Main, Michael; Axler, Renata; Lehoux, Pascale; Giacomini, Mita; Slater, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Responsiveness to citizens as users of technological innovation helps motivate translational research and commercial engagement among academics. Yet, retaining citizen trust and support for research encourages caution in pursuit of commercial science. We explore citizen expectations of the specifically academic nature of commercial science [i.e. academic entrepreneurship (AE)] and the influence of conflict of interest concerns, hopes about practical benefits and general beliefs. We conducted a cross-sectional national opinion survey of 1002 Canadians online in 2010. Approval of AE was moderate (mean 3.2/5, SD 0.84), but varied by entrepreneurial activity. Concern about conflict of interests (COI) was moderate (mean 2.9/5, SD 0.86) and varied by type of concern. An ordinary least-squares regression showed that expectations of practical benefits informed support for AE, specifically that academic-industry collaboration can better address real-world problems; conflict of interest concerns were insignificant. These findings suggest that citizens support AE for its potential to produce practical benefits, but enthusiasm varies and is reduced for activities that may prioritize private over public interests. Further, support exists despite concern about COI, perhaps due to trust in the academic research context. For user engagement in research priority setting, these findings suggest the need to attend to the commercial nature of translational science. For research policy, they suggest the need for governance arrangements for responsible innovation, which can sustain public trust in academic research, and realize the practical benefits that inform public support for AE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Relationship of Stated Learning Preferences, Personality Type, and Career Background to Academic and Leadership Performance at the United States Air Command and Staff College

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-11

    Kolb envisioned experiential 26 Table 2 Subscales on the NASSP Learning Styles Profile Cognitive Styles Perceptual Responses Analytic Skill...Research Type Theory and Learning Preferences Jung and the Theory of Psychological Types Isabel Briggs Myers’ Contribution to Jung’s Work The Myers...Implications Recommendations for Further Study Summary of Specific Conclusions Discussion Grounded Curriculum Learning Preferences Type Theory Student

  19. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-10-14

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory.

  20. Perspectives of Academic Social Scientists on Knowledge Transfer and Research Collaborations: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Australian Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Adrian; Head, Brian; Boreham, Paul; Povey, Jenny; Ferguson, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports results from a survey of academic social scientists in Australian universities on their research engagement experience with industry and government partners and end-users of research. The results highlight that while academics report a range of benefits arising from research collaborations, there are also significant impediments…

  1. Experiencing type 2 diabetes mellitus: qualitative analysis of adolescents' concept of illness, adjustment, and motivation to engage in self-care behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Katherine S; Brouwer, Amanda M; Fox, Michelle M; Olson, Kimberly A; Yelich-Koth, Sara L; Fleischman, Katie M; Hains, Anthony A; Davies, W Hobart; Kichler, Jessica C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of adolescents diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in terms of how youths conceptualized the effect of T2DM on daily life, adjustment to the illness, and motivation related to diabetes self-care management. The aims of the study were to gather essential information in order to develop appropriate intervention techniques and inform future studies intended to understand the psychosocial experiences of youths with T2DM. Eight adolescents diagnosed with T2DM were recruited from an outpatient pediatric diabetes clinic at a Midwestern children's hospital. A qualitative interview was developed, which was scheduled to last about 30 to 45 minutes. Data were analyzed using the consensual qualitative research methodology, wherein qualitative coders developed core ideas and themes related to the adolescent experience of T2DM. Three main themes were identified, including how the youths conceptualized the impact of T2DM, adjustment to self-care, and motivation to perform self-care behaviors. Knowledge related to the cause of T2DM and adjustment to completing self-care behaviors was varied among youths. Few adolescents spoke about motivation sources, although when mentioned, it typically involved witnessing negative health consequences in family members or friends with T2DM. The data represent essential initial information related to youths with T2DM, which will help guide in developing future studies designed to understand the psychosocial experiences of youths with T2DM and appropriate intervention techniques. Future research that aims to increase internal and external motivation may be able to subsequently impact adherence to self-care behaviors.

  2. Keterlibatan Siswa (Student Engagement sebagai Mediator Kompetensi Emosi dan Prestasi Akademik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Dharmayana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a hypothesis that emotional competencies have indirect effects to the academic achievement through school engagement and a higher Academic success requires higher emotional competencies and school engagement. This study aimed to test the hypothesis. It utilized subjects consisting of 417 excellent students. Psychological scale (emotional competence scale, Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM intelligence test and documen-tations were used for collecting the data. A Structural equation modeling of AMOS 6.0 was applied to analyze the data. The important result of this study supported the hypothesis and affirmed that emotional competence indirectly affects the academic achievement through the school engagement. Based on the result of this research, it was suggested that the efforts and interventions have to include the aspects of emotional competence and school engagement as integral parts of educational program in the school. Keywords: emotional competence, student engagement, academic achievement

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  4. Designing for user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles is concerned with making user experience engaging. The cascade of social web applications we are now familiar with - blogs, consumer reviews, wikis, and social networking - are all engaging experiences. But engagement is an increasingly common goal in business and productivity environments as well. This book provides a foundation for all those seeking to design engaging user experiences rich in communication and interaction. Combining a handbook on basic principles with case studies, it provides readers with a ric

  5. Auto-concepto y desempeño académico en adolescentes: relaciones con sexo, edad e institución Adolescents’ self concept and academic achievement: relationships among gender,age and type of institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Urquijo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tuvo como objetivo explorar las relaciones empíricas entre diversas formas de autoconcepto (académico, social, emocional y familiar y el desempeño académico en lengua y matemáticas de adolescentes que asisten al tercer ciclo de la Educación General Básica, prestando especial atención al sexo, el año y el tipo de institución. Así, se han estudiado 850 alumnos de 7o y 9o años de escuelas públicas y privadas de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, Argentina. Fueron utilizados el Cuestionario de Autoconcepto Forma A (AFA y pruebas para la Evaluación de la Calidad de la Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires. Los resultados indicaron correlaciones estadísticamente significativas entre diversas formas de autoconcepto y el desempeño académico, tanto en lengua cuanto en matemáticas. Sin embargo, los análisis de estas relaciones en función del sexo, el año y el tipo de escuela mostraron que el autoconcepto se asoció al desempeño académico solamente entre los alumnos de las escuelas públicas. Además de eso, para los varones el autoconcepto se asoció al rendimiento en lengua y matemáticas en 7o y 9o años, mientras que en las mujeres se encontraron relaciones significativas tan solamente con lengua en 7o año.The aim of this work was to study self-concept (academic, social, emotional and familiar and academic achievement in language and math exploring sex, grade, and institutional type relations. 850 public and private basic general education students (7th and 9th grades from Mar del Plata (Argentine were assessed with the Cuestionario de Autoconcepto Forma A (AFA and tested in language and math with the Education Quality Assessment of Buenos Aires Government. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations among different forms of self-concept and academic achievement in language and math. Nevertheless, when considering sex, grade and institution type, the self-concept was associated to academic achievement only in

  6. Under-represented students' engagement in secondary science learning: A non-equivalent control group design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann-Hamilton, Joy J.

    Problem. A significant segment of the U.S. population, under-represented students, is under-engaged or disengaged in secondary science education. International and national assessments and various research studies illuminate the problem and/or the disparity between students' aspirations in science and the means they have to achieve them. To improve engagement and address inequities among these students, more contemporary and/or inclusive pedagogy is recommended. More specifically, multicultural science education has been suggested as a potential strategy for increased equity so that all learners have access to and are readily engaged in quality science education. While multicultural science education emphasizes the integration of students' backgrounds and experiences with science learning , multimedia has been suggested as a way to integrate the fundamentals of multicultural education into learning for increased engagement. In addition, individual characteristics such as race, sex, academic track and grades were considered. Therefore, this study examined the impact of multicultural science education, multimedia, and individual characteristics on under-represented students' engagement in secondary science. Method. The Under-represented Students Engagement in Science Survey (USESS), an adaptation of the High School Survey of Student Engagement, was used with 76 high-school participants. The USESS was used to collect pretest and posttest data concerning their types and levels of student engagement. Levels of engagement were measured with Strongly Agree ranked as 5, down to Strongly Disagree ranked at 1. Participants provided this feedback prior to and after having interacted with either the multicultural or the non-multicultural version of the multimedia science curriculum. Descriptive statistics for the study's participants and the survey items, as well as Cronbach's alpha coefficient for internal consistency reliability with respect to the survey subscales, were

  7. The Development and Initial Use of a Survey of Student "Belongingness", Engagement and Self-Confidence in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Mantz

    2016-01-01

    Students' sense of "belongingness" and their engagement in academic study have been identified as key contributors to student success. A short instrument that can identify changes over time in students' sense of belonging to their institution, their academic engagement and their self-confidence has been developed and used in conjunction…

  8. Perceived Instructor Affective Support in Relation to Academic Emotions and Motivation in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiz, Gonul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations among perceived instructor affective support, academic enjoyment, academic hopelessness, behavioural engagement and academic help seeking in college classrooms. A self-report survey was administered to 277 college students enrolled in a teacher training department of a major…

  9. Academic Perspectives and Experiences of Knowledge Translation: A Qualitative Study of Public Health Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Alex; Zardo, Pauline; McKenzie, Donna Margaret; Ellis, Niki

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the views and experiences of knowledge translation of 14 Australian public health academics. Capacity to engage in knowledge translation is influenced by factors within the academic context and the interaction of the academic and policy environments. Early and mid-career researchers reported a different set of experiences and…

  10. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Itwas therefore recommended that efforts should be made to look into other pressing factors like self-esteem, teacher's attitude, student's attitude, parental background among others which may be influencing student's poor academic achievement. Key words: Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination, Academic ...

  11. Customer brand engagement on online social media platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros; Malciute, Justina

    delivers a thorough investigation of the concept and proposes a conceptual model of customer brand engagement on online social media platforms. The study suggests that customer brand relationship related factors will influence the level of customer engagement, which in turn will affect the levels......The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge of a newly emerged concept of customer engagement with brands in the context of online social media platforms. Drawing on the overview of currently available academic literature and the results of a quantitative consumer study, the paper...... of behavioral loyalty and intention to recommend the brand. Hence, this paper is an important contribution to the academic marketing literature in the field of customer engagement, which also provides useful managerial insights for marketing practitioners....

  12. UNDERSTANDING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT WITH SCHOOL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel ROBU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of literature on student engagement with school. There is a large agreement on the predictive role that individual differences in student engagement with school plays in relation to a wide range of educational outcomes and to general adjustment. Numerous empirical studies have attempted to explain how individual characteristics of students (e.g., gender, academic motivation, school-related self-efficacy etc., family environment (e.g., parent social support, aspirations of parents concerning the adolescents’ school trajectory or quality of adolescent-parents relationship, and the school/classroom climate (e.g., social support from teachers and peers, autonomy granted to students, quality of instructional practices etc. impact student engagement with school and the academic achievement/performance. This paper summarizes the existing literature on antecedents and positive outcomes of student engagement with school. The implications for educational practice and policy makers are discussed.

  13. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in face-to-face tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Ruth L; Lewis, Peter A; Windsor, Carol A; Wheeler, Margaret; Forster, Elizabeth; Foster, Joanne; Chapman, Helen

    2011-09-01

    Chronic nursing shortages have placed increasing pressure on many nursing schools to recruit greater numbers of students with the consequence of larger class sizes. Larger class sizes have the potential to lead to student disengagement. This paper describes a case study that examined the strategies used by a group of nursing lecturers to engage students and to overcome passivity in a Bachelor of Nursing programme. A non-participant observer attended 20 tutorials to observe five academics deliver four tutorials each. Academics were interviewed both individually and as a group following the completion of all tutorial observations. All observations, field notes, interviews and focus groups were coded separately and major themes identified. From this analysis two broad categories emerged: getting students involved; and engagement as a struggle. Academics used a wide variety of techniques to interest and involve students. Additionally, academics desired an equal relationship with students. They believed that both they and the students had some power to influence the dynamics of tutorials and that neither party had ultimate power. The findings of this study serve to re-emphasise past literature which suggests that to engage students, the academics must also engage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Academic activism in tourism studies:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Rob; Dredge, Dianne; Jamal, Tazim

    2018-01-01

    and critical narratives of four tourism scholars to describe and analyse in a systematic manner the experiences of these researchers each engaged in what they consider to be academic activism. Our aim is to bring into focus and raise as matters of concern the future of tourism research in the neoliberal...... political positioning; and a critical situated approach to understanding the external influences upon our research and strivings to contribute to the public good. The paper raises challenging questions on the meaning of tourism research and the “public good” in the neoliberal university, and what being...

  15. Marketing engagement through visual content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius MANIC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engaging visual is a must in the modern marketing world. Wide access to mass communication devices, with extended visuals enhancements, made visual content an important point of interest for any publisher, on all media channels. The decreasing costs and huge variety of types are premises for an easy and effective marketing investment, with strong benefits for any company and its brands. Loyal customers are achieved and kept through visual content; the lack of it in the general marketing

  16. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  17. Academic Achievement in Primary School in Offspring Born to Mothers With Type 1 Diabetes (the EPICOM Study): A Register-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Sine; Clausen, Tine D; Vlachová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effect of maternal pregestational type 1 diabetes on offspring primary school performance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a prospective combined clinical and register-based cohort study comparing primary school performance in offspring (n = 707......) of women with pregestational type 1 diabetes with matched control offspring (n = 60,341). We also examined the association between HbA1c levels during pregnancy and later school performance among offspring born to women with pregestational type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Offspring of mothers with pregestational...

  18. Motivational predictors of coping with academic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Julie; Stephan, Yannick; Maiano, Christophe; Le Scanff, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The present study focused on the motivational predictors of coping with academic examination through the test of the contribution of self-determination for academic studies and achievement goals. Coping strategies, academic motivation and achievement goals were assessed among 199 undergraduate students. Regression analysis revealed that problem-focused coping is positively predicted by identified regulation and negatively by amotivation, whereas emotion-focused coping is positively predicted by introjected regulation and amotivation. Mastery approach goals contributed positively to problem-focused coping. Identified regulation and mastery approach goals made a unique positive contribution to problem-focused coping, and amotivation was negatively related. Students' coping actions may vary according to both the reasons why they engage in academic studies and the goals they pursue in this setting.

  19. A Study of Work Engagement among Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gemmy S.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how community college instructors perceive their level of work engagement. Businesses have studied work engagement, but the empirical literature on work engagement of community college instructors has been limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent the type of faculty member (full-time instructor versus…

  20. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  1. Academic Language in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Erica M.; Grifenhagen, Jill F.; Dickinson, David K.

    2016-01-01

    This article defines academic language by examining the central features of vocabulary, syntax, and discourse function. Examples of each feature are provided, as well as methods of identifying them in oral language and printed text. We describe a yearlong study that found teachers used different types of academic language based on instructional…

  2. Distributed academic leadership in emergent research organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Bernardus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis “distributed academic leadership in emergent research organizations" that Ben Kokkeler on October 29th 2014 successfully defended at the University of Twente, shows that a specific type of academic leadership developes, deep in the heart of the university, in emerging research institutes.

  3. Effective Social Media Engagement for Nonprofits: What Matters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Carboni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ public management relationship theory to examine how nonprofits can effectively engage social media stakeholders in two-way communication. Though many nonprofit organizations have a social media presence, there is variance in how well organizations use social media to engage stakeholders. Simply having a social media presence is not enough to engage stakeholders.  We examine Facebook posts of a stratified random sample of youth development organizations to determine what predicts stakeholder engagement. We find the type of Facebook post is a significant predictor of stakeholder engagement.  Longer posts also significantly predict increased stakeholder engagement.  At the organizational level, having many posts is a significant negative predictor of stakeholder engagement, indicating that users may feel bombarded and are less likely to engage.  Increased organizational spending on advertising as a proportion of total budget is positively associated with stakeholder engagement

  4. Approaching Engagement towards Human-Engaged Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niksirat, Kavous Salehzadeh; Sarcar, Sayan; Sun, Huatong

    2018-01-01

    Debates regarding the nature and role of HCI research and practice have intensified in recent years, given the ever increasingly intertwined relations between humans and technologies. The framework of Human-Engaged Computing (HEC) was proposed and developed over a series of scholarly workshops to...

  5. Sexual Harassment, Self Esteem and Academic Engagement as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  6. Adolescent Work Intensity, School Performance, and Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E.; Bachman, Jerald G.

    2010-01-01

    Teenagers working more than 20 hours per week perform worse in school than youth who work less. There are two competing explanations for this association: (1) that paid work takes time and effort away from activities that promote achievement, such as completing homework, preparing for examinations, getting help from parents and teachers, and…

  7. Students' academic self-efficacy viz-a-viz their academic achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self-efficacy predicts academic achievement by influencing the effect of skills, previous experience, mental ability, or other self-beliefs on subsequent achievement. Students with high self-efficacy set challenging goals engage in more effective learning strategy use and persevere when encountered by difficult tasks.

  8. Empower, not impose!-Preventing academic procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Johannes D; Prokop, Philipp; Rau, Renate

    2018-01-01

    In the frame of the goal setting process between supervisor and student while writing a thesis, it is hypothesized that mutually set goals (participation) and writing down the results of the meeting (recording) can prevent procrastination and increase engagement of the student. With a questionnaire relating to the latest written thesis (n = 97, academic sample), the effects of goal setting characteristics (recording, participation) and task characteristics (ambiguity, control) on engagement and procrastination were examined. Results of a multiple mediation model indicate that recording indirectly influences engagement and procrastination through its effect on ambiguity. Moreover, participation indirectly influences engagement through its effect on control. It is concluded that goal setting characteristics and task characteristics can affect student's procrastination. Thus, the present research provides criteria for how supervisors can prevent students from procrastinating.

  9. Final report on a pilot academic e-books project at Keio University Libraries : Potential for the scholarly use of digitized academic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takashi

    This article reports on the results and significance of a pilot academic e-books project carried out at the Keio University Libraries for fiscal 2010 to 2012 to assess the viability of a new model of the libraries providing all the campuses with accesses to Japanese academic books digitized jointly with academic publishers and cooperative firms. It focuses on the experimental use of digitized books, highlighting the students’ attitudes and expectations towards e-books as found from surveys. Some major findings include the following. Users have a strong demand for digitized readings that are rather lookup-oriented than learning-oriented, with greater value placed on the functionalities of federated full-text searching, reading on a screen, and accessing the desired chapter direct from table of contents. They also want an online space in which to manage different forms of digitized learning resources. We investigated the potential of e-books and new type of textbooks as educational infrastructures based on the results of experiment. Japan’s university libraries should need to engage actively in the mass digitization of academic books to be adaptive to the change in the ways research, study and teaching are conducted. We plan to start a joint experiment with other university libraries to develop a practical model for the use of e-books.

  10. Engagement Means Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  11. On making engagement tangible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Spink, A.J.; Grieco, F; Krips, O.E.; Loijens, L.W.S.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this article the complexity of the construct engagement and three theories on this topic are discussed. Csikszentmihalyi's theory of flow is taken as starting point for the measurement of engagement. The measurement of each of its eight aspects is discussed, including its pros and cons.

  12. Rules of (Student) Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskist, William; Busler, Jessica N.; Kirby, Lauren A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Teachers often think of student engagement in terms of hands-on activities that get students involved in their courses. They seldom consider the larger aspects of the teaching--learning environment that often influence the extent to which students are willing to become engaged in their coursework. In this chapter, we describe five "rules of…

  13. Students Engaged in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Channing R.; Wilkins, Emily B.; Groccia, James E.

    2018-01-01

    The role of peer teaching has long been established in academia as a means to foster student engagement in the classroom, increase student learning, and as a way to reduce faculty workload. This chapter highlights the direct and powerful positive impacts of engaging students as teachers upon the student providing the instruction, those receiving…

  14. Exploring the Relationship between Student Engagement, Twitter, and a Learning Management System: A Study of Undergraduate Marketing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Whiting, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Because student engagement is believed to be a predictor of academic achievement, there is significant interest in discovering methods that will improve and increase student engagement at all levels of education. This study investigated the relationship between digital and social media usage and student engagement. In particular, this study sought…

  15. Publishing to become an 'ideal academic'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    over a two-year period in a recently merged Finnish university. I focus specifically on how a translocal discourse of competitive performance measurement and standards of academic excellence are accomplished in the local construction of the “ideal academic” as a person who publishes articles in A level...... journals. While the construct is hard for anyone to live up to, it would seem to be more difficult for some people than for others. The current obsession with getting published in top journals place those women, who are heavily engaged in teaching activities and with responsibilities besides academic work...

  16. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  17. Digital Downsides: Exploring University Students' Negative Engagements with Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are now an integral feature of university study. As such, academic research has tended to concentrate on the potential of digital technologies to support, extend and even "enhance" student learning. This paper, in contrast, explores the rather more messy realities of students' engagements with digital technology. In…

  18. Closing the Civic Engagement Gap: The Potential of Action Civics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alexander; Stolte, Laurel; Cohen, Alison K.

    2011-01-01

    When taught in an engaging manner, civic education can help stimulate and motivate students to excel in other academic areas, while simultaneously preparing them to be active citizens in the democracy. As an initial attempt to more systematically analyze civic education practice, this article presents four case studies of projects in one action…

  19. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  20. Role of Social Well-Being and Academic Vitality in Predicting the Academic Motivation in Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Due to the studentship stressful factors and challenging clinical conditions and internship, the nursing students undergo emotional exhaustion and academic burnout. The outcomes might, also, negatively affect their academic engagement and functions. The aim of this study was to explain the academic motivation of the nursing students based on the social welfare and vitality.  Instrument & Methods: In the correlational study, the nursing students of Arak University of Medical Sciences were studied in the academic year 2014-15. 210 students were selected via available sampling. Data was collected using academic motivation, Kees social welfare, and academic vitality questionnaires. Data was analyzed by SPSS 18 software using Pearson correlation and multivariate regression tests. Findings: The total mean scores of social welfare, academic motivation, and academic vitality were 98.68±13.21, 40.55±5.98, and 18.58±7.58, respectively. There were significant and positive correlations between social welfare and academic motivation (r=0.183; p<0.001 and the subscales including emotional motivation (r=0.103; p<0.048 and cognitive motivation (r=0.154; p<0.003. Due to the lack of any correlation between academic vitality and academic motivation and its sub-scales, the academic vitality could not predict the academic motivation. Nevertheless, the social welfare could predict 33% of the variance of academic motivation. Conclusion: The social welfare plays an important role to determine the academic motivation of nursing students. Nevertheless, academic vitality plays no role. 

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SATISFACTION WITH LIFE AND EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Vorina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern organizations need dedicated employees who are engaged with their work. The theme of employee engagement has generated a great deal of attention among many human resource practitioners and academic researchers across the world. In this paper we present an analysis the relationship between satisfaction with life and employee engagement in a casual sample of 1006 respondents in Slovenia. Based on multipla linear regression analysis, we found that relation between satisfaction with life and employee engagement is statistically significant (F: 381.80, Sig.: 0.000. Among two evaluated multiple regression models, as the most appropriate, the multiple linear regression model with one regressors (satisfaction with life and sample size of 1006. We found out that the engagement of employee would increase if the satisfaction with life increase.

  2. Sexual Minority and Employee Engagement: Implications for Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung H. Jin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing attention given to the construct of work engagement in the workplace, it remains under-researched in the academic literature. Using Kahn’s conceptual foundation of work engagement, this study examines whether high levels of work engagement lead to equally satisfying work experiences for members of the workforce regardless of their sexual orientation. Using the 2012 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS, authors find that while active engagement at work had positive influence on employee job satisfaction regardless of one’s sexual orientation, high level of engagement at work among LGBT employees was less strongly associated with job satisfaction than it was for those non-LGBT employees. Implications are discussed.

  3. Composing for Energy Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Lea

    carefully designed to be invisible, unnoticed, and un-engaging, a green transition will most likely make energy more visible and one of the major challenges proves to be how to re-design for more and for ‘the right’ kinds of energy engagement. This challenge is not only taken up by engineers and policy...... to be a dynamic and changeable ‘thing’ emerging through socio-technical relations and infrastructural environments. As the different cases ‘compose’ relations between people, energy, infrastructures, and environmental issues differently, they make possible specific kinds of engagement and not others...

  4. Measuring user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Lalmas, Mounia; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2014-01-01

    User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online

  5. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  6. Analysis of the Reasons and Countermeasures for Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xia; Bin, Feng

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a perspective of the various types of academic corruption that is currently running rife in society, a theoretical analysis of the roots of academic corruption, and proposals for a number for countermeasures to put a stop to academic corruption. (Contains 3 notes.) [This article was translated by Ted Wang.

  7. Maternity and Paternity Policies Available to Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Ruth Sara

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how frequently parental leave and other related childcare policies are available to academic librarians across the United States. It also looks at the relationships between policies offered and types of academic libraries that offer those policies. The author surveyed administrators at academic libraries serving baccalaureate,…

  8. Improvement in children’s fine motor skills following a computerized typing intervention

    OpenAIRE

    McGlashan, Hannah L.; Blanchard, Caroline C.V.; Sycamore, Nicole J.; Lee, Rachel; French, Blandine; Holmes, Nicholas P.

    2017-01-01

    Children spend a large proportion of their school day engaged in tasks that require manual dexterity. If children experience difficulties with their manual dexterity skills it can have a consequential effect on their academic achievement. The first aim of this paper was to explore whether an online interactive typing intervention could improve children’s scores on a standardised measure of manual dexterity. The second aim was to implement a serial reaction time tapping task as an index of chi...

  9. Barriers Approach to Innovation in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsuan Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in academic libraries is not a brand new issue. Academic libraries can benefit from successful innovation, since innovation is a key contributor to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage for survival. Building on two case studies, 28 participants from leadership teams to practitioners are involved, the qualitative findings identified the specific two types of barriers that academic libraries face by applying a barriers approach to innovation, that’s, environmental and organizational barriers. Especially, seven dimensions of two types of barriers to innovation are found.

  10. Engagement in Digital Lecture Halls: A Study of Student Course Engagement and Mobile Device use During Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn Witecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities have experienced increases in technology ownership and usage amongst students entering undergraduate programs. Almost all students report owning a mobile phone and many students view laptops and tablets as educational tools, though they also report using them for non-academic activities during lectures. We explored the relationship between student course engagement and the use of smartphones, laptops, cell phones, and tablets during lecture. Undergraduate students responded to an online survey asking about both course engagement and mobile device habits. Results show that smartphone use was most strongly related to lowered course engagement and while laptop use was related to lowered engagement, it was to a lesser extent. In contrast, overall engagement of students using tablets or cell phones was not significantly different than those who did not.

  11. Engage Youth, Entrench Democracy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and reluctant to engage in political action. But that is just one view. ... take positive action. For example ... thought. It seems, in fact, that they are keenly attentive to the conditions suffered by Brazil's .... proposed the fusion of the complementary.

  12. Student Engagement with Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-McKenna, Mary; Felten, Peter; Darby, Alexa

    2018-01-01

    Student engagement in the local community comes with both risks and rewards. This chapter explains the cognitive, behavioral, and affective outcomes of student learning in the community, along with noting the importance of preparation and reflection.

  13. The Relation of Student Engagement and Other Admission Metrics to Master of Accounting Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckless, Frank; Krawczyk, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether the use of student engagement (SE) information as part of the admissions process can help us to predict student academic success in Master of Accounting (MAC) programs. The association of SE, undergraduate grade point average (UGPA), and Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) score to academic performance was tested…

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Middle School Science Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aker, Leanna B.

    Researchers and educational practitioners have long been concerned with declines in science engagement reported by students as they transition into the middle school setting. Though the operationalization of engagement is still nascent, an emerging consensus on a three-faceted model of student engagement has recently emerged in the research literature (Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris, 2004). Thus, a synthesis of existing primary research of early adolescents' science engagement under this emerging conceptualization was warranted. The results of this meta-analysis indicate that instructional methods, class characteristics and competence predictors had the strongest relationship with self-reported science engagement in early adolescence. These predictors also show the strongest relationship with affective and cognitive engagement sub-types. Though affective and cognitive engagement were well represented in primary studies, behavioral engagement was underrepresented in student self-reports.

  15. The measurement of employee engagement in government institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, N.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Employee engagement has consistently been rated as one of the top issues on chief executive officers’ lists of priorities and is a main focus of attention of both academics and human resources practitioners. A number of studies focus on employee engagement in the private sector, however there are relatively fewer studies that focus on employee engagement in government institutions. The aim of this study was twofold: Firstly, the validity and reliability of the employee engagement instrument for government institutions were determined. Secondly, it was determined if any significant differences could be detected between the employee engagement levels of the various biographical groups that participated in the survey. A quantitative research study was conducted using a database of a research company. The database in question is made up of 285 000 business people from various industries and sizes of business and who occupy different roles, reflecting the profile of the South African working population. A total of 4 099 employees, of which 427 represented government institutions, completed the employee engagement questionnaire. The results confirmed the validity and reliability of the questionnaire for government institutions, but with a slightly different structure. Some biographical groupings indicated that they experience employee engagement in a significantly different way. The results indicate that the younger employees together with top and senior management experience the highest levels of engagement in government institutions. The significance of these results is that not all biographical groups’ engagement levels can be managed equally

  16. International Engagement Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    agreements and issue legal guidance on international law and intellectual property issues. ICPO will play an important role in realizing this vision and...the U.S. and its partners. INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT VISION The directorate’s vision is for global S&T engagements to take advantage of emerging ideas...reduce risk to U.S. and partner countries, and increase their resilience; and Establish enduring relationships to provide access to

  17. The rules of engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects on the “dialogic turn,” focusing on one analytical framework for understanding the wide range of processes that fall under the rubric of engagement. The notion of power-in-interaction is explored using a case study of informal dialogue, the Dana Centre, London. Using...... that imposed hierarchies are continually re-negotiated. In concluding I reflect on some implications of using power in the analysis of engagement....

  18. Archetypes for Engaged Scholarship in Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Petra; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels; Kilian, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the topic of university-industry collaboration (UIC), a term that is used to describe the active engagement of a company (or companies) in a joint research project with academics. The objectives and motivations of UIC have been discussed widely in the literature and are sum...... present typical forms of collaboration, which we call archetypes, with their defining characteristics and argue that UIC is a valuable research strategy, which we as IS researchers should pursue in order to obtain relevance in our research....

  19. Academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Orozco, Carola; Gaytán, Francisco X; Bang, Hee Jin; Pakes, Juliana; O'Connor, Erin; Rhodes, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Immigration to the United States presents both challenges and opportunities that affect students' academic achievement. Using a 5-year longitudinal, mixed-methods approach, we identified varying academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant students from Central America, China, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico. Latent class growth curve analysis revealed that although some newcomer students performed at high or improving levels over time, others showed diminishing performance. Multinomial logistic regressions identified significant group differences in academic trajectories, particularly between the high-achieving youth and the other groups. In keeping with ecological-developmental and stage-environment fit theories, School Characteristics (school segregation rate, school poverty rate, and student perceptions of school violence), Family Characteristics (maternal education, parental employment, and household structure), and Individual Characteristics (academic English proficiency, academic engagement, psychological symptoms, gender, and 2 age-related risk factors, number of school transitions and being overaged for grade placement) were associated with different trajectories of academic performance. A series of case studies triangulate many of the quantitative findings as well as illuminate patterns that were not detected in the quantitative data. Thus, the mixed-methods approach sheds light on the cumulative developmental challenges that immigrant students face as they adjust to their new educational settings. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  20. The Concept of Employee Engagement: A Comprehensive Review from a Positive Organizational Behavior Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, Chang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Employee engagement has been understood from various academic and practical perspectives, mainly due to its recent popularity. This study explores not only positive movements--positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship (POS), and positive organizational behavior (POB)--as a background of engagement but also the conceptualization,…

  1. The 4Ps of Innovation Culture: Conceptions of Creatively Engaging with Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Theresa Dirndorfer

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a distillation of findings emerging from an ongoing series of investigations of the research practices of academics in a university context to foreground the creativity in our engagements with information. The empirical research involved an ethnographic exploration of the scholarly practices of two scholars engaged in the…

  2. Student Engagement at a Large Suburban Community College: Gender and Race Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontam, Varalakshmi; Gabriel, George

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that there are individual differences in academic achievement associated with gender and race. Research also suggests that student engagement is an important determinant of student outcomes/achievement. The present study explored student engagement at an extra-large community college. It specifically investigated possible…

  3. A Decade of Community Engagement Literature: Exploring Past Trends and Future Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Diann Olszowy; Lee, Joonghee

    2017-01-01

    Academic journals play a lead role in disseminating community-campus engagement scholarship. However, assessment of the content, methodologies, and authorship of this published body of works is lacking. This study was performed to review publication trends in the "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement" ("JHEOE"),…

  4. Gender Disparities in Academic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waljee, Jennifer F; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Kim, H Myra; Gyetko, Margaret R; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Woolliscroft, James O; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    In academia, women remain underrepresented. The authors' sought to examine differences in faculty position and professional satisfaction among academic physicians by gender. From 2008 to 2012, academic faculty members at a single institution were surveyed (2008, n = 737; 2010, n = 1151; and 2012, n = 971) regarding current position, choice of position, professional satisfaction, and desire for leaving. Logistic regression was performed to compare aspects of professional satisfaction by gender. Men more often held tenure track positions compared with women (2008, 45 percent versus 20 percent; 2010, 47 percent versus 20 percent; and 2012, 49 percent versus 20 percent; p Women were more likely to engage in only clinical activities compared with men (2008, 31 percent versus 18 percent; 2010, 28 percent versus 14 percent; and 2012, 33 percent versus 13 percent; p Women chose tracks to accommodate work-life balance [2008, OR, 1.9 (95 percent CI, 1.29 to 2.76); 2010, OR, 2.0 (95 percent CI, 1.38 to 2.76); and 2012, OR, 2.1 (95 percent CI, 1.40 to 3.00)], rather than the opportunity of tenure [2008, OR, 0.4 (95 percent CI, 0.23 to 0.75); 2010, OR, 0.5 (95 percent CI, 0.35 to 0.85); and 2012, OR, 0.5 (95 percent CI, 0.29 to 0.76) compared with men. Men reported higher professional satisfaction compared with women (2008, 5.7 versus 5.4, p women. Women report lower levels of professional satisfaction in academic practice compared with men. Given the increasing pressures of academic practice, efforts to align work-life balance and professional goals could potentially improve faculty satisfaction and retention.

  5. Beyond marks: new tools to visualise student engagement via social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Badge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence shows that engaged students perform better academically than disinterested students. Measurement of engagement with education is difficult and imprecise, especially in large student cohorts. Traditional measurements such as summary statistics derived from assessment are crude secondary measures of engagement at best and do not provide much support for educators to work with students and curate engagement during teaching periods. We have used academic-related student contributions to a public social network as a proxy for engagement. Statistical summaries and novel data visualisation tools provide subtle and powerful insights into online student peer networks. Analysis of data collected shows that network visualisation can be an important curation tool for educators interested in cultivating student engagement.

  6. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffres, Meghan N.; Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled.

  7. Gender Differences in Popularity and Engagement in Sport Activities among Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Majerič

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to analyse the gender differences among students at the University of Ljubljana concerning the popularity of sports and participation in different types and modes of sport activities. The research was done in the 2013 academic year on a random sample of 3% of the students (N=1390. A questionnaire about students’ lifestyles was used (Majerič, 2013. In this study, two variables were analysed: the popularity of different sport activities, and different types and modes of sport activities. The data of the variables were analysed with SPSS for Windows. The basic statistical parameters for both variables were calculated. To calculate the gender differences, a t-test for independent samples and a Mann-Whitney U test were run. An analysis of the popularity of different sport activities showed that gender differences were statistically significant in jogging (p=0.000, walking (p=0.000, football (p=0.000, basketball (p=0.000, fitness (p=0.001, aerobics (p=0.002, and dance activities (p=0.009. Analysis of the types and modes of sport activities among students showed that 63.90% of male students and 68.10% of female students were engaged in unorganized types of sport. Gender differences were found to be statistically significant in two types of sport activities: engaged organized in clubs–competitive out of faculty (p=0.000 and engaged in sport organized at the faculty–competitive (p=0.000. Our findings and conclusions provide useful guidance for the closer and wider professional public.

  8. Academic well-being and smoking among 14- to 17-year-old schoolchildren in six European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Lindfors, Pirjo; Rimpelä, Arja; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Rathmann, Katharina; Perelman, Julian; Federico, Bruno; Richter, Matthias; Kunst, Anton E.; Lorant, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that poor academic performance is related to smoking, but the association between academic well-being and smoking is less known. We measured academic well-being by school burnout and schoolwork engagement and studied their associations with smoking among 14- to 17-year-old

  9. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    the importance of academic patenting. Our findings suggest that academic involvement in patenting results in a citation premium, as academic patents appear to generate more forward citations. We also find that in the European context of changing research objectives and funding sources since the mid-1990s...

  10. The Academic Adviser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  11. The Priority of Intersectionality in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrand, Kristen L; Eliason, Jennifer; St Cloud, Tiffani; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Recent societal events highlight inequities experienced by underrepresented and marginalized communities. These inequities are the impetus for ongoing efforts in academic medicine to create inclusive educational and patient care environments for diverse stakeholders. Frequently, approaches focus on singular populations or broad macroscopic concepts and do not always elucidate the complexities that arise at the intersection between multiple identities and life experiences. Intersectionality acknowledges multidimensional aspects of identity inclusive of historical, structural, and cultural factors. Understanding how multiple identity experiences impact different individuals, from patients to trainees to providers, is critical for improving health care education and delivery. Building on existing work within academic medicine, this Commentary outlines six key recommendations to advance intersectionality in academic medicine: embrace personal and collective loci of responsibility; examine and rectify unbalanced power dynamics; celebrate visibility and intersectional innovation; engage all stakeholders in the process of change; select and analyze meaningful metrics; and sustain the commitment to achieving health equity over time. Members of the academic medical community committed to advancing health equity can use these recommendations to promote and maintain meaningful changes that recognize and respond to the multidimensional voices and expressed needs of all individuals engaged in providing and receiving health care.

  12. The Academic Motivation Scale: Dimensionality, Reliability, and Construct Validity Among Vocational Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Karin Støen Utvær

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-determination theory (SDT distinguishes types of motivation according to types of self-regulation along a continuum of internalisation. Types of motivation vary in quality and outcomes and are frequently used in research as predictors of educational outcomes such as learning, performance, engagement, and persistence. The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, which is based on the SDT, has not previously been evaluated in Norway. In response, by using correlation and confirmatory factor analysis, we examined the dimensionality, reliability, and construct validity of the AMS among vocational health and social care students. Our hypothesised 7-factor model demonstrated the best fit, while the AMS demonstrated good reliability and construct validity in the sample of students. However, some improvements remain necessary. In predicting the rate of school completion among students on vocational tracks, amotivation and identified regulation appeared to be more powerful as intrinsic motivational variables.

  13. An Exploratory Study of Online Consumer Engagement on Social Media and its impact on Purchase Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Teh, Sook-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the social media phenomenon has spawned new ways of communication and engagement for consumers and companies alike. In particular, social networking sites such as Facebook have gained popularity and a strong membership base due to its pervasive nature and opportunities for seamless engagement. However, the concept of online consumer engagement on social media is an emerging construct in marketing literature and remains vague due to lack of academic research and empirical su...

  14. The Academic Ethics Of Students In Principles Of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Bob Brown; Allen Wilkins

    2011-01-01

    Questionnaires on academic ethics were completed by 115 students enrolled in principles of economics at a state university. Ninety-seven percent admitted to having engaged in at least 1 of 16 academic practices while a university student considered unethical in the literature. Levels of participation in specific practices ranged from 20% to 88% and were unrelated to student characteristics. Students participated more in practices they rated less unethical. Primary reasons for participation we...

  15. Relations among Academic Enablers and Academic Achievement in Children with and without High Levels of Parent-Rated Symptoms of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick; Jenkins, Lyndsay N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic enablers (i.e., engagement, interpersonal skills, motivation, study skills) and academic achievement in children with and without high levels of parent-rated symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity (Symptoms of IIH Group). The study included 69 participants (29 [42%] in the IIH…

  16. Youth and Academic and Educational Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Zokaei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The empirical studies undertaken on academic culture in Iran suggest an inefficient academic acculturation and students alienation from the structure and process of a desired academic culture. A sense of powerlessness, normlessness, anomie, social isolation and in general strangement from the self, educational processes, unverrsity camp, academic staff members and also from other students is increasingly growing in the minds and feelings of a considerable number of higher education students in humanities and social sciences. Drawing on a mixed methodology, the following paper aims to reconstruct the phenomenology of academic and educational alienation based on students personal lived experience and narrativity. Apart from accounting for internal and external social factors affecting this experience, we have proposed a typology of the types of alienation experienced by different groups of students and the strategies they have adopted to counter it. Results suggest that alienation is directly affected by culture politics and involves different social, psychological, and economic consequences in their lives.

  17. The Profile of Academic Offenders: Features of Students Who Admit to Academic Dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Liat; Davidovitch, Nitza

    2016-08-29

    Dishonesty in academic settings is a reckless behavior that is unique to students and is associated with cheat    ing and plagiarism of academic tasks. Incidents involving dishonesty in higher education have increased considerably in the past decade, with regard to the extent of these practices, the types of dishonesty employed, and their prevalence. The current study examines the profile of "academic offenders". Which types are more prone to commit academic offenses? To what degree are they "normative" and do they represent the average student with regard to personal traits, personal perceptions, features of their academic studies, risk behaviors, and health risks. The study is based on a structured anonymous questionnaire. The sample consisted of 1,432 students, of whom 899 were female (63%) and 533 male (37%). The research findings indicate a common tendency among more than one quarter of the sample reported cheating on homework and 12.5% reported cheating on tests. Strong associations were found between academic dishonesty and various personal perceptions, the academic study experience, and involvement in other risky and deviant behaviors. Significant predictors of academic dishonesty were found, i.e., self-image, ethics, grades, time devoted to homework, and deviant and daring behaviors. The research findings might help indicate policies for optimally dealing with dishonesty, maybe even before the offense is committed, by means of cooperation between academic forces.

  18. The Profile of Academic Offenders: Features of Students Who Admit to Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Liat; Davidovitch, Nitza

    2016-01-01

    Dishonesty in academic settings is a reckless behavior that is unique to students and is associated with cheat ing and plagiarism of academic tasks. Incidents involving dishonesty in higher education have increased considerably in the past decade, with regard to the extent of these practices, the types of dishonesty employed, and their prevalence. The current study examines the profile of “academic offenders”. Which types are more prone to commit academic offenses? To what degree are they “normative” and do they represent the average student with regard to personal traits, personal perceptions, features of their academic studies, risk behaviors, and health risks. The study is based on a structured anonymous questionnaire. The sample consisted of 1,432 students, of whom 899 were female (63%) and 533 male (37%). The research findings indicate a common tendency among more than one quarter of the sample reported cheating on homework and 12.5% reported cheating on tests. Strong associations were found between academic dishonesty and various personal perceptions, the academic study experience, and involvement in other risky and deviant behaviors. Significant predictors of academic dishonesty were found, i.e., self-image, ethics, grades, time devoted to homework, and deviant and daring behaviors. The research findings might help indicate policies for optimally dealing with dishonesty, maybe even before the offense is committed, by means of cooperation between academic forces. PMID:27569198

  19. A brief report on the relationship between self-control, video game addiction and academic achievement in normal and ADHD students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghbin, Maryam; Shaterian, Fatemeh; Hosseinzadeh, Davood; Griffiths, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, research into video game addiction has grown increasingly. The present research aimed to examine the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement of normal and ADHD high school students. Based on previous research it was hypothesized that (i) there would be a relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement (ii) video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between male and female students, and (iii) the relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between normal students and ADHD students. The research population comprised first grade high school students of Khomeini-Shahr (a city in the central part of Iran). From this population, a sample group of 339 students participated in the study. The survey included the Game Addiction Scale (Lemmens, Valkenburg & Peter, 2009), the Self-Control Scale (Tangney, Baumeister & Boone, 2004) and the ADHD Diagnostic checklist (Kessler et al., 2007). In addition to questions relating to basic demographic information, students' Grade Point Average (GPA) for two terms was used for measuring their academic achievement. These hypotheses were examined using a regression analysis. Among Iranian students, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement differed between male and female students. However, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, academic achievement, and type of student was not statistically significant. Although the results cannot demonstrate a causal relationship between video game use, video game addiction, and academic achievement, they suggest that high involvement in playing video games leaves less time for engaging in academic work.

  20. Linking Classroom Environment with At-Risk Engagement in Science: A Mixed Method Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stephen Craig

    This explanatory sequential mixed-method study analyzed how the teacher created learning environment links to student engagement for students at-risk across five science classroom settings. The learning environment includes instructional strategies, differentiated instruction, positive learning environment, and an academically challenging environment. Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered in the form of self-reporting surveys and a follow-up interview. The researcher aimed to use the qualitative results to explain the quantitative data. The general research question was "What are the factors of the teacher-created learning environment that were best suited to maximize engagement of students at-risk?" Specifically explaining, (1) How do the measured level of teacher created learning environment link to the engagement level of students at-risk in science class? and (2) What relationship exists between the student perception of the science classroom environment and the level of behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and social engagement for students at-risk in science class? This study took place within a large school system with more than 20 high schools, most having 2000-3000 students. Participating students were sent to a panel hearing that determined them unfit for the regular educational setting, and were given the option of attending one of the two alternative schools within the county. Students in this alternative school were considered at-risk due to the fact that 98% received free and reduced lunch, 97% were minority population, and all have been suspended from the regular educational setting. Pairwise comparisons of the SPS questions between teachers using t-test from 107 students at-risk and 40 interviews suggest that each category of the learning environment affects the level of behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and social engagement in science class for students at-risk in an alternative school setting. Teachers with higher student perceptions of

  1. The Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS) Model: An Integrated Model for Medical Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegers-Jager, Karen M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Themmen, Axel P N

    2017-11-01

    Not all students cope successfully with the demands of medical school, and students' struggles may result in study delay or dropout. To prevent these outcomes, medical schools need to identify students who are experiencing academic difficul ties and provide them with timely interventions through access to support programs. Although the importance of early identification and intervention is well recognized, less is known about successful strategies for identifying and supporting struggling students.Building on the literature and their own empirical findings, the authors propose an integrated, school-wide model for medical student success comprising a continuum of academic and behavioral support. This Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS) model focuses on improving both academic and behavioral outcomes by offering support for students at four levels, which range from adequate instruction for all, to targeted small-group interventions, to individualized support, and also include exit support for students who might be better off in another degree program. Additionally, medical schools should provide both academic and behavioral support; set high, yet realistic expectations and clearly communicate these to students; and intervene early, which requires timely identification of at-risk students who would benefit from the different types and tiers of support. Finally, interventions should be evidence based and fit the needs of the identified groups of students. The authors argue that adopting the core principles of the 4T-CABS model will enable medical schools to maximize academic engagement and performance for all students.

  2. Intention to quit amongst Generation Y academics in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anecia Robyn

    2013-11-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate intention to quit amongst Generation Y academics in HEIs. Motivation for the study: Higher education institutions are more dependent on the abilities and commitment of their staff than most other organisations. More than 4000 academics will retire and need to be replaced by 2018, providing justification for the study of intention to quit of academics. Research design, approach and method: An ex post facto quantitative research design was followed. Academics at six HEIs in South Africa were sampled. Measurement instruments included abridged versions of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, Arnold and Feldman Intention to Quit Scale, Job Descriptive Scale and Chew’s reward scale. Main findings: Employee engagement, job satisfaction, remuneration, reward, recognition and transformational leadership were significantly related to intention to quit. In the partial model, three of these variables explained 45% of the variance in intention to quit. Partial least square path modelling revealed that employee engagement and job satisfaction have significant negative impacts on intention to quit. Practical/managerial implications: The findings serve as input for the development of efficacious strategies to retain Generation Y academics at HEIs in South Africa. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to our knowledge of intention to quit amongst Generation Y academics. It provides evidence of the complexity and inter-relatedness of variables in the phenomenological network of intention to quit.

  3. European Studies and Public Engagement: A Conceptual Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müllerleile

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Contemporary European Research User Username Password Remember me Subscribe... Sign up for issue alerts Follow JCER on Twitter Font Size Make font size smaller Make font size default Make font size larger Journal Content Search Search Scope Browse By Issue By Author By Title Information For Readers For Authors For Librarians Journal Help Keywords CFSP Communication ESDP EU EU enlargement EU trade policy Energy, EU, External Policy Europe European Commission European Parliament European Union European integration Europeanisation First Enlargement Germany Liberty Lisbon Treaty Poland Russia Security teaching European studies The UACES Blog The Commission after the 2014 EP... Power shift? The EU’s pivot to Asia 100 Books on Europe to be Remembered For a Global European Studies? EU Member State Building in the... Open Journal Systems Home About Login Register Search Current Archives Announcements UACES Home > Vol 10, No 4 (2014 > Müllerleile European Studies and Public Engagement: A Conceptual Toolbox Andreas Müllerleile Abstract This article examines public engagement strategies for academics working in the field of European Studies. Should academics engage with the public? What are the most effective outreach strategies? And what are the implications for universities and departments? The article argues that engaging with the public should be considered an integral part for academics working on topics that relate to the European Union or European politics. The article has a theoretical and a practical dimension. The first part of the paper deals with the nature of public engagement, explaining why it is an important issue and how it differs from the mainstream understanding of public engagement. The practical part of the paper presents the idea of building an online presence through which academics can engage with the public debate both during periods of low issue salience and high issue salience. The final section includes a toolbox

  4. Engaging With Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    to engage us with reality. Engaging with Reality investigates some of the major global themes as they are reflected in documentaries from the USA, UK and Denmark. Engaging with Reality is a contribution to comparative, transnational studies of documentary in contemporary media culture. By comparing......Documentaries play an important role in the increasingly global media culture that has been developing over the last few decades. Despite its many different forms and genres, all documentaries claim a special relation to the way things are in the world, and they each attempt in their own way...... documentaries in three different countries dealing with the same global themes, the book contributes to a broader and deeper understanding of our global media culture. The book deals with documentaries as part of a new form of cosmopolitan narratives, as part of new, global forms of social imagination...

  5. Engagement beyond critique?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.; Jørgensen, Nanna Jordt

    2018-01-01

    In response to academic ideals of neutrality, complexity and cultural relativism promoted in postmodern cultural critique, different attempts have been made to make anthropology more “engaged” in the promotion of social change. In this article, we discuss three contemporary positions...

  6. Engagement through communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we work from the assumption that university engagement can be fostered by addressing the dissemination of scientific knowledge as a communication process, and we explore how university engagement can be encouraged through the communication of scientific knowledge to SMEs (small...... and potentials) in relation to scientific knowledge, which must be taken into account in attempts to communicate scientific knowledge to SMEs. Based on this analysis, we discuss solutions and outline some communicative principles that can contribute with a solution-oriented perspective on how communicating...

  7. Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, Alan

    2014-01-01

    ). The ‘deficit theory’ which still today characterize many scientific activities that address citizen can be criticized for ‘one-way communication’, ‘sanctity of expertise’, and treatment of the publics as ‘homogeneous’. When arguing for the need for public engagement with science it is question about...... for dialogue exercises look microscopic against the backdrop of global science and its governance. Maybe it has been over-promised what such public engagement exercises can deliver. We can safely conclude that, despite all the ‘from deficit to democracy’ talk, no such easy shift has been made. At best, partial...

  8. Teachers' instructional behaviors as important predictors of academic motivation : Changes and links across the school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Bosker, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments play an important role for students' learning and outcomes. Research indicates that many students show poor academic motivation. Teachers' behavior can function as a protective factor for sustaining students' interest and active engagement in schools. However, the knowledge

  9. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  10. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  11. Social Responsibility and Commitment in Management Institutes: Mediation by Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its major influence on individual’s performance, engagement is increasingly becoming popular among practitioners. While its influence on performance has been well established, research on the influence of variables related to organizations on engagement is still in its nascent stage. Therefore, this study examines the mediating role of employee engagement in the corporate social responsibility (CSR – organizational commitment relationship. Multiple regression results using responses from 150 academics working in Indian management institutes predominantly owned by business groups partially support the relationships hypothesized. The findings may encourage Indian management institutes owned by business groups to consider CSR in teaching and research as serious investment areas in order to have a more engaged and committed workforce.

  12. Is all co-production created equal? Understanding drivers and outcomes across different users and forms of engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, K.; Lemos, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    Despite a growing recognition of the importance of coproduced information in networks of decision-makers facing climate change, relatively little attention has been paid to how different types of users and forms of engagement (e.g. brokering and bridging of climate information) may yield different coproduction outcomes. In this study, we compare drivers and outcomes of co-production of a large network (twenty-five cases) of users within the scope of the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA), a boundary organization whose mission is to disseminate climate information in the Great Lakes Region. We focus especially on drivers of co-production within boundary organizations (e.g. embeddness, complementarity, financial and human resources and trust building and legitimacy) to explore different forms of engagement and models of brokering and bridging information. Our case studies span a wide range of users, including cities, businesses, academic and professional organizations and governmental agencies. We find that different kinds of resources and engagement matter in terms of desirable outcomes. In addition, while the supply of resources by boundary organizations is necessary to foster co-production, effective use and stable networks are often not achieved in the absence of sustained engagement and support.

  13. Staying Engaged: Knowledge and Research Needs in Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Te; Degol, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review knowledge about student engagement and look ahead to the future of study in this area. We begin by describing how researchers in the field define and study student engagement. In particular, we describe the levels, contexts, and dimensions that constitute the measurement of engagement, summarize the contexts that shape engagement and the outcomes that result from it, and articulate person-centered approaches for analyzing engagement. We conclude by addressing limitations to the research and providing recommendations for study. Specifically, we point to the importance of incorporating more work on how learning-related emotions, personality characteristics, prior learning experiences, shared values across contexts, and engagement in nonacademic activities influence individual differences in student engagement. We also stress the need to improve our understanding of the nuances involved in developing engagement over time by incorporating more extensive longitudinal analyses, intervention trials, research on affective neuroscience, and interactions among levels and dimensions of engagement. PMID:27087833

  14. Civic Engagement and Associationalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Damon Timothy; Barraket, Jo; Lewis, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    use a large survey to explore these questions empirically by focusing on the membership patterns and civic engagement practices of 4,001 citizens drawn from eight suburbs across Greater Melbourne, Australia. Our findings indicate that, while associational intensity is positively related to civic...

  15. The Player Engagement Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    , categories and triggers involved in this process. By applying grounded theory to the analysis of the responses, a process-oriented player engagement framework was developed and four main components consisting of objectives, activities, accomplishments and affects as well as the corresponding categories...

  16. Tools of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Alumni relations professionals need a method of measuring alumni engagement, including giving, that goes beyond counting event attendees and the number of Twitter followers. Social media are changing the way things have been done within the alumni relations profession, but that does not mean that people throw out everything they have done in the…

  17. Mellem engagement og afmagt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Nielsen, Birger Steen; Schmidt, Camilla

    Bogen præsenterer resultaterne fra udviklings- og forskningsprojektet "BUPL-tillidsrepræsentanten. Nye udfordringer - nye svar". Den giver et fyldigt indblik i tillidsrepræsentanternes arbejde, deres engagement, vanskeligheder og forhåbninger. På baggrund af et større værkstedsarbejde fremlægges...

  18. Engaging with users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Bang, Anne Louise

    with the biggest sense organ – our skin. Thus, the aim of our research is to develop new dialogue tools for teaching fashion and textile students in order to stimulate new ways of thinking and engaging with users. By developing and employing participatory design methods in the field of fashion and textiles, we...

  19. Reframing Global Engagement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wende, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Globalization has strongly influenced higher education during the last decades. As in many other sectors, this has generated contradictory outcomes. Higher education has opened up to the world and become more engaged at the global level. But how will this process continue with the current backlash

  20. Analytics for Customer Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Block, Frank; Eisenbeiss, Maik; Hardie, Bruce G. S.; Lemmens, Aurelie; Saffert, Peter

    In this article, we discuss the state of the art of models for customer engagement and the problems that are inherent to calibrating and implementing these models. The authors first provide an overview of the data available for customer analytics and discuss recent developments. Next, the authors

  1. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  2. Health Behaviors and Academic Performance Among Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Eun Sun; Park, Byoung Mo

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the most prominent health-related behaviors impacting the academic performance of Korean adolescents. The 2012 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey data were analyzed using an ordinal regression analysis after adjusting for general and other health behaviors. Before adjustment, all health behaviors were significantly associated with academic performance. After adjustment for other health behaviors and confounding factors, only smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.98, 2.16), p academic performance, and engaging in a regular diet [OR = 0.65, 95% CI (0.65, 0.62), p academic performance. Regular diet, reducing smoking and alcohol drinking, and physical activity should be the target when designing health interventions for improving academic performance in Korean adolescents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Designing Engaging Interactions with Digital Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate how the experience of engagement in interaction can be explained by examining the experiences of richness and control and how these experiences are influenced by the features of a product, the expertise of a person and the type of task. This research is carried out

  4. Ethical philanthropy in academic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2006-05-01

    From an ethical perspective, psychiatrists cannot accept gifts of significant monetary value from their patients. This guideline raises important questions regarding institutional practices related to gift-giving in academic psychiatry. The first aim of this article is to explain the ethical tensions and shared ethical commitments of the professions of psychiatry and philanthropy. The second aim is to outline a series of steps that may be undertaken to assure ethical philanthropic practices within an institution, including the establishment of a committed advisory workgroup and the creation of ground rules and safeguards for gift-giving. Each situation should be evaluated for "ethical risk," and specific measures to safeguard donors should be considered. The author outlines methods to manage, minimize, or eliminate conflict of interest issues, including identification and disclosure of conflicting interests, role separation, goal clarification, confidentiality protections, proper timing, and ongoing oversight. Three case illustrations are provided and discussed. The process of institutional engagement, dialogue, and shared problem-solving is especially important. A shared, constructive ethic will be attained only if leaders and diverse stakeholders communicate the value of the new approach through their words, expectations, and actions. Through these efforts, greater attention will be given to the concerns of people with mental illness, and academic institutions may be better able to fulfill their responsibilities to this important but neglected population now and in the future.

  5. Factors of academic procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Kranjec, Eva; Košir, Katja; Komidar, Luka

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated dimensions of perfectionism, anxiety, and depression as factors of academic procrastination. Our main research interest was to examine the role of specific dimensions of perfectionism as moderators in the relationship between anxiety and depression and academic procrastination. Four scales were administered on the sample of 403 students: perfectionism scale FMPS, academic procrastination scale APS-SI, depression scale CESD and anxiety scale STAI-X2. The results showed ...

  6. Adventures from Justin's Life: Engaging Your Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, James A.; Herron, Sherry S.

    2018-03-01

    Many teachers have had students ask the proverbial question, "When will I ever use this in my life?" In the sciences, especially physics, teachers seem to battle this torrent of indifference continually. Although many areas of our students' lives can distract them from their academic pursuits, we as teachers must be introspective in order to prevent our teaching style from becoming one of our students' potential distractions. For example, a problem source with teaching physics may be an inability to successfully pique students' interest in our lessons. According to Barrett, student engagement is critical in order for learning to occur. Student engagement is so crucially important that researchers from across the globe attempt to assist teachers in the careful construction of pedagogical "hooks" whereby they can actively engage their students. A student who is not academically engaged may find little use for what is presented and may be bored stiff during the lesson. Regardless of your theoretical perspectives on learning, constructivists to traditionalists alike have no excuse to be boring, and therefore should engage their students before presenting physics concepts.

  7. Workaholic and work engaged employees: dead ringers or worlds apart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Ilona; Taris, Toon W; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2011-10-01

    Building on Deci and Ryan's Self-Determination Theory and Meijman and Mulder's Effort-Recovery Model, the present study examined the nature, antecedents, and consequences of working hard (i.e., workaholism and work engagement) in a Dutch convenience sample of 1,246 employees. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that workaholism and work engagement were two largely independent concepts. Crossing these two concepts yielded four types of workers: workaholic employees, engaged employees, engaged workaholics, and nonworkaholic/nonengaged employees. MANOVA and subsequent ANOVAs were used to compare these four groups regarding their motivation, working hours, and levels of burnout. As expected, study results revealed that workaholic employees were driven by controlled motivation, whereas engaged employees were driven by autonomous motivation. Engaged workaholics were driven by both controlled and autonomous motivation. In addition, the results revealed that engaged workaholics spent most time on working. Unlike workaholic employees, engaged workaholics did not experience the highest levels of burnout, suggesting that high engagement may buffer the adverse consequences of workaholism. The present study emphasizes the importance of differentiating among at least three categories of employees who work hard: workaholic employees, engaged employees, and-for the first time-engaged workaholics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Mobilisation for public engagement: Benchmarking the practices of research institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entradas, Marta; Bauer, Martin M

    2017-10-01

    Studies on scientists' practices of public engagement have pointed to variations between disciplines. If variations at the individual level are reflected at the institutional level, then research institutes in Social Sciences (and Humanities) should perform higher in public engagement and be more involved in dialogue with the public. Using a nearly complete sample of research institutes in Portugal 2014 ( n = 234, 61% response rate), we investigate how public engagement varies in intensity, type of activities and target audiences across scientific areas. Three benchmark findings emerge. First, the Social Sciences and the Humanities profile differently in public engagement highlighting the importance of distinguishing between these two scientific areas often conflated in public engagement studies. Second, the Social Sciences overall perform more public engagement activities, but the Natural Sciences mobilise more effort for public engagement. Third, while the Social Sciences play a greater role in civic public engagement, the Natural Sciences are more likely to perform educational activities. Finally, this study shows that the overall size of research institutes, available public engagement funding and public engagement staffing make a difference in institutes' public engagement.

  9. University student social media use and its influence on offline engagement in higher educational communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sutherland

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has emphasised social media adoption by students and the implementation of social media by educators, yet few studies have explored whether students are using it to facilitate engagement in offline environments with peers within university communities. Studies suggest engagement in educational communities and extra-curricular activities can reduce student attrition. This study surveyed 106 undergraduate students to investigate whether students using social media to interact online with their university felt: (i connected to the broader university community, and (ii social media helped them engage offline by meeting up with peers and attending university events. The results indicated that the majority (82% never or rarely used the technology to facilitate offline engagement within their academic communities. Fourth year students were most likely to use social media to engage offline (66.7%. However, more than half of students (52.8% felt that university social media profiles helped them to feel part of their academic community.

  10. Not just robo-students: why full engagement matters and how schools can promote it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Jerusha O; Pope, Denise C

    2013-09-01

    Research has long linked academic engagement to positive social, psychological, and physical developmental outcomes; however, qualitative studies in high-performing schools find that some students who work hard in school may be compromising their mental and physical health in the pursuit of top grades. Such research calls for closer and more contextualized examinations of the concept of engagement. This study examines academic engagement in a sample of 6,294 students (54 % female; 44 % White, 34 % Asian, and 22 % other racial or ethnic background) attending 15 high-achieving schools. Findings show that two-thirds of students at these schools are not regularly "fully engaged" in their academic schoolwork; that is, they do not regularly report high levels of affective, behavioral and cognitive engagement. Although most students report working hard, few enjoy their schoolwork and find it valuable. This lack of full engagement, particularly the absence of affective and cognitive engagement, is associated with more frequent school stress, higher rates of cheating, and greater internalizing, externalizing, and physical symptoms of stress. The study also finds that full engagement is strongly related to positive teacher-student relationships. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  11. Identifying the necessary and sufficient number of risk factors for predicting academic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio, Robert; Hunt, Elizabeth; Bornovalova, Marina

    2012-03-01

    Identifying the point at which individuals become at risk for academic failure (grade point average [GPA] academic success or failure. This study focused on 12 school-related factors. Using a thorough 5-step process, we identified which unique risk factors place one at risk for academic failure. Academic engagement, academic expectations, academic self-efficacy, homework completion, school relevance, school safety, teacher relationships (positive relationship), grade retention, school mobility, and school misbehaviors (negative relationship) were uniquely related to GPA even after controlling for all relevant covariates. Next, a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine a cutoff point for determining how many risk factors predict academic failure (GPA academic failure, which provides a way for early identification of individuals who are at risk. Further implications of these findings are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Longitudinal Links between Older Sibling Features and Younger Siblings' Academic Adjustment during Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchey, Heather A.; Shoulberg, Erin K.; Jodl, Kathleen M.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated prospective relations between older siblings' support and academic engagement and younger siblings' academic adjustment from 7th to post-8th grade. The study was unique in that it incorporated a sample of both African American and European American adolescents. Also investigated was the extent to which the gender…

  13. Understanding Dishonest Academic Behaviour Amongst Business Students--The Business Leaders of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagraim, Jeffrey; Goodman, Suki; Pulker, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This study applies the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to increase understanding about dishonest academic behaviour amongst undergraduate business students. A total of 579 respondents from three universities in South Africa completed an online survey about their beliefs regarding academic dishonesty, their intentions to engage in dishonest…

  14. Academic Libraries and High-Impact Practices for Student Retention: Library Deans' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies on retention have highlighted the role of student engagement in influencing students' withdrawal decisions. This study seeks to address how academic libraries affect student retention by examining the perception of academic library deans or directors on the alignment between library services and resources with ten nationally…

  15. Does Methylphenidate Improve Academic Performance? A Systematic Review and Meta‑analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, Anne Fleur; Luman, Marjolein; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Oosterlaan, J.

    2018-01-01

    Academic improvement is amongst the most common treatment targets when prescribing stimulants to children with ADHD.Previous reviews on stimulant-related academic improvements are inconclusive and focus on task engagement. Recentliterature suggests outcome-domain-specific medication effects that are

  16. Does methylphenidate improve academic performance? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, Anne Fleur; Luman, Marjolein; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2018-01-01

    Academic improvement is amongst the most common treatment targets when prescribing stimulants to children with ADHD. Previous reviews on stimulant-related academic improvements are inconclusive and focus on task engagement. Recent literature suggests outcome-domain-specific medication effects that

  17. Changes in Time-Related Academic Behaviour Are Associated with Contextual Motivational Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K.; Lane, Forrest C.; Mwavita, Mwarumba

    2018-01-01

    Research in the field of time-related academic behaviour (i.e., procrastination and timely engagement) has traditionally been focused on more stable factors, such as personality. Recent research suggests there may be a motivational component to these behaviours. The present study examines whether time-related academic behaviour is stable across…

  18. Disruptive Technology: Saving Money and Inspiring Engagement in Professional Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Penne; Talbot, Elizabeth

    Competent, efficient, and cost-effective delivery of professional development is a challenge in health care. Collaboration of teaching methodologies with academia and acute care offers fresh perspectives and delivery methods that can facilitate optimal outcomes. One multihospital system introduced the academic "flipped classroom" model to its acute care setting and integrated it into professional development requirements. The concept of the flipped classroom requires independent student engagement prior to classroom activities versus the traditional classroom lecture model. Results realized a cost savings in 2 years of $28,737 in addition to positive employee engagement.

  19. The relationship between organizational culture and work engagement: A multilevel investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Krog, Anja Karolin

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the broader factors that impact on work engagement is required in order to understand how the organizational context influences work engagement. However, knowledge of broader contextual predictors of work engagement is scarce. Using a multilevel framework, this study examined the role of four organizational culture types in facilitating work engagement of employees. Based on the organizational culture literature and work engagement research, it was assumed that the r...

  20. Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Kathan; Konold, Timothy; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-06-01

    School climate has been linked to a variety of positive student outcomes, but there may be important within-school differences among students in their experiences of school climate. This study examined within-school heterogeneity among 47,631 high school student ratings of their school climate through multilevel latent class modeling. Student profiles across 323 schools were generated on the basis of multiple indicators of school climate: disciplinary structure, academic expectations, student willingness to seek help, respect for students, affective and cognitive engagement, prevalence of teasing and bullying, general victimization, bullying victimization, and bullying perpetration. Analyses identified four meaningfully different student profile types that were labeled positive climate, medium climate-low bullying, medium climate-high bullying, and negative climate. Contrasts among these profile types on external criteria revealed meaningful differences for race, grade-level, parent education level, educational aspirations, and frequency of risk behaviors. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.