WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic emergency physicians

  1. Implementation of a Team-based Physician Staffing Model at an Academic Emergency Department

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    Jose V. Nable

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is scant literature regarding the optimal resident physician staffing model of academic emergency departments (ED that maximizes learning opportunities. A department of emergency medicine at a large inner-city academic hospital initiated a team-based staffing model. Its pre-interventional staffing model consisted of residents and attending physicians being separately assigned patients, resulting in residents working with two different faculty providers in the same shift. This study aimed to determine if the post-interventional team-based system, in which residents were paired with a single attending on each shift, would result in improved residents’ learning and clinical experiences as manifested by resident evaluations and the number of patients seen. Methods: This retrospective before-and-after study at an academic ED with an annual volume of 52,000 patients examined the mean differences in five-point Likert-scale evaluations completed by residents assessing their ED rotation experiences in both the original and team-based staffing models. The residents were queried on their perceptions of feeling part of the team, decision-making autonomy, clinical experience, amount of supervision, quality of teaching, and overall rotational experience. We also analyzed the number of patients seen per hour by residents. Paired sample t-tests were performed. Residents who were in the program in the year preceding and proceeding the intervention were eligible for inclusion. Results: 34 of 38 eligible residents were included (4 excluded for lack of evaluations in either the pre- or post-intervention period. There was a statistically significant improvement in resident perception of the quality and amount of teaching, 4.03 to 4.27 (mean difference=0.24, p=0.03. There were non-statistically significant trends toward improved mean scores for all other queries. Residents also saw more patients following the initiation of the team-based model

  2. Effectiveness of Resident Physicians as Triage Liaison Providers in an Academic Emergency Department

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    Victoria Weston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department (ED crowding is associated with detrimental effects on ED quality of care. Triage liaison providers (TLP have been used to mitigate the effects of crowding. Prior studies have evaluated attending physicians and advanced practice providers as TLPs, with limited data evaluating resident physicians as TLPs. This study compares operational performance outcomes between resident and attending physicians as TLPs. Methods: This retrospective cohort study compared aggregate operational performance at an urban, academic ED during pre- and post-TLP periods. The primary outcome was defined as cost-effectiveness based upon return on investment (ROI. Secondary outcomes were defined as differences in median ED length of stay (LOS, median door-to-provider (DTP time, proportion of left without being seen (LWBS, and proportion of “very good” overall patient satisfaction scores. Results: Annual profit generated for physician-based collections through LWBS capture (after deducting respective salary costs equated to a gain (ROI: 54% for resident TLPs and a loss (ROI: −31% for attending TLPs. Accounting for hospital-based collections made both profitable, with gains for resident TLPs (ROI: 317% and for attending TLPs (ROI: 86%. Median DTP time for resident TLPs was significantly lower (p<0.0001 than attending or historical control. Proportion of “very good” patient satisfaction scores and LWBS was improved for both resident and attending TLPs over historical control. Overall median LOS was not significantly different. Conclusion: Resident and attending TLPs improved DTP time, patient satisfaction, and LWBS rates. Both resident and attending TLPs are cost effective, with residents having a more favorable financial profile.

  3. The distribution of the h-index among academic emergency physicians in the United States.

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    DeLuca, Lawrence A; St John, Alex; Stolz, Uwe; Matheson, Lincoln; Simpson, Allan; Denninghoff, Kurt R

    2013-10-01

    Hirsch's h-index (h) attempts to measure the combined academic impact and productivity of a scientist by counting the number of publications by an author, ranked in descending order by number of citations, until the paper number equals the number of citations. This approach provides a natural number or index of the number of publications and the number of citations per publication. H was first described in physics and was demonstrated to be highly predictive of continued academic activity, including recognized measures of scientific excellence such as membership in the National Academy of Sciences and being a Nobel laureate. Citation rates, research environments, and years of experience all affect h, making any comparisons appropriate only for scientists working in the same field for a similar time period. The authors are unaware of any report describing the distribution of h among academic emergency physicians (AEPs). The objective was to describe the distribution of h for AEPs and to determine whether Hirsch's demonstration of the h-index as a predictor of continued scholarly activity among physicists would also apply to AEPs. Academic EPs were identified from lists provided on allopathic U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residency program websites. "Harzing's Publish or Perish," a free program available on the Web that queries Google Scholar, was used to calculate h for each AEP. Agreement between raters was analyzed on a subset of 100 EPs. An analysis of the 20 EPs with the top h-indices was performed to characterize the entire body of their scholarly work, and their h-indices were calculated at 12 and 24 years into their careers. A total of 4,744 AEPs from 136 programs were evaluated. Nine programs did not publicly list the faculty at their institutions and were excluded. A linear weighted kappa was used to measure rater concordance, with agreement of 98.3% and κ = 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.861 to 0.957). The majority of AEPs had h-indices of zero or

  4. International women physicians' perspectives on choosing an academic medicine career.

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    Borges, Nicole J; Grover, Amelia C; Navarro, Anita M; Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Elton, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Concerns about recruiting physicians into academic careers is an international issue. A qualitative study with United States (US) women physicians revealed insights into how, when, and why physicians choose an academic career in medicine. The current study explored international women physicians' perspectives on their career choice of academic medicine and determined if different themes emerged. We expanded the 2012 study of US women physicians by interviewing women physicians in Canada, Pakistan, Mexico, and Sweden to gain an international perspective on choosing an academic career. Interviews were thematically analyzed against themes identified in the previous study. Based on themes identified in the study of US physicians, qualitative analysis of 7 international women physicians revealed parallel themes for the following areas: Why academic medicine? Fit; People; Aspects of academic health centre environment. How the decision to enter academic medicine was made? Decision-making style; Emotionality When the decision to enter academic medicine was made? Practising physician; Fellowship; Medical student. Work-life balance, choosing academic medicine by default, serendipity, intellectual stimulation, mentors, research and teaching were among the areas specifically highlighted. Parallel themes exist regarding how, why, and when US and international women physicians choose academic medicine as a career path.

  5. American College of Emergency Physicians

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    ... Career Center is where you can find your dream job Search Jobs Now Tweets about "@ACEPNow OR # ... For You emCareers.org Insurance Programs Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians emCareers.org Terms of ...

  6. Qualitative Research on Emergency Medicine Physicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to systematically review the qualitative research studying Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians in Emergency Departments (ED). Background: Qualitative research aims to study complex social phenomena. EM is a highly complex medical and social environment that can be investigated...... with qualitative research. Methods: Electronic databases of English peer-reviewed articles were searched from 1971 to 2012 using Medline through PubMed and PsychINFO. This search was supplemented with hand-searches of Academic Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medicine Journal from 1999 to 2012 and cross references...... and training, communication, professional roles, and organizational factors, and into 12 sub-themes. Conclusion: The strength of qualitative research is its ability to grasp and operationalize complex relations within EM. Although qualitative research methodologies have gained in rigour in recent years and few...

  7. Laceration Repair for Emergency Physicians

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    Alisa Wray

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This TBL is appropriate for medical students and all levels of residents. Introduction: Lacerations are one of the most common chief complaints presenting to the emergency department, representing 8.2% of ED visits.1 Wound management is one of the emergency medicine milestones.2 As such, it is an essential skill to cover when training emergency physicians. Historically, training programs correlate competency with quantity of procedures, with little focus on the quality.3 Objectives: By the end of this educational session, the learner will: 1 List the appropriate types and sizes of suture for various locations and types of lacerations. 2 Understand various suturing techniques and their indications, and 3 Show proficiency in performing various suturing techniques including: simple interrupted, horizontal mattress, vertical mattress, and repair of V-shaped lacerations. Method: This is an mTBL (modified team based learning session.

  8. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

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    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  9. Professional Bankruptcy for the Academic Physician

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    Thornburg, Loralei L.; Glantz, J. Christopher; Caprio, Thomas V.; Gillespie, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    In modern academic medicine, the amount of academic time is decreasing as the workload and commitments are increasing. As physicians take on so many professional obligations that there is no way to meet all of the demands of the ever-expanding responsibilities, the question becomes: Should academic physicians ever consider filing for their own “professional bankruptcy”? Presented here are 10 steps to successful academic bankruptcy for the overextended junior faculty. Although somewhat fanciful, this method allows faculty to take an honest and critical assessment of their personal and professional goals and to align their career with these goals. With a critical eye to the future, this alignment will allow faculty to decrease their workload while maintaining productivity. PMID:21976103

  10. The work of the American emergency physician.

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    Wyatt, J P; Weber, J E; Chudnofsky, C

    1998-01-01

    The organisation of the American emergency health care system has changed rapidly during recent years, but it remains very different to the system in the United Kingdom. American emergency departments are organised around an attending physician based service, rather than a consultant led service. As a result, the work of the American emergency physician differs considerably from that of the United Kingdom A&E consultant. The problems associated with working in an attending physician based ser...

  11. Emergency Physician Use of Cognitive Strategies to Manage Interruptions.

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    Ratwani, Raj M; Fong, Allan; Puthumana, Josh S; Hettinger, Aaron Z

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether emergency physicians use strategies to manage interruptions during clinical work. Interruption management strategies include immediately engaging the interruption by discontinuing the current task and starting the interruption, continuing the current task while engaging the interruption, rejecting the interruption, or delaying the interruption. An observational time and motion study was conducted in 3 different urban, academic emergency departments with 18 attending emergency physicians. Each physician was observed for 2 hours, and the number of interruptions, source of interruptions, type of task being interrupted, and use of interruption management strategies were documented. Participants were interrupted on average of 12.5 times per hour. The majority of interruptions were in person from other staff, including nurses, residents, and other attending physicians. When participants were interrupted, they were often working on their computer. Participants almost always immediately engaged the interruption task (75.4% of the time), followed by multitasking, in which the primary task was continued while the interrupting task was performed (22.2%). Physicians rejected or delayed interruptions less than 2% of the time. Our results suggest there is an opportunity to introduce emergency physicians to the use of interruption management strategies as a method of handling the frequent interruptions they are exposed to. Use of these strategies when high-risk primary tasks are performed may reduce the disruptiveness of some interruptions and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of resource utilization between emergency physicians and pediatric emergency physicians.

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    Weiner, Scott G; Ruffing, Ronald P; Barnewolt, Brien A

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric patients in the emergency department (ED) are typically seen either by general emergency physicians (EPs) or by pediatric emergency physicians (PEPs) who have completed either a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine or both pediatric and emergency medicine residencies. This study evaluates admission rates, turnaround times, and test and medication utilization for EPs versus PEPs. A retrospective chart analysis was conducted at an academic tertiary care hospital with a dedicated pediatric ED. When the pediatric ED is open (from noon to midnight), it is always staffed with dedicated pediatric nurses and residents. In our ED, the only variable is the attending physician, who can either be an EP or a PEP. All visits for patients younger than 18 years who presented during the time the pediatric ED was open from July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2010, were eligible for inclusion. Only patients seen by physicians who saw more than 400 patients during this period were included. Disposition outcomes for patients who were either admitted or discharged were compared between EPs and PEPs. Complete blood count, Chem 7, urinalysis, chest radiography ordering rates, and intravenous fluid and ondansetron administration were used as surrogates for general conclusions about test utilization. There were 13,347 patient visits eligible for inclusion, of which 8330 (62.4%) were seen by 2 PEPs, and 5017 (37.6%) were seen by 9 EPs. There was a difference in mean patient age (6.9 vs 7.1 years, P = 0.01), whereas sex (53.6% vs 53.9% male, P = 0.72), race (P = 0.13), acuity (mean Emergency Severity Index 3.35 vs 3.33, P = 0.99), and mode of arrival (10.6% vs 12.3% emergency medical services transport, P = 0.06) were not significantly different. Overall admission rates were similar (17.1% PEP vs 17.5% EP, P = 0.50), as were critical care admissions (2.9% PEP vs 2.7% EP of total admissions, P = 0.40). Turnaround times were significantly different (146.0 ± 2.5 minutes PEP vs 149.7 ± 3

  13. Burnout among female emergency medicine physicians: A nationwide study.

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    Soltanifar, Atefeh; Pishbin, Elham; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Najaf Najafi, Mona; Siahtir, Maryam

    2018-02-13

    The challenging and stressful nature of emergency medicine place the practitioners of this young branch of medicine at risk of burnout. In Iran, the number of women choosing the specialty of emergency medicine has been increasing in recent years. No studies have focused on burnout among female emergency medicine physicians. We conducted this study to evaluate the level of burnout in female emergency medicine physicians in Iran. In this cross-sectional study, all Iranian female emergency medicine physicians with more than 2 years of work experience as specialists, received a questionnaire containing 22-item Maslach Burnout Inventory scales and 7-item Cassidy social support scale, as well as questions about workload and career satisfaction. In total, 77 questionnaires were analysed (response rate: 75%; median age: 36 years, median for work experience = 3 years). A total of 34% of participants were academic faculties. The level of burnout in three subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and perceived low personal accomplishment was moderate to high in 84.5, 48.1 and 80.5% of participants respectively. A total of 94.8% of female emergency medicine physicians perceived their workload to be moderate to high and only 1.3% of them had high job satisfaction. Alarming high rate of burnout and job dissatisfaction among female emergency medicine physicians in our study requires careful attention. Further investigations are suggested to identify the contributory factors to burnout and the probability of some gender disparities in this field. © 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  14. Effect of emergency physician burnout on patient waiting times.

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    De Stefano, Carla; Philippon, Anne-Laure; Krastinova, Evguenia; Hausfater, Pierre; Riou, Bruno; Adnet, Frederic; Freund, Yonathan

    2018-04-01

    Burnout is common in emergency physicians. This syndrome may negatively affect patient care and alter work productivity. We seek to assess whether burnout of emergency physicians impacts waiting times in the emergency department. Prospective study in an academic ED. All patients who visited the main ED for a 4-month period in 2016 were included. Target waiting times are assigned by triage nurse to patients on arrival depending on their severity. The primary endpoint was an exceeded target waiting time for ED patients. All emergency physicians were surveyed by a psychologist to assess their level of burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We defined the level of burnout of the day in the ED as the mean burnout level of the physicians working that day (8:30 to the 8:30 the next day). A logistic regression model was performed to assess whether burnout level of the day was independently associated with prolonged waiting times, along with previously reported predictors. Target waiting time was exceeded in 7524 patients (59%). Twenty-six emergency physicians were surveyed. Median burnout score was 35 [Interquartile (24-49)]. A burnout level of the day higher than 35 was independently associated with an exceeded target waiting time (adjusted odds ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.39-1.70), together with previously reported predictors (i.e., day of the week, time of the day, trauma, age and daily census). Burnout of emergency physicians was independently associated with a prolonged waiting time for patients visiting the ED.

  15. Physician assistants in Australasian emergency departments.

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    Close, Benjamin; Zolcinski, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A physician assistant (PA) is a university qualified health professional who's primary role is to provide medical care under the direction and supervision of medical staff. This is a new profession in Australasia. The PA is well suited to working in both rural, regional and urban settings that deliver emergency medical care. A perspective is presented on their role and scope of practice within the Australasian emergency care system supported by some early findings from their use in a tertiary ED. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  16. Implementation of Computerized Physician Order Entry for Critical Patients in an Academic Emergency Department is Not Associated with a Change in Mortality Rate

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    Doug D. Brunette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is limited literature on the effect of computerized physician order entry(CPOE on mortality. The objective of our study was to determine if there was a change inmortality among critically ill patients presenting to the emergency department (ED after theimplementation of a CPOE system.Methods: This was a retrospective study of all critically ill patients in the ED during the yearbefore and the year after CPOE implementation. The primary outcome measures were mortalityin the ED, after admission, and overall. Secondary outcome measures included length of stay inthe resuscitation area of the ED, length of hospital stay, and disposition following hospitalization.Patient disposition was used as a marker for neurologic function, and patients were grouped aseither being discharged to home vs. nursing home, rehabilitation center, or a long-term healthcarefacility. We analyzed data using descriptive statistics, chi- square, and Wilcoxon rank sum tests.Results: There were 2,974 critically ill patients in the year preceding CPOE and 2,969 patientsin the year following CPOE implementation. There were no differences in mortality between thetwo groups in the ED, after admission, or overall. The pre- and post-CPOE mortality rate for theED, hospital, or overall was 2.52% vs. 2.02% (P = 0.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.3 to 1.3,7.8% versus 8.29% (P = 0.61, 95% CI -1.9 to 0.9, and 10.32% vs. 10.31% (P = .60, 95% CI -1.5to 1.6, respectively. There was no difference in hospital length of stay between pre- and post-CPOE patients (3 days versus 3 days, a difference of 0.05 days (95% CI -0.47 to 0.57. Lengthof stay in the ED resuscitation area was longer in the post-CPOE group (31 versus 32 minutes, adifference of -1.96 minutes (95% CI -3.4 to -0.53. More patients were discharged to home in thepre-CPOE group (66.8% versus 64.3%, a difference of 2.54% (95% CI 0.13% to 4.96%.Conclusion: The implementation of CPOE was not associated with a change

  17. Women Physicians: Choosing a Career in Academic Medicine

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    Borges, Nicole J.; Navarro, Anita M.; Grover, Amelia C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite recent efforts to understand the complex process of physician career development, the medical education community has a poor understanding of why, how, and when women physicians embark on a career in academic medicine. Method In 2010, the authors phone-interviewed women physicians in academic medicine regarding why, how, and when they chose an academic medicine career. Project investigators first individually and then collectively analyzed transcripts to identify themes in the data. Results Through analyzing the transcripts of the 53 interviews, the investigators identified five themes related to why women choose careers in academic medicine: fit, aspects of the academic health center environment, people, exposure, and clincial medicine. They identified five themes related to how women make the decision to enter academic medicine: change in specialty, dissatisfaction with former career, emotionality, parental influence, and decision-making styles. The authors also identified four themes regarding when women decide to enter academic medicine: as a practicing phyisican, fellow, resident, or medical student. Conclusions Choosing a career in academic medicine is greatly influenced by the environment in which one trains and by people—be they faculty, mentors, role models, or family. An interest in teaching is a primary reason women choose a career in academic medicine. Many women physicians entering acadmic medicine chose this after or during fellowship, which is when they became more aware of academic medicine as a possible career. For many women, choosing academic medicine was not necessarily an active, planned decision; rather it was serendipitous or circumstantial. PMID:22104052

  18. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

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    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.)

  19. Job satisfaction among obstetrician-gynecologists: a comparison between private practice physicians and academic physicians.

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    Bell, Darrel J; Bringman, Jay; Bush, Andrew; Phillips, Owen P

    2006-11-01

    Physician job satisfaction has been the subject of much research. However, no studies have been conducted comparing academic and private practice physician satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology. This study was undertaken to measure satisfaction levels for academic and private practice obstetrician-gynecologists and compare different aspects of their practice that contributed to their satisfaction. A survey was mailed to randomly selected obstetrician-gynecologists in Memphis, TN; Birmingham, AL; Little Rock, AR; and Jackson, MS. Physicians were asked to respond to questions concerning demographics and career satisfaction. They were also asked to assess the contribution of 13 different aspects of their practice in contributing to their job selection and satisfaction using a Likert scale. A score of 1 meant the physician completely disagreed with a statement regarding a factor's contribution or was completely dissatisfied; a score of 5 meant the physician completely agreed with a factor's contribution or was completely satisfied. Simple descriptive statistics, as well as the 2-sample t test, were used. Likert scale values were assumed to be interval measurements. Of the 297 questionnaires mailed, 129 (43%) physicians responded. Ninety-five (74%) respondents rated their overall satisfaction as 4 or 5. No significant difference was found between academic and private physicians when comparing overall job satisfaction (P = .25). When compared to private practice physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to overall job satisfaction for academic physicians were the ability to teach, conduct research, and practice variety (P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .007, respectively). When compared with academic physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to job satisfaction for private practice physicians were autonomy, physician-patient relationship, and insurance reimbursement (P = .0058, P = .0001, and P = .0098, respectively). When choosing a practice setting

  20. Emergency Physician Performed Ultrasound for DVT Evaluation

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    John Christian Fox

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis is a common condition that is often difficult to diagnose and may be lethal when allowed to progress. However, early implementation of treatment substantially improves the disease prognosis. Therefore, care must be taken to both acquire an accurate differential diagnosis for patients with symptoms as well as to screen at-risk asymptomatic individuals. Many diagnostic tools exist to evaluate deep vein thrombosis. Compression ultrasonography is currently the most effective diagnostic tool in the emergency department, shown to be highly accurate at minimal expense. However, limited availability of ultrasound technicians may result in delayed imaging or in a decision not to image low-risk cases. Many studies support emergency physiciansas capable of accurately diagnosing deep vein thrombosis using bedside ultrasound. Further integration of ultrasound into the training of emergency physicians for use in evaluating deep vein thrombosis will improve patient care and cost-effective treatment.

  1. Physician performance feedback in a Canadian academic center.

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    Garvin, Dennis; Worthington, James; McGuire, Shaun; Burgetz, Stephanie; Forster, Alan J; Patey, Andrea; Gerin-Lajoie, Caroline; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Roth, Virginia

    2017-10-02

    Purpose This paper aims at the implementation and early evaluation of a comprehensive, formative annual physician performance feedback process in a large academic health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods approach was used to introduce a formative feedback process to provide physicians with comprehensive feedback on performance and to support professional development. This initiative responded to organization-wide engagement surveys through which physicians identified effective performance feedback as a priority. In 2013, physicians primarily affiliated with the organization participated in a performance feedback process, and physician satisfaction and participant perceptions were explored through participant survey responses and physician leader focus groups. Training was required for physician leaders prior to conducting performance feedback discussions. Findings This process was completed by 98 per cent of eligible physicians, and 30 per cent completed an evaluation survey. While physicians endorsed the concept of a formative feedback process, process improvement opportunities were identified. Qualitative analysis revealed the following process improvement themes: simplify the tool, ensure leaders follow process, eliminate redundancies in data collection (through academic or licensing requirements) and provide objective quality metrics. Following physician leader training on performance feedback, 98 per cent of leaders who completed an evaluation questionnaire agreed or strongly agreed that the performance feedback process was useful and that training objectives were met. Originality/value This paper introduces a physician performance feedback model, leadership training approach and first-year implementation outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to health administrators and physician leaders interested in implementing physician performance feedback or improving physician engagement.

  2. Emergency physicians' knowledge and provision of child passenger safety information.

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    Zonfrillo, Mark R; Nelson, Kyle A; Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-02-01

    While physicians provide discharge instructions to patients and families following emergency department (ED) visits, injury prevention information may not be routinely included in these instructions. This study assessed emergency physicians' knowledge and provision of child passenger safety (CPS) information to patients following motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). This study was both a survey of emergency physician knowledge and provision of CPS information and an examination of frequency of CPS information in discharge instructions at a single institution. Members of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Emergency Medicine were invited to participate in the survey. Respondents were asked about their provision of CPS information to patients and knowledge of national AAP CPS recommendations. The institutional ED medical record chart review assessed the frequency of written CPS information for patients of MVC-related visits who were discharged home. There were 317 survey respondents from 1,024 eligible physicians, of whom 43 began but did not complete the survey. The data analyzed are from the 274 who completed the survey. While 85% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 81% to 89%) of physicians believed that CPS information should be included in discharge instructions, only 36% (95% CI = 31% to 42%) correctly answered all knowledge questions. Of the 51 self-identified division/department chiefs, 15 (29.4%; 95% CI = 16.9% to 41.9%) reported that their EDs routinely provide CPS information in discharge instructions for pediatric passengers in MVCs. For the medical record review, of the 152 randomly selected MVC visits, 13 (8.6%; 95% CI = 4.1% to 13.0%) had documented CPS information in the discharge instructions. Patients with documented CPS information were younger, but there were no significant differences in race, sex, or maximum abbreviated injury scale score between patients with versus without CPS information. While emergency physicians value the use of CPS

  3. Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.

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    Lindfors, Sara; Eintrei, Christina; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

  4. Distributed academic leadership in emergent research organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Bernardus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis “distributed academic leadership in emergent research organizations" that Ben Kokkeler on October 29th 2014 successfully defended at the University of Twente, shows that a specific type of academic leadership developes, deep in the heart of the university, in emerging research institutes.

  5. Comparison of prescribing indicators of academic versus non-academic specialist physicians in Urmia, Iran.

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    Sadigh-Rad, Laya; Majdi, Leila; Javaezi, Mehrnush; Delirrad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    As chief prescribers, physicians could have a key role in rational drug use. Core prescribing indicators of all physicians have been evaluated in the Islamic Republic of Iran for several years, but no study has assessed the effects of academic status of doctors on their prescribing behaviors. We aimed to compare prescribing indicators of two groups of academic and non-academic specialist physicians working in Urmia, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, prescribing indicators of the total number of 37 academic and 104 non-academic specialist physicians in six medical specialties (infectious diseases, psychiatry, otorhinolaryngology, gynecology, pediatrics and general surgery) were studied during 2012 using Rx-analyzer, a dedicated computer application. A set of five quality indicators was used based on the World Health Organization and International Network for Rational Use of Drugs recommendations. Totally, 709,771 medications in 269,660 prescriptions were studied. For academic and non-academic specialist physicians, the average number of medications per prescription was 2.26 and 2.65, respectively. Similarly, patients' encounters with injectable pharmaceuticals were 17.37% and 26.76%, respectively. The corresponding figures for antimicrobial agents were 33.12% and 45.46%, respectively. The average costs of every prescription were 6.53 and 3.30 United States Dollar for academic and non-academic specialist physicians, respectively. All the above-mentioned differences were statistically significant. Better prescribing patterns were observed in academic specialist physicians. However, they prescribed medications that were more expensive, while the reason was not investigated in this study. Further studies may reveal the exact causes of these differences.

  6. Improving interunit transitions of care between emergency physicians and hospital medicine physicians: a conceptual approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Christopher; Cheung, Dickson S; Apker, Julie; Horwitz, Leora I; Howell, Eric E; O'Leary, Kevin J; Patterson, Emily S; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Wears, Robert; Williams, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Patient care transitions across specialties involve more complexity than those within the same specialty, yet the unique social and technical features remain underexplored. Further, little consensus exists among researchers and practitioners about strategies to improve interspecialty communication. This concept article addresses these gaps by focusing on the hand-off process between emergency and hospital medicine physicians. Sensitivity to cultural and operational differences and a common set of expectations pertaining to hand-off content will more effectively prepare the next provider to act safely and efficiently when caring for the patient. Through a consensus decision-making process of experienced and published authorities in health care transitions, including physicians in both specialties as well as in communication studies, the authors propose content and style principles clinicians may use to improve transition communication. With representation from both community and academic settings, similarities and differences between emergency medicine and internal medicine are highlighted to heighten appreciation of the values, attitudes, and goals of each specialty, particularly pertaining to communication. The authors also examine different communication media, social and cultural behaviors, and tools that practitioners use to share patient care information. Quality measures are proposed within the structure, process, and outcome framework for institutions seeking to evaluate and monitor improvement strategies in hand-off performance. Validation studies to determine if these suggested improvements in transition communication will result in improved patient outcomes will be necessary. By exploring the dynamics of transition communication between specialties and suggesting best practices, the authors hope to strengthen hand-off skills and contribute to improved continuity of care. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. A Qualitative Study of the Influences on Clinical Academic Physicians' Postdoctoral Career Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica F; Barratt, Helen; Rees, Geraint; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-01-23

    To describe the influences on clinical academic physicians' postdoctoral career decision-making. Thirty-five doctoral trainee physicians from University College London took part in semi-structured interviews in 2015 and 2016. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their career to-date, their experiences undertaking a PhD, and their career plans post-PhD. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to generate, review, and define themes from the transcripts. Emerging differences and similarities in participants' reasons for pursuing a PhD were then grouped to produce typologies to explore how their experiences influenced their career decision-making. Participants described four key reasons for undertaking a PhD, which formed the basis of the four typologies identified. These reasons included: to pursue a clinical academic career; to complete an extensive period of research to understand whether a clinical academic career was the desired path forward; to improve clinical career prospects; and to take a break from clinical training. These findings highlight the need to target efforts at retaining clinical academic physicians according to their reasons for pursuing a PhD and their subsequent experiences with the process. Those responsible for overseeing clinical training must be well-informed of the long-term benefits of training academically-qualified physicians. In light of current political uncertainty, universities, hospitals, and external agencies alike must increase their efforts to inspire and assuage early-career clinical academic physicians' fears regarding their academic future.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  8. Physicians' job satisfaction and motivation in a public academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vasconcelos Filho, Paulo; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon; D'Ávila Viana, Ana Luiza

    2016-12-07

    Physician shortage is a global issue that concerns Brazil's authorities. The organizational structure and the environment of a medical institution can hide a low-quality life of a physician. This study examines the relationship between the hospital work environment and physicians' job satisfaction and motivation when working in a large public academic hospital. The study was restricted to one large, multispecialty Brazil's hospital. Six hundred hospital physicians were invited to participate by e-mail. A short version of the Physician Worklife Survey (PWS) was used to measure working satisfaction. Physicians were also asked for socio-demographic information, medical specialty, and the intention to continue working in the hospital. Data from 141 questionnaires were included in the analyses. Forty-five physicians graduated from the hospital's university, and they did not intend to leave the hospital under any circumstance (affective bond). The motivating factor for beginning the career at the hospital and to continue working there were the connection to the medical school and the hospital status as a "prestigious academic hospital"; the physicians were more satisfied with the career than the specialty. Only 30% completely agreed with the statement "If I had to start my career over again, I would choose my current specialty," while 45% completely agreed with the statement "I am not well compensated given my training and experience." The greater point of satisfaction was the relationship with physician colleagues. They are annoyed about the amount of calls they are requested to take and about how work encroaches on their personal time. No significant differences between medical specialties were found in the analysis. The participants were satisfied with their profession. The fact that they remained at the hospital was related to the academic environment, the relationship with colleagues, and the high prestige in which society holds the institution. The points of

  9. Physician Assistants Contribution to Emergency Department Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Brook, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this report is to determine physician assistant (PA productivity in anacademic emergency department (ED and to determine whether shift length or department censusimpact productivity.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted at a tertiary ED during June and July of 2007.Productivity was calculated as the mean number of patients seen each hour. Analysis of variance wasused to compare the productivity of different length shifts, and linear regression analysis was used toassess the relationship between productivity and department volume.Results: One hundred sixty PA shifts were included. Shifts ranged from 4 to 13 hours. Meanproductivity was 1.16 patients per hour (95% confidence interval [CI] ¼ 1.12–1.20. Physicianassistants generated a mean of 2.35 relative value units (RVU per hour (95% CI¼1.98–2.72. Therewas no difference in productivity on different shift lengths (P¼0.73. There was no correlation betweendepartmental census and productivity, with an R2 (statistical term for the coefficient of determination of0.01.Conclusion: In the ED, PAs saw 1.16 patients and generated 2.35 RVUs per hour. The length of theshift did not affect productivity. Productivity did not fluctuate significantly with changing departmentalvolume.

  10. Emergency Physician Awareness of Prehospital Procedures and Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Waldron

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maintaining patient safety during transition from prehospital to emergency department (ED care depends on effective handoff communication between providers. We sought to determine emergency physicians’ (EP knowledge of the care provided by paramedics in terms of both procedures and medications, and whether the use of a verbal report improved physician accuracy. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase observational survey of a convenience sample of EPs in an urban, academic ED. In this large ED paramedics have no direct contact with physicians for non-critical patients, giving their report instead to the triage nurse. In Phase 1, paramedics gave verbal report to the triage nurse only. In Phase 2, a research assistant (RA stationed in triage listened to this report and then repeated it back verbatim to the EPs caring for the patient. The RA then queried the EPs 90 minutes later regarding their patients’ prehospital procedures and medications. We compared the accuracy of these 2 reporting methods. Results: There were 163 surveys completed in Phase 1 and 116 in Phase 2. The oral report had no effect on EP awareness that the patient had been brought in by ambulance (86% in Phase 1 and 85% in Phase 2. The oral report did improve EP awareness of prehospital procedures, from 16% in Phase 1 to 45% in Phase 2, OR=4.28 (2.5-7.5. EPs were able to correctly identify all oral medications in 18% of Phase 1 cases and 47% of Phase 2 cases, and all IV medications in 42% of Phase 1 cases and 50% of Phase 2 cases. The verbal report led to a mild improvement in physician awareness of oral medications given, OR=4.0 (1.09-14.5, and no improvement in physician awareness of IV medications given, OR=1.33 (0.15-11.35. Using a composite score of procedures plus oral plus IV medications, physicians had all three categories correct in 15% of Phase 1 and 39% of Phase 2 cases (p<0.0001. Conclusion: EPs in our ED were unaware of many prehospital procedures and

  11. Gender disparities in research productivity among 9952 academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Cherla, Deepa V; Diaz, Lucia; Kovalerchik, Olga; Mauro, Kevin M; Baredes, Soly; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S

    2013-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased considerably over the past 3 decades, and they now comprise approximately half of medical school matriculants. We examine whether gender disparities in research productivity are present throughout various specialties and compare these findings to those previously described among otolaryngologists. Bibliometric analysis. Research productivity, measured by the h-index, was calculated for 9,952 academic physicians representing 34 medical specialties. Additionally, trends in how rate of research productivity changed throughout different career stages were compared. Women were underrepresented at the level of professor and in positions of departmental leadership relative to their representation among assistant and associate professors. Male faculty had statistically higher research productivity both overall (H = 10.3 ± 0.14 vs. 5.6 ± 0.14) and at all academic ranks. For the overall sample, men and women appeared to have equivalent rates of research productivity. In internal medicine, men had higher early-career productivity, while female faculty had productivity equaling and even surpassing that of their male colleagues beyond 20 to 25 years. Men and women had equivalent productivity in surgical specialties throughout their careers, and similar rates in pediatrics until 25 to 30 years. Female academic physicians have decreased research productivity relative to men, which may be one factor contributing to their underrepresentation at the level of professor and departmental leader relative to their proportions in junior academic ranks. Potential explanations may include fewer woman physicians in the age groups during which higher academic ranks are attained, greater family responsibilities, and greater involvement in clinical service and educational contributions. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Gender differences in academic productivity and leadership appointments of physicians throughout academic careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darcy A; Enders, Felicity; Lindor, Rachel; McClees, Martha; Lindor, Keith D

    2011-01-01

    Because those selected for leadership in academic medicine often have a record of academic productivity, publication disparities may help explain the gender imbalance in leadership roles. The authors aimed to compare the publication records, academic promotions, and leadership appointments of women and men physicians longitudinally throughout academic careers. In 2007, the authors conducted a retrospective, longitudinal cohort study of all 25 women physicians then employed at Mayo Clinic with ≥20 years of service at Mayo and of 50 male physician controls, matched 2:1 by appointment date and career category, to women. The authors recorded peer-reviewed publications, timing of promotion, and leadership appointments throughout their careers. Women published fewer articles throughout their careers than men (mean [standard deviation] 29.5 [28.8] versus 75.8 [60.3], P = .001). However, after 27 years, women produced a mean of 1.57 more publications annually than men (P academic rank of professor compared with seven women (28%) (P = .01). Throughout their careers, women held fewer leadership roles than men (P leadership position, compared with 15 men (30%). Women's publication rates increase and actually exceed those of men in the latter stages of careers, yet women hold fewer leadership positions than men overall, suggesting that academic productivity assessed midcareer may not be an appropriate measure of leadership skills and that factors other than publication record and academic rank should be considered in selecting leaders.

  13. Moral experience and ethical challenges in an emergency department in Pakistan: emergency physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed

    2015-04-01

    Emergency departments (ED) are often stressful environments posing unique ethical challenges-issues that primarily raise moral rather than clinical concerns-in patient care. Despite this, there are very few reports of what emergency physicians find ethically challenging in their everyday work. Emergency medicine (EM) is a relatively young but rapidly growing specialty that is gaining acceptance worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of EM residents and physicians regarding the common ethical challenges they face during patient care in one of only two academic EM departments in Pakistan. These challenges could then be addressed in residents' training and departmental practice guidelines. A qualitative research design was employed and in-depth interviews were conducted with ED physicians. Participants were encouraged to think of specific examples from their work, to highlight the particular ethical concerns raised and to describe in detail the process by which those concerns were addressed or left unresolved. Transcripts were analysed using grounded theory methods. Thirteen participants were interviewed and they described four key challenges: how to provide highest quality care with limited resources; how to be truthful to patients; what to do when it is not possible to provide or continue treatment to patients; and when (and when not) to offer life-sustaining treatments. Participants' accounts provided important insights into how physicians tried to resolve these challenges in the 'local moral world' of an ED in Pakistan. The study highlights the need for developing systematic and contextually appropriate mechanisms for resolving common ethical challenges in the EDs and for training residents in moral problem solving. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Attitudes Toward Academic Dishonesty in Physician Assistant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Marianne E; Coleman, Suzanne; Johannsson, Mark B; Wright, Karen A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physician assistant (PA) students' attitudes and experiences toward academic dishonesty during training and to determine whether PA students self-report cheating during PA school. An anonymous, quantitative, exploratory, descriptive survey was sent to clinical-year PA students enrolled in PA programs accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). A sample of 493 self-selected PA students in their clinical year of training responded to the survey. Only 3% of clinical-year PA students self-reported cheating during PA school. Males self-reported significantly higher rates of cheating in PA school than females. The most common cheating behavior that clinical-year PA students reported either observing or hearing about in PA school was receiving information about an exam prior to its administration (70.9%). The attitudinal statement that respondents most strongly agreed with was that "cheaters in PA school just end up hurting themselves in the long run." The strongest predictor for cheating in PA school was a history of cheating as an undergraduate. This study confirmed previous research indicating that academic dishonesty exists in PA education. It also determined that clinical-year PA student attitudes toward and experiences with academic dishonesty vary.

  15. Sports medicine training and practice opportunities for emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henehan, Michael J; Cappellari, Ann M; Stromwall, Amy E; Donaldson, Nathan G

    2013-10-01

    There is growing interest among emergency physicians to seek additional training in Sports Medicine (SM) and to add it to their clinical practice. This presents unique training and practice management issues. The majority of Primary Care SM fellowship programs list that they will accept emergency physicians, and approximately one-third have already had an emergency physician as an SM fellow. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the key elements for emergency physicians to consider as they pursue SM career goals. Training needs such as continuity of care as it pertains to the athlete, SM skills development, and practice management are reviewed. Practice challenges such as malpractice insurance and billing issues are discussed. Examples of several practice models are presented. Evolving trends in SM practice and training opportunities for emergency physicians are discussed as well. Sports Medicine is a viable career option for emergency physicians and may complement their skills set in the management of acute injuries. Practice and training opportunities will continue to evolve as this pathway into the practice of SM gains further recognition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The organizational commitment of emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval de la Torre, A; Bulchand Gidumal, J; Melián González, S

    2016-12-30

    Background. There are not too many studies that deal with the organizational commitment of emergency physicians. This commitment has been shown to impact organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of commitment of the emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals and the factors that may influence it. Method. Online survey using SurveyMonkey to emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals. Results. Two hundred and five questionnaires were received, 162 from physicians and 43 from heads of the emergency service. Results show an intermediate level of commitment, with affective commitment showing the lowest level and continuance commitment showing the highest level. The capabilities of the physician have an influence on their affective commitment; specific training in emergency procedures and seniority has an influence on their continuance commitment; and the opinion they hold about the organization of their service influences affective commitment. Conclusions. Emergency physicians show an average involvement in the hospital in which they work (average 3.8 on a range of 1 to 5), feel an average affection for it (3.4), and have a high intention to keep working there (4.0). The resources the hospital has due to its level do not have an influence on this commitment, while the training and perceptions of the service do have an influence.

  17. Prevention and treatment of sleep deprivation among emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency physicians commonly experience sleep deprivation because of the need to work shifts during evening and late night hours. The negative effects of this problem are compounded by job stress and traditional methods of scheduling work shifts. Sleep deprivation may be reduced by schedules designed to lessen interference with normal sleep patterns and circadian rhythms. Pharmacological treatments for sleep deprivation exist in the form of alertness-enhancing agents, caffeine and modafinil. Sleep-promoting agents may also help treat the problem by helping physicians to sleep during daytime hours. Minimizing sleep deprivation may help prevent job burnout and prolong the length of an emergency physician's career.

  18. [The evaluation of academic emergency department design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Turgut; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Oktay, Cem; Saygun, Meral; Ağalar, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    In our study which was based upon a questionnaire, the inner and outer architectural designs of emergency services of Emergency Medicine Departments were investigated. In this descriptive study, a standard questionnaire was sent to 26 Emergency Medicine Departments which were operating at that time. In the questionnaire, the internal, external architectural and functional features were questioned. Answers of 22 Emergency Medicine Departments were analysed. Two Emergency Medicine Departments that were not operating at that time were not included in the study. The analysis of the replies revealed that only 59% (n=13) of the Emergency Medicine Departments were designed as an emergency service prior to the construction. The ambulance parking areas were not suitable in 77% of the emergency units while only 54.5% (n=12) had protection against adverse weather conditions. In only 59% (n=13) of the emergency units, a triage unit was present and in only one of the in only one (4.5%), a decontamination room was available. It was understood that only 32% (n=8) of the emergency units were appropriate in enlarging their capacity taking the local risk factors into consideration. There was a toilette for disabled patients in only 18% (n=4) of the units as well. Considering a 12-year of history of the Emergency Medicine in Turkey, the presence of a lecture room is still 68% (n=15) in emergency departments which reflects that academic efforts in this field is emerging in challenging physical conditions. The results of our study revealed that emergency service architecture was neglected in Turkey and medical care given was precluded by the insufficient architecture. The design of emergency services has to be accomplished under guidance of scientific data and rules taking advices of architects who have knowledge and experience on this field.

  19. Emergency Physician Estimation of Blood Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Larsson C, Saltvedt S, Wiklund I, et al. Estimation of blood loss after cesarean section and vaginal delivery has low validity with a tendency to...of Emergency Medicine, Seattle, Washington Supervising Section Editor: H. Bryant Nguyen, MD, MS Submission history : Submitted November 9, 2010...between laboratory determination and visual estimation of blood loss during normal delivery . Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1991;38:119–124. 3

  20. Female authorship in emergency medicine parallels women practicing academic emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinjum, Banu E; Getto, Leila; Tiedemann, Juliah; Marri, Maaya; Brodowy, Michelle; Bollinger, Melissa; O'Connor, Robert E; Breyer, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Studies have shown that women in emergency medicine (EM) lag behind their male counterparts in academic productivity. We compared the proportion of female attending physicians from EM academic programs to the proportion of female first or second authors of original scientific manuscripts and case reports from four major EM journals in a single year. We used a retrospective cross-sectional design. Original scientific manuscripts and case reports from four major EM journals published in 2005: Academic Emergency Medicine, Annals of Emergency Medicine, American Journal of Emergency Medicine, and Journal of Emergency Medicine were reviewed to determine genders of first and second authors. The proportion of female first or second authorship was then compared to the proportion of female EM attending physicians from 134 academic EM programs in the United States. Data were analyzed using Pearson's chi-squared and Clopper-Pearson binomial confidence intervals as appropriate. A p-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. The percentage of female faculty; 940/3571 (26.32%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 24.9-27.8%) vs. the percentage of female first or second authorship 289/1123 (25.73%, 95% CI 23.3-28.4%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.562). There was no difference in the proportion of male and female authors with multiple manuscripts (p = 0.889). As measured by first and second authorship, there was no discrepancy between the proportion of female EM faculty and the proportion of female authorship in EM literature from 2005. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fundamentals of financial statement analysis for academic physician managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, J T; Boom, M L

    1998-04-01

    Academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) and academic medical practices are under pressure to control costs to compete with for-profit health care institutions. The authors explain how academic physician managers who want to control costs wisely must first understand the cost structure of the medical center or practice and compare that structure with those of for-profit institutions. Doing this requires a firm understanding of how to use a valuable tool, financial statement analysis, to assess an institution's health and performance. Such analysis consists of calculating a variety of financial ratios (e.g., operating income divided by revenues; net income divided by total assets) and then comparing them with the corresponding ratios that are considered industry norms. Three types of financial statements (defined in detail) lend themselves to this approach: the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The authors define standard financial ratios, point out their uses and limitations, and emphasize that a ratio's meaning derives from comparing it with the corresponding benchmark ratio in the industry as a whole. Ratios should be used not as the end point of assessing financial status, but as ways to identify possible problems that require further investigation. Analysis of trends of ratios over time within an institution is a complementary approach. The authors then discuss the use of ratios in three standard types of institutional evaluation: of performance, of liquidity and leverage, and of strategic planning. In addition, they present the financial statement of a fictitious academic medical center as an example of how to use ratios for financial statement analysis. The authors emphasize that the key to using the ratios they discuss and hundreds of others is first to decide what question needs answering and then to choose the relevant ratios to provide a basis for finding the answer.

  2. CAEP 2015 Academic Symposium: Leadership within the emergency medicine academic community and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Doug; Worthington, James R; Joubert, Gary; Holroyd, Brian R; Stempien, James; Letovsky, Eric; Rutledge, Tim; LeBlanc, Constance; Pitters, Carrol; McCallum, Andrew; Carr, Brendan; Gerace, Rocco; Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Christenson, Jim

    2016-05-01

    A panel of emergency medicine (EM) leaders endeavoured to define the key elements of leadership and its models, as well as to formulate consensus recommendations to build and strengthen academic leadership in the Canadian EM community in the areas of mentorship, education, and resources. The expert panel comprised EM leaders from across Canada and met regularly by teleconference over the course of 9 months. From the breadth of backgrounds and experience, as well as a literature review and the development of a leadership video series, broad themes for recommendations around the building and strengthening of EM leadership were presented at the CAEP 2015 Academic Symposium held in Edmonton, Alberta. Feedback from the attendees (about 80 emergency physicians interested in leadership) was sought. Subsequently, draft recommendations were developed by the panel through attendee feedback, further review of the leadership video series, and expert opinion. The recommendations were distributed to the CAEP Academic Section for further feedback and updated by consensus of the expert panel. The methods informed the panel who framed recommendations around four themes: 1) leadership preparation and training, 2) self-reflection/emotional intelligence, 3) academic leadership skills, and 4) gender balance in academic EM leadership. The recommendations aimed to support and nurture the next generation of academic EM leaders in Canada and included leadership mentors, availability of formal educational courses/programs in leadership, self-directed education of aspiring leaders, creation of a Canadian subgroup with the AACEM/SAEM Chair Development Program, and gender balance in leadership roles. These recommendations serve as a roadmap for all EM leaders (and aspiring leaders) to build on their success, inspire their colleagues, and foster the next generation of Canadian EM academic leaders.

  3. Inability of Physicians and Nurses to Predict Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Matthew C.; Page, David B.; Kunstadt, Ethan B.; Ragan, Matt; Rodgers, Joel; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is a commonly assessed dimension of emergency department (ED) care quality. The ability of ED clinicians to estimate patient satisfaction is unknown. We sought to evaluate the ability of emergency medicine resident physicians and nurses to predict patient-reported satisfaction with physician and nursing care, pain levels, and understanding of discharge instructions. Methods We studied a convenience sample of 100 patients treated at an urban academic ED. Patients rated satisfaction with nursing care, physician care, pain level at time of disposition and understanding of discharge instructions. Resident physicians and nurses estimated responses for each patient. We compared patient, physician and nursing responses using Cohen’s kappa, weighting the estimates to account for the ordinal responses. Results Overall, patients had a high degree of satisfaction with care provided by the nurses and physicians, although this was underestimated by providers. There was poor agreement between physician estimation of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.23, standard error: 0.078) and nursing estimates of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.11, standard error: 0.043); physician estimation of patient pain (weighted κ=0.43, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.39, standard error: 0.081); physician estimates of patient comprehension of discharge instruction (weighted κ=0.19, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.13, standard error: 0.078). Providers underestimated pain and patient comprehension of discharge instructions. Conclusion ED providers were not able to predict patient satisfaction with nurse or physician care, pain level, or understanding of discharge instructions. PMID:26759661

  4. Clinical review of malaria for the emergency physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Janneck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of the Plasmodium genus, and is one of the most prevalent diseases in Africa and around the world. Emergency physicians in both endemic and non-endemic regions often encounter initial presentations of malaria, and knowledge about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease is crucial in caring for these patients. This article covers briefly the epidemiology of malaria and the lifecycle of the Plasmodium parasite. This is followed by a discussion of the clinical evaluation, diagnosis, and management of patients with malaria, as pertinent to the African emergency physician.

  5. Education and training of physicians for radiation emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The project orders implied the development, testing, and evaluation of a curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management and the development of a master curriculum. Objectives were to develop, preserve, and enlarge medical competence concerning prehospital care of radiation accident patients. The project is expected to contribute to qualify emergency physicians challenged by scenarios related to radiological and nuclear hazards. The development and the content of the curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management are being described. The conduction and evaluation of two pilot training courses with a total of 40 participating physicians are being presented. Successful testing of the pilot courses proves the value of the curriculum developed. Self-contained courses can be performed according to the master curriculum and the respective master presentations. Moreover, single modules can be integrated in existing education and training programmes. Suggestions for the implementation and accreditation of the curriculum are being made. (orig.)

  6. Who Are the Most Influential Emergency Physicians on Twitter?

    OpenAIRE

    Riddell, Jeff; Brown, Alisha; Kovic, Ivor; Jauregui, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Twitter has recently gained popularity in emergency medicine (EM). Opinion leaders on Twitter have significant influence on the conversation and content, yet little is known about these opinion leaders. We aimed to describe a methodology to identify the most influential emergency physicians (EPs) on Twitter and present a current list. Methods: We analyzed 2,234 English language EPs on Twitter from a previously published list of Twitter accounts generated b...

  7. Emergency department physician internet use during clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence.

  8. Neonatal endocrine emergencies: a primer for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elizabeth; Pearson, Nadia M; Pillow, M Tyson; Toledo, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The resuscitation principles of securing the airway and stabilizing hemodynamics remain the same in any neonatal emergency. However, stabilizing endocrine disorders may prove especially challenging. Several organ systems are affected simultaneously and the clinical presentation can be subtle. Although not all-inclusive, the implementation of newborn screening tests has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in neonates. Implementing routine screening tests worldwide and improving the accuracy of present tests remains the challenge for healthcare providers. With further study of these disorders and best treatment practices we can provide neonates presenting to the emergency department with the best possible outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. More than just a hobby: building an academic career in global emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian B K; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Hauswald, Mark

    2014-07-01

    As the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) continues to spread around the world, a growing number of academic emergency physicians have become involved in global EM development, research, and teaching. While academic departments have always found this work laudable, they have only recently begun to accept global EM as a rigorous academic pursuit in its own right. This article describes how emergency physicians can translate their global health work into "academic currency" within both the clinician-educator and clinician-researcher tracks. The authors discuss the impact of various types of additional training, including global EM fellowships, for launching a career in global EM. Clearly delineated clinician-researcher and clinician-educator tracks are important for documenting achievement in global EM. Reflecting a growing interest in global health, more of today's EM faculty members are ascending the academic ranks as global EM specialists. Whether attempting to climb the academic ladder as a clinician-educator or clinician-researcher, advanced planning and the firm support of one's academic chair is crucial to the success of the promotion process. Given the relative youth of the subspecialty of global EM, however, it will take time for the pathways to academic promotion to become well delineated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Do family physicians, emergency department physicians, and pediatricians give consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Jacqueline; Carson, James D; Garel, Alisha; Libfeld, Paula; Snow, Catherine L; Law, Marcus; Frémont, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    To identify differences and gaps in recommendations to patients for the management of sport-related concussion among FPs, emergency department physicians (EDPs), and pediatricians. A self-administered, multiple-choice survey was e-mailed to FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Two community teaching hospitals in the greater Toronto area in Ontario. Two hundred seventy physicians, including FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians, were invited to participate. Identification of sources of concussion management information, usefulness of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after sport-related concussions. The response rate was 43.7%. Surveys were completed by 70 FPs, 23 EDPs, and 11 pediatricians. In total, 49% of FP, 52% of EDP, and 27% of pediatrician respondents reported no knowledge of any consensus statements on concussion in sport, and 54% of FPs, 86% of EDPs, and 78% of pediatricians never used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2. Only 49% of FPs, 57% of EDPs, and 36% of pediatricians always advised cognitive rest. This study identified large gaps in the knowledge of concussion guidelines and implementation of recommendations for treating patients with sport-related concussions. Although some physicians recommended physical and cognitive rest, a large proportion failed to consistently advise this strategy. Better knowledge transfer efforts should target all 3 groups of physicians. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  11. Academic Emergency Medicine Physicians’ Knowledge of Mechanical Ventilation

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    Susan R. Wilcox

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although emergency physicians frequently intubate patients, management of mechanical ventilation has not been emphasized in emergency medicine (EM education or clinical practice. The objective of this study was to quantify EM attendings’ education, experience, and knowledge regarding mechanical ventilation in the emergency department. Methods: We developed a survey of academic EM attendings’ educational experiences with ventilators and a knowledge assessment tool with nine clinical questions. EM attendings at key teaching hospitals for seven EM residency training programs in the northeastern United States were invited to participate in this survey study. We performed correlation and regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between attendings’ scores on the assessment instrument and their training, education, and comfort with ventilation. Results: Of 394 EM attendings surveyed, 211 responded (53.6%. Of respondents, 74.5% reported receiving three or fewer hours of ventilation-related education from EM sources over the past year and 98 (46% reported receiving between 0-1 hour of education. The overall correct response rate for the assessment tool was 73.4%, with a standard deviation of 19.9. The factors associated with a higher score were completion of an EM residency, prior emphasis on mechanical ventilation during one’s own residency, working in a setting where an emergency physician bears primary responsibility for ventilator management, and level of comfort with managing ventilated patients. Physicians’ comfort was associated with the frequency of ventilator changes and EM management of ventilation, as well as hours of education. Conclusion: EM attendings report caring for mechanically ventilated patients frequently, but most receive fewer than three educational hours a year on mechanical ventilation, and nearly half receive 0-1 hour. Physicians’ performance on an assessment tool for mechanical ventilation is

  12. The health of healthcare: Emergency department physician well-being

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    Martin Gagne

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physician health and well-being is an important issue that ultimately affects job performance. We compared the self-reported incidence of known medical issues, physical and mental health symptoms, and health behaviors of Emergency Physicians (EPs with the general public in the United States. Methods: Questions selected from a national survey conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC about public health trends were distributed to via Facebook to a private group of 12,917 EPs. Responses were compared between EPs and the general population using Chi-square tests of independence. Results: Our results demonstrated that EPs suffer less from chronic diseases, especially those related to the cardiopulmonary system; however, they suff er from a higher incidence of musculoskeletal pain and infectious disease complaints. EPs also exhibit higher rates of mental health symptoms, sleep-related complications, and alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Awareness, education, and advocacy may help improve physician health and ultimately job performance.

  13. Physicians' Perceptions about the Emergence of Adolescent Overweight in India

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    Shailaja Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Overweight is increasing in developing countries even as underweight remains highly prevalent in some communities, leading to a double burden of malnutrition. This study explored physicians' perceptions about emergence of overweight and its clinical management in a socioeconomically developing region of India, where underweight constitutes to be a major health problem among children and adolescents. Objective:This study aimed to explore how physicians in the Vijayapura city, India are understanding and managing the emerging double burden of underweight and overweight in adolescents. Material and Methods: A semi structured questionnaire was developed consisting of 35 close-ended questions about causes of obesity, gender differences, and treatment practices and three open-ended questions about the perceived main reasons for obesity .One question ranked various reasons for emergence of adolescent obesity. Twenty- ve physicians participated in the survey. Results: Physicians treated more adolescents for underweight than overweight; however, most said overweight had increased over the past 5 years (72% while underweight had been steady or decreased (80%. Most desired more training on treating patients for overweight (92% and under-nutrition (60%. Most agreed that urban dwelling (72%, high socioeconomic status (72%, male gender (84% and parental obesity (80% were risk factors for obesity. Almost all discussed eating habits (100% and activity levels (80%, and two-thirds ranked environmental factors, like urbanization, globalization, and technology, as most inuential. Conclusion: Physicians indicated that while the predominant problem among adolescents in this part of India is underweight, overweight is increasing due to various environmental, socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors.

  14. Development of a clinical forensic medicine curriculum for emergency physicians in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, W S

    1994-06-01

    To address the forensic needs of living patients, the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, USA initiated the first clinical forensic medicine training programme in the USA. In July 1991, formal training in clinical forensic medicine was incorporated into the core curriculum of the USA's second oldest academic emergency medicine training programme. The University of Louisville, in cooperation with the Kentucky Medical Examiner's Office, developed the curriculum to provide the emergency physician with the knowledge base and technical skills to perform forensic evaluations of living patients. Forensic lectures are given monthly by local and regional forensic experts including: forensic pathologists, prosecuting attorneys, firearm and ballistics examiners, law enforcement officers, forensic chemists and forensic odontologists. Topics which are presented include: forensic pathology, forensic photography, ballistics and firearms analysis, paediatric physical and sexual assault, crime scene investigation, forensic odontology, courtroom and expert testimony and the forensic evaluation of penetrating trauma. As a result of the introduction of clinical forensic medicine into the core curriculum of an emergency medicine training programme the residents are now actively addressing the forensic issues encountered in the Emergency department. Key, often short-lived forensic evidence, which was frequently overlooked or discarded while delivering patient care is now recognized, documented and preserved. The development and introduction of a clinical forensic medicine curriculum into emergency medicine training has greatly enhanced the emergency physician's ability to recognize, document and address the forensic needs of their patients who are victims of violent and non-fatal trauma.

  15. Emergency Physicians Are Able to Detect Right Ventricular Dilation With Good Agreement Compared to Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Matt A; Clary, Julie M; Kline, Jeffrey A; Russell, Frances M

    2017-07-01

    Focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS) is a useful tool in evaluating patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute dyspnea. Prior work has shown that right ventricular (RV) dilation is associated with repeat hospitalizations and shorter life expectancy. Traditionally, RV assessment has been evaluated by cardiologist-interpreted comprehensive echocardiography. The primary goal of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability between emergency physicians (EPs) and a cardiologist for determining RV dilation on FOCUS performed on ED patients with acute dyspnea. This was a prospective, observational study at two urban academic EDs; patients were enrolled if they had acute dyspnea and a computed tomographic pulmonary angiogram without acute disease. All patients had an EP-performed FOCUS to assess for RV dilation. RV dilation was defined as an RV to left ventricular ratio greater than 1. FOCUS interpretations were compared to a blinded cardiologist FOCUS interpretation using agreement and kappa statistics. Of 84 FOCUS examinations performed on 83 patients, 17% had RV dilation. Agreement and kappa, for EP-performed FOCUS for RV dilation were 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80-95%) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.48-0.88), respectively. Emergency physician sonographers are able to detect RV dilation with good agreement when compared to cardiology. These results support the wider use of EP-performed FOCUS to evaluate for RV dilation in ED patients with dyspnea. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. Tattoos and piercings: a review for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdang, Michael; Mallek, Jennifer T; Mallon, William K

    2011-11-01

    Tattoos and piercings are increasingly part of everyday life for large sections of the population, and more emergency physicians are seeing these body modifications (BM) adorn their patients. In this review we elucidate the most common forms of these BMs, we describe how they may affect both the physical and psychological health of the patient undergoing treatment, and also try to educate around any potential pitfalls in treating associated complications.

  17. Tattoos and Piercings: A Review for the Emergency Physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdang, Michael; Mallek, Jennifer T; Mallon, William K

    2011-01-01

    Tattoos and piercings are increasingly part of everyday life for large sections of the population, and more emergency physicians are seeing these body modifications (BM) adorn their patients. In this review we elucidate the most common forms of these BMs, we describe how they may affect both the physical and psychological health of the patient undergoing treatment, and also try to educate around any potential pitfalls in treating associated complications. PMID:22224126

  18. Nurse-Physician Teamwork in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Ajeigbe, David Oladipo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teamwork gained momentum in the 1980s. Research studies in the military and aviation demonstrated that teamwork is essential to safety. There were limited studies dealing with the practice of teamwork between nurses and physicians in the Emergence Departments (EDs). Aims: Descriptive aim of the study was to examine differences between staff in the Interventional and Control Groups on perception of staff teamwork. The exploratory aim was to examine staff perception of job satisfac...

  19. Washington Poison Center as perceived by our state's emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William O; Caffrey, Angela

    2008-03-01

    In 1986, we conducted the first survey of Washington emergency physicians about their perceptions of the performance of the Washington Poison Center (WPC); the results were summarized and published. The exercise was repeated in 1993, 1997 and in 2005. The original conventional 2-page survey was updated and distributed with an explanatory letter and return envelope to a mailing list obtained from the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Responses were tallied, summarized and compared to prior surveys. For 2005, 612 surveys were distributed; 221 were returned. The average respondent had been in practice for 14 years, with more than 50% functioning in "urban" communities. They reported calling the WPC an average of 19 times per year, and particularly valued being able to consult with a board-certified medical toxicologist in a virtually "STAT'' manner. In more than 80% of calls, the information played a positive role in management of the patient. Washington's emergency physicians continue to highly value the WPC's services, with increasing numbers in favor of governmental support of the operation.

  20. Tattoos and Piercing: A Review for the Emergency Department Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William K. Mallon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tattoos and piercings are increasingly part of everyday life for large sections of the population, and more emergency physicians are seeing these body modifications (BM adorn their patients. In this review we elucidate the most common forms of these BMs, we describe how they may affect both the physical and psychological health of the patient undergoing treatment, and also try to educate around any potential pitfalls in treating associated complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:393–398.

  1. Do Emergency Physicians Educate Patients about the Dangers of Drinking and Driving after a Motor Vehicle Collision, and What Are the Barriers or Motivators to Do So?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Meghan; Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Van Aarsen, Kristine; Millard, Wanda; Lim, Rodrick; Miller, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired driving is the leading cause of criminal death in Canada and results in numerous emergency department (ED) visits each year. Methods: An online survey was distributed to 94 emergency physicians and emergency medicine residents at an academic tertiary care hospital in Southwestern Ontario. Descriptive statistics were…

  2. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  3. Assessment of abuse-related injuries: a comparative study of forensic physicians, emergency room physicians, emergency room nurses and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Udo J L; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; de Bruin, Kim H

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study was made investigating whether emergency room physicians, emergency room nurses, forensic physicians, and interns are competent in describing, recognising and determining the possible cause of injuries. The injury assessment scores varied from good--adequate--fail and remained blank in various participant groups. Forensic physicians scored significantly better than emergency room staff and interns in the assessment of abuse-related injuries. There were almost no differences noted between emergency room physicians and emergency room nurses. For the functional group with more or less than 4 to 6 years of experience, no significant differences were noted for scoring good in all 5 cases. The fact that forensic physicians scored better than the emergency room staff is probably explained by the fact that almost all practicing forensic physicians have been officially qualified. Training in this field for all professionals involved in such assessment should be mandatory.

  4. Emergency Department Physician Internet Use during Clinical Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. Methods: The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Results: Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Conclusion: We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence. PMID:23304394

  5. An environmental scan of academic pediatric emergency medicine at Canadian medical schools: Identifying variability across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Jennifer D; Meckler, Garth; Argintaru, Niran; Lim, Roderick; Stiell, Ian G

    2018-01-28

    To complement our environmental scan of academic emergency medicine departments, we conducted a similar environmental scan of the academic pediatric emergency medicine programs offered by the Canadian medical schools. We developed an 88-question form, which was distributed to pediatric academic leaders at each medical school. The responses were validated via email to ensure that the questions were answered completely and consistently. Fourteen of the 17 Canadian medical schools have some type of pediatric emergency medicine academic program. None of the pediatric emergency medicine units have full departmental status, while nine are divisions, two are sections, and three have no status. Canadian academic pediatric emergency medicine is practised at 13 major teaching hospitals and one specialized pediatric emergency department. There are 394 pediatric emergency medicine faculty members, including 13 full professors and 64 associate professors. Eight sites regularly take pediatric undergraduate clinical clerks, and all 14 provide resident education. Fellowship training is offered at 10 sites, with five offering advanced pediatric emergency medicine fellowship training. Half of the sites have at least one physician with a Master's degree in education, totalling 18 faculty members across Canada. There are 31 clinical researchers with salary support at nine universities. Eleven sites have published peer-reviewed papers (n=423) in the past five years, ranging from two to 102 per site. Annual academic budgets range from $10,000 to $2,607,515. This comprehensive review of academic activities in pediatric emergency medicine across Canada identifies the variability across the country, including the recognition of sites above and below the national average, which may prompt change at individual sites. Sharing these academic practices may inspire sites to provide more support to teachers, educators, and researchers.

  6. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. The purpose of this study was to examine academic and non-academic technology use by emerging adult college students. Survey results (N = 235) provided insights into emerging adult college student technology preferences and frequency…

  7. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  8. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

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    DelliFraine, Jami L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess academic emergency medicine (EM chairs’ perceptions of quality improvement (QI training programs.Methods: A voluntary anonymous 20 item survey was distributed to a sample of academic chairs of EM through the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. Data was collected to assess the percentage of academic emergency physicians who had received QI training, the type of training they received, their perception of the impact of this training on behavior, practice and outcomes, and any perceived barriers to implementing QI programs in the emergency department.Results: The response rate to the survey was 69% (N = 59. 59.3% of respondents report that their hospital has a formal QI program for physicians. Chairs received training in a variety of QI programs. The type of QI program used by respondents was perceived as having no impact on goals achieved by QI (χ2 = 12.382; p = 0.260, but there was a statistically significant (χ2 = 14.383; p = 0.006 relationship between whether or not goals were achieved and academic EM chairs’ perceptions about return on investment for QI training. Only 22% of chairs responded that they have already made changes as a result of the QI training. 78.8% of EM chairs responded that quality programs could have a significant positive impact on their practice and the healthcare industry. Chairs perceived that QI programs had the most potential value in the areas of understanding and reducing medical errors and improving patient flow and throughput. Other areas of potential value of QI include improving specific clinical indicators and standardizing physician care.Conclusion: Academic EM chairs perceived that QI programs were an effective way to drive needed improvements. The results suggest that there is a high level of interest in QI but a low level of adoption of training and implementation.[West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:479-485.

  9. CAEP 2015 Academic Symposium: Current State and Recommendations to Achieve Adequate and Sustainable Funding for Emergency Medicine Academic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eddy S; Artz, Jennifer D; Wilkie, Ryan D; Stiell, Ian G; Topping, Claude; Belanger, François P; Afilalo, Marc; Renouf, Tia; Crocco, Anthony; Wyatt, Kelly; Christenson, Jim

    2016-05-01

    To describe the current state of academic emergency medicine (EM) funding in Canada and develop recommendations to grow and establish sustainable funding. A panel of eight leaders from different EM academic units was assembled. Using mixed methods (including a literature review, sharing of professional experiences, a survey of current EM academic heads, and data previously collected from an environmental scan), 10 recommendations were drafted and presented at an academic symposium. Attendee feedback was incorporated, and the second set of draft recommendations was further distributed to the Canadian Association Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section for additional comments before being finalized. Recommendations were developed around the funding challenges identified and solutions developed by academic EM university-based units across Canada. A strategic plan was seen as integral to achieving strong funding of an EM unit, especially when it aligned with departmental and institutional priorities. A business plan, although occasionally overlooked, was deemed an important component for planning and sustaining the academic mission. A number of recommendations surrounding philanthropy consisted of creating partnerships with existing foundations and engaging multiple stakeholders and communities. Synergy between academic and clinical EM departments was also viewed as an opportunity to ensure integration of common missions. Education and networking for current and future leaders were also viewed as invaluable to ensure that opportunities are optimized through strong leadership development and shared experiences to further the EM academic missions across the country. These recommendations were designed to improve the financial circumstances for many Canadian EM units. There is a considerable wealth of resources that can contribute to financial stability for an academic unit, and an annual networking meeting and continuing education on these issues will facilitate

  10. Role of Pediatric Emergency Physicians in Identifying Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Paul, Audrey; Schwartz, Gerald; Pauzé, Denis; Eakin, Paul; Barata, Isabel; Holtzman, Doug; Benjamin, Lee S; Wright, Joseph L; Nickerson, Amanda B; Joseph, Madeline

    2017-02-01

    Bullying is an important public health issue with broad implications. Although this issue has been studied extensively, there is limited emergency medicine literature addressing bullying. The emergency department (ED) physician has a unique opportunity to identify children and adolescents that are victims of bullying, and make a difference in their lives. Our aim is to discuss the role of the emergency physician (EP) in identifying patients who have been victims of bullying and how to provide effective management as well as referral for further resources. This document provides a framework for recognizing, stabilizing, and managing children who have experienced bullying. With the advent of social media, bullying behavior is not limited to in-person situations, and often occurs via electronic communication, further complicating recognition because it may not impart any physical harm to the child. Recognition of bullying requires a high level of suspicion, as patients may not offer this history. After the stabilization of any acute or overt indications of physical injury, along with obtaining a history of the mechanism of injury, the EP has the opportunity to identify the existence of bullying as the cause of the injury, and can address the issue in the ED while collaborating with "physician-extenders," such as social workers, toward identifying local resources for further support. The ED is an important arena for the assessment and management of children who have experienced bullying. It is imperative that EPs on the front lines of patient care address this public health epidemic. They have the opportunity to exert a positive impact on the lives of the children and families who are the victims of bullying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognosis for Emergency Physician with Substance Abuse Recovery: 5-year Outcome Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, John S.; Campbell, Michael; Skipper, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Emergency physicians (EPs) are reported to have a higher rate of substance use disorder (SUD) than most specialties, although little is known about their prognosis. We examined the outcomes of emergency physician compared to other physicians in the treatment of substance use disorders in Physician Health Programs (PHP). Methods: This study used the dataset from a 5-year, longitudinal, cohort study involving 904 physicians with diagnoses of SUD consecutively admitted to ...

  12. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers. Part 1: Their changing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, D J

    1996-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management, intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development; management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. This article article was prepared by the author from research into and presentation of a thesis entitled. "The Importance of Leadership Training And Development For Physicians In Academic Medical Centers In An Increasingly Complex Healthcare Environment, " prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in the College (ACHE). Part 2 will appear in the next issue of the Journal.

  13. Esophageal coin removal by emergency physicians: a continuous quality improvement project incorporating rapid sequence intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rishi; Brown, Lance

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe our experience removing esophageal coins from children in a tertiary care pediatric emergency department over a 4-year period. We retrospectively reviewed a continuous quality improvement data set spanning October 1, 2004, through September 30, 2008. In 96 of 101 cases (95%), emergency physicians successfully retrieved the coin. The median age of the children was 19 months (interquartile range [IQR] 13-43 months; range 4 months-12.8 years). The median time to removal of coin from initiation of intubation was 8 minutes (IQR 4-14 minutes; range 1-60 minutes). Coins were extracted using forceps only in 56 cases, whereas forceps and a Foley catheter were used in the remainder. Succinylcholine and etomidate were used in almost all cases for rapid sequence intubation prior to coin removal. Complications were identified in 46 cases: minor bleeding (13), lip laceration (7), multiple attempts (5), hypoxia (3), accidental extubation (3), dental injuries (3), bradycardia (2), coin advanced (1), right main-stem bronchus intubation (1), and other (8). Emergency physicians successfully removed esophageal coins following rapid sequence intubation in most cases. Our approach may be considered for the management of pediatric esophageal coins, particularly in an academic pediatric emergency department.

  14. CAEP 2016 Academic Symposium on Education Scholarship: Training our Future Clinician Educators in Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Robert A; Artz, Jennifer D; Carrière, Benoit; Field, Simon; Huffman, James; Dong, Sandy L; Bhanji, Farhan; Yiu, Stella; Smith, Sheila; Mengual, Rose; Hicks, Chris; Frank, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To develop consensus recommendations for training future clinician educators (CEs) in emergency medicine (EM). A panel of EM education leaders was assembled from across Canada and met regularly by teleconference over the course of 1 year. Recommendations for CE training were drafted based on the panel's experience, a literature review, and a survey of current and past EM education leaders in Canada. Feedback was sought from attendees at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) annual academic symposium. Recommendations were distributed to the society's Academic Section for further feedback and updated by a consensus of the expert panel. Recommendations were categorized for one of three audiences: 1) Future CEs; 2) Academic departments and divisions (AD&D) that support training to fulfill their education leadership goals; and 3) The CAEP Academic Section. Advanced medical education training is recommended for any emergency physician or resident who pursues an education leadership role. Individuals should seek out mentorship in making decisions about career opportunities and training options. AD&D should regularly perform a needs assessment of their future CE needs and identify and encourage potential individuals who fulfill education leadership roles. AD&D should develop training opportunities at their institution, provide support to complete this training, and advocate for the recognition of education scholarship in their institutional promotions process. The CAEP Academic Section should support mentorship of future CEs on a national scale. These recommendations serve as a framework for training and supporting the next generation of Canadian EM medical educators.

  15. Family physicians' perceptions of academic detailing: a quantitative and qualitative study

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    O'Connor Nicolette

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of academic detailing in changing physicians' knowledge and practice has been the subject of many primary research publications and systematic reviews. However, there is little written about the features of academic detailing that physicians find valuable or that affect their use of it. The goal of our project was to explore family physicians' (FPs perceptions of academic detailing and the factors that affect their use of it. Methods We used 2 methods to collect data, a questionnaire and semi-structured telephone interviews. We mailed questionnaires to all FPs in the Dalhousie Office of Continuing Medical Education database and analyzed responses of non-users and users of academic detailing. After a preliminary analysis of questionnaire data, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 7 FPs who did not use academic detailing and 17 who did use it. Results Overall response rate to the questionnaire was 33% (289/869. Response rate of non-users of academic detailing was 15% (60/393, of users was 48% (229/476. The 3 factors that most encouraged use of academic detailing were the topics selected, the evidence-based approach adopted, and the handout material. The 3 factors that most discouraged the use of academic detailing were spending office time doing CME, scheduling time to see the academic detailer, and having CME provided by a non-physician. Users of academic detailing rated it as being more valuable than other forms of CME. Generally, interview data confirmed questionnaire data with the exception that interview informants did not view having CME provided by a non-physician as a barrier. Interview informants mentioned that the evidence-based approach adopted by academic detailing had led them to more critically evaluate information from other CME programs, pharmaceutical representatives, and journal articles, but not advice from specialists. Conclusion Users of academic detailing highly value its educational

  16. Work-life balance in academic medicine: narratives of physician-researchers and their mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Erin A; De Castro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A; Griffith, Kent A; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-12-01

    Leaders in academic medicine are often selected from the ranks of physician-researchers, whose demanding careers involve multiple professional commitments that must also be balanced with demands at home. To gain a more nuanced understanding of work-life balance issues from the perspective of a large and diverse group of faculty clinician-researchers and their mentors. A qualitative study with semi-structured, in-depth interviews conducted from 2010 to 2011, using inductive analysis and purposive sampling. One hundred former recipients of U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) K08 or K23 career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Three researchers with graduate training in qualitative methods conducted the interviews and thematically coded verbatim transcripts. Five themes emerged related to work-life balance: (1) the challenge and importance of work-life balance for contemporary physician-researchers, (2) how gender roles and spousal dynamics make these issues more challenging for women, (3) the role of mentoring in this area, (4) the impact of institutional policies and practices intended to improve work-life balance, and (5) perceptions of stereotype and stigma associated with utilization of these programs. In academic medicine, in contrast to other fields in which a lack of affordable childcare may be the principal challenge, barriers to work-life balance appear to be deeply rooted within professional culture. A combination of mentorship, interventions that target institutional and professional culture, and efforts to destigmatize reliance on flexibility (with regard to timing and location of work) are most likely to promote the satisfaction and success of the new generation of clinician-researchers who desire work-life balance.

  17. Effect of Teaching Academic Skills on Academic Achievement in Medical Emergency Students

    OpenAIRE

    Otaghi M

    2015-01-01

    Aims: An important aspect of the student’s learning in academic performance is self-regulating. Students without required academic achievement skills need educational approaches to obtain the required insight in self-regulate learning. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of teaching academic skills on academic achievement in the advanced diploma medical emergency students of Ilam University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods: The intervening pretest-posttest stu...

  18. The impact of new-generation physicians on the function of academic anesthesiology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Patricia A

    2007-12-01

    Academic departments of anesthesiology have had to adapt a wide variety of clinical and educational work functions to the viewpoints, values and normative expectations of the newer generations of physicians who now present themselves for training as well as for faculty employment. This commentary will elaborate on key points that academic departments must recognize and incorporate into their functional and organizational imperatives in order to remain successful with regard to physician recruitment and retention. Recognition of differences between newer-generation vs. established physician issues and concerns include differences in: learning style, teaching style, approach to clinical schedules and the concept of life-work balance, academic and personal motivation, desire for control of their work experience, effective productivity incentives, as well as communication style issues and implications thereof. The spectrum of physicians who contribute to the impact of these factors on contemporary academic anesthesiology departments include faculty, nonfaculty staff physicians, residents and medical students. Academic departments of anesthesiology which can successfully incorporate the changes and most importantly the functional and organizational flexibility needed to respond to the newer generations' worldview and so-called balanced goals will be able to best attract high-caliber housestaff and future faculty.

  19. Strategies used to handle stress by academic physicians at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Sara; Boman, John; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress and coping strategies among academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim was to gain knowledge of stress-coping strategies used by academic physicians. Seventeen academic physicians employed at the University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. Qualitative analyses were conducted of data from five focus-group interviews. We identified eight different categories of coping strategies, e.g. self-awareness, time management, to cut corners, and to be in control. We also attempted to fit the dimensions of coping strategies into the models proposed by Folkman and Lazarus and Beehr and McGrath, respectively. The strategies were predominantly used to prevent stress from occurring, to manage anticipated stress, or to handle stress when occurring. Furthermore, the majority of the strategies identified could be placed in the problem-focused category, which we divided in a behavioural and a cognitive sub-category and in a new cognitive problem-focused and emotion-focused category. The study contributes to a wider understanding of the stress coping strategies academic physicians use. Further studies are needed to determine the consequences of these findings in order to enable the design of measures to reduce and prevent stress among academic physicians.

  20. Workload of Attending Physicians at an Academic Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Chen

    2010-08-01

    Conclusion: This study found that work hours among departments differed significantly and that physicians in surgical departments spend the longest hours in clinical work. Those in administrative positions are most involved in clinical work. However, work hours do not definitely represent work intensity, and to define the workload by working hours may be inappropriate for some departments. This possible difference between work hours and work intensity merits further consideration.

  1. Should pediatric emergency physicians be decentralized in the medical community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Benjamin, Lee; Soriano, Annie R; Ponce, Marie Grace; Baren, Jill

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric emergency physicians (PEPs) are well established as primary emergency department (ED) providers in dedicated pediatric centers and university settings. However, the optimum role of these subspecialists is less well defined in the community hospital environment. This study examined the impact on the ED care of children after the introduction of 10 PEPs into a simulated medical community. A computer-generated community was created, containing 10 community hospitals treating 250,000 pediatric ED patients. Children requiring ED treatment received their care at the closest ED to their location. Ten PEPs were introduced into the community, and their impact on patient care was examined under 2 different models. In a restrictive model, the PEPs established 2 full-time pediatric EDs within the 2 busiest hospitals, whereas, in a distributive model, the PEPs were distributed throughout the 8 busiest hospitals. In the 8-hospital model, the PEPs provided direct patient care along with the general emergency physicians in that facility and also provided educational, administrative, and performance improvement support for the department. In the restrictive model, the PEPs impacted the care of 100% of the children presenting for treatment at their 2 practice sites. In the distributive model, impact included the direct patient care by the PEP but also included changes produced in the care provided by the general emergency physicians at the site. Three different levels of impact were considered for the presence of the PEPs: a low-impact version in which the PEPs' presence only impacted 25% of the children at that site, a moderate-impact version in which the impact affected 50% of the children, and a high-impact version in which the impact affected 75% of the children. A secondary analysis was performed to account for the possibility of patients self-diverting from the closest ED to 1 of the pediatric EDs in the restrictive model. In the restrictive model, the addition of 10

  2. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Statement on Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Shellie L; Iserson, Kenneth V; Merck, Lisa H

    2017-10-01

    The integrity of the research enterprise is of the utmost importance for the advancement of safe and effective medical practice for patients and for maintaining the public trust in health care. Academic societies and editors of journals are key participants in guarding scientific integrity. Avoiding and preventing plagiarism helps to preserve the scientific integrity of professional presentations and publications. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Ethics Committee discusses current issues in scientific publishing integrity and provides a guideline to avoid plagiarism in SAEM presentations and publications. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. Designing Academic Leadership Minor Programs: Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Lamine; Gerhardt, Kris

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of leadership programs in universities and colleges in North America, leadership educators and researchers are engaged in a wide ranging dialogue to propose clear processes, content, and designs for providing academic leadership education. This research analyzes the curriculum design of 52 institutions offering a "Minor…

  4. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  5. Attitudes towards homeless people among emergency department teachers and learners: a cross-sectional study of medical students and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Alison G; Zhang, Tony; Hwang, Stephen W

    2013-08-23

    Medical students' attitudes and beliefs about homeless people may be shaped by the attitudes of their teachers and one of the most common sites for learning about homeless patients is the emergency department. The objective of this study was to determine if medical students in the preclinical and clinical years and emergency medicine faculty and residents have different attitudes and beliefs about homeless people. The Health Professional Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI), was administered to all medical students, and emergency medicine physicians and residents at a large academic health sciences center in Canada. The HPATHI examines attitudes, interest and confidence on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences among groups were examined using the Kruskal Wallis test and Pearson's chi-square test. The HPATHI was completed by 371 individuals, for an overall response rate of 55%. Analysis of dichotomized median and percentage results revealed 5/18 statements were significant by both methods. On the attitudes subscales physicians and residents as a group were more negative for 2/9 statements and on the confidence subscale more positive for 1/4 statements. The interest subscale achieved overall statistical significance with decreased positive responses among physicians and residents compared to medical students in 2/5 statements. This study revealed divergences in attitudes, interests and beliefs among medical students and emergency medicine physicians and residents. We offer strategies for training interventions and systemic support of emergency faculty. Emergency medicine physicians can examine their role in the development of medical students through both formal and informal teaching in the emergency department.

  6. Developing Academic Identities: Persuasive Writing as a Tool to Strengthen Emergent Academic Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Paula M.; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how writing samples produced by middle school students reveal their emerging academic identities through their rhetorical choices in writing. Analyses of two texts produced by each student revealed students' implicit understandings of the requirements of academic voice. Through comparisons of each student's texts, strategies…

  7. Pioneering small-group learning in Tanzanian emergency medicine: Investigating acceptability for physician learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G Lim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emergency medicine (EM is a relatively new, but growing medical specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. African EM training programmes have used small-group learning (SGL modalities in their curricula. However, there is little knowledge of whether SGL modalities are perceived to be effective in these African EM training programmes. Objectives. To investigate the acceptability of SGL for physicians’ training in an academic Tanzanian emergency department using a novel EM curriculum. Methods. Using responses to a written questionnaire, we explored the perceived effectiveness of SGL compared with traditional didactic lectures among 38 emergency department physician learners in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Perceptions of SGL were identified from qualitative responses, and regression analyses were used to determine strength of association between quantitative outcomes. Results. Reported benefits of SGL included team building, simulation training, enhancement of procedural skills, and the opportunity to discuss opinions on clinical management. SGL scored more favourably with regard to improving clinical practice, enjoyment of learning, and building peer-to-peer relations. Lectures scored more favourably at improving medical knowledge. Preference towards SGL over lectures for overall training increased with years of clinical experience (95% confidence interval (CI 0.16 - 0.62, p=0.002, Spearman’s rho 0.51, and the perception that SGL reinforces learner-teacher relationships correlated with seniority within residency training (95% CI 0.14 - 0.86, p=0.007, Spearman’s rho 0.47. Conclusion. Techniques of SGL were perceived as effective at improving clinical practice in the emergency department setting. These modalities may be more favourably accepted by more experienced physician learners – therefore, new EM teaching programmes in Africa should consider these factors when targeting educational strategies for their respective regions and learner

  8. Availability of emergency contraception: a survey of hospital emergency department gynaecologists and emergency physicians in Piedmont, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Marco; Casagranda, Ivo; Charrier, Lorena; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2012-10-01

    To compare the knowledge and the willingness of emergency physicians and gynaecologists caring for women in Italian emergency departments (EDs) to prescribe levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-EC pills). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009; anonymous postal questionnaires were mailed to the medical staff working at the 30 EDs located in Piedmont (Italy). Emergency physicians and gynaecologists have similar knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LNG-EC pills, but do not feel at ease in prescribing these and consider the prescription of LNG-EC pills an inappropriate activity for ED staff. In Italy, unlike in most other European countries, LNG-EC pills are still prescription drugs. Thus it may be useful to further investigate the reasons why Italian ED medical staff do not feel the prescription of LNG-EC pills should be within their remit and whether women can successfully obtain the prescription from physicians working in other services that can be accessed around the clock.

  9. Emergency department physicians spend only 25% of their working time on direct patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, Laila Maria; Nørgaard, Birgitte; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2013-01-01

    physicians spend on these tasks and it is therefore difficult to assess how changes in the system might affect workflow and thus time efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate how physicians in the emergency department (ED) of a public hospital in Denmark spend their time. Results were stratified...... for physicians working in the emergency room (ER) and the admission area of our ED....

  10. Academic productivity and its relationship to physician salaries in the University of California Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijalkowski, Natalia; Zheng, Luo Luo; Henderson, Michael T; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate whether physicians with higher academic productivity, as measured by the number of publications in Scopus and the Scopus Hirsch index (h-index), earn higher salaries. This was a cross-sectional study. Participants were ophthalmologists, otolaryngologists, neurosurgeons, and neurologists classified as "top earners" (>$100,000 annually) within the University of California (UC) healthcare system in 2008. Bibliometric searches on Scopus were conducted to retrieve the total number of publications and Hirsch indices (h-index), a measure of academic productivity. The association between the number of publications and h-index on physicians' total compensation was determined with multivariate regression models after controlling for the four specialties (ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and neurology), the five institutions (UC San Francisco, UC Los Angeles, UC San Diego, UC Irvine, and UC Davis), and academic rank (assistant professor, associate professor, and professor). The UC healthcare system departments reported 433 faculty physicians among the four specialties, with 71.6% (n = 310) earning more than $100,000 in 2008 and classifying as top earners. After controlling for the specialty, institution, and ranking, there was a significant association between the number of publications on salary (P Scopus number of publications and h-index were correlated (P Scopus h-index was of borderline significance in predicting physician salary (P = 0.12). Physicians with higher Scopus publications had higher total salaries across all four specialties. Every 10 publications were associated with a 2.40% increase in total salary after controlling for specialty, institution, rank, and chair. Ophthalmologists, otolaryngologists, neurosurgeons, and neurologists in the UC healthcare system who are more academically productive receive greater remuneration.

  11. Communication between nurses and physicians: strategies to surviving in the emergency department trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abourbih, Daniel; Armstrong, Sherry; Nixon, Kirsty; Ackery, Alun D

    2015-02-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a challenging and stressful work environment where communication lapses can lead to negative health outcomes. This article offers strategies to Emergency Medicine residents, nurses and staff physicians on how to improve communication to optimize patient care. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D). A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p academic physicians were e-mailed and a total of 252 subjects replied resulting in a 63.6% response rate. There were 84 (33.3%) female and 168 (66.7%) male academic physicians participating in the study. One hundred and eight out of 252 (42.8%) academic physicians were taking night calls (p sleep and 84 (33.3%) reported napping daily (p 10) (p academic physicians was associated with a poorer quality of life (p academic physicians suffered from sleepiness. There was an association between the poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Sense of meaning as a predictor of burnout in emergency physicians in Israel: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Itzhak, Shulamit; Dvash, Jonathan; Maor, Maya; Rosenberg, Noa; Halpern, Pinchas

    2015-12-01

    Burnout is common in physicians and particularly acute in emergency physicians. Physician burnout may adversely affect physicians' lives and the quality of care they provide, but much remains unknown about its main contributing factors. The present study evaluated burnout rates and contributing factors in emergency physicians in Israel, specifically focusing on the role of a sense of meaning, which has received little attention in the literature concerning burnout in emergency physicians. A multicenter study, involving a convenience sample of physicians working full-time in the emergency departments of 16 general hospitals in Israel, was conducted. Questionnaires were used to assess burnout, demographic characteristics, professional stress, emotional distress, satisfaction, and quality of professional life, and open-ended questions were used to evaluate subjective perception of job satisfaction. Seventy physicians completed the questionnaires; 71.4% reported significant burnout levels in at least one of the burnout measures, while 82% also reported medium or high levels of competency. Burnout levels were associated with work-life balance, work satisfaction, social support, depressive symptoms, stress, and preoccupying thoughts. Regression analysis yielded two significant factors associated with burnout: worry and a sense of existential meaning derived from work. In addition, 61%, 51%, and 17% of participants exhibited high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and a low sense of personal accomplishment, respectively. These results indicate a high burnout rate in emergency physicians in Israel and highlight relevant positive and negative factors including the importance of addressing existential meaning in designing specific intervention programs to counter burnout.

  14. Technology-enabled academic detailing: computer-mediated education between pharmacists and physicians for evidence-based prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall; Nguyen, Anne; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Cressman, Céline; Zibrik, Lindsay

    2013-09-01

    Academic detailing (AD) is the practice of specially trained pharmacists with detailed medication knowledge meeting with physicians to share best practices of prescribing. AD has demonstrated efficacy in positively influencing physicians' prescribing behavior. Nevertheless, a key challenge has been that physicians in rural and remote locations, or physicians who are time challenged, have limited ability to participate in face-to-face meetings with academic detailers, as these specially trained academic detailers are primarily urban-based and limited in numbers. To determine the feasibility of using information technologies to facilitate communication between academic detailers and physicians (known as Technology-Enabled Academic Detailing or TEAD) through a comparison to traditional face-to-face academic detailing (AD). Specifically, TEAD is compared to AD in terms of the ability to aid physicians in acquiring evidence-informed prescribing information on diabetes-related medications, measured in terms of time efficiency, satisfaction of both physicians and pharmacists, and quality of knowledge exchange. General Practitioner Physicians (n=105) and pharmacists (n=12) were recruited from across British Columbia. Pharmacists were trained to be academic detailers on diabetes medication usage. Physicians were assigned to one of four intervention groups to receive four academic detailing sessions from trained pharmacists. Intervention groups included: (1) AD only, (2) TEAD only, (3) TEAD crossed over to AD at midpoint, and (4) AD crossed over to TEAD at midpoint. Evaluation included physician-completed surveys before and after each session, pharmacist logs after each detailing session, interviews and focus groups with physicians and pharmacists at study completion, as well as a technical support log to record all phone calls and emails from physicians and pharmacists regarding any technical challenges during the TEAD sessions, or usage of the web portal. Because

  15. Effect of Teaching Academic Skills on Academic Achievement in Medical Emergency Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otaghi M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: An important aspect of the student’s learning in academic performance is self-regulating. Students without required academic achievement skills need educational approaches to obtain the required insight in self-regulate learning. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of teaching academic skills on academic achievement in the advanced diploma medical emergency students of Ilam University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods: The intervening pretest-posttest study without any control group was a section of a greater action-research study to conduct and implement an educational process. The intervention included two 3-hour educational workshops for ten academic skills at one month interval for 23 advanced diploma medical emergency students of Ilam University of Medical Sciences during their second educational semester in 2014. The study tool was a 10-phrase self-made questionnaire, its validity and reliability was confirmed. Data was analyzed in SPSS 21 software using Paired-T test. Findings: There was an increase in the mean total score of academic skills after the intervention (p=0.009. From ten skills, the differences between the mean scores before and after the intervention were significant only in academic planning skills (p=0.025, the utilization of the memory strengthening methods (p=0.045, and correct study techniques (p=0.031. Academic intervention affected the students’ academic achievement (GPA (p=0.001. Conclusion: Conducting academic skills educational workshops affects the utilization of the skills by the students and their academic achievements. 

  16. Administrative Costs Associated With Physician Billing and Insurance-Related Activities at an Academic Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Phillip; Kaplan, Robert S; Richman, Barak D; Shah, Mahek A; Schulman, Kevin A

    2018-02-20

    Administrative costs in the US health care system are an important component of total health care spending, and a substantial proportion of these costs are attributable to billing and insurance-related activities. To examine and estimate the administrative costs associated with physician billing activities in a large academic health care system with a certified electronic health record system. This study used time-driven activity-based costing. Interviews were conducted with 27 health system administrators and 34 physicians in 2016 and 2017 to construct a process map charting the path of an insurance claim through the revenue cycle management process. These data were used to calculate the cost for each major billing and insurance-related activity and were aggregated to estimate the health system's total cost of processing an insurance claim. Estimated time required to perform billing and insurance-related activities, based on interviews with management personnel and physicians. Estimated billing and insurance-related costs for 5 types of patient encounters: primary care visits, discharged emergency department visits, general medicine inpatient stays, ambulatory surgical procedures, and inpatient surgical procedures. Estimated processing time and total costs for billing and insurance-related activities were 13 minutes and $20.49 for a primary care visit, 32 minutes and $61.54 for a discharged emergency department visit, 73 minutes and $124.26 for a general inpatient stay, 75 minutes and $170.40 for an ambulatory surgical procedure, and 100 minutes and $215.10 for an inpatient surgical procedure. Of these totals, time and costs for activities carried out by physicians were estimated at a median of 3 minutes or $6.36 for a primary care visit, 3 minutes or $10.97 for an emergency department visit, 5 minutes or $13.29 for a general inpatient stay, 15 minutes or $51.20 for an ambulatory surgical procedure, and 15 minutes or $51.20 for an inpatient surgical procedure. Of

  17. The Physician-as-Stakeholder: An Exploratory Qualitative Analysis of Physicians' Motivations for Using Shared Decision Making in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Elizabeth M; Goff, Sarah L; Elia, Tala R; Khordipour, Errel R; Poronsky, Kye E; Nault, Kelly A; Lindenauer, Peter K; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is increasingly recognized as an important facet of patient-centered care. Despite growing interest in SDM in the emergency department (ED), little is known about emergency physicians' (EPs') motivations for using SDM. Understanding current patterns of SDM use and EP's rationale for using SDM is essential for the development of interventions to increase use. Recognizing the EP as an important stakeholder in SDM research, we sought to identify and explore factors that may motivate EPs' engagement in SDM. In this qualitative study, informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory, we conducted semistructured interviews with a purposeful sample of EPs. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Using a directed qualitative content analysis approach, three members of the research team performed open coding of the transcripts in an iterative process, building a provisional code book as coding progressed. Respondent validation was employed to ensure methodologic rigor. Fifteen EPs, ages 31-65, from both academic and community practice settings, were interviewed. Several had not heard of the specific phrase "shared decision making," but all understood the concept and felt that they used SDM techniques to some degree. Most noted they had often had an agenda when they used SDM, which often motivated them to have the conversation. Agendas described included counteracting an algorithmic or defensive approach to diagnosis and treatment, avoiding harmful tests, or sharing uncertainty. All participants believed that patients benefited from SDM in terms of satisfaction, engagement, or education. Nearly all participants identified research outcomes that they felt would encourage their use of SDM (e.g., improvements in patient engagement, mitigation of risk) and many prioritized patient-centered outcomes over systems outcomes such as improved resource utilization. Little consensus was seen, however, regarding the importance

  18. Evaluation of an Asynchronous Physician Voice Mail Sign-out for Emergency Department Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Leora I.; Parwani, Vivek; Shah, Nidhi R.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Meredith, Thom; Jenq, Grace Y.; Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Communication failures contribute to errors in the transfer of patients from the emergency department (ED) to inpatient medicine units. Oral (synchronous) communication has numerous benefits but is costly and time-consuming. Taped (asynchronous) communication may be more reliable and efficient, but lacks interaction. We evaluated a new asynchronous physician-physician sign-out compared to the traditional synchronous sign-out. Methods A voicemail-based, semi-structured sign-out for routine ED admissions to internal medicine was implemented in October, 2007 at an urban, academic medical center. Outcomes were obtained by pre- and post-intervention surveys of ED and IM housestaff, physician assistants and hospitalist attendings; and by examination of access logs and administrative data. Outcome measures included utilization; physician perceptions of ease, accuracy, content, interaction and errors; and rate of transfers to intensive care from the floor within 24 hours of ED admission. Results were analyzed both quantitatively, and qualitatively using standard qualitative analytic techniques. Results During September-October, 2008 (one year post-intervention), voicemails were recorded regarding 90.5% of medicine admissions; 69.7% of these were accessed at least once by admitting physicians. The median length of each sign-out was 2.6 minutes (IQR 1.9 to 3.5). We received 117/197 responses (59%) to the pre-intervention survey and 113/206 responses (55%) to the post-intervention survey. A total of 73/101 (72%) respondents reported dictated sign-out was easier than oral sign-out and 43/101 (43%) reported it was more accurate. However, 70/101 (69%) reported interaction among participants was worse. There was no change in the rate of ICU transfer within 24 hours of admission from the ED in April-June, 2007 (65/6,147; 1.1%) versus April-June 2008 (70/6,263; 1.1%); difference of 0%, 95% CI, −0.4% to 0.3%. The proportion of internists reporting at least one perceived

  19. Reimagining the self at late-career transitions: how identity threat influences academic physicians' retirement considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyura, Betty; Bohnen, John; Wasylenki, Don; Jarvis, Anna; Giblon, Barney; Hyland, Robert; Silver, Ivan; Leslie, Karen

    2015-06-01

    There is scant empirical work exploring academic physicians' psychosocial adjustment during late-career transitions or on the factors that influence their retirement decisions. The authors examine these issues through the lens of sociopsychological identity theory, specifically examining how identity threat influences academic physicians' decisions about retirement. Participants were academic physicians at a Canadian medical school and were recruited via e-mail requests for clinical faculty interested in discussing late-career and retirement planning issues. Participants included 15 males and 6 females (N = 21; mean age = 63, standard deviation = 7.54), representing eight specialties (clinical and surgical). Data were collected in October and November 2012 via facilitated focus groups, which were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and anonymized, then analyzed using thematic analysis. Four primary themes were identified: centrality of occupational identity, experiences of identity threat, experiences of aging in an indifferent system, and coping with late-career transitions. Identity threats were manifested in apprehensions about self-esteem after retirement, practice continuity, and clinical competence, as well as in a loss of meaning and belonging. These identity challenges influenced decisions on whether to retire. Organizational and system support was perceived as wanting. Coping strategies included reimagining and revaluing various aspects of the self through assimilating new activities and reprioritizing others. Identity-related struggles are a significant feature of academic physicians' considerations about late-career transitions. Understanding these challenges, their antecedents, and their consequences can prepare faculty, and their institutions, to better manage late-career transitions. Individual- and institution-level implications are discussed.

  20. No Easy Way Out: A Case of Physician-Assisted Dying in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David H

    2017-10-12

    Currently, 1 out of 6 Americans lives within a jurisdiction in which physician-assisted dying is legally authorized. In most cases, patients ingest lethal physician-assisted dying medications at home without involvement of emergency medical services (EMS) or the emergency department (ED). However, occasionally the dying process is interrupted as a result of incomplete ingestion or vomiting of medications, confusion about timing of dying trajectory, familial emotional distress, and other variables. A case is presented here of a patient who arrived by ambulance to an urban ED after ingesting physician-assisted dying medication. Stepwise analysis of communication and actions between providers (paramedics, emergency physician, and admitting physician), risk management, and family are described chronologically. This case highlights the significant distress experienced by each party, as well as key challenges and learning points. Guidance is provided to emergency providers about expectations and communication. In states with limited physician-assisted dying experience, many EMS agencies, EDs, and hospitals require comprehensive protocols to handle the complex ethical and psychosocial issues surrounding physician-assisted dying in the ED. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation on legal problems encountered by emergency medicine physicians in Turkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsin Emre Kayipmaz

    Full Text Available Medicine is a profession that carries certain risks. One risky area of practice is the emergency department. Emergency physicians diagnose and treat a high volume of patients, and are also responsible for preparing reports for forensic cases. In this study, we aim to investigate emergency physicians' legal-administrative problems and reveal their level of understanding on forensic cases.An electronic questionnaire form was prepared after the approval of an ethical committee. This form was sent to the residents, specialists and academicians of emergency medicine by e-mail. The physicians were asked to fill out the form online. All the gathered data was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were presented as frequency percentages with mean and standard deviation. Chi-square tests were used to compare the groups. Correlation between number of complaint cases and age, sex, career, institution, and duration of service in emergency department were investigated. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.294 physicians participated in the questionnaire. According to the questionnaire, 170 of the physicians were reported to the patient communication units due to medical malpractice. Mean number of compliant reports was 3.20±3.5. 29 of the physicians received administrative penalties. 42 of the physicians were judged in the court for medical malpractice. 1 physician was fined 5000 Turkish Liras as a result of these judgments.We found that the number of complaint reports is negatively correlated with duration of service in emergency medicine and age. There was a significant difference between number of complaint reports and career (p<0.05. The physicians' level of awareness on forensic cases was found to be insufficient. Lack of legislation knowledge may be an important cause of complaint reports concerning emergency physicians, who have a high load of patients. Thus, we think that increasing the frequency of post-graduate education sessions and

  2. [Scientific publication output of Spanish emergency physicians from 2005 to 2014: a comparative study].

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    Fernández-Guerrero, Inés María; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; Miró, Òscar

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the research output of Spanish emergency physicians between 2005 and 2014 and to compare it to their output in the previous 10-year period (1995-2004) as well as to that of emergency physicians in other countries and Spanish physicians in other specialties. Original articles indexed in the Science Citation Index Expanded of the Web of Science were included. Documents from Spanish emergency physicians were identified by combining the word Spain and any other search term identifying an emergency service or unit in Spain. To identify articles from 7 other Spanish specialties (hematology, endocrinology, cardiology, pneumology, digestive medicine, pediatrics, surgery and orthopedic medicine or traumatology) and emergency physicians in 8 other countries (United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, France, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium) we used similar strategies. Information about production between 1995 and 2004 was extracted from a prior publication. Spanish emergency physicians signed 1254 articles (mean [SD], 125 [44] articles/y) between 2005 and 2014. That level of productivity was greater than in the 1995-2004 period (mean, 26 [14] articles/y), although the annual growth rate fell from 12.5% in the previous 10-year period to 5.2% in the most recent one. Emergency medicine was among the least productive Spanish specialties we studied, but our discipline's annual growth rate of 5.2% was the highest. Spanish emergency medicine occupies an intermediate position (ranking fifth) among the 9 countries studied, although the population-adjusted rank was higher (fourth). When output was adjusted for gross domestic product, Spain climbed higher in rank, to second position. The annual growth rate was the fourth highest among countries, after Germany (9.9%), the Netherlands (7.3%), and Italy (6.0%). The research output of Spanish emergency physicians continues to be quantitatively lower than that of other Spanish specialties and of emergency physicians in other

  3. Perceived roles of Emergency Department physicians regarding anticipatory guidance on firearm safety.

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    Price, James H; Thompson, Amy; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Wiblishauser, Michael; Dowling, Jamie; Teeple, Karen

    2013-05-01

    Several professional medical societies advocate for firearm safety counseling with patients. Little is known about Emergency Physicians' practices and perceptions of firearm safety counseling. To assess Emergency Physicians' beliefs regarding firearm control and their confidence in counseling patients on firearm safety. A national random sample (n = 500) of the members of the American College of Emergency Physicians was sent a valid and reliable questionnaire on firearm safety counseling. Of the 278 (56.8%) responding physicians, those who were non-white and those who were not members of the National Rifle Association (NRA) perceived firearm violence to be more of a problem than white physicians and those who were members of the NRA. The majority did not believe that patients would view them as a good source of information on firearm safety (63.3%) or that patients would accept them providing anticipatory firearm safety guidance (56.5%). The majority of the Emergency Department physicians did not believe firearm safety counseling would impact firearm-related homicides (75.2%) or suicides (70%). The vast majority of Emergency Physicians had never been formally trained regarding firearm safety counseling, did not believe patients would see them as credible sources, and did not believe that anticipatory guidance on firearm safety would have any impact. These data may help inform Emergency Medicine residency programs on the training needs of residents regarding anticipatory guidance on firearm safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physician and Nurse Acceptance of Technicians to Screen for Geriatric Syndromes in the Emergency Department

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    Brian F Gage

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency medicine physician and nurse acceptance of nonnurse, nonphysician screening for geriatric syndromes. Methods: This was a single-center emergency department (ED survey of physicians and nurses after an 8-month project. Geriatric technicians were paid medical student research assistants evaluating consenting ED patients older than 65 years for cognitive dysfunction, fall risk, or functional decline. The primary objective of this anonymous survey was to evaluate ED nurse and physician perceptions about the geriatric screener feasibility and barriers to implementation. In addition, as a secondary objective, respondents reported ongoing geriatric screening efforts independent of the research screeners. Results: The survey was completed by 72% of physicians and 33% of nurses. Most nurses and physicians identified geriatric technicians as beneficial to patients without impeding ED throughput. Fewer than 25% of physicians routinely screen for any geriatric syndromes. Nurses evaluated for fall risk significantly more often than physicians, but no other significant differences were noted in ongoing screening efforts. Conclusion: Dedicated geriatric technicians are perceived by nurses and physicians as beneficial to patients with the potential to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Most nurses and physicians are not currently screening for any geriatric syndromes. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:489–495.

  5. Women Physicians Are Underrepresented in Recognition Awards From the Association of Academic Physiatrists.

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    Silver, Julie K; Blauwet, Cheri A; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Slocum, Chloe S; Tenforde, Adam S; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Zafonte, Ross D; Goldstein, Richard; Gallegos-Kearin, Vanessa; Reilly, Julia M; Mazwi, Nicole L

    2018-01-01

    Determine representation by gender for individual recognition awards presented to physicians by the Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP). Cross-sectional survey was used. Lists of individual recognition award recipients for the 27-yr history of the AAP awards (1990-2016) were analyzed. The primary outcome measures were the total numbers of men versus women physician award recipients overall and for the past decade (2007-2016). No awards were given to women physicians for the past 4 yrs (2013-2016) or in half of the award categories for the past decade (2007-2016). No woman received the outstanding resident/fellow award since its inception (2010-2016). There was a decrease in the proportion of awards given to women in the past decade (2007-2016, 7 of 39 awards, 17.9%) as compared with the first 17 yrs (1990-2006, 10 of 46 awards, 21.7%). Furthermore, compared with their proportional membership within the specialty, women physicians were underrepresented for the entire 27-yr history of the AAP awards (1990-2016, 17 of 85 awards, 20%). According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the proportion of full-time female physical medicine and rehabilitation faculty members was 38% in 1992 and 41% in 2013. Women physicians have been underrepresented by the AAP in recognition awards. Although the reasons are not clear, these findings should be further investigated.

  6. Martian Dust and Its Interaction with Human Physiology: An Emergency Physician's Perspective

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    Sim, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Martian dust has known physical and chemical characteristics which portend adverse effects when humans are exposed. An emergency physician briefly summarizes the potentially harmful components and offers some mitigating and treatment measures.

  7. Sabbatical programs and the status of academic emergency medicine: a survey.

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    Bernstein, E; James, T; Bernstein, J

    1999-09-01

    The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) commissioned a survey in 1998 to describe sabbatical programs, academic rank, and tenure, and to shed light on factors affecting the continuum of faculty development, as a context for evaluating the potential importance of emergency medicine (EM) sabbatical programs. The chairs of 120 EM residency programs were surveyed. The response rate was 90%. Of 108 responses, 44 were academic EM departments (AEMDs); ten were their affiliates. The setting was urban for 82%; 37% were publicly funded and 58% privately. AEMDs were more likely to have a tenure track and eligibility for a sabbatical program, but not more likely to use a sabbatical program. Among 2,042 ranked EM faculty, there were 121 professors and 346 associate professors. Mean sabbatical length was six months, provided at full pay requiring a mean of 5.7 years of employment. Among 39 programs reporting eligibility for an EM sabbatical, requirements included: tenure (43%), academic rank of associate professor (78%), an application with multiple approval levels (92%), and a formal report (75%). Thirteen EM programs used sabbaticals; only 40 faculty members altogether (9% of senior faculty) have taken sabbaticals. The mean value of sabbaticals (rated by users on a scale of 1 to 10) was 6.8. Reduced funding, lack of departmental status, difficulty retaining faculty, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) regulations, graduate medical education (GME) cutbacks, and no release time were identified as challenges for emergency physicians (EPs) wishing to participate in sabbaticals. Strategies proposed to overcome these obstacles include quality customer service, streamlined operations, outside contracts, computerization, hiring individuals with PhDs, collaboration, political activity, and faculty development. A sabbatical can be beneficial for individuals and their institutions, but presently EPs have not been able to maximize use of available opportunities. Some

  8. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

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    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  9. Work family balance, stress, and salivary cortisol in men and women academic physicians.

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    Bergman, B; Ahmad, F; Stewart, D E

    2008-01-01

    The stress of medical practice has been recurrently studied, but work- and family-related determinants of health by gender remain under researched. To test the hypothesis that cortisol excretion would be affected by the perceived severity of total workload imbalance. By hierarchical regression analysis, the associations between work-family balance and diurnal salivary cortisol levels by sex in academic physicians (n = 40) were investigated. Men physicians reported more paid work hours per week than women physicians and women more time in childcare, but their total working hours were similar. Controlling for sex and age, the mean of the diurnal cortisol release was associated with a combined effect of sex and responsibility at home. When morning cortisol, sex, and children at home were held constant, cortisol levels in the evening were associated with responsibility at home without significant gender interaction. With increasing responsibility at home, women and men reacted differently with regard to cortisol responses over the day. However, in the evening, controlling for the morning cortisol, these gender differences were not as obvious. These findings highlight traditional gender patterns among both women and men physicians in the challenge of finding a balance between work and family.

  10. Implementation of a computerized physician medication order entry system at the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmeijer, Mathijs D; Holtzer, Wouter; van Dongen, René; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2003-06-01

    In the period 1997-2001 the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam implemented the computerized physician medication order entry (CPmOE) system Medicator. This article describes several important aspects of this program: technological architecture, features, implementation project, authentication and training, continuous support, human resource investments, route of prescription, logistics and administration. Furthermore important advantages and disadvantages of the CPmOE system are discussed. Advantages mainly concern patient safety and drug logistics, while disadvantages are related to access to a computer, user friendliness of the software and printer problems.

  11. Payment segment differences in hospital and physician charges for inpatient and emergency room procedures: cost shifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegji, Charles E; Self, Donald R; Self, Robin M

    2010-04-01

    A study of hospital facility and physician charges relative to payments, as affected by source of payment is provided. Charges relative to payment source are studied for both emergency room visits and inpatient hospital stays using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for 2003. We present evidence that hospitals are more flexible when billing inpatient stays than emergency room visits, where flexibility is measured in terms of charges relative to expected payments. There was little difference, however, between physician charges relative to payment for inpatient stays and emergency room visits. Finally, we found that ethnicity may have an effect on hospitals' expected payments.

  12. Career-Success Scale – A new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddeberg Claus

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. Methods 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. Results The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. Conclusion The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia.

  13. Career-success scale - a new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-06-02

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia.

  14. Plagiarism, Intertextuality and Emergent Authorship in University Students' Academic Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Helen Thompson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Issues of plagiarism, intertextuality and authorial presence in academic writing are fundamental to the teaching and learning activities of all university lecturers and their students. Knowing how to assist students, particularly those who speak English as an additional language (EAL, to develop a sense of text/knowledge ownership and authorial presence in the creation of discipline-based scholarly texts can be especially challenging. Clarifying what is encompassed by the notion of ‘common knowledge’ is also central to this process. The aim of this paper is to explore the political and intertextual nature of text/knowledge construction and emergent student authorship through the analysis of interviews and written assignments from two EAL students, together with interview data from lecturers from relevant disciplinary fields. Drawing on the work of Bakhtin, Kristeva and Penrose and Geisler, I conclude by suggesting that it is by engaging with, rather than fearing, intertextual connections, that we can create a dialogic pedagogy for academic writing that will enable students to articulate an authoritative authorial identity of their own. The importance of lecturer intervention during the drafting stages of text production is also emphasised. Keywords: plagiarism; intertextuality; emergent authorship; academic writing

  15. [Organization of the emergency physician and rescue service with special reference to mass injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, J; Stoeckel, H

    1987-04-01

    When a large number of casualties has occurred due to accidents or other medical disasters the normal individualized emergency physician and rescue service has to be rearranged within a short period of time. It is essential to achieve informations as detailed as possible about the number of victims and the kind of the disaster situation. A physician especially trained for such instances should be informed immediately and take over the responsibility as leading emergency physician for the management of the large scale emergency situation. After proper screening has been performed to sort out these patients who have high treatment priority the leading emergency physician has to coordinate the medical treatment of the victims provided by the other emergency physicians. The location where the accident occurred has to be structured and the transportation of the patients into the hospitals has to be arranged. In addition back-up facilities are to be activated to gain a large number of personNel l and ambulance transportation facilities. By following these logistical scheme it becomes possible to handle large scale accidents within a reasonable period of time.

  16. The role of triage liaison physicians on mitigating overcrowding in emergency departments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Brian H; Guo, Xiaoyan; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Schull, Michael; Holroyd, Brian; Bullard, Michael; Vandermeer, Benjamin; Ospina, Maria; Innes, Grant

    2011-02-01

    The objective was to examine the effectiveness of triage liaison physicians (TLPs) on mitigating the effects of emergency department (ED) overcrowding. Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, HealthSTAR, Dissertation Abstracts, and ABI/INFORM Global), controlled trial registry websites, conference proceedings, study references, contact with experts in the field, and correspondence with authors were used to identify potentially relevant TLP studies. Intervention studies in which a TLP was used to influence ED overcrowding metrics (length of stay [LOS] in minutes, physician initial assessment [PIA], and left without being seen [LWBS]) were included in the review. Two reviewers independently conducted data extraction and assessed the citation relevance, inclusion, and study quality. For continuous outcomes, weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated and reported with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For dichotomous variables, individual and pooled statistics were calculated as relative risk (RR) with 95% CI. From 14,446 potentially relevant studies, 28 were included in the systematic review. Thirteen were journal publications, 12 were abstracts, and three were Web-based articles. Most studies employed before-after designs; 23 of the 28 studies were considered of weak quality. Based on the statistical pooling of data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs), TLP resulted in shorter ED LOS compared to nurse-led triage (WMD = -36.85 min; 95% CI = -51.11 to -22.58). One of these RCTs showed a significant reduction in the PIA associated to TLP presence (WMD = -30.00 min; 95% CI = -56.91 to -3.09); the other RCT showed no change in LWBS due to a CI that included unity (RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.67 to 1.00). While the evidence summarized here suggests that to have a TLP is an effective intervention to mitigate the effects of ED overcrowding, due to the weak research methods identified, more

  17. The impact of leadership training programs on physicians in academic medical centers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Sharon E; Soobiah, Charlene; Levinson, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    To identify the impact of leadership training programs at academic medical centers (AMCs) on physicians' knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes. In 2011, the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature, identifying relevant studies by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register), scanning reference lists, and consulting experts. They deemed eligible any qualitative or quantitative study reporting on the implementation and evaluation of a leadership program for physicians in AMCs. Two independent reviewers conducted the review, screening studies, abstracting data, and assessing quality. The authors initially identified 2,310 citations. After the screening process, they had 11 articles describing 10 studies. Three were controlled before-and-after studies, four were before-and-after case series, and three were cross-sectional surveys. The authors did not conduct a meta-analysis because of the methodological heterogeneity across studies. Although all studies were at substantial risk of bias, the highest-quality ones showed that leadership training programs affected participants' advancement in academic rank (48% versus 21%, P=.005) and hospital leadership position (30% versus 9%, P=.008) and that participants were more successful in publishing papers (3.5 per year versus 2.1 per year, Pleadership programs have modest effects on outcomes important to AMCs. Given AMCs' substantial investment in these programs, rigorous evaluation of their impact is essential. High-quality studies, including qualitative research, will allow the community to identify which programs are most effective.

  18. Nerve injury following shoulder dislocation: the emergency physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Victor; Crane, Steve

    2006-08-01

    We describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with a right anterior shoulder dislocation following a fall onto the right shoulder and right upper arm. She also complained of numbness in the right forearm and dorsum of the right hand. The examination revealed a bruise to the upper aspect of the right arm resulting from the impact following the fall. The patient also had a right wrist drop and loss of sensation in the lateral border of the right forearm and on the dorsum of the right hand, suggesting a radial nerve injury. She also had altered sensation in the ulnar distribution of her right hand, suspicious of concomitant ulnar nerve injury. No loss of sensation in the distribution of the axillary nerve (regimental patch) was observed. These findings were carefully documented and the patient subsequently had the shoulder reduced under entonox and morphine. The neurological deficits remained unchanged. The patient was sent home from the emergency room with arrangements for orthopaedic and physiotherapy follow-up. After a 3-month period, she had clinical and electromyography evidence of persistent radial and ulnar nerve deficit. She continues to have physiotherapy. This case highlights the need for awareness of the potential for nerve damage following shoulder dislocation and also to ensure that appropriate follow-up plan is instituted on discharge from the emergency department.

  19. Racial Differences in Opiate Administration for Pain Relief at an Academic Emergency Department

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    Dickason, R. Myles

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The decision to treat pain in the emergency department (ED is a complex, idiosyncratic process. Prior studies have shown that EDs undertreat pain. Several studies demonstrate an association between analgesia administration and race. This is the first Midwest single institution study to address the question of race and analgesia, in addition to examining the effects of both patient and physician characteristics on race-based disparities in analgesia administration. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of patients presenting to an urban academic ED with an isolated diagnosis of back pain, migraine, or long bone fracture (LBF from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. Demographic and medication administration information was collected from patient charts by trained data collectors blinded to the hypothesis of the study. The primary outcome was the proportion of African-Americans who received analgesia and opiates, as compared to Caucasians, using Pearson’s chi-squared test. We developed a multiple logistic regression model to identify which physician and patient characteristics correlated with increased opiate administration. Results: Of the 2,461 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 57% were African-American and 30% Caucasian (n=2136. There was no statistically significant racial difference in the administration of any analgesia (back pain: 86% vs. 86%, p=0.81; migraine: 83% vs. 73%, p=0.09; LBF: 94% vs. 90%, p=0.17, or in opiate administration for migraine or LBF. African-Americans who presented with back pain were less likely to receive an opiate than Caucasians (50% vs. 72%, p<0.001. Secondary outcomes showed that higher acuity, older age, physician training in emergency medicine, and male physicians were positively associated with opiate administration. Neither race nor gender patient-physician congruency correlated with opiate administration. Conclusion: No race-based disparity in overall analgesia administration was

  20. Finding a mentor: the complete examination of an online academic matchmaking tool for physician-faculty

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    Martinez GF

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To have a successful career in academic medicine, finding a mentor is critical for physician-faculty. However, finding the most appropriate mentor can be challenging for junior faculty. As identifying a mentor pool and improving the search process are paramount to both a mentoring program’s success, and the academic medical community, innovative methods that optimize mentees’ searches are needed. This cross-sectional study examines the search and match process for just over 60 junior physician-faculty mentees participating in a department-based junior faculty mentoring program. To extend beyond traditional approaches to connect new faculty with mentors, we implement and examine an online matchmaking technology that aids their search and match process. Methods: We describe the software used and events leading to implementation. A concurrent mixed method design was applied wherein quantitative and qualitative data, collected via e-surveys, provide a comprehensive analysis of primary usage patterns, decision making, and participants’ satisfaction with the approach. Results: Mentees reported using the software to primarily search for potential mentors in and out of their department, followed by negotiating their primary mentor selection with their division chief’s recommendations with those of the software, and finally, using online recommendations for self-matching as appropriate. Mentees found the online service to be user-friendly while allowing for a non-threatening introduction to busy senior mentors. Conclusions: Our approach is a step toward examining the use of technology in the search and match process for junior physician-faculty. Findings underscore the complexity of the search and match process.

  1. Impact of physician assistants on the outcomes of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia receiving chemotherapy in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Brett E; Yolin-Raley, Deborah S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Soiffer, Robert J; Alyea, Edwin P

    2013-09-01

    Inpatient academic medical center care historically has been delivered by faculty physicians in conjunction with physicians in training (house officers [HOs]). Alternative staffing models have emerged secondary to American Counsel for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) care provided by a physician assistant (PA) service compared with a traditional model. Data were retrospectively collected on patients admitted with AML for reinduction chemotherapy from 2008 to 2012. Primary outcome measures were inpatient mortality and length of stay (LOS). Secondary measures included readmissions, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, consults requested, and radiologic studies ordered. Ninety-five patients with AML were reviewed. Forty-seven patients (49.5%) were admitted to the HO service, and 48 patients (50.5%) were admitted to the PA service. Demographic data were similar between services. LOS was significantly different between the services, with a mean of 36.8 days with the HO model compared with 30.9 days with the PA service (P=.03). The 14-day readmission rate also differed significantly; it was 10.6% (five of 47 patients) and zero for the HO and PA models, respectively (P=.03). The mean number of consults with the HO model was 2.11 (range, zero to five) versus 1.47 (range, zero to four) with the PA service (P=.03). Mortality and ICU transfers were not significantly different. The data demonstrate equivalent mortality and ICU transfers, with a decrease in LOS, readmission rates, and consults for patients cared for in the PA service. This suggests that the PA service is associated with increased operational efficiency and decreased health service use without compromising health care outcomes.

  2. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among academic physicians and its impact on the quality of life and occupational performance

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    Aclan Ozder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sleep disorders can affect health and occupational performance of physicians as well as outcomes in patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS among academic physicians at a tertiary academic medical center in an urban area in the northwest region of Turkey, and to establish a relationship between the self-perceived sleepiness and the quality of life using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D. Material and Methods: A questionnaire prepared by the researchers after scanning the literature on the subject was e-mailed to the academic physicians of a tertiary academic medical center in Istanbul. The ESS and the EQ-5D were also included in the survey. The e-mail database of the institution directory was used to compile a list of active academic physicians who practiced clinical medicine. Paired and independent t tests were used for the data analysis at a significance level of p 10 (p < 0.001. In the case of the EQ-5D index and visual analogue scale of the EQ-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D VAS, the status of sleepiness of academic physicians was associated with a poorer quality of life (p < 0.001. Conclusions: More than a 1/4 of the academic physicians suffered from sleepiness. There was an association between the poor quality of life and daytime sleepiness. There was also a positive relationship between habitual napping and being sleepy during the day.

  3. The CRASH report: emergency management dilemmas facing acute physicians in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Laura C; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marino, Philip; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; McCabe, Colm; Kemnpy, Aleksander; Swan, Lorna; Boutsikou, Maria; Al Zahrani, Ahmed; Coghlan, Gerry J; Schreiber, Benjamin E; Howard, Luke S; Davies, Rachel; Toshner, Mark; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Church, Alistair C; Peacock, Andrew; Corris, Paul A; Lordan, James L; Gaine, Sean; Condliffe, Robin; Kiely, David G; Wort, Stephen John

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of acute emergencies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) can be challenging. In the UK and Ireland, management of adult patients with PAH is centred in eight nationally designated pulmonary hypertension (PH) centres. However, many patients live far from these centres and physicians in local hospitals are often required to manage PAH emergencies. A committee of physicians from nationally designated PH centres identified the 'most common' emergency clinical scenarios encountered in patients with PAH. Thereafter, a review of the literature was performed centred on these specified topics and a management approach was developed based on best available evidence and expert consensus. Management protocols were developed on the following PAH emergencies: chest pain (including myocardial ischaemia), right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, sepsis, haemoptysis ('CRASH'), as well as considerations relevant to surgery, anaesthesia and pregnancy. Emergencies are not uncommon in PAH. While expertise in PAH management is essential, all physicians involved in acute care should be aware of the principles of acute management of PAH emergencies. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary, with physicians from tertiary PH centres supporting care locally and planning safe transfer of patients to PH centres when appropriate. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. The Use of a Statewide Prescription Drug Monitoring Program by Emergency Department Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Meier, Jennifer L; Muscott, Rachel; Zosel, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about how emergency physicians have used Wisconsin's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP). To characterize emergency physician knowledge and utilization of the program and how it modifies practice. Online survey data were collected 1 year after program implementation. Descriptive statistics were generated and qualitative responses were grouped by content. Of the 63 respondents, 64.1% had used the program. Lack of a DEA number and knowledge about how to sign up were the most common barriers to registration. Over 97% of program users found it useful for confirming suspicion of drug abuse and 90% wrote fewer prescriptions after program implementation. Time constraints and the difficult log-in process were common barriers to use. More users than nonusers stated that their workplace was supportive of program use. Although barriers exist, PDMP utilization appears useful to emergency physicians and associated with modifications to patient management.

  5. Material safety data sheet: a useful resource for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, M I; Cone, D C; Roberts, J R

    1996-03-01

    The large number of hazardous chemicals manufactured, transported, and stored in the United States creates the potential for significant toxic exposures to workers in industry today. Emergency physicians are likely to be called upon to evaluate many of these exposures when they occur in the acute setting. In addition to single-patient exposure, significant potential exists for such exposures in the setting of mass casualties. Emergency physicians need a source of readily available information regarding chemical hazards that can be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of such exposures. The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is reviewed herein, with special attention given to the sort of information that can be found on the MSDS and how such information can be clinically helpful to emergency physicians. The significant drawbacks and limitations of MSDS documents are also reviewed.

  6. The impact of physician burnout on clinical and academic productivity of gynecologic oncologists: A decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Taylor B; Dilley, Sarah E; Smith, Haller J; Huh, Warner K; Modesitt, Susan C; Rose, Stephen L; Rice, Laurel W; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Straughn, J Michael

    2017-09-01

    Physician burnout is associated with mental illness, alcohol abuse, and job dissatisfaction. Our objective was to estimate the impact of burnout on productivity of gynecologic oncologists during the first half of their career. A decision model evaluated the impact of burnout on total relative value (RVU) production during the first 15years of practice for gynecologic oncologists entering the workforce from 2011 to 2015. The SGO practice survey provided physician demographics and mean annual RVUs. Published data were used to estimate probability of burnout for male and female gynecologic oncologists, and the impact of depression, alcohol abuse, and early retirement. Academic productivity was defined as annual PubMed publications since finishing fellowship. Without burnout, RVU production for the cohort of 250 gynecologic oncologists was 26.2 million (M) RVUs over 15years. With burnout, RVU production decreased by 1.6 M (5.9% decrease). Disproportionate rates of burnout among females resulted in 1.1 M lost RVUs for females vs. 488 K for males. Academic production without burnout was estimated at 9277 publications for the cohort. Burnout resulted in 1383 estimated fewer publications over 15years (14.9%). The impact of burnout on clinical and academic productivity is substantial across all specialties. As health care systems struggle with human resource shortages, this study highlights the need for effective burnout prevention and wellness programs for gynecologic oncologists. Unless significant resources are designated to wellness programs, burnout will increasingly affect the care of our patients and the advancement of our field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C; Johansen, Jakob Kjersgaard; Zwisler, Stine; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2017-12-06

    Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed in proportion to a known tone of 94 dB. Before and after episodes of noise exposure, the physicians underwent a hearing test indicating whether the noise had had any impact on the function of the outer sensory hair cells. This was accomplished by measuring the amplitude level shifts of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions. Furthermore, the prehospital personnels' hearing was investigated using pure-tone audiometry to reveal any occupational hearing loss. All prehospital personnel were compared to ten in-hospital controls. Our results indicate high-noise exposure levels of ≥80 dB(A) during use of sirens on the MECU and during HEMS operations compared to in-hospital controls (70 dB(A)). We measured an exposure up to ≥90 dB(A) under the helmet for HEMS crew. No occupational hearing loss was identified with audiometry. A significant level shift of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions at 4 kHz for HEMS crew compared to MECU physicians was found indicating that noise affected the outer hair cell function of the inner ear, thus potentially reducing the hearing ability of the HEMS crew. Further initiatives to prevent noise exposure should be taken, such as active noise reduction or custom-made in-ear protection with communication system for HEMS personnel. Furthermore, better insulation of MECU and ambulances is warranted. We found that the exposure levels exceeded the

  8. After the "Doc Fix": Implications of Medicare Physician Payment Reform for Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Eugene C; Reschovsky, James D

    2016-07-01

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) introduces incentives for clinicians serving Medicare patients to move away from traditional "fee-for-service" and into alternative payment models (APMs) such as accountable care organizations and bundled payment arrangements. Thus, MACRA creates strong reasons for various teaching clinical services to participate in APMs, not only for Medicare patients but for other public and private payers as well. Unfortunately, different APMs may be more or less applicable to the diverse teaching physician roles, academic clinical programs, and patient populations served by medical schools and teaching hospitals. Therefore, this time of transition will complicate the work of academic clinical program leaders endeavoring to sustain the tripartite mission of patient care, health professional education, and research. Nonetheless, payment reforms promoted by MACRA can reward efforts to reinvent medical education to better incorporate value into medical decision making, as well as to give clinical learners the tools and insights needed to recognize their personal financial (and other) conflicts and navigate these to meet their patients' needs. This post-MACRA environment may intensify the need for researchers in academic medicine to stay independent of the short-term financial interests of affiliated clinical institutions. Health sciences scholars must be able to study effectively and speak forcefully regarding the actual benefits, risks, and costs of health care services so that educators and clinicians can identify high-value care and deliver it to their patients.

  9. Accuracy of physical and ultrasonographic examinations by emergency physicians for the early diagnosis of intraabdominal haemorrhage in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyuncu, S; Cete, Y; Bozan, H; Kartal, M; Akyol, A J

    2007-05-01

    To determine the accuracy of physical examination and ultrasonographic evaluation performed by emergency physicians in cases of blunt abdominal trauma for the early diagnosis of intraabdominal haemorrhage. In this clinical prospective study, trauma patients were evaluated with four-quadrant ultrasonography by emergency physicians after initial stabilisation and physical examination. Diagnoses based on demographic data, physical examination and emergency physician's ultrasonography were compared with the subsequent clinical course. A total of 442 patients participated in the study. The sensitivity and specificity of emergency physician's ultrasonographic examination to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage were 86 and 99%, respectively. Pre-test sensitivity and specificity of physical examination to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage were 39 and 90%, respectively. Physical examination was not a reliable method to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage in cases of blunt abdominal trauma. In contrast, abdominal ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians was a reliable diagnostic tool. Emergency physicians should be familiar with abdominal ultrasonographic examination, which should be routine in cases of blunt abdominal trauma.

  10. Physician medical oversight in emergency medical services: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnek, Jonathan R; Fernandez, Antonio R; Margolis, Gregg S; O'Connor, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of direct contact with medical direction that nationally registered emergency medical services (EMS) professionals receive. The secondary objective was to determine whether differences in medical director contact were associated with work-related characteristics. As part of biennial reregistration paperwork, nationally registered EMS professionals reregistering in 2004 were asked to complete a survey regarding medical direction. There were three survey questions asking participants to indicate, on a five-point scale, how often they interacted with their medical director in specific situations (whether the medical director participated in continuing education, met personally to discuss an EMS issue, and was seen at the scene of an EMS call). Individuals were categorized as having limited contact if they had not observed their medical director in any of the above situations for more than six months. All others where categorized as having recent contact. Demographic characteristics were collected and statistical analysis was performed using chi-square. In 2004, 45,173 individuals reregistered, with 28,647 (63%) returning surveys. A complete case analysis was performed, leaving 22,026 (49%) individuals. There were 13,756 (62.5%) individuals who reported having recent medical director contact. A stepwise increase in the percentage of those reporting recent contact was present when comparing the providers' certification levels (emergency medical technician EMT-Basic 47.6%, EMT-Intermediate 62.3%, and EMT-Paramedic 78.5%, p medical director. Nearly one-third of participants in this study reported having limited medical director contact. Certification level, service type, and community size were significantly associated with the amount of contact with medical direction.

  11. Emergency medicine resident physicians' perceptions of electronic documentation and workflow: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, P M; Redden, L; Poole, S; Pozner, C N; Horsky, J; Raja, A S; Poon, E; Schiff, G; Landman, A

    2015-01-01

    To understand emergency department (ED) physicians' use of electronic documentation in order to identify usability and workflow considerations for the design of future ED information system (EDIS) physician documentation modules. We invited emergency medicine resident physicians to participate in a mixed methods study using task analysis and qualitative interviews. Participants completed a simulated, standardized patient encounter in a medical simulation center while documenting in the test environment of a currently used EDIS. We recorded the time on task, type and sequence of tasks performed by the participants (including tasks performed in parallel). We then conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant. We analyzed these qualitative data using the constant comparative method to generate themes. Eight resident physicians participated. The simulation session averaged 17 minutes and participants spent 11 minutes on average on tasks that included electronic documentation. Participants performed tasks in parallel, such as history taking and electronic documentation. Five of the 8 participants performed a similar workflow sequence during the first part of the session while the remaining three used different workflows. Three themes characterize electronic documentation: (1) physicians report that location and timing of documentation varies based on patient acuity and workload, (2) physicians report a need for features that support improved efficiency; and (3) physicians like viewing available patient data but struggle with integration of the EDIS with other information sources. We confirmed that physicians spend much of their time on documentation (65%) during an ED patient visit. Further, we found that resident physicians did not all use the same workflow and approach even when presented with an identical standardized patient scenario. Future EHR design should consider these varied workflows while trying to optimize efficiency, such as improving

  12. Application of statistical process control to physician-specific emergency department patient satisfaction scores: a novel use of the funnel plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, David; Callahan, Charles D; Markwell, Stephen; de la Cruz, Jonathan; Milbrandt, Joseph C; Harvey, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    between the first and second 8-month intervals after the institution of process improvement efforts aimed at improving patient satisfaction. For the first 8-month period, 34,632 patients were evaluated in and discharged from the ED, with 581 surveys returned for 21 physicians. The mean (±SD) overall group physician patient satisfaction score was 81.8 (±24.7). Returned surveys per physician ranged from 2 to 58. For the second period, 34,858 patients were evaluated and discharged from the ED, with 670 patient satisfaction surveys returned for 20 physicians. The mean (±SD) overall physician score for all surveys returned during the second period was 85.0 (±22.2). Returned surveys per physician ranged from 8 to 65. The application of statistical control methodology using funnel plots as a means of analyzing ED group and physician patient satisfaction scores was possible. The authors believe that using funnel plots to analyze scores graphically can rapidly help determine the significance of individual physician patient satisfaction scores. In addition, serial funnel plots may prove to be useful as a means of measuring changes in patient satisfaction, particularly in response to quality improvement interventions. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Modelling attending physician productivity in the emergency department: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Davis, Samuel; Wilker, Elissa H; Wong, Matthew L; Litvak, Ori; Traub, Stephen J; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2018-03-15

    Emergency physician productivity, often defined as new patients evaluated per hour, is essential to planning clinical operations. Prior research in this area considered this a static quantity; however, our group's study of resident physicians demonstrated significant decreases in hourly productivity throughout shifts. We now examine attending physicians' productivity to determine if it is also dynamic. This is a retrospective cohort study, conducted from 2014 to 2016 across three community hospitals in the north-eastern USA, with different schedules and coverage. Timestamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged by the sites' electronic health record. Generalised estimating equations were constructed to predict productivity in terms of new patients per shift hour. 207 169 patients were seen by 64 physicians over 2 years, comprising 9822 physician shifts. Physicians saw an average of 15.0 (SD 4.7), 20.9 (SD 6.4) and 13.2 (SD 3.8) patients per shift at the three sites, with 2.97 (SD 0.22), 2.95 (SD 0.24) and 2.17 (SD 0.09) in the first hour. Across all sites, physicians saw significantly fewer new patients after the first hour, with more gradual decreases subsequently. Additional patient arrivals were associated with greater productivity; however, this attenuates substantially late in the shift. The presence of other physicians was also associated with slightly decreased productivity. Physician productivity over a single shift follows a predictable pattern that decreases significantly on an hourly basis, even if there are new patients to be seen. Estimating productivity as a simple average substantially underestimates physicians' capacity early in a shift and overestimates it later. This pattern of productivity should be factored into hospitals' staffing plans, with shifts aligned to start with the greatest volumes of patient arrivals. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved

  14. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  15. Opportunities and barriers to enhance research capacity and outputs among academic family physicians in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Maya H; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Mahmassani, Dina M; AlBeri, Adel A K; AlDabbagh, Abdul-Munem Y; Farahat, Taghreed M; AlShafaee, Mohammed A; Lakkis, Najla A

    2016-01-01

    To explore the current status of academic primary care research in Arab countries and investigate the barriers to its adequate implementation. Research is an essential building block that ensures the advancement of the discipline of Family Medicine (FM). FM research thus ought to be contributed to by all family physicians; nevertheless, its development is being hindered worldwide by several challenges. The amount of research conducted by academic academic family physicians and general practitioners is scant. This phenomenon is more pronounced in the Arab countries. An online questionnaire was emailed to all academic family physicians practicing in member Arab countries of the World Organization of Family Doctors WONCA-East Mediterranean Region. Seventy-six out of 139 academic family physicians from eight Arab countries completed the questionnaire. Around 75% reported that they are required to conduct research studies, yet only 46% contributed to at least one publication. While 75% and 52.6% disclosed their interest in participating in a research team and in leading a research team respectively, 64.5% reported being currently involved in research activities. Of all, 56% have attended a research ethics course. Lack of training in research, the unavailability of a healthcare system that is supportive of research, insufficient financial resources, and the unavailability of electronic health records were perceived as major barriers in conducting FM research. Although many physicians in Arab academic institutions expressed enthusiasm to conduct research projects, FM research infrastructure remains to be weak. This demonstrates the need for immense efforts from different parties particularly governments and academic institutions.

  16. An assessment of emotional intelligence in emergency medicine resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Linder, Kathryn; Shah, Anuj; London, Kory Scott; Chandra, Shruti; Naples, Robin

    2017-12-27

    To define the emotional intelligence (EI) profile of emergency medicine (EM) residents, and identify resident EI strengths and weaknesses. First-, second-, and third-year residents (post-graduate years [PGY] 1, 2, and 3, respectively) of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's EM Program completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i 2.0), a validated instrument offered by Multi-Health Systems. Reported scores included total mean EI, 5 composite scores, and 15 subscales of EI. Scores are reported as means with 95% CIs. The unpaired, two-sample t-test was used to evaluate differences in means. Thirty-five residents completed the assessment (response rate 97.2%). Scores were normed to the general population (mean 100, SD 15). Total mean EI for the cohort was 103 (95%CI,100-108). EI was higher in female (107) than male (101) residents. PGY-2s demonstrated the lowest mean EI (95) versus PGY-1s (104) and PGY-3s (110). The difference in PGY-3 EI (110; 95%CI,103-116) and PGY-1 EI (95, 95%CI,87-104) was statistically significant (unpaired t-test, pself-actualization (107); empathy (107); interpersonal relationships (106); impulse control (106); and stress tolerance (106). Lowest subscale score was in assertiveness (98). Self-regard (89), assertiveness (88), and independence (90) were areas in which PGY-2s attained relatively lower scores (unpaired t-test, ptraining that may assist in developing EM residents, specifically in self-regard, assertiveness, and self-expression. Further study is required to ascertain if patterns in level of training are idiosyncratic or relate to the natural maturation of residents.

  17. Workplace violence against physicians in Turkey's emergency departments: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Başak; Çetin, Murat; Çolak Oray, Neşe; Can, İsmail Özgür

    2017-06-29

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of violence directed at emergency department (ED) physicians in Turkey and confirm the factors influencing such violence. Cross-sectional survey study. Country of Turkey. Physicians currently practising in EDs in Turkey. The prevalence of violence directed at physicians and factors that may influence it, such as physicians' personal characteristics, ED characteristics and physicians' opinions regarding the causes of and suggested methods of preventing violence. A total of 713 physicians participated. Of these, 78.1% reported being subjected to violence in the past year and 65.9% reported more than one such incident. Being subjected to violence was related to age (p=0.008), working in an ED with a high patient admission rate (p=0.018), current position (pviolence. The present safety precautions against violence do not appear to influence the prevalence of violence. Our results indicated that ED physicians' experience of violence is related to personal characteristics such as age and level of expertise, and hospital and ED characteristics such as high patient admission rates. Presently, no measures taken to reduce this violence have been proven effective. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Management of children with possible appendicitis: a survey of emergency physicians in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Cabe, Kieran; Babl, Franz E; Dalton, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    To describe current practice in managing children with possible acute appendicitis in EDs in Australia and New Zealand as the basis for a clinical practice guideline (CPG). An anonymous survey was distributed to consultant emergency physicians working at PREDICT (Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative) sites in Australia and New Zealand in April 2013. A second, site-based survey was distributed to the PREDICT representatives at each of the 13 sites. The response rate was 100% (13/13) for the site-based survey and 82% (145/176) for the physician survey. Most respondents agreed that right lower quadrant (RLQ) tenderness (94%), anorexia (92%), migration of abdominal pain to the RLQ (86%), rebound tenderness in the RLQ (60%) and RLQ tenderness produced on coughing, hopping or percussion (63%) were valuable symptoms and signs in diagnosing appendicitis. The responses regarding nausea and vomiting and fever were less consistent. Less than 50% regarded blood tests (C-reactive protein, white cell count) as relevant for the diagnosis of appendicitis. Most physicians (61%) agreed there was a role for a validated CPG for possible appendicitis in children, although only 3/13 sites reported use of such a CPG. This survey of senior emergency physicians across Australia and New Zealand demonstrated congruence in several clinical markers and disagreements in others in the approach to diagnosing children with possible appendicitis. Whereas emergency physicians would like a validated CPG, this survey has highlighted some critical issues. Particularly, the low regard for blood tests, integral to published diagnostic scoring systems, will be a challenge for the development and introduction of such a CPG in Australia and New Zealand. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B.; Chapman, Christina H.; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R.; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Methods and Materials: Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Results: Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Conclusion: Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves.

  20. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Awad A. [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chapman, Christina H.; Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Deville, Curtiland, E-mail: cdeville@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Methods and Materials: Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Results: Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Conclusion: Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves.

  1. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B; Chapman, Christina H; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Procedural sedation and analgesia practices by emergency physicians in the Netherlands: a nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuypers, Maybritt I.; Smits, Gaël J. P.; Valkenet, Suzanne C.; Thijssen, Wendy A. M. H.; Plötz, Frans B.

    2017-01-01

    Several efforts have been made to assure and to improve the quality of procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) performed by emergency physicians (EPs) in The Netherlands. This study investigated the current PSA practice and competences of EPs in both adult and paediatric patients. In particular, if

  3. Using the theory of reasoned action to explain physician intention to prescribe emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Marjorie R; Schwartz, Lisa R; Kelly, Patricia J; Lisbon, Eleanor; Hall, Matthew A

    2006-03-01

    Although research has examined providers' knowledge, attitudes and prescribing behaviors with regard to emergency contraception, none has used a theory-based approach to understanding the interplay of these factors. A cross-sectional survey of 96 faculty physicians from one Southern and three Midwestern universities was conducted in 2004 to assess factors associated with intention to prescribe emergency contraception. The theory of reasoned action guided the study hypotheses and survey design. Correlation and regression analyses were used to examine the data. Only 42% of respondents strongly intended to prescribe emergency contraception for teenagers, but 65-77% intended to do so for all other specified groups (women who ask for the method, who have had a method problem, who have experienced rape or incest, and who have had unprotected sex). Consistent with the theory of reasoned action, high intention to prescribe emergency contraception was associated with positive attitudes toward doing so and with the perception that specific colleagues or professional groups support prescribing it; however, the perception of support by colleagues or professional groups in general did not predict intention. Also consistent with the theory, physicians' knowledge about emergency contraception and their demographic characteristics were not significant. Interventions to encourage physicians to provide emergency contraception should take into account their attitudes toward the method and the components of those attitudes.

  4. Access to In-Network Emergency Physicians and Emergency Departments Within Federally Qualified Health Plans in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Dorner, MSc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under regulations established by the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans must meet minimum standards in order to be sold through the federal Marketplace. These standards to become a qualified health plan (QHP include maintaining a provider network sufficient to assure access to services. However, the complexity of emergency physician (EP employment practices – in which the EPs frequently serve as independent contractors of emergency departments, independently establish insurance contracts, etc... – and regulations governing insurance repayment may hinder the application of network adequacy standards to emergency medicine. As such, we hypothesized the existence of QHPs without in-network access to EPs. The objective is to identify whether there are QHPs without in-network access to EPs using information available through the federal Marketplace and publicly available provider directories. Results: In a national sample of Marketplace plans, we found that one in five provider networks lacks identifiable in-network EPs. QHPs lacking EPs spanned nearly half (44% of the 34 states using the federal Marketplace. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the present regulatory framework governing network adequacy is not generalizable to emergency care, representing a missed opportunity to protect patient access to in-network physicians. These findings and the current regulations governing insurance payment to EPs dis-incentivize the creation of adequate physician networks, incentivize the practice of balance billing, and shift the cost burden to patients.

  5. Pathology and medical malpractice. Academic and trainee empirical review of cases by State of Texas physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Timothy Craig; Stafford, Mehary; Liang, Bryan A

    2014-04-01

    This study examines whether the assumptions that pathologists understand the medical malpractice negligence rule and have a clear single standard of care are reasonable. Two hundred eighty-one Texas academic pathologists and trainees were presented 10 actual pathology malpractice cases from publicly available sources, representing the tort system's signal. Of the respondents, 55.52% were trainees, and 44.48% were pathology faculty. Only in two cases did more than 50% of respondents correctly identify the behavior of pathologists as defined by legal outcomes. In only half of the cases did more than 50% of pathologists concur with the jury verdict. This study provides further evidence that physicians do not understand the legal rule of negligence. Pathologists have a poor understanding of negligence and cannot accurately predict a jury verdict. There is significant divergence from the single standard of care assumption. Alternative methods to provide appropriate compensation and to establish physician accountability should be explored. Additional education about medical negligence is needed.

  6. Assisting Undergraduate Physician Assistant Training in Psychiatry: The Role of Academic Psychiatry Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Ferguson, Britnay A

    2015-12-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) are medical professionals who practice medicine with the supervision of a physician through delegated autonomy. PA school accreditation standards provide limited guidance for training PAs in psychiatry. As a result, PA students may receive inconsistent and possibly inadequate exposure to psychiatry. Providing broad and in-depth exposure to the field of psychiatry is important to attract PA students to pursue careers in psychiatry and provide a possible solution to the shortage of psychiatrists nationwide. Additionally, this level of exposure will prepare PA students who pursue careers in other fields of medicine to recognize and address their patient's psychiatric symptoms in an appropriate manner. This training can be provided by an academic department of psychiatry invested in the education of PA students. We describe a training model implemented at our university that emphasizes psychiatrist involvement in the preclinical year of PA school and full integration of PA students into the medical student psychiatry clerkship during the clinical years. The benefits and challenges to implementing this model are discussed as well.

  7. Productivity assessment of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in oncology in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moote, Marc; Nelson, Ron; Veltkamp, Robin; Campbell, Darrell

    2012-05-01

    Demand for oncologists will increase dramatically over the next 15 years. Physician assistants (PAs) and Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been identified as one solution to meet the projected shortages in oncology. It has previously been reported that 56% of oncologists work with PAs and NPs, more than two thirds of whom believe it benefits their practice with some noted productivity advantages. The purpose of this study was to quantify the productivity of PAs and NPs working in oncology in an academic medical center. A 2-week self-reported time study was performed in a single large academic medical center. Services were categorized as billable, bundled, care facilitation, administrative, and other based on time spent performing services in each category. Current procedural terminology codes were used to determine the economic value of services provided. A total of 54 PAs and NPs were included in the final analysis. PAs and NPs reported similar clinical activities. Overall, there was high variability noted in terms of productivity, notably with PA/NP direct billable revenue. Opportunities were identified to improve utilization of oncology PAs and NPs, with suggestions for future research related to PA and NP productivity tracking. Productivity measurement for PAs and NPs can be challenging. To our knowledge, this is the first study that quantifies PA and NP productivity in oncology according to known economic indicators such as charges and work relative value units.

  8. English-based Pediatric Emergency Medicine Software Improves Physician Test Performance on Common Pediatric Emergencies: A Multicenter Study in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global health agencies and the Vietnam Ministry of Health have identified pediatric emergency care and health information technology as high priority goals. Clinical decision support (CDS software provides physicians with access to current literature to answer clinical queries, but there is limited impact data in developing countries. We hypothesized that Vietnamese physicians will demonstrate improved test performance on common pediatric emergencies using CDS technologies despite being in English.Methods: This multicenter, prospective, pretest-posttest study was conducted in 11 Vietnamese hospitals enrolled a convenience sample of physicians who attended an 80-minute software training on a pediatric CDS software (PEMSoft. Two multiple-choice exams (A, B were administered before and after the session. Participants, who received Test A as a pretest, received Test B as a posttest, and vice versa. Participants used the CDS software for the posttest. The primary outcome measure was the mean percentage difference in physician scores between the pretest and posttest, as calculated by a paired, two-tailed t-test.Results: For the 203 participants, the mean pretest, posttest, and improvement scores were 37% (95% CI: 35-38%, 70% (95% CI: 68-72%, and 33% (95% CI: 30-36%, respectively, with p<0.0001. This represents an 89% improvement over baseline. Subgroup analysis of practice setting, clinical experience, and comfort level with written English and computers showed that all subgroups equivalently improved their test scores.Conclusion: After brief training, Vietnamese physicians can effectively use an English-based CDS software based on improved performance on a written clinical exam. Given this rapid improvement, CDS technologies may serve as a transformative tool in resource-poor environments. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:471–476.

  9. Online medical literature consultation habits of academic teaching physicians in the EU and CIS countries: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Chiel T M; Swenne, Cees A; van der Hoorn-van Velthoven, Catharina A M; Belt, Johannes H J

    2012-01-01

    Both in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and in the European Union (EU2004), ample availability of up to date medical scientific literature is important for progress in medical science and for the education of the next generation of healthcare workers. The aim of this research is to assess if the use of online medical literature among academic teaching (AT) physicians is at the same level in the CIS as in the EU2004. In the capital cities of the CIS and the EU2004 member states, AT physicians holding an academic position at least equivalent to an associate professor and performing the three classical tasks in academic medicine (teaching, research and patient care) were interviewed about their use of and familiarity with the Internet and 9 online literature services, including journals and bibliographical databases such as PubMed (Medline), The Cochrane Library and Web of Science. Library staff members were interviewed about the availability of these online literature services at their libraries. About 750 physicians and 40 library staff members were invited for participation. Eventually 124 AT physicians and 22 library staff members participated. Internet was everywhere available, but used daily by more AT physicians in the EU2004 (71% versus 48% in the CIS, P = .005). AT physicians in the EU2004 accessed a higher percentage of all articles online (74% versus 43% in the CIS, PEU2004. In the EU2004 more AT physicians were familiar with Open Access journals (89% versus 51% in the CIS, PEU2004. It is recommended that the awareness of freely available online literature services such as Open Access journals is enhanced among AT physicians and library staff members, especially in the CIS.

  10. Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a survey of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Andrew; Furyk, Jeremy; Banks, Colin; Chu, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to establish current practice among Australasian emergency physicians and trainees on several aspects of the investigation of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). An electronic questionnaire (SurveyMonkey™) was distributed to emergency physicians and trainees by email through the ACEM. Survey recipients were asked about demographics, followed by a series of questions relating to the investigation of SAH. There were 878 survey respondents (response rate 24%). Our data showed that 47.3% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that a CT brain within 6 h of headache onset is sufficient to exclude a diagnosis of SAH. For a CT performed within 12 h of ictus, 14.4% were satisfied that SAH could be excluded. After a negative CT scan, for further investigation of SAH, 88% of respondents preferred lumbar puncture to CT angiography. For detection of xanthochromia in the cerebrospinal fluid, 57.7% of respondents felt that spectrophotometry (vs visual inspection) is necessary to accurately diagnose SAH. A range of information was collected regarding the investigation of suspected SAH. We report significant differences in the diagnostic approach of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees to this condition, in particular the utility of CT within 6 h for exclusion of SAH. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Emergency physician hiring practices: the effects of certain conditions on employability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, R M; Ufberg, J W

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of certain Emergency Physician (EP) conditions on hiring decisions by fellow EPs. An anonymous survey asked 255 Pennsylvania EPs to rate the likelihood of their voting to offer a position in each of six scenarios. Three scenarios consisted of EPs unable to work regular shifts because of periodic migraines, a sleep disorder, and periodic difficulty handling stress. The other scenarios involved an EP with a probable future pregnancy, a recovered alcoholic, and a healthy HIV-positive physician. Most respondents said they were unlikely to recommend hiring colleagues who disclose a disorder restricting their availability for regular shifts. EPs were generally tolerant of recovered alcoholics and plans for pregnancy leave, but nearly half had significant reservations regarding hiring HIV-positive peers. An understanding of which conditions negatively impact an EP's ability to obtain employment in Emergency Medicine may be useful in emergency medicine career counseling or in the process of obtaining disability coverage.

  12. Caring for the forensic population: recognizing the educational needs of emergency department nurses and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Harada, Nahoko; Amar, Angela

    2012-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a point of contact for victims of violence after an act of criminal activity has occurred. Hence, ED clinicians are in a key position to have a significant impact on both the medical and legal outcomes of the forensic patient population. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare forensic knowledge, practice, and experiences of ED nurses and physicians. Specific aims were to (1) describe experiences of nurses and physicians related to forensic practice; (2) compare clinical forensic knowledge and experience between nurses and physicians; and (3) describe forensic learning needs. This descriptive, correlational study utilized a survey questionnaire completed by 134 ED nurses and physicians. Results of the survey revealed no significant differences in the education, knowledge, and confidence with forensic patients between ED nurses and physicians. However, just over half of the sample reported feeling confident in managing forensic patients indicating a need for increased forensic education. Practice implications indicate that forensic education is needed and desired among ED nurses and physicians within the clinical setting. Further studies must be done to gain a more in depth understanding of existing forensic practices and protocols to elevate the level of care received by forensic patients within the ED setting. © 2012 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  13. The Association Between Money and Opinion in Academic Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkhahn, Robert H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Financial conflicts of interest have come under increasing scrutiny in medicine, but their impact has not been quantified. Our objective was to use the results of a national survey of academic emergency medicine (EM faculty to determine if an association between money and personal opinion exists.Methods: We conducted a web-based survey of EM faculty. Opinion questions were analyzed with regard to whether the respondent had either 1 received research grant money or 2 received money from industry as a speaker, consultant, or advisor. Responses were unweighted, and tests of differences in proportions were made using Chi-squared tests, with p<0.05 set for significance.Results: We received responses from 430 members; 98 (23% received research grants from industry, while 145 (34% reported fee-for-service money. Respondents with research money were more likely to be comfortable accepting gifts (40% vs. 29% and acting as paid consultants (50% vs. 37%. They had a more favorable attitude with regard to societal interactions with industry and felt that industry-sponsored lectures could be fair and unbiased (52% vs. 29%. Faculty with fee-for-service money mirrored those with research money. They were also more likely to believe that industry-sponsored research produces fair and unbiased results (61% vs. 45% and less likely to believe that honoraria biased speakers (49% vs. 69%.Conclusion: Accepting money for either service or research identified a distinct population defined by their opinions. Faculty engaged in industry-sponsored research benefitted socially (collaborations, academically (publications, and financially from the relationship. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2: 126-132.

  14. Disruptive Behaviors in an Emergency Department: the Perspective of Physicians and Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maddineshat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disruptive behaviors cause many problems in the workplace, especially in the emergency department (ED.This study was conducted to assess the physician’s and nurse’s perspective toward disruptive behaviors in the emergency department. Methods: In this cross-sectional study a total of 45 physicians and 110 nurses working in the emergency department of five general hospitals in Bojnurd participated. Data were collected using a translated, changed, and validated questionnaire (25 item. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: Findings showed that physicians gave more importance to nurse-physician relationships in the ED when compared to nurses’ perspective (90% vs. 70%. In this study, 81% of physicians and 52% of nurses exhibited disruptive behaviors. According to the participants these behaviors could result in adverse outcomes, such as stress (97%, job dissatisfaction and can compromise patient safety (53%, quality of care (72%, and errors (70%. Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors could have a negative effects on relationships and collaboration among medical staffs, and on patients’ quality of care as well. It is essential to provide some practical strategies for prevention of these behaviors.

  15. Current level of training, experience and perceptions of emergency physicians as expert witnesses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Nicola Y; Weiland, Tracey J

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine emergency physicians' training, experience and perceptions as expert witnesses. Emergency physicians of an adult tertiary referral and teaching hospital participated in a pilot survey regarding their experiences in report writing and in court as expert witnesses. The 28-item survey also examined the amount of formalized forensic medical teaching that emergency physicians had received during their training. Of the participants, 41% (95% CI 21.6-64.1; 7/17) had never received any undergraduate or postgraduate training in forensic medicine, 11/17 (65%, 95% CI 41.2-82.8) had provided a written expert opinion for court, and 12/17 (71%, 95% CI 46.6-87.0) had attended court as an expert witness. All participants considered themselves 'skilled in attending an emergency resuscitation', whereas 3/13 (23%, 95% CI 7.5-50.9) considered themselves 'skilled in attending a courtroom trial'. Nearly 90% (95% CI 64.7-98.0; 15/17) thought that medical evidence training should be a requirement of emergency speciality training. The most commonly preferred forms of medical evidence training were mock court sessions (76%, 95% CI 52.2-91.0; 13/17) and forensic workshops (76%, 95% CI 52.2-91.0; 13/17). From 10 non-technical skills required of an EP, 'appearing in court as an expert witness' was perceived to be the second most difficult skill by most respondents. Emergency physicians in this pilot study have limited training for the role of expert witness and see it as one of the most difficult non-technical skills they have to perform. Further research is required regarding the current and future scope of forensic training.

  16. [Reform of emergency physician training in Austria : Finally up to date?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, H; Baubin, M; Kreutziger, J; Frank, G; Prause, G

    2018-02-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) have significantly improved. The structure and organization of Austrian EMS comply with European standards but training requirements for prehospital EMS physicians are insufficient when compared with other countries. Although some EMS systems follow the German or Swiss postgraduate training concepts, the legal requirements in Austria defining the scope of mandatory training for physicians in the prehospital setting are only minimal. Thus, besides board certification as a general practitioner or specialist of any discipline, the only formal requirement is a 1-week theoretical course comprising some manikin simulations. Experience in anesthesia or intensive care medicine is still not mandatory. The Austrian Society of Anesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care Medicine (ÖGARI) drafted a reform paper in 2009, which was adapted by the Austrian Chamber of Physicians, section of emergency medicine, and subsequently presented to the Austrian Ministry of Health. Due to the slowness of the legislation process, the relevant § 40 of the Austrian Physician 's Act is still unchanged. In the meantime, Austrian specialist training regulations were restructured in 2015 with significant consequences. Due to changes in the residency programs, board certification and subsequent full working permit becomes more difficult to obtain, thus further aggravating the shortage of emergency physicians in Austria. In order to counteract the threatening shortage of prehospital EMS physicians, the ÖGARI section of emergency medicine was requested by the Ministry of Health to develop a reasonable model for how physicians could be qualified and subsequently employed in EMS prior to full board certification. Presently, the Austrian Ministry of Health, the Chamber of Physicians and medical societies are in discussion on whether this approach might fit into the legal framework. This manuscript details the

  17. Acute effects of the electromagnetic waves emitted by mobile phones on attention in emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Gurkan; Sadoglu, Davut; Ardic, Senol; Yilmaz, Hakan; Imamoglu, Melih; Turedi, Suleyman

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of the electromagnetic waves (EMW) emitted by mobile phones on attention in emergency physicians. This single-center, prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical study was performed among emergency physicians in a tertiary hospital. Thirty emergency physicians were enrolled in the study. Initial d2 test was applied in the evaluation of attention and concentration of all the physicians, who were randomly assigned into one of two groups. The control group members hold mobile phones in 'off' mode to their left ears for 15min. The members of the intervention group hold mobile phones in 'on' mode to their left ears for 15min, thus exposing them to 900-1800MHz EMW. The d2 test was re-applied to both groups after this procedure. Differences in attention and concentration levels between the groups were compared. Difference between initial and final d2 test in total performance (TN-E, p=0.319), in total number of figures marked (TN, p=0.177), in test performance percentile (PR, p=0.619) and in attention fluctuation (FR, p=0.083) were similar between the groups. However, difference in the number of figures missed (E1 selective attention, p=0.025), difference between numbers of incorrectly marked figures (E2, p=0,018) and difference in focus levels (E, p=0.016) were significantly in favor of the intervention group. According to our study findings, the EMW emitted by mobile phones has no deleterious effect on the attention and concentration levels of emergency physicians, and even has a positive impact on selective attention levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Alice M; Bryant, Jamie; Carey, Mariko L; Paul, Christine L; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Levi, Christopher R

    2015-06-26

    Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasminogen Activator. This study aimed to identify among emergency physicians, (1) rates of agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke care; and (2) individual and hospital factors associated with high agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use. Australian fellows and trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey assessing perceptions of tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Demographic and hospital characteristics were also collected. 429 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded (13% response rate). Almost half (47.2%) did not agree with any statements regarding the benefits of tissue Plasminogen Activator use for acute stroke. Perceived routine administration of tissue Plasminogen Activator by the head of respondents' emergency department was significantly associated with high agreement with the evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke is not high among responding Australian emergency physicians. In order for tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment to become widely accepted and adopted in emergency settings, beliefs and attitudes towards treatment need to be in accordance with clinical practice guidelines.

  19. Estimating the degree of emergency department overcrowding in academic medical centers: results of the National ED Overcrowding Study (NEDOCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Steven J; Derlet, Robert; Arndahl, Jeanine; Ernst, Amy A; Richards, John; Fernández-Frackelton, Madonna; Schwab, Robert; Stair, Thomas O; Vicellio, Peter; Levy, David; Brautigan, Mark; Johnson, Ashira; Nick, Todd G; Fernández-Frankelton, Madonna

    2004-01-01

    No single universal definition of emergency department (ED) overcrowding exists. The authors hypothesize that a previously developed site-sampling form for academic ED overcrowding is a valid model to quantify overcrowding in academic institutions and can be used to develop a validated short form that correlates with overcrowding. A 23-question site-sampling form was designed based on input from academic physicians at eight medical schools representative of academic EDs nationwide. A total of 336 site-samplings at eight academic medical centers were conducted at 42 computer-generated random times over a three-week period by independent observers at each site. These sampling times ranged from very slow to severely overcrowded. The outcome variable was the degree of overcrowding as assessed by the charge nurse and ED physicians. The full model consisted of objective data that were obtained by counting the number of patients, determining patients' waiting times, and obtaining information from registration, triage, and ancillary services. Specific objective data were indexed to site-specific demographics. The outcome and objective data were compared using a multiple linear regression to determine predictive validity of the full model. A five-question reduced model was calculated using a backward stepdown procedure. Predictive validity and relationships between the outcome and objective data were assessed using a mixed-effects linear regression model, treating center as random effect. Overcrowding occurred 12% to 73% of the time (mean, 35%), with two hospitals being overcrowded more than 50% of the time. Comparison of objective and outcome data resulted in an R(2) of 0.49 (p Overcrowding varied widely between academic centers during the study period. Results of a five-question reduced model are valid and accurate in predicting the degree of overcrowding in academic centers.

  20. Job satisfaction and motivation among physicians in academic medical centers: insights from a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina; Amelung, Volker E; Baker, Laurence C; Gaitanides, Michael; Schwartz, Friedrich W; Rundall, Thomas G

    2008-12-01

    Our study assesses how work-related monetary and nonmonetary factors affect physicians' job satisfaction at three academic medical centers in Germany and the United States, two countries whose differing health care systems experience similar problems in maintaining their physician workforce. We used descriptive statistics and factor and correlation analyses to evaluate physicians' responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Our study revealed that German physician respondents were less satisfied overall than their U.S. counterparts. In both countries, participation in decision making that may affect physicians' work was an important correlate of satisfaction. In Germany other important factors were opportunities for continuing education, job security, extent of administrative work, collegial relationships, and access to specialized technology. In the U.S. sample, job security, financial incentives, interaction with colleagues, and cooperative working relationships with colleagues and management were important predictors of overall job satisfaction. The implications of these findings for the development of policies and management tactics to increase physician job satisfaction in German and U.S. academic medical centers are discussed.

  1. Perspectives of South American physicians hosting foreign rotators in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Steve; Adler, David H; Inboriboon, Pholaphat Charles; Alvarado, Hermenegildo; Acosta, Raul; Godoy-Monzon, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) is increasingly becoming an international field. The number of fellowships in International EM in the USA is growing along with opportunities to complete international health electives (IHEs) during residency training. The impact on host institutions, however, has not been adequately investigated. The objective of this study is to assess the experience of several South American hospitals hosting foreign EM residents completing IHEs. Anonymous, semi-structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with physicians working in Emergency Departments in three hospitals in Lima, Peru and one hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. All participants reported previously working with EM foreign rotators. Interviews were analyzed qualitatively and coded for common themes. Three department chairs, six residents, and 15 attending physicians were interviewed (total = 24). After qualitative analysis of interviews, two broad theme categories emerged: Benefits and Challenges. Most commonly reported benefits were knowledge sharing about emergency medical systems (78%), medical knowledge transfer (58%), and long-term relationship formation (42%). Top challenges included rotator Spanish language proficiency (70%) lack of reciprocity (58%), and level of training and rotation length (25%). Spanish proficiency related directly to how involved rotators became in patient care (e.g., taking a history, participating in rounds) but was not completely prohibitive, as a majority of physicians interviewed felt comfortable speaking in English. Lack of reciprocity refers to the difficulty of sending host physicians abroad as well as failed attempts at building long-lasting relationships with foreign institutions. Lastly, 25% preferred rotators to stay for at least 1 month and rotate in the last year of EM residency. This latter preference increased knowledge transfer from rotator to host. Our research identified benefits and challenges of IHEs in Emergency Medicine from the

  2. Nurses' evaluation of physicians' non-clinical performance in emergency departments: advantages, disadvantages and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Mufarrij, Afif; Saliba, Miriam; Mourad, Yara; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline

    2015-02-27

    Peer evaluation is increasingly used as a method to assess physicians' interpersonal and communication skills. We report on experience with soliciting registered nurses' feedback on physicians' non-clinical performance in the ED of a large academic medical center in Lebanon. We utilized a secondary analysis of a de-identified database of ED nurses' assessment of physicians' non-clinical performance coupled with an evaluation of interventions carried out as a result of this evaluation. The database was compiled as part of quality/performance improvement initiatives using a cross-sectional design to survey registered nurses working at the ED. The survey instrument included open ended and closed ended questions assessing physicians' communication, professionalism and leadership skills. Three episodes of evaluation were carried out over an 18 month period. Physicians were provided with a communication training carried out after the first cycle of evaluation and a detailed feedback on their assessment by nurses after each evaluation cycle. A paired t-test was carried out to compare mean evaluation scores between the three cycles of evaluation. Thematic analysis of nurses' qualitative comments was carried out. A statistically significant increase in the averages of skills was observed between the first and second evaluations, followed by a significant decrease in the averages of the three skills between the second and third evaluations. Personalized feedback to ED physicians and communication training initially contributed to a significant positive impact on improving ED physicians' non-clinical skills as perceived by the ED nurses. Yet, gains achieved were lost upon reaching the third cycle of evaluation. However, the thematic analysis of the nurses' qualitative responses portrays a decrease in concerns across the various dimensions of non-clinical performance. Nurses' evaluation of the non-clinical performance of physicians has the potential of improving communication

  3. Family physicians' professional identity formation: a study protocol to explore impression management processes in institutional academic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Charo; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Schweyer, Francois-Xavier; López-Roig, Sofia; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Burns, Jane; Hugé, Sandrine; Pastor-Mira, Maria Ángeles; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Spencer, Sarah; Fiquet, Laure; Pereiró-Berenguer, Inmaculada

    2014-09-06

    Despite significant differences in terms of medical training and health care context, the phenomenon of medical students' declining interest in family medicine has been well documented in North America and in many other developed countries as well. As part of a research program on family physicians' professional identity formation initiated in 2007, the purpose of the present investigation is to examine in-depth how family physicians construct their professional image in academic contexts; in other words, this study will allow us to identify and understand the processes whereby family physicians with an academic appointment seek to control the ideas others form about them as a professional group, i.e. impression management. The methodology consists of a multiple case study embedded in the perspective of institutional theory. Four international cases from Canada, France, Ireland and Spain will be conducted; the "case" is the medical school. Four levels of analysis will be considered: individual family physicians, interpersonal relationships, family physician professional group, and organization (medical school). Individual interviews and focus groups with academic family physicians will constitute the main technique for data generation, which will be complemented with a variety of documentary sources. Discourse techniques, more particularly rhetorical analysis, will be used to analyze the data gathered. Within- and cross-case analysis will then be performed. This empirical study is strongly grounded in theory and will contribute to the scant body of literature on family physicians' professional identity formation processes in medical schools. Findings will potentially have important implications for the practice of family medicine, medical education and health and educational policies.

  4. Canadian pediatric emergency physician knowledge of concussion diagnosis and initial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemek, Roger; Eady, Kaylee; Moreau, Katherine; Farion, Ken J; Solomon, Beverly; Weiser, Margaret; Dematteo, Carol

    2015-03-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of concussion is a critical step in the appropriate management of patients following minor head trauma. The authors hypothesized that wide practice variation exists among pediatric emergency medicine physicians in the application of physical and cognitive rest recommendations following an acute concussion. The authors developed a 35-item questionnaire incorporating case vignettes to examine pediatric emergency physician knowledge of concussion diagnosis, understanding of initial management using return-to-play/school/work guidelines, use of existing concussion protocols, and perceived barriers to protocol use. Using a modified Dillman technique, the authors distributed an online survey to members of Pediatric Emergency Research Canada, a national association of pediatric emergency physicians. Of 176 potential participants, 115 (65%) responded to the questionnaire, 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81, 0.93) of whom reported having diagnosed 20 or more concussions annually. Although 90% (95% CI: 0.83, 0.94) of respondents adequately diagnosed concussion, only 64% (95% CI: 0.54, 0.72) correctly applied graduated return-to-play guidelines. Cognitive rest recommendations were also frequently limited: 40% (95% CI: 0.31, 0.49) did not recommend school absence, 30% (95% CI: 0.22, 0.39) did not recommend schoolwork reduction, and 35% (95% CI: 0.27, 0.45) did not recommend limiting screen time. Eighty percent (95% CI: 0.72, 0.87) of respondents reported having used guidelines frequently or always to guide clinical decisions regarding concussion. Despite a proficiency in the diagnosis of concussion, pediatric emergency physicians exhibit wide variation in recommending the graduated return to play and cognitive rest following concussion.

  5. Understanding how emergency medicine physicians survive and thrive in rural practice: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Ashra; Keesey, Andrea; Bluman, Bob; Lynn, Brenna; Wilkinson, Tandi

    2017-11-01

    The challenges facing emergency medicine (EM) services in Canada reflect the limitations of the entire healthcare system. The emergency department (ED) is uniquely situated in the healthcare system such that shortcomings in hospital- and community-based services are often first revealed there. This is especially true in rural settings, where there are additional site-specific barriers to the provision of EM care. Existing studies look at the factors that influence rural EM physicians in isolation. This study uses a qualitative approach and generates a theoretical model that describes the complex interplay between major factors that influence the experience of rural EM physicians. Eight focus groups were conducted with 39 physicians from rural British Columbia, Canada. Semi-structured focus group protocols were designed to leverage the diversity of the focus groups, which included rural generalists, full-time EM practitioners, physicians from very small and remote communities, locums, international medical graduates, physicians new to practice, and physicians who no longer practice rural EM. Following the principles of grounded theory, interview probes were adjusted iteratively to reflect emerging findings. Transcripts were analysed to identify codes and major themes, which served as the basis for the theoretical model. The theoretical model reveals how the causal conditions (a lack of medical and human resources, and the isolation of rural communities due to topography, distance, and inclement weather) contribute to physicians' common experience of feeling fearful and under-supported at work. Two core phenomena emerge as important needs: supportive professional relationships, and healthcare system adaptability. Contextual factors such as remuneration and continuing medical education funding, and the intervening conditions of physicians' rural exposure during formative years, also have an effect. Physicians create innovative solutions to address the challenges that

  6. Specialist Physicians' Attitude towards Emergency Medicine; a Semi-Structured Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Shahrooz; Nejati, Amir; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Aghili, Seyed Mojtaba

    2018-01-01

    The present study is a survey to assess the pros and cons of emergency medicine (EM) from the viewpoint of the scholars from other medicine disciplines to improve the efficiency of EM in the healthcare system. This is a semi-structured qualitative study. Face-to-face interviews with various physicians with different specialties were performed to gather information on their viewpoints. Study population was selected mainly based on their history of collaboration with emergency medicine specialists in several educational hospitals in Tehran, Iran. All interviews were recorded and then transcribed to paper. Data were mainly categorized and reported into four themes: 1) general aspects of emergency medicine, goals and policies 2) Management of emergency department 3) Educational aspects 4) therapeutic aspects. 22 specialist physicians with the mean age of 47.3±7.6 years were studied (77.3% male). The average of their work experience as a specialist was 13.6±7.5 years. From the viewpoint of other experts, the establishment of EM and training of EM specialists is accompanied with relative disadvantages and advantages regarding goals and policies, patient management, therapeutic interventions and student education in the emergency department. Initiating resuscitation and maintaining hemodynamic stability and appropriate triage of the patients can add to the benefits of EM by preventing unreasonable hospitalization, and reducing the workload and difficulty of the work of other professionals working in the hospital. Based on the results of the current study, it seems that most Iranian specialist physicians have a positive attitude towards emergency medicine and think that emergency medicine could have beneficial effects for the health system and hospital management system.

  7. Why and when to use CT in children: perspective of a pediatric emergency medicine physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Department is a risk-laden environment for clinicians caring for children. A number of factors can increase the risk of medical errors and adverse events, including lack of standardized medication dosing because of size variation in the pediatric age range, unique physical and developmental characteristics of children that affect treatment strategies, and the inability of young or non-verbal children to provide a medical history or to clearly communicate pain and other symptoms. The Emergency Department (ED) setting is often hectic and chaotic, with lots of interruptions. Many EDs lack the pediatric-specific supplies deemed essential for managing pediatric emergencies, and long hours or overnight shifts, while necessary for maintaining 24-hour emergency services, can cause provider fatigue that can lead to increased medical errors. It is in this environment that ED physicians make decisions about the use of CT scans in children, often without evidence-based guidelines to help them weigh risks and benefits. Although recent efforts have raised the awareness of the risk of exposure to radiation, many pediatric providers and families lack adequate information to guide decisions about the use of CT. Pediatricians and emergency physicians need to collaborate with radiologists to maintain current knowledge of the risks and benefits of CT scans, to advocate for pediatric protocols and evidence-based guidelines, and to engage families in decisions regarding the evaluation and treatment of pediatric patients in the Emergency Department. (orig.)

  8. Why and when to use CT in children: perspective of a pediatric emergency medicine physician

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frush, Karen [Duke University School of Medicine, DUMC, Department of Pediatrics, Box 3701, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The Emergency Department is a risk-laden environment for clinicians caring for children. A number of factors can increase the risk of medical errors and adverse events, including lack of standardized medication dosing because of size variation in the pediatric age range, unique physical and developmental characteristics of children that affect treatment strategies, and the inability of young or non-verbal children to provide a medical history or to clearly communicate pain and other symptoms. The Emergency Department (ED) setting is often hectic and chaotic, with lots of interruptions. Many EDs lack the pediatric-specific supplies deemed essential for managing pediatric emergencies, and long hours or overnight shifts, while necessary for maintaining 24-hour emergency services, can cause provider fatigue that can lead to increased medical errors. It is in this environment that ED physicians make decisions about the use of CT scans in children, often without evidence-based guidelines to help them weigh risks and benefits. Although recent efforts have raised the awareness of the risk of exposure to radiation, many pediatric providers and families lack adequate information to guide decisions about the use of CT. Pediatricians and emergency physicians need to collaborate with radiologists to maintain current knowledge of the risks and benefits of CT scans, to advocate for pediatric protocols and evidence-based guidelines, and to engage families in decisions regarding the evaluation and treatment of pediatric patients in the Emergency Department. (orig.)

  9. The 2017 International Joint Working Group recommendations of the Indian College of Cardiology, the Academic College of Emergency Experts, and INDUSEM on the management of low-risk chest pain in emergency departments across India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vivek; Shah, Pavitra Kotini; Galwankar, Sagar; Sammon, Maura; Hosad, Prabhakar; Beeresha; Erickson, Timothy B.; Gaieski, David F.; Grover, Joydeep; Hegde, Anupama V.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Jarwani, Bhavesh; Kataria, Himanshu; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa; Nagamani, A. C.; Patel, Anjali; Patel, Ketan; Ramesh, D.; Rangaraj, R.; Shamanur, Narendra; Sridhar, L.; Srinivasa, K. H.; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-01-01

    There have been no published recommendations for the management of low-risk chest pain in emergency departments (EDs) across India. This is despite the fact that chest pain continues to be one of the most common presenting complaints in EDs. Risk stratification of patients utilizing an accelerated diagnostic protocol has been shown to decrease hospitalizations by approximately 40% with a low 30-day risk of major adverse cardiac events. The experts group of academic leaders from the Indian College of Cardiology and Academic College of Emergency Experts in India partnered with academic experts in emergency medicine and cardiology from leading institutions in the UK and USA collaborated to study the scientific evidence and make recommendations to guide emergency physicians working in EDs across India. PMID:28367012

  10. Diagnostic accuracy and use of nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography by emergency physicians: phase II of the FOTO-ED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Thulasi, Praneetha; Fraser, Clare L; Keadey, Matthew T; Ward, Antoinette; Heilpern, Katherine L; Wright, David W; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-07-01

    During the first phase of the Fundus Photography vs Ophthalmoscopy Trial Outcomes in the Emergency Department study, 13% (44/350; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9% to 17%) of patients had an ocular fundus finding, such as papilledema, relevant to their emergency department (ED) management found by nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography reviewed by neuro-ophthalmologists. All of these findings were missed by emergency physicians, who examined only 14% of enrolled patients by direct ophthalmoscopy. In the present study, we evaluate the sensitivity of nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography, an alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy, for relevant findings when photographs are made available for use by emergency physicians during routine clinical care. Three hundred fifty-four patients presenting to our ED with headache, focal neurologic deficit, visual change, or diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 120 mm Hg had nonmydriatic fundus photography obtained (Kowa nonmydriatic α-D). Photographs were placed on the electronic medical record for emergency physician review. Identification of relevant findings on photographs by emergency physicians was compared with a reference standard of neuro-ophthalmologist review. Emergency physicians reviewed photographs of 239 patients (68%). Thirty-five patients (10%; 95% CI 7% to 13%) had relevant findings identified by neuro-ophthalmologist review (6 disc edema, 6 grade III/IV hypertensive retinopathy, 7 isolated hemorrhages, 15 optic disc pallor, and 1 retinal vascular occlusion). Emergency physicians identified 16 of 35 relevant findings (sensitivity 46%; 95% CI 29% to 63%) and also identified 289 of 319 normal findings (specificity 91%; 95% CI 87% to 94%). Emergency physicians reported that photographs were helpful for 125 patients (35%). Emergency physicians used nonmydriatic fundus photographs more frequently than they performed direct ophthalmoscopy, and their detection of relevant abnormalities improved. Ocular fundus

  11. An Analysis of WhatsApp Usage for Communication Between Consulting and Emergency Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacti, Umut; Lok, Ugur; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Polat, Haci

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate WhatsApp messenger usage for communication between consulting and emergency physicians. A retrospective, observational study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care university hospital between January 2014 and June 2014. A total of 614 consultations requested by using the WhatsApp application were evaluated, and 519 eligible consultations were included in the study. The WhatsApp messages that were transferred to consultant physicians consisted of 510 (98.3%) photographic images, 517 (99.6%) text messages, 59 (11.3%) videos, and 10 (1.9%) voice messages. Consultation was most frequently requested from the orthopedics clinic (n = 160, 30.8%). The majority of requested consultations were terminated only by evaluation via WhatsApp messages. (n = 311, 59.9%). Most of the consulting physicians were outside of the hospital or were mobile at the time of the consultation (n = 292, 56.3%). The outside consultation request rate was significantly higher for night shifts than for day shifts (p = .004), and the majority of outside consultation request were concluded by only WhatsApp application (p WhatsApp is useful a communication tool between physicians, especially for ED consultants who are outside the hospital, because of the ability to transfer large amounts of clinical and radiological data during a short period of time.

  12. Recognition and Knowledge of Medications with Black Box Warnings Among Pediatricians and Emergency Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollin, Craig Geoffrey; Fu, Jonathan; Levin, Ross

    2016-06-01

    "Boxed warnings" (BW), sometimes referred to as "black box warnings," are the most serious level of warning provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We aimed to assess physician awareness and knowledge of BW, and to gain a better understanding of where physicians obtain information about serious adverse drug reactions for commonly prescribed medications. A cross-sectional survey instrument was administered to emergency medicine (EM) and pediatrician (Peds) attending and resident physicians. The main outcome measures were physician performance in identifying medications with and without black box warnings and the content of the warnings. The survey response rate was 81/198 (41 %). Respondents correctly identified medications with BW only 36.3 % of the time, but were able to correctly identify medications without such warnings 83.8 % of the time. Attending physicians were better able to identify medications with or without BW when compared with residents (p < 0.05). Among residents, there was a statistically significant increase in the ability to identify medications with or without BW with increasing year of training (p < 0.01). Correct identification of the content of BW was low in both groups (13.3 %). Only 19/50 (37 %) EM physicians and 16/31 (52 %) Peds reported that they consider BW when prescribing medications. 23/81 (29 %) respondents indicated that they did not stay current or had no method of staying current with black box information. EM and Peds attending and resident physicians at a single institution had limited ability to identify medications containing BW or the content of such warnings. A significant number reported that they did not stay current or had no consistent method for staying current with BW.

  13. Does emergency physician empathy reduce thoughts of litigation? A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dustin D; Kellar, Jesse; Walters, Elizabeth L; Reibling, Ellen T; Phan, Tammy; Green, Steven M

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesised the addition of brief empathetic statements to physician-patient interaction might decrease thoughts regarding litigation. We enrolled a convenience sample of adults in our emergency department (ED) waiting room into a randomised, double-blind controlled trial. Subjects watched videos of simulated discharge conversations between physicians and patient actors; half of the videos differed only by the inclusion of two brief empathetic statements: verbalisations that (1) the physician recognises that the patient is concerned about their symptoms and (2) the patient knows their typical state of health better than a physician seeing them for the first time and did the right thing by seeking evaluation. After watching the video subjects were asked to score a five-point Likert scale their thoughts regarding suing this physician in the event of a missed outcome leading to lost work (primary outcome), and four measures of satisfaction with the physician encounter (secondary outcomes). We enrolled and randomised 437 subjects. 213 in the empathy group and 208 in the non-empathy group completed the trial. Sixteen subjects did not complete the trial due to computer malfunction or incomplete data sheets. Empathy group subjects reported statistically significant less thoughts of litigation than the non-empathy group (mean Likert scale 2.66 vs 2.95, difference -0.29, 95% CI -0.04 to -0.54, p=0.0176). All four secondary measures of satisfaction with the physician encounter were better in the empathy group. In this study, the addition of brief empathetic statements to ED discharge scenarios was associated with a statistically significant reduction in thoughts regarding litigation. NCT01837706. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Physician identification and patient satisfaction in the emergency department: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Mary P; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Mahadevan, Swaminatha V; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Patient satisfaction has become a quality indicator tracked closely by hospitals and emergency departments (EDs). Unfortunately, the primary factors driving patient satisfaction remain poorly studied. It has been suggested that correct physician identification impacts patient satisfaction in hospitalized patients, however, the limited studies that exist have demonstrated mixed results. In this study, we sought to identify factors associated with improved satisfaction among ED patients, and specifically, to test whether improving physician identification by patients would lead to increased satisfaction. We performed a pre- and postintervention, survey-based study of patients at the end of their ED visits. We compared patient satisfaction scores as well as patients' abilities to correctly identify their physicians over two separate 1-week periods: prior to and after introducing a multimedia presentation of the attending physicians into the waiting room. A total of 486 patients (25% of all ED visits) were enrolled in the study. In the combined study population, overall patient satisfaction was higher among patients who correctly identified their physicians than among those who could not identify their physicians (combined mean satisfaction score of 8.1 vs. 7.2; odds ratio [OR] 1.07). Overall satisfaction was also higher among parents or guardians of pediatric patients than among adult patients (satisfaction score of 8.4 vs. 7.4; OR 1.07), and among patients who experienced a shorter door-to-doctor time (satisfaction score of 8.2 for shorter waiting time vs. 5.6 for longer waiting time; OR 1.15). Ambulance patients showed decreased satisfaction over some satisfaction parameters, including physician courtesy and knowledge. No direct relationship was demonstrated between the study intervention (multimedia presentation) and improved patient satisfaction or physician identification. Improved patient satisfaction was found to be positively correlated with correct physician

  15. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  16. Attitudes toward Management of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Complications: A National Survey of Academic Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arch G. Mainous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disease that requires a significant degree of medical intervention, and family physicians are one potential provider of care for patients who do not have access to specialists. The extent to which family physicians are comfortable with the treatment of and concerned about potential complications of SCD among their patients is unclear. Our purpose was to examine family physician’s attitudes toward SCD management. Methods. Data was collected as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA survey in the United States and Canada that targeted family physicians who were members of CERA-affiliated organizations. We examined attitudes regarding management of SCD. Results. Overall, 20.4% of respondents felt comfortable with treatment of SCD. There were significant differences in comfort level for treatment of SCD patients depending on whether or not physicians had patients who had SCD, as well as physicians who had more than 10% African American patients. Physicians also felt that clinical decision support (CDS tools would be useful for treatment (69.4% and avoiding complications (72.6% in managing SCD patients. Conclusions. Family physicians are generally uncomfortable with managing SCD patients and recognize the utility of CDS tools in managing patients.

  17. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to a...

  18. Does outcome feedback make you a better emergency physician? A systematic review and research framework proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Curtis F; Schachter, Howard; Stewart, Aviva T; McGowan, Jessie

    2009-11-01

    The organization of emergency medical care limits the ability of emergency physicians to know the outcomes of most of their patients after the patients leave the emergency department. This lack of outcome feedback may hinder the practice of emergency medicine (EM) by preventing "calibration" of the decision tools of practitioners. We sought to determine what is currently known about outcome feedback in EM, including its incidence, impact and modifiers. We searched the following databases: PreMEDLINE, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, DARE, Health Technology Assessment Database and AMED. We performed manual searches on abstract databases, reference lists, various health information and research websites, and nonindexed journals. Selection entailed a 2-step screening pro cess to exclude articles not pertaining to outcome feedback in EM. Our search yielded 1128 bibliographic records, from which screening identified 7 relevant reports: 5 surveys, 1 system level evaluation and 1 intervention trial. All studies were found to have "inadequate" or "unable to assess" reporting and study quality. Systems for outcome feedback to EM residents have been increasingly available since 1984, though they are perceived to be inadequate. Commonly used mechanisms for outcome feedback include automatic routing of discharge summaries, case conferences for admitted patients and telephone calls to patients or families for discharged patients. With respect to attending emergency physicians, no conclusions or clinical recommendations can be made given the level of available evidence. The potential importance of outcome feedback remains, at this time, underevaluated. We propose a research framework, and hypothesize that increasing outcome feedback would increase emergency physician diagnostic accuracy, therapeutic outcomes, clinical efficiency and job satisfaction. Future research in this area should include surveys and focus groups, as well as simulated or real-world intervention

  19. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Mediating the Relationship between Emerging Adulthood and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Farukh; Hanafi, Zahyah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Academic achievement of students can be fostered and improved if they learn to apply emotional intelligence in their emerging adulthood. The core objective of this research is to test the relationship between emerging adulthood and academic achievement by taking emotional intelligence as a mediator. Methodology: The sample comprises 90…

  1. Differentiating Urgent and Emergent Causes of Acute Red Eye for the Emergency Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Christopher J; Yang, Allen; Yonkers, Marc; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2017-04-01

    Patients commonly present with an acute red eye to the emergency department (ED). It is important to distinguish between benign and sight-threatening diagnoses. Here we provide a comprehensive overview on the acute red eye in the ED.

  2. Perceptions of Emergency Department Physicians Toward Collaborative Practice With Nurse Practitioners in an Emergency Department Setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wingert, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Once considered reserved for life-threatening disease or illness, emergency departments in the United States are now described as the primary care clinic and the social work department for many Americans (Grumback, Keane & Bindman, 1993...

  3. Translation of ERC resuscitation guidelines into clinical practice by emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Henrik; Bachmann, Kaspar; Strunk, Guido; Neuhold, Stephanie; Zapletal, Bernhard; Maurer, Claudia; Fast, Andrea; Stumpf, Dominik; Greif, Robert

    2014-01-30

    Austrian out-of-hospital emergency physicians (OOHEP) undergo mandatory biannual emergency physician refresher courses to maintain their licence. The purpose of this study was to compare different reported emergency skills and knowledge, recommended by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines, between OOHEP who work regularly at an out-of-hospital emergency service and those who do not currently work as OOHEP but are licenced. We obtained data from 854 participants from 19 refresher courses. Demographics, questions about their practice and multiple-choice questions about ALS-knowledge were answered and analysed. We particularly explored the application of therapeutic hypothermia, intraosseous access, pocket guide use and knowledge about the participants' defibrillator in use. A multivariate logistic regression analysed differences between both groups of OOHEP. Age, gender, years of clinical experience, ERC-ALS provider course attendance and the self-reported number of resuscitations were control variables. Licenced OOHEP who are currently employed in emergency service are significantly more likely to initiate intraosseous access (OR = 4.013, p ERC-ALS provider course since 2005 have initiated more mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation (OR = 1.670, p ERC guidelines better into clinical practice, but more training on life-saving rescue techniques needs to be done to improve knowledge and to raise these rates of application.

  4. Indications and results of emergency surgical airways performed by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; Bruijstens, L.; Ploeg, J. van der; Tan, E.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Edwards, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway management is essential in critically ill or injured patients. In a "can't intubate, can't oxygenate" scenario, an emergency surgical airway (ESA), similar to a cricothyroidotomy, is the final step in airway management. This procedure is infrequently performed in the prehospital

  5. Workplace violence against physicians in Turkey’s emergency departments: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Başak; Çetin, Murat; Çolak Oray, Neşe; Can, İsmail Özgür

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the prevalence of violence directed at emergency department (ED) physicians in Turkey and confirm the factors influencing such violence. Design Cross-sectional survey study. Setting Country of Turkey. Participants Physicians currently practising in EDs in Turkey. Main outcome measures The prevalence of violence directed at physicians and factors that may influence it, such as physicians’ personal characteristics, ED characteristics and physicians’ opinions regarding the causes of and suggested methods of preventing violence. Results A total of 713 physicians participated. Of these, 78.1% reported being subjected to violence in the past year and 65.9% reported more than one such incident. Being subjected to violence was related to age (p=0.008), working in an ED with a high patient admission rate (p=0.018), current position (pviolence. The present safety precautions against violence do not appear to influence the prevalence of violence. Conclusions Our results indicated that ED physicians’ experience of violence is related to personal characteristics such as age and level of expertise, and hospital and ED characteristics such as high patient admission rates. Presently, no measures taken to reduce this violence have been proven effective. PMID:28663323

  6. Factors that trigger emergency physicians to contact a poison centre: findings from a Swiss study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurter, David; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Jahns, Maximilian; Haberkern, Monika; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Eriksson, Urs; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    Poison centres offer rapid and comprehensive support for emergency physicians managing poisoned patients. This study investigates institutional, case-specific and poisoning-specific factors which influence the decision of emergency physicians to contact a poison centre. Retrospective, consecutive review of all poisoning-related admissions to the emergency departments (EDs) of a primary care hospital and a university hospital-based tertiary referral centre during 2007. Corresponding poison centre consultations were extracted from the poison centre database. Data were matched and analysed by logistic regression and generalised linear mixed models. 545 poisonings were treated in the participating EDs (350 (64.2%) in the tertiary care centre, 195 (35.8%) in the primary care hospital). The poison centre was consulted in 62 (11.4%) cases (38 (61.3%) by the tertiary care centre and 24 (38.7%) by the primary care hospital). Factors significantly associated with poison centre consultation included gender (female vs male) (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.69 to 5.29; p1 vs 1) (OR 2.84; 95% CI 1.65 to 4.9; ppoison centre consultation. Poison centre consultation was significantly higher during the week, and significantly less during night shifts. The poison centre was consulted significantly more when patients were admitted to intensive care units (OR 5.81; 95% CI 3.25 to 10.37; ppoison centre consultation by emergency physicians. It appears that intensive care unit admission and other factors reflecting either complexity or uncertainty of the clinical situation are the strongest predictors for poison centre consultation. Hospital size did not influence referral behaviour.

  7. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  8. The emerging roles of academic librarians in the electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . It sees the traditional roles as functions that have enabled the librarian to provide the needs of his clientele mostly within the walls of the academic library. It also enumerates and expatiates on the roles of the academic librarian in the ...

  9. An exploration of key issues and potential solutions that impact physician wellbeing and professional fulfillment at an academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Iris; Brady, Keri J S; Trockel, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    Background. Physician wellness is a vital element of a well-functioning health care system. Not only is physician wellness empirically associated with quality and patient outcomes, but its ramifications span individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal levels. The purpose of this study was to explore academic physicians' perceptions about their work-related wellness, including the following questions: (a) What are the workplace barriers and facilitators to their wellness? (b) What workplace solutions do theythinkwouldimprove their wellness? (c)What motivates their work? and (d) What existing wellness programs are they aware of? Methods. A multi-method design was applied to conduct a total of 19 focus group sessions in 17 clinical departments. All academic faculty ranks and career lines were represented in the 64 participating physicians, who began the sessions with five open-ended survey questions pertaining to physician wellness in their work environment. Participants entered their answers into a web-based survey program that enabled anonymous data collection. The initial survey component was followed by semi-structured focus group discussion. Data analysis of this qualitative study was informed by the general inductive approach as well as a review of extant literature through September 2015 on physician wellness, professional fulfillment, satisfaction, dissatisfaction, burnout and work-life. Results. Factors intrinsic to the work of physicians dominated the expressed reasons for work motivation. These factors all related to the theme of overall contribution, with categories of meaningful work, patient care, teaching, scientific discovery, self-motivation and matching of career interests. Extrinsic factors such as perceptions of suboptimal goal alignment, inadequate support, restricted autonomy, lack of appreciation, and suboptimal compensation and benefits dominated the risk of professional dissatisfaction. Discussion. Our findings indicate that the

  10. Survey of attitudes of senior emergency physicians towards the introduction of emergency department ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R E; Lee, A; Clenaghan, S; McGovern, S; Martyn, C; Bowra, J

    2005-08-01

    Emergency department ultrasound (EDU) is widely practised in the USA, Australia, parts of Europe, and Asia. EDU has been used in the UK since the late 1990s but as yet, few areas have established a practice. To assess the current climate of opinion with respect to the practice, constraints, and establishment of EDU among emergency department (ED) consultants on the island of Ireland. A postal questionnaire was formulated, piloted, and assessed for ambiguity by a sample of ED consultants and an independent non-ED consultant, prior to being mailed to all ED consultants in Ireland. Of the 58 consultants canvassed 46 (79%) responded. Of the respondents, 40 (87%) strongly agreed/agreed that EDU is appropriate and should be performed in the ED. Of these, 3 (7%) are currently performing EDU; 37 (80%) have not had formal training in EDU, however 42 (91%) support the establishment of national guidelines for training in focused ultrasound in the ED. Problems instituting EDU were often multifactorial. Commonly highlighted difficulties included financial issues (24 respondents, 52%) and radiology department support (16 respondents, 34%). Other cited problems include varying interdepartmental practices (15 respondents, 33%) and (for some EDs) low numbers of patients requiring EDU, with projected difficulties in skills maintenance. Despite the vast majority of ED consultants being in favour of EDU, very few actually perform it on a regular basis or have had any formal training. Highlighted difficulties in EDU implementation included financial constraints, lack of support from radiology departments, and lack of formal training.

  11. From Test Scores to Language Use: Emergent Bilinguals Using English to Accomplish Academic Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mojica, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Prominent discourses about emergent bilinguals' academic abilities tend to focus on performance as measured by test scores and perpetuate the message that emergent bilinguals trail far behind their peers. When we remove the constraints of formal testing situations, what can emergent bilinguals do in English as they engage in naturally occurring…

  12. The Impact of Emergency Physician Seniority on Clinical Efficiency, Emergency Department Resource Use, Patient Outcomes, and Disposition Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Jui; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Tsai, Tsung-Cheng; Wu, Kuan-Han; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lin, Yan-Ren

    2016-02-01

    The ability of emergency physicians (EPs) to continue within the specialty has been called into question due to high stress in emergency departments (EDs).The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of EP seniority on clinical performance.A retrospective, 1-year cohort study was conducted across 3 EDs in the largest health-care system in Taiwan. Participants included 44,383 adult nontrauma patients who presented to the EDs. Physicians were categorized as junior, intermediate, and senior EPs according to ≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 years of ED work experience. The door-to-order and door-to-disposition time were used to evaluate EP efficiency. Emergency department resource use indicators included diagnostic investigations of electrocardiography, plain film radiography, laboratory tests, and computed tomography scans. Discharge and mortality rates were used as patient outcomes. Disposition accuracy was evaluated by ED revisit rate.Senior EPs were found to have longer door-to-order (11.3, 12.4 minutes) and door-to-disposition (2, 1.7 hours) time than nonsenior EPs in urgent and nonurgent patients (junior: 9.4, 10.2 minutes and 1.7, 1.5 hours; intermediate: 9.5, 10.7 minutes and 1.7, 1.5 hours). Senior EPs tended to order fewer electrocardiograms, radiographs, and computed tomography scans in nonurgent patients. Adjusting for age, sex, disease acuity, and medical setting, patients treated by junior and intermediate EPs had higher mortality in the ED (adjusted odd ratios, 1.5 and 1.6, respectively).Compared with EPs with ≤10 years of work experience, senior EPs take more time for order prescription and patient disposition, use fewer diagnostic investigations, particularly for nonurgent patients, and are associated with a lower ED mortality rate.

  13. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Are mothers' and fathers' parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults' academic engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Emily A; Lefkowitz, Eva S

    2017-06-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students ( N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers' and fathers' parenting style, parent-offspring relationship quality, academic attitudes, academic behaviors, and academic performance. Emerging adults with more permissive mothers viewed grades as less important than emerging adults with less permissive mothers. Mothers' authoritarian parenting, mothers' permissive parenting, and relationship quality with father were differentially related to academic engagement depending on emerging adults' gender. Both mothers' and fathers' parenting characteristics may impact the academic engagement of emerging adults via past parenting behaviors and current quality of the parent-offspring relationship, despite decreased physical proximity of emerging adults and their parents.

  15. Are mothers’ and fathers’ parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults’ academic engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Emily A.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2017-01-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students (N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers’ and fathers’ parenting style, parent-offspring relationship quality, academic attitudes, academic behaviors, and academic performance. Emerging adults with more permissive mothers viewed grades as less important than emerging adults with less permissive mothers. Mothers’ authoritarian parenting, mothers’ permissive parenting, and relationship quality with father were differentially related to academic engagement depending on emerging adults’ gender. Both mothers’ and fathers’ parenting characteristics may impact the academic engagement of emerging adults via past parenting behaviors and current quality of the parent-offspring relationship, despite decreased physical proximity of emerging adults and their parents. PMID:28529398

  16. Patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial prophylaxis for anthrax during the 2001 bioterrorism-related outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aber Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics by individuals worried about biological agent exposures during bioterrorism events is an important public health concern. However, little is documented about the extent to which individuals with self-identified risk of anthrax exposure approached physicians for antimicrobial prophylaxis during the 2001 bioterrorism attacks in the United States. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected members of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians to assess patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial agents during the 2001 anthrax attacks. Results Ninety-seven physicians completed the survey. Sixty-four (66% respondents had received requests from patients for anthrax prophylaxis; 16 (25% of these physicians prescribed antibiotics to a total of 23 patients. Ten physicians prescribed ciprofloxacin while 8 physicians prescribed doxycycline. Conclusion During the 2001 bioterrorist attacks, the majority of the emergency physicians we surveyed encountered patients who requested anthrax prophylaxis. Public fears may lead to a high demand for antibiotic prophylaxis during bioterrorism events. Elucidation of the relationship between public health response to outbreaks and outcomes would yield insights to ease burden on frontline clinicians and guide strategies to control inappropriate antibiotic allocation during bioterrorist events.

  17. Acceptability of Physician Directed Academic Detailing to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening: an Application of the RESPECT Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Gwen; Basch, Corey H; Zybert, Patricia; Wolf, Randi L; Basch, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    In developing effective interventions to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in at risk populations, a necessary first requirement is feasibility. This paper describes how the RESPECT approach to health education guided the conceptualization and implementation of physician-directed academic detailing (AD) to increase practice-wide CRC screening uptake. Physician-directed AD was one intervention component in a large educational randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening uptake. Study participants, primarily urban minority, were aged 50 or older, insured for CRC screening with no out-of-pocket expense and out of compliance with current screening recommendations. The trial was conducted in the New York City metropolitan area. Participants identified their primary care physician; 564 individuals were recruited, representing 459 physician practices. Two-thirds of the physician practices were randomized to receive AD. The RESPECT approach, modified for AD, comprises: 1) Rapport, 2) Educate, but don't overwhelm, 3) Start with physicians where they are, 4) Philosophical orientation based on a humanistic approach to education, 5) Engagement of the physician and his/her office staff, 6) Care and show empathy, and 7) Trust. Feasibility was assessed as rate of AD delivery. The AD was delivered to 283 (92.5%) of the 306 practices assigned to receive it; 222/283 (78.4%) delivered to the doctor. The AD was feasible and acceptable to implement across a range of clinical settings. The RESPECT approach offers a framework for tailoring educational efforts, allowing flexibility, as opposed to strict adherence to a highly structured script or a universal approach.

  18. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)....... initiatives. Although no hearing loss was demonstrated in the personnel of the ground-based units, a reduced function of the outer sensory hair cells was found in the HEMS group following missions.......BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS......). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. METHODS: Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed...

  19. Human Trafficking: A Guide to Identification and Approach for the Emergency Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandro, Jamie; Chisolm-Straker, Makini; Duber, Herbert C; Findlay, Shannon Lynn; Munoz, Jessica; Schmitz, Gillian; Stanzer, Melanie; Stoklosa, Hanni; Wiener, Dan E; Wingkun, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Human trafficking is a significant human rights problem that is often associated with psychological and physical violence. There is no demographic that is spared from human trafficking. Traffickers maintain control of victims through physical, sexual, and emotional violence and manipulation. Because victims of trafficking seek medical attention for the medical and psychological consequences of assault and neglected health conditions, emergency clinicians are in a unique position to recognize victims and intervene. Evaluation of possible trafficking victims is challenging because patients who have been exploited rarely self-identify. This article outlines the clinical approach to the identification and treatment of a potential victim of human trafficking in the emergency department. Emergency practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion when evaluating patients who appear to be at risk for abuse and violence, and assess for specific indicators of trafficking. Potential victims should be evaluated with a multidisciplinary and patient-centered technique. Furthermore, emergency practitioners should be aware of national and local resources to guide the approach to helping identified victims. Having established protocols for victim identification, care, and referrals can greatly facilitate health care providers' assisting this population. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An exploration of key issues and potential solutions that impact physician wellbeing and professional fulfillment at an academic center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Schrijver

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physician wellness is a vital element of a well-functioning health care system. Not only is physician wellness empirically associated with quality and patient outcomes, but its ramifications span individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal levels. The purpose of this study was to explore academic physicians’ perceptions about their work-related wellness, including the following questions: (a What are the workplace barriers and facilitators to their wellness? (b What workplace solutions do theythinkwouldimprove their wellness? (cWhat motivates their work? and (d What existing wellness programs are they aware of? Methods. A multi-method design was applied to conduct a total of 19 focus group sessions in 17 clinical departments. All academic faculty ranks and career lines were represented in the 64 participating physicians, who began the sessions with five open-ended survey questions pertaining to physician wellness in their work environment. Participants entered their answers into a web-based survey program that enabled anonymous data collection. The initial survey component was followed by semi-structured focus group discussion. Data analysis of this qualitative study was informed by the general inductive approach as well as a review of extant literature through September 2015 on physician wellness, professional fulfillment, satisfaction, dissatisfaction, burnout and work-life. Results. Factors intrinsic to the work of physicians dominated the expressed reasons for work motivation. These factors all related to the theme of overall contribution, with categories of meaningful work, patient care, teaching, scientific discovery, self-motivation and matching of career interests. Extrinsic factors such as perceptions of suboptimal goal alignment, inadequate support, restricted autonomy, lack of appreciation, and suboptimal compensation and benefits dominated the risk of professional dissatisfaction. Discussion. Our findings

  1. Computed tomography use in minor head injury: attitudes and practices of emergency physicians, neurosurgeons, and radiologists in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özan, Ebru; Ataç, Gökçe Kaan

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to determine the attitudes and practices of emergency physicians (EPs), neurosurgeons, and radiologists in Turkey regarding computed tomography (CT) use for adults with minor head injury (MHI). This cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2015 and October 2016 after obtaining the approval of the institutional ethical committee. The purpose of this study was disclosed to the participants prior to beginning the survey. The study was performed conducting a questionnaire via e-mail on three groups of participants including EPs, neurosurgeons, and radiologists. Participants comprised academic staff at university hospitals as well as department chiefs, specialists, and residents working at university, government, and private hospitals, all of whom are in charge of evaluating MHI patients. A total of 607 participants including 201 (33.1%) EPs, 179 (29.5%) neurosurgeons, and 227 (37.4%) radiologists responded to the survey; 31% of the participants reported awareness and 27.3% reported use of head CT rules in MHI. Awareness and use of the rules were most prominent in EPs group, while the lowest rates were observed in radiologists group (phead CT rules in MHI stated by EPs were medicolegal anxiety (73.6%), expectations of patients and/or patient relatives (72.6%), and time constraints (44.3%). The leading factors stated by neurosurgeons were medicolegal anxiety (60.9%) and expectations of patient and/or patient relatives (46.4%); "not being consulted in the decision-making process to obtain CT in MHI" (65.6%) and medicolegal anxiety (49.8%) were the leading factors stated by radiologists. The results of our study show that many physicians in Turkey do not have favorable attitudes regarding head CT rules in MHI. Medicolegal anxiety, expectations of patient and/or patient relatives, time constraints, wide availability of CT, and lack of adequate education on radiation protection or on patient dose from imaging are the common reasons for this practice

  2. Quality Improvement Initiative to Decrease Variability of Emergency Physician Opioid Analgesic Prescribing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Burton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addressing pain is a crucial aspect of emergency medicine. Prescription opioids are commonly prescribed for moderate to severe pain in the emergency department (ED; unfortunately, prescribing practices are variable. High variability of opioid prescribing decisions suggests a lack of consensus and an opportunity to improve care. This quality improvement (QI initiative aimed to reduce variability in ED opioid analgesic prescribing. Methods: We evaluated the impact of a three-part QI initiative on ED opioid prescribing by physicians at seven sites. Stage 1: Retrospective baseline period (nine months. Stage 2: Physicians were informed that opioid prescribing information would be prospectively collected and feedback on their prescribing and that of the group would be shared at the end of the stage (three months. Stage 3: After physicians received their individual opioid prescribing data with blinded comparison to the group means (from Stage 2 they were informed that individual prescribing data would be unblinded and shared with the group after three months. The primary outcome was variability of the standard error of the mean and standard deviation of the opioid prescribing rate (defined as number of patients discharged with an opioid divided by total number of discharges for each provider. Secondary observations included mean quantity of pills per opioid prescription, and overall frequency of opioid prescribing. Results: The study group included 47 physicians with 149,884 ED patient encounters. The variability in prescribing decreased through each stage of the initiative as represented by the distributions for the opioid prescribing rate: Stage 1 mean 20%; Stage 2 mean 13% (46% reduction, p<0.01, and Stage 3 mean 8% (60% reduction, p<0.01. The mean quantity of pills prescribed per prescription was 16 pills in Stage 1, 14 pills in Stage 2 (18% reduction, p<0.01, and 13 pills in Stage 3 (18% reduction, p<0.01. The group mean

  3. [Communication in special situations: a training programme with standardized patients for emergency medical physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopka, Sasa; Brokmann, Jörg Ch; Rossaint, Rolf; Pirkl, Andrea; Beckers, Stefan K

    2009-02-01

    Regulations for the post-graduate education of physicians deployed in the emergency medical system in Germany are existing, but unfortunately not standardised nationwide. Within the compulsory certification course "soft skills" are not incorporated resp. psychological disorders are not considered to an adequate extent. In respect of increasing emergency calls with psycho-social indications it seemed necessary to invent a specialised course concerning these issues. Integrating under-graduate experiences of classes with standardized patients, objectives were defined; a pilot course was composed using scenarios as acute psychosis, suicidal tendency and bringing bad news including structured video-feedback. Evaluation data approved the tested approach concerning content as well as feasibility, pointed out areas for improvement, but encouraged further implementation of the program to greater extend.

  4. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave W. Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their relationship with self-reported patient care practices. Methods: In this cross-sectional study burnout was measured at two university-based emergency medicine residency programs with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We also measured depression, quality of life (QOL and career satisfaction using validated questionnaires. Six items assessed suboptimal care and the frequency with which they were performed. Results: We included 77 out of 155 (49.7% responses. The EP burnout rate was 57.1%, with no difference between attending and resident physicians. Residents were more likely to screen positive for depression (47.8% vs 18.5%, p=0.012 and report lower QOL scores (6.7 vs 7.4 out of 10, p=0.036 than attendings. Attendings and residents reported similar rates of career satisfaction (85.2% vs 87.0%, p=0.744. Burnout was associated with a positive screen for depression (38.6% vs 12.1%, p=0.011 and lower career satisfaction (77.3% vs 97.0%, p=0.02. EPs with high burnout were significantly more likely to report performing all six acts of suboptimal care. Conclusion: A majority of EPs demonstrated high burnout. EP burnout was significantly associated with higher frequencies of self-reported suboptimal care. Future efforts to determine if provider burnout is associated with negative changes in actual patient care are necessary.

  5. Emergency Physicians as Good Samaritans: Survey of Frequency, Locations, Supplies and Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor W. Burkholder, MD, MPH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the frequency and locations in which emergency physicians (EPs are bystanders to an accident or emergency; equally uncertain is which contents of an “emergency kit” may be useful during such events. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and locations of Good Samaritan acts by EPs and also determine which emergency kit supplies and medications were most commonly used by Good Samaritans. Methods: We conducted an electronic survey among a convenience sample of EPs in Colorado. Results: Respondents reported a median frequency of 2.0 Good Samaritan acts per five years of practice, with the most common locations being sports and entertainment events (25%, road traffic accidents (21%, and wilderness settings (19%. Of those who had acted as Good Samaritans, 86% reported that at least one supply would have been useful during the most recent event, and 66% reported at least one medication would have been useful. The most useful supplies were gloves (54%, dressings (34%, and a stethoscope (20%, while the most useful medications were oxygen (19%, intravenous fluids (17%, and epinephrine (14%. Conclusion: The majority of EPs can expect to provide Good Samaritan care during their careers and would be better prepared by carrying a kit with common supplies and medications where they are most likely to use them.

  6. Supply and demand of board-certified emergency physicians by U.S. state, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ashley F; Ginde, Adit A; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2009-10-01

    The objective was to estimate the emergency medicine (EM) board-certified emergency physician (EP) workforce supply and demand by U.S. state. The 2005 National Emergency Department Inventories-USA provided annual visit volumes for U.S. emergency departments (EDs). We estimated full-time equivalent (FTE) EP demand at each ED by dividing the actual number of visits by the estimated average EP visit volume (3,548 visits/year) and then summing FTEs by state. Our model assumed that at least one EP should be present 24/7 in each ED. The number of EM board-certified EPs per state was provided by the American Board of Medical Specialties (American Board of Emergency Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics) and the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine. We used U.S. Census Bureau civilian population estimates to calculate EP population density by state. The supply of EM board-certified EPs was 58% of required FTEs to staff all EDs nationally and ranged from 10% in South Dakota to 104% in Hawai'i (i.e., there were more EPs than the estimated need). Texas and Florida had the largest absolute shortages of EM board-certified EPs (2,069 and 1,146, respectively). The number of EM board-certified EPs per 100,000 U.S. civilian population ranged from 3.6 in South Dakota to 13.8 in Washington, DC. States with a higher population density of EM board-certified EPs had higher percent high school graduates and a lower percent rural population and whites. The supply and demand of EM board-certified EPs varies by state. Only one state had an adequate supply of EM board-certified EPs to fully staff its EDs.

  7. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  8. Analysis of patients with decompression illness transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Oode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There have been few reports investigating the effects of air transportation on patients with decompression illness (DCI. Aims: To investigate the influence of air transportation on patients with DCI transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters (HEMS: Emergency medical system of physician-staffed emergency helicopters. Settings and Design: A retrospective medical chart review in a single hospital. Materials and Methods: A medical chart review was retrospectively performed in all patients with DCI transported via HEMS between July 2009 and June 2013. The exclusion criteria included cardiopulmonary arrest on surfacing. Statistical analysis used: The paired Student′s t-test. Results: A total of 28 patients were treated as subjects. Male and middle-aged subjects were predominant. The number of patients who suddenly surfaced was 15/28. All patients underwent oxygen therapy during flight, and all but one patient received the administration of lactate Ringer fluid. The subjective symptoms of eight of 28 subjects improved after the flight. The range of all flights under 300 m above sea level. There were no significant differences between the values obtained before and after the flight for Glasgow coma scale, blood pressure, and heart rate. Concerning the SpO 2 , statistically significant improvements were noted after the flight (96.2 ± 0.9% versus 97.3 ± 0.7%. There were no relationships between an improvement in subjective symptoms and the SpO 2 . Conclusion: Improvements in the subjective symptoms and/or SpO 2 of patients with DCI may be observed when the patient is transported via HEMS under flights less than 300 m in height with the administration of oxygen and fluids.

  9. Assigning a team-based pager for on-call physicians reduces paging errors in a large academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Lisa; Chi, Jeffrey; Kulik, Carol; Momeni, Arash; Shelton, Andrew; DePorte, Cynthia; Hopkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    As complexity of care of hospitalized patients has increased, the need for communication and collaboration among members of the team caring for the patient has become increasingly important. This often takes the form of a nurse's need to contact a patient's physician to discuss some aspect of care and modify treatment plans. Errors in communication delay care and can pose risk to patients. This report describes the successful implementation of a standardized team-based paging system at an academic center. Results showed a substantial improvement in nurses' perceptions of knowing how to contact the correct physician when discussion of the patient's care is needed. This improvement was found across multiple medical and surgical specialties and was particularly effective for services with the greatest communication problems.

  10. Productivity Assessment of Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Oncology in an Academic Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Moote, Marc; Nelson, Ron; Veltkamp, Robin; Campbell, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Productivity measurement for physician assistants and nurse practitioners can be challenging. This study quantifies their productivity in oncology according to economic indicators such as charges and work relative value units.

  11. Test Characteristics of Emergency Physician-Performed Limited Compression Ultrasound for Lower-Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel J; Byyny, Richard L; Rice, Cliff A; Faragher, Jeff P; Nordenholz, Kristen E; Haukoos, Jason S; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2016-12-01

    The current literature suggests that emergency physician (EP)-performed limited compression ultrasound (LCUS) is a rapid and accurate test for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Our primary objective was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of LCUS for the diagnosis of DVT when performed by a large heterogeneous group of EPs. This was a prospective diagnostic test assessment of LCUS conducted at two urban academic emergency departments. The scanning protocol involved compression at the common femoral, superficial femoral, and popliteal veins. Patients were eligible if undergoing radiology department ultrasound of the lower extremity with moderate or high pretest probability for DVT, or low pretest probability for DVT with a positive d-dimer. The enrolling EP performed LCUS before radiology department ultrasound of the same lower extremity. Sensitivity, specificity, and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with the radiologist interpretation of the radiology department ultrasound as the criterion standard. A total of 56 EPs enrolled 296 patients for LCUS, with a median age of 50 years and 50% female. Fifty (17%) DVTs were identified by radiology department ultrasound, and another five (2%) cases were deemed indeterminate. The sensitivity and specificity of EP-performed LCUS was 86% (95% CI 73-94%) and 93% (95% CI 89-96%), respectively. A large heterogeneous group of EPs with limited training can perform LCUS with intermediate diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, LCUS performed by EPs with limited ultrasound training is not sufficiently sensitive or specific to rule out or diagnose DVT as a single testing modality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M; Brunett, Patrick H; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together-traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. [Improvement of emergency physician education through simulator training. Consideration on the basis of the model project "NASimSaar25"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, W; Kubulus, D; Schlechtriemen, T; Adler, J; Höhn, M; Schmidt, D; Duchêne, S; Steiner, P; Volk, T; Wrobel, M

    2014-09-01

    Prehospital emergency medicine is a challenge for trainee emergency physicians. Rare injuries and diseases as well as patients in extreme age groups can unexpectedly face emergency physicians. In the regulations on medical education the German Medical Association requires participation in 50 emergency missions under the supervision of an experienced emergency physician. This needs to be improved because on-the-job training does not generally represent the whole spectrum of emergency medicine and a good and structured training under on call conditions is nearly impossible. The subject of the model project described was whether practical training for emergency physicians can be achieved by participation in simulation training instead of real emergency situations. After modification of the Saarland regulations on medical education it was possible to replace up to 25 participations in emergency missions by simulation training. The concept of the course NASimSaar25 requires participants to complete 25 simulator cases in 3 days in small training groups. Emergency situations from all medical disciplines need to be treated. A special focus is on the treatment of life-threatening and rare diseases and injuries. Modern simulators and actors are used. The debriefings are conducted by experienced tutors based on approved principles. Medical contents, learning targets from the field of crew resource management (CRM) and soft skills are discussed in these debriefings. Education in the field of emergency medicine can be improved by simulator-based learning and training. However, practical work under a tutor in real and clinical experience cannot be completely replaced by simulation. Simulator training can only be successful if theoretical knowledge has already been acquired. A simulator-based course concept can result in an improvement of emergency medical education. The model project NASimSaar25 was well received by the target audience and mostly very well evaluated in terms of

  14. Effect of a resident physician educational program on pediatric emergency department pharmacy interventions and medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Megan E; Lighter, Donald E; Godambe, Ashok V; Edgerson, Brandon; Bradley, Randy; Godambe, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of a resident physician educational program in a pediatric emergency department (ED) on pharmacy interventions and medication errors, particularly dose adjustments, order clarifications, and adverse drug events (ADE). The ED pharmacist recorded all interventions and medication errors on weekdays from 3 to 11 pm during a 9-month period, consisting of a preobservational (Quarter 1), observational (Quarter 2), and interventional (Quarter 3) phases. Program implementation occurred in Quarter 3, with an initial 3-hour lecture during the ED orientation, followed by daily patient case discussions. Weekly interventions and errors were analyzed using statistical process control u-chart analyses. Chi-square analyses of independence were also performed. Resident and ED staff feedback on the program was obtained through anonymous internet-based surveys. A total of 3507 interventions were recorded during the 9-month period. Chi-square approximation and interval estimation of odds ratio showed a statistically significant decrease between Quarters 1 and 3 in the number of dose adjustments (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.324-0.689) and order clarifications (95% CI, 0.137 to 0.382) after initiation of the program. The decline in ADE, while not as substantial (95% CI, 0.003 to 1.078), still achieved a level of significance (90% CI, 0.006 to 0.674). Survey results were positive toward the program. The implementation of a resident physician educational program in our pediatric ED significantly decreased the number of medication errors, increased resident physician awareness of the potential for errors, and increased ED pharmacist utilization.

  15. Factors influencing emergency medicine physicians' management of sports-related concussions: a community-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Stephen; Kothari, Rashmi; Koestner, Amy; Mohney, Gretchen; Baker, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Numerous guidelines to grade and manage sports-related concussions have been published. However, little is known about how frequently they are implemented in the emergency department. This study evaluates the current practices of emergency physicians (EPs) in managing sports-related concussions. To evaluate the current practice of EP evaluation and management of sports-related concussions. All EPs and emergency medicine residents in Kalamazoo County were surveyed regarding their management of sports-related concussions. The surveys obtained demographic data, participants' use of guidelines, and the importance of clinical and non-clinical factors in deciding when to allow a player to return to play. Of the 73 EP respondents, only 23% used a nationally recognized guideline, with no significant difference between attending and resident EPs. The symptomatic complaints of loss of consciousness, amnesia of the event, and difficulty concentrating were ranked most important by EPs in assessing patients with sports-related concussions. Among non-clinical factors, residents were significantly more likely than attendings to report that medical-legal, parental, and players' concerns were more likely to influence their decision in allowing a patient to return to play. EPs take into consideration important clinical factors in assessing patients with sports-related concussion. However, almost 75% do not use any nationally recognized guideline in their evaluation. Residents are more likely than attendings to be influenced by non-clinical factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of E-learning Compared to Classroom Learning in the Diagnostic Approach to Bioterrorism and Chemical Terrorism for Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alavi-Moghaddam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Emergency physicians play an important role in the immediate diagnosis of bioterrorism activities. The present study was conducted with the purpose of comparing the effectiveness of e-learning and classroom learning in approach to bioterrorism and chemical terrorism for emergency physicians.Methods: This was a semi-empirical study, which was conducted via testing knowledge before and after the educational intervention in the field of bioterrorism and chemical terrorism on the emergency physicians in Tehran. The external validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by two academic experts in order to determine the ability to detect bioterrorist and chemical terrorist diseases. In this study, education was done in both virtual and classroom forms. The education regarded 6 bioterrorist diseases in group A (anthrax, plague, viral hemorrhagic fever, tularemia, smallpox, and 5 chemical terrorist diseases (nerve gas, mustard, lewisite, phosgene, chlorine.Results: 160 doctors participated in this study. 96 people (60% were men and 64 people (40% were women. The average age of the participants was 36.2±5.5 years. In e-learning method, the pre-test scores average was (30.6%, while the post-test scores average was (81.6% (p=0.001. In classroom learning method, the pre-test scores average was (41.9%, while the post-test scores average was (72.9%, which the pre-test and post-test scores average differences in both cases are significant (p<0.001. In e-learning method, the difference was (51%, and in the classroom method it was (31%, which these two represent a 20% difference between methods. From statistical point of view, this difference indicates that the e-learning method being more effective (p=0.02.Conclusions: Based on the study results, it seems that in comparison to the classroom learning, e-learning method is more effective in helping emergency physicians to diagnose bioterrorism or chemical terrorism factors.Keywords: E

  17. [New Royal Decree on clinical trials: main implications for emergency medicine physicians who do research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Arenillas, Mar; Haj-Ali Saflo, Okba; Sáenz de Tejada, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The new European Union directives affecting clinical trials of medicines introduced important changes for Spain, leading to the publication of a Royal Decree regulating the conduct of clinical trials that went into effect in January 2016. The decree sets out the principles for complying with the EU directives, regulates the work of institutional review boards (IRBs) or ethics committees that review research proposals, introduces means to facilitate clinical research, and clarifies the role of the Spanish register of clinical trials, among other topics. This paper discusses the main changes that have been introduced, especially those intended to facilitate research, such as the new concepts of low intervention trial and noncommercial clinical research. These concepts may be particularly useful for clinical trials designed by emergency medicine physicians. We also comment on changes affecting vulnerable populations and the documents that must be presented to both the researchers' IRB and the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Health Care Products.

  18. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. Emerging adults are also increasingly identified by their technology use and practices. Collegiate instructors will be better equipped for educating these individuals when armed with insights concerning emerging adults' technology…

  20. Push-Alert Notification of Troponin Results to Physician Smartphones Reduces the Time to Discharge Emergency Department Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aikta; Wang, Angela S; Feldman, Michael J; Hefferon, Darren A; Kiss, Alex; Lee, Jacques S

    2017-09-01

    For emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain, discharge decisions often hinge on troponin results. Push-alert notifications deliver results immediately to physician smartphones. Our objective is to determine whether troponin push alerts improve the time to discharge decisions for ED patients with chest pain. In an academic ED, we assessed the effect of a quality improvement initiative using troponin push alerts to physician smartphones, with a cluster-randomized evaluation. Participating physicians were randomized to receive troponin push alerts (intervention) or not receive them (control). We retrospectively identified patients treated by participating physicians during the study period who were discharged from the ED with chest pain. The primary outcome was the time from final troponin result to discharge decision. Secondary outcomes included length of stay. A linear mixed model was used to adjust for physician clustering. During the study, 1,554 patients were discharged from the ED with chest pain. There were 551 patients in the control group and 554 in the intervention group who met inclusion criteria. The overall median interval from final troponin result to discharge decision was 79.7 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 33.6 to 167.8 minutes); it was 94.3 minutes (IQR 36.2 to 177.8 minutes) in the control group and 68.5 minutes (IQR 30.5 to 157.2 minutes) in the intervention group. This 25.8-minute difference in medians (95% confidence interval 24.6 to 28.0 minutes) was statistically significant. Total ED length of stay was 345 minutes (IQR 261 to 419 minutes) in the control group and 328 minutes (IQR 250 to 408 minutes) in the intervention group. Physicians who received troponin push alerts discharged their patients with chest pain 26 minutes faster than those without troponin notifications. Total ED length of stay did not significantly improve for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc

  1. Assessment of the relation of violence and burnout among physicians working in the emergency departments in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Bülent; Ergin, Ahmet; Yüksel, Aykut; Türkçüer, İbrahim; Ayrık, Cüneyt; Boz, Bora

    2015-05-01

    Violence and burnout are frequently seen among medical doctors; however, the relation is not clear. This study aimed to assess the violence and its possible effects on burnout in physicians working in emergency units. This cross-sectional study targeted all physicians working in the emergency units of Pamukkale University Hospital, County and City Hospitals, 112 Emergency Services, and Private Hospitals in Denizli. Data were obtained by means of a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of questions on the demographics of the participants, Turkish version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and of the perpetrators of violence. What was also documented on the questionnaire was whether participants had been subjected to or had witnessed any verbal or physical violence during the previous one month of emergency physicians' certification program. A total of one hundred and seventy-four physicians were included into the study (85% of the targeted group). Many of the participants were between 24 and 59 years of age, with a mean age of 36.8±5.8 years. Married male doctors working in the City Hospital made up the majority. There were significant associations between emotional exhaustion and total violence (p=0.012) and verbal violence (p=0.016); depersonalization and total violence (p=0.021) and verbal violence (p=0.012). The results presented here indicated that there was a strong relation between burnout and violence experienced by physicians working in emergency units. Violence in the emergency department has a substantial effect on the physicians' well-being.

  2. Exploration of the perceptions of emergency physicians and interns regarding the medical documentation practices of interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoardi, Jonathon; Spencer, Lyndall; Sinnott, Michael; Nicholls, Kim; O'Connor, Angela; Jones, Fleur

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to learn the factors that influence the documentation practices of ED interns. A second objective was to identify the expectations of emergency physicians (EPs) towards the medical record documentation of ED interns. A qualitative design was adopted using semi-structured interviews in convenience samples drawn from both groups. Eighteen interviews were conducted with intern volunteers and 10 with EP volunteers. One (5%) intern and two (20%) EPs had received medical documentation training. Factors that encouraged interns' documentation included: patient acuity (the more critical the condition, the more comprehensive the documentation) and the support of senior colleagues. Inhibiting factors included uncertainty about how much to write, and the shift being worked (interns indicated they wrote less at night). Factors of consequence to senior personnel included the apparent reluctance of interns to document management plans. They noted that interns frequently confine their notes to assessment, investigations and treatments, whereas EPs preferred records that demonstrated intern thought processes and included such matters as future actions to follow immediate treatment. A positive theme that emerged included the high level of support interns received from their senior colleagues. Another theme, the influence of patient acuity, held both positive and negative implications for intern writing practices. The lack of formal training is an impediment to the production of useful medical records by ED interns. One solution proposed by both interns and senior personnel was the introduction of the subject into intern education programmes. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  3. Commentary: "Who was caring for Mary?" revisited: a call for all academic physicians caring for patients to focus on systems and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick S; Spear, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Over 15 years have passed since Mary's near death (Annals of Internal Medicine. 1993;118:146-148). Disappointment in the care by fellow academic physicians persists; however, a reanalysis of her case through the lens of complex systems design and performance yields a more accurate and actionable perspective. Mary's suffering was not due to human failure alone. Human failure was provoked and exacerbated by broken processes including ambiguous assignments of responsibility; inadequate transfers of information and authority; unreliable or unavailable protocols for providing safe, effective treatment; and a failure to integrate the deep but narrow perspectives of individual specialists into a complete picture of Mary's condition. Her case exemplifies, in personal terms, many of the system challenges academic medical centers face: Faculty have other missions that can conflict with patient care; disease complexity is high, requiring input from multiple subspecialists; clinical departments serve as roadblocks to communication; and novice physicians, requiring close supervision, have primary responsibility for the day-to-day care of acutely ill patients. The academic physicians who first cared for Mary unwittingly accepted flawed systems, and they failed to work around them. At great monetary and emotional expense, last-minute heroics saved Mary. In a dysfunctional system, even the most conscientious physician may be viewed as uncaring. As Mary's case so clearly illustrates, patients and their families see the system and the physician as one. Only by working to improve the systems of delivery will academic physicians again be consistently viewed as caring.

  4. National Survey of Emergency Physicians Concerning Home-Based Care Options as Alternatives to Emergency Department-Based Hospital Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Amy R; Crowley, Christopher; Killeen, James; Castillo, Edward M

    2017-11-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States play a prominent role in hospital admissions, especially for the growing population of older adults. Home-based care, rather than hospital admission from the ED, provides an important alternative, especially for older adults who have a greater risk of adverse events, such as hospital-acquired infections, falls, and delirium. The objective of the survey was to understand emergency physicians' (EPs) perspectives on home-based care alternatives to hospitalization from the ED. Specific goals included determining how often EPs ordered home-based care, what they perceive as the barriers and motivators for more extensive ordering of home-based care, and the specific conditions and response times most appropriate for such care. A group of 1200 EPs nationwide were e-mailed a six-question survey. Participant response was 57%. Of these, 55% reported ordering home-based care from the ED within the past year as an alternative to hospital admission or observation, with most doing so less than once per month. The most common barrier was an "unsafe or unstable home environment" (73%). Home-based care as a "better setting to care for low-acuity chronic or acute disease exacerbation" was the top motivator (79%). Medical conditions EPs most commonly considered for home-based care were cellulitis, urinary tract infection, diabetes, and community-acquired pneumonia. Results suggest that EPs recognize there is a benefit to providing home-based care as an alternative to hospitalization, provided they felt the home was safe and a process was in place for dispositioning the patient to this setting. Better understanding of when and why EPs use home-based care pathways from the ED may provide suggestions for ways to promote wider adoption. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of Free, Open Access Medical Education and Perceived Emergency Medicine Educational Needs Among Rural Physicians in Southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkl, Alex; Chan, Teresa; Blau, Elaine

    2016-09-21

    Free, open access medical education (FOAM) has the potential to revolutionize continuing medical education, particularly for rural physicians who practice emergency medicine (EM) as part of a generalist practice. However, there has been little study of rural physicians' educational needs since the advent of FOAM. We asked how rural physicians in Southwestern Ontario obtained their continuing EM education. We asked them to assess their perceived level of comfort in different areas of EM. To understand how FOAM resources might serve the rural EM community, we compared their responses with urban emergency physicians. Responses were collected via survey and interview. There was no significant difference between groups in reported use of FOAM resources. However, there was a significant difference between rural and urban physicians' perceived level of EM knowledge, with urban physicians reporting a higher degree of confidence for most knowledge categories, particularly those related to critical care and rare procedures. This study provides the first description of EM knowledge and FOAM resource utilization among rural physicians in Southwestern Ontario. It also highlights an area of educational need -- that is, critical care and rare procedures. Future work should address whether rural physicians are using FOAM specifically to improve their critical care and procedural knowledge. As well, because of the generalist nature of rural practice, future work should clarify whether there is an opportunity cost to rural physicians' knowledge of other clinical domains if they chose to focus more time on continuing education in critical care EM.

  6. [National Program of Continuous Academic Development for the General Physician (PRONADAMEG). The Chihuahua City experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to report on the experience obtained during 8 years of the Programa Nacional de Actualización y Desarrollo Académico para el Medico General (PRONADAMEG) in Chihuahua City in Northern Mexico. During this period, 276 general physicians enrolled in PRONADAMEG and 140 concluded their training, with end effectiveness of 50.7%.

  7. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P nurses and medical technicians (P Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type.

  8. Wide Variability in Emergency Physician Admission Rates: A Target to Reduce Costs Without Compromising Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Guterman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attending physician judgment is the traditional standard of care for emergency department (ED admission decisions. The extent to which variability in admission decisions affect cost and quality is not well understood. We sought to determine the impact of variability in admission decisions on cost and quality. Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study of patients presenting to a university-affiliated, urban ED from October 1, 2007, through September 30, 2008. The main outcome measures were admission rate, fiscal indicators (Medicaid-denied payment days, and quality indicators (15- and 30-day ED returns; delayed hospital admissions. We asked each Attending to estimate their inpatient admission rate and correlated their personal assessment with actual admission rates. Results: Admission rates, even after adjusting for known confounders, were highly variable (15.2%-32.0% and correlated with Medicaid denied-payment day rates (p=0.038. There was no correlation with quality outcome measures (30-day ED return or delayed hospital admission. There was no significant correlation between actual and self-described admission rate; the range of mis-estimation was 0% to 117%. Conclusion: Emergency medicine attending admission rates at this institution are highly variable, unexplained by known confounding variables, and unrelated to quality of care, as measured by 30-day ED return or delayed hospital admission. Admission optimization represents an important untapped potential for cost reduction through avoidable hospitalizations, with no apparent adverse effects on quality.

  9. Can different physicians providing urgent and non-urgent treatment improve patient flow in emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Flora Fei-Fei; Tsai, Tsung-Cheng; Lin, Yan-Ren; Wu, Kuan-Han; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Li, Chao-Jui

    2017-11-06

    Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding is a worldwide problem, and it might be caused by prolonged patient stay in the ED. This study tried to analyze if different practice models influence patient flow in the ED. A retrospective, 1-year cohort study was conducted across two EDs in the largest healthcare system in Taiwan. A total of 37,580 adult non-trauma patients were involved in the study. The clinical practice between two ED practice models was compared. In one model, urgent and non-urgent patients were treated by different emergency physicians (EPs) separately (separated model). In the other, EPs treated all patients assigned randomly (merged model). The ED length of stay (LOS), diagnostic tool use (including laboratory examinations and computed tomography scans), and patient dispositions (including discharge, general ward admission, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and ED mortality) were selected as outcome indicators. Patients discharged from ED had 0.4h shorter ED LOS in the separated model than in merged model. After adjusting for the potential confounding factors through regression model, there was no difference of patient disposition of the two practice models. However, the separated model showed a slight decrease in laboratory examination use (adjusted odds ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.96) compared with the merged model. The separated model had better patient flow than the merged model did. It decreased the ED LOS in ED discharge patients and laboratory examination use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Gendered academic adjustment among Asian American adolescents in an emerging immigrant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Lisa; Supple, Andrew J; Stein, Gabriela L; Gonzalez, Laura M

    2012-03-01

    Research on the academic adjustment of immigrant adolescents has been predominately conducted in large cities among established migration areas. To broaden the field's restricted focus, data from 172 (58% female) Asian American adolescents who reside within a non-traditional or emerging immigrant community in the Southeastern US were used to examine gender differences in academic adjustment as well as school, family, and cultural variables as potential mediators of gender differences found. Results suggest that girls report significantly higher educational goals, intrinsic academic motivation, and utility value of school compared to boys. These gender differences are statistically mediated by ethnic exploration and family processes, most prominently, family respect. School connectedness and perceived discrimination are also associated with academic adjustment at the bivariate level, suggesting that academic success may be best promoted if multiple domains of influence can be targeted.

  11. Can Emergency Physicians Perform Common Carotid Doppler Flow Measurements to Assess Volume Responsiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolz, Lori A.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Common carotid flow measurements may be clinically useful to determine volume responsiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of emergency physicians (EP to obtain sonographic images and measurements of the common carotid artery velocity time integral (VTi for potential use in assessing volume responsiveness in the clinical setting. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we showed a five-minute instructional video demonstrating a technique to obtain common carotid ultrasound images and measure the common carotid VTi to emergency medicine (EM residents. Participants were then asked to image the common carotid artery and obtain VTi measurements. Expert sonographers observed participants imaging in real time and recorded their performance on nine performance measures. An expert sonographer graded image quality. Participants were timed and answered questions regarding ease of examination and their confidence in obtaining the images. Results: A total of 30 EM residents participated in this study and each performed the examination twice. Average time required to complete one examination was 2.9 minutes (95% CI [2.4-3.4 min]. Participants successfully completed all performance measures greater than 75% of the time, with the exception of obtaining measurements during systole, which was completed in 65% of examinations. Median resident overall confidence in accurately performing carotid VTi measurements was 3 (on a scale of 1 [not confident] to 5 [confident]. Conclusion: EM residents at our institution learned the technique for obtaining common carotid artery Doppler flow measurements after viewing a brief instructional video. When assessed at performing this examination, they completed several performance measures with greater than 75% success. No differences were found between novice and experienced groups. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:255–259.

  12. Development of emergency medicine as academic and distinct clinical discipline in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihefendic, Nizama; Zildzic, Muharem; Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Zoran; Vasic, Dusko

    2011-01-01

    Emergency medicine is a new academic discipline, as well as a recent independent clinical specialization with the specific principles of practice, education and research. It is also a very important segment of the overall health care and health system. Emergency medicine as a distinct specialty was introduced in the U.S. in 1970. Ten years later and relatively quickly emergency medicine was introduced in the health system in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a specialty with a special education program for specialist and a final exam. Compare the development of emergency medicine in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the trends of development of this discipline in the world as a specialization and an academic discipline. Identify specific problems and possible solutions and learn lessons from other countries. Reviewed are the literature data on the development of emergency medicine in the world, programs of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, the organizational scheme of emergency centers and residency. This is then compared with data of the current status of emergency medicine as an academic discipline and a recognized specialization, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are substantial differences in the development of emergency medicine in the United States, European Union and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although Bosnia and Herzegovina relatively early recognized specialty of emergency medicine in academia, it failed to mach the academic progress with the practical implementation. A&E departments in the Community Health Centers failed to meet the desired objectives even though they were led by specialists in emergency medicine. The main reason being the lack of space and equipment as well as staff needed to meet set standards of good clinical practice, education and research. Furthermore the Curriculum of undergraduate education and specialization does not match modern concept of educational programs that meet the principles set out in emergency medicine and learning through

  13. Physician medical direction and clinical performance at an established emergency medical services system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Marc-David; White, Shaun D; Perry, Malcolm L; Platt, Thomas E; Hardan, Mohammed S; Stoy, Walt A

    2009-01-01

    Few developed emergency medical services (EMS) systems operate without dedicated medical direction. We describe the experience of Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) EMS, which in 2007 first engaged an EMS medical director to develop and implement medical direction and quality assurance programs. We report subsequent changes to system performance over time. Over one year, changes to the service's clinical infrastructure were made: Policies were revised, paramedic scopes of practice were adjusted, evidence-based clinical protocols were developed, and skills maintenance and education programs were implemented. Credentialing, physician chart auditing, clinical remediation, and online medical command/hospital notification systems were introduced. Following these interventions, we report associated improvements to key indicators: Chart reviews revealed significant improvements in clinical quality. A comparison of pre- and post-intervention audited charts reveals a decrease in cases requiring remediation (11% to 5%, odds ratio [OR] 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20-0.85], p = 0.01). The proportion of charts rated as clinically acceptable rose from 48% to 84% (OR 6 [95% CI 3.9-9.1], p < 0.001). The proportion of misplaced endotracheal tubes fell (3.8% baseline to 0.6%, OR 0.16 [95% CI 0.004-1.06], (exact) p = 0.05), corresponding to improved adherence to an airway placement policy mandating use of airway confirmation devices and securing devices (0.7% compliance to 98%, OR 714 [95% CI 64-29,334], (exact) p < 0.001). Intravenous catheter insertion in unstable cases increased from 67% of cases to 92% (OR 1.31 [95% CI 1.09-1.71], p = 0.004). EMS administration of aspirin to patients with suspected ischemic chest pain improved from 2% to 77% (OR 178 [95% CI 35-1,604], p < 0.001). We suggest that implementation of a physician medical direction is associated with improved clinical indicators and overall quality of care at an established EMS system.

  14. Annual Trends in Follow-Up Visits for Pediatric Concussion in Emergency Departments and Physicians' Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Liraz; Scolnik, Michal; Macpherson, Alison; Rothman, Linda; Guttmann, Astrid; Grool, Anne M; Rodriguez Duque, Daniel; Zemek, Roger L

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether children and youth with concussion receive follow-up visits in accordance with the recommended guidelines. We conducted a retrospective, population-based study using linked health administrative data from all concussion-related visits to emergency department and physician offices by children aged 5 through 18 years (range, 5.00-18.99) in Ontario between 2003 and 2013. We analyzed the percentage of children and youth seen for follow-up. The Mann-Kendall test for trends was used to assess a monotonic increasing trend over time in concussion follow-up visits. A total of 126 654 children and youth were evaluated for an index concussion visit. The number of children and youth assessed for concussion follow-up (N = 45 155) has increased significantly over time (P < .001). In 2003, 781 of 7126 patients (11.0%; 95% CI, 10.3-11.7) with an index visit for concussion had a follow-up assessment. By 2013, 6526 of 21 681 (30.1%; 95% CI, 29.5-30.7) patients received follow-up care. The proportion of children and youth receiving follow-up after an acute concussion has significantly increased between 2003 and 2013. Nevertheless, more than two-thirds of all patients do not seek medical follow-up or clearance as recommended by current concussion guidelines, suggesting that ongoing efforts to improve and monitor compliance with recommended guidelines by patients and physicians are important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved quality and efficiency after the introduction of physician-led team triage in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lena; Engström, Marie-Louise; Castrén, Maaret; Wiklund, Tony; Enlund, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) may negatively affect patient outcomes, so different triage models have been introduced to improve performance. Physician-led team triage obtains better results than other triage models. We compared efficiency and quality measures before and after reorganization of the triage model in the ED at our county hospital. We retrospectively compared two study periods with different triage models: nurse triage in 2008 (baseline) and physician-led team triage in 2012 (follow-up). Physician-led team triage was in use during day-time and early evenings on weekdays. Data were collected from electronic medical charts and the National Mortality Register. We included 20,073 attendances in 2008 and 23,765 in 2012. The time from registration to physician presentation decreased from 80 to 33 min (P triage improved the efficiency and quality in EDs.

  16. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  17. Career-Success Scale – A new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg Claus; Stamm Martina; Buddeberg-Fischer Barbara; Klaghofer Richard

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. Methods 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success...

  18. Composition of emergency medical services teams and the problem of specialisation of emergency medical services physicians in the opinions of occupationally active paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rębak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine includes prevention, prehospital care, specialised treatment, rehabilitation, and education. Aim of the research: The objective of the analysis was to determine the opinions of paramedics concerning the problem of the composition of emergency medical services (EMS teams and specialisation of EMS system physicians according to their education level and sense of coherence. Material and methods: The study was conducted among 336 occupationally active paramedics working in EMS teams delivering prehospital care in selected units in Poland. The study was conducted at Ambulance Stations and in Hospital Emergency Departments, which within their structure had an out-of-hospital EMS team. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey, and the research instrument was the Orientation to Life Questionnaire SOC-29 and a questionnaire designed by the author. Results: The respondents who had licentiate education relatively more frequently indicated paramedics with licentiate education level as persons most suitable to undertake medical actions (26.32% rather than physicians (21.05%. Paramedics with 2-year post-secondary school education relatively more often mentioned physicians (33.07% than those with licentiate education (17.32%. As many as 89.58% of the paramedics reported the need for a physician in the composition of the EMS team delivering prehospital care, while only 10.42% of them expressed an opinion that there should be teams composed of paramedics only. According to 30.65% of respondents, EMS team delivering prehospital care should include a physician with the specialty in emergency medicine, whereas 8.04% of respondents reported the need for a physician, irrespective of specialisation. However, 42.56% of the paramedics expressed an opinion that a physician is needed only in a specialist team with a specialisation in emergency medicine. The opinions of the paramedics concerning the need for a physician

  19. Quality of work life of rural emergency department nurses and physicians: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, Isabelle; Fleet, Richard; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Archambault, Patrick; Légaré, France; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Ouimet, Mathieu; Poitras, Julien; Dupuis, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Information about recruitment and retention factors and quality of work life (QWL) in rural emergency departments (EDs) is limited. A pilot study was used to determine the feasibility of a large-scale study of these variables in Quebec EDs. Two EDs, approximately 10,000 and 30,000 patients per year respectively, were selected as convenience samples. An online survey containing the Quality of Work Life Systemic Inventory (QWLSI; 34 items) and the Recruitment and Retention Factors Questionnaire (39 items) was sent to ED nurses and physicians of these two EDs. Descriptive statistics of percentage, mean and standard deviation and correlations were used to analyse the data. Forty out of 64 eligible workers (62%) gave their consent to participate, but only 20 had completed both questionnaires. Participants' mean age was 42 years (SD = 11.6). The average participants satisfaction with their access to continuing education was low (Mean = 1.6, SD = 0.8). However, their satisfaction with technical resources (Mean = 2.4, SD = 0.7), pre-hospital and inter-hospital transfer services (Mean = 2.5, SD = 0.6), relationships with colleagues (Mean = 2.7, SD = 0.6) and managers (Mean = 2.2, SD = 0.7), work-life balance (Mean = 2.4, SD = 0.6) and emergency patient access to other departments (Mean = 3.7, SD = 0.6) was in the average. The impact of several aspects of the rural environment (e.g. tranquility) on quality of life was also in the average (Mean = 2.5, SD = 0.7). QWL was in the average, excepted subscale 'support offered to employee' for which the QWL was lower. Data collection was difficult and the larger study will require strategies to improve recruitment such as a paper alternative. The study showed globally good recruitment and retention factors and QWL for these ED nurses and physicians. These results will help hospital administrations better plan initiatives aimed at improving retention and QWL.

  20. Effects of physician-based emergency medical service dispatch in severe traumatic brain injury on prehospital run time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Verburg, N.; Brens-Heldens, V.; Andriessen, T. M. J. C.; Van der Naalt, J.; Peerdeman, S. M.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Greuters, S.; Schober, P.; Vos, P. E.; Christiaans, H. M. T.; Boer, C.; Valk, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Prehospital care by physician-based helicopter emergency medical services (P-HEMS) may prolong total prehospital run time. This has raised an issue of debate about the benefits of these services in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We therefore investigated the effects of P-HEMS dispatch

  1. Do Emergency Physicians and Medical Students Find It Unethical to ‘Look up’ Their Patients on Facebook or Google?

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    Ben-Yakov, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of search engines and online social media (OSM websites by healthcare providers is increasing and may even be used to search for patient information. This raises several ethical issues. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of OSM and web-searching for patient information and to explore attitudes towards the ethical appropriateness of these practices by physicians and trainees in the emergency department (ED. Methods: We conducted an online survey study of Canadian emergency physicians and trainees listed under then Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP and senior medical students at the University of Toronto. Results: We received 530 responses (response rate 49.1%: 34.9% medical students, 15.5% residents, 49.6% staff physicians. Most had an active Facebook account (74%. Sixty-four participants (13.5% had used Google to research a patient and 10 (2.1% had searched for patients on Facebook. There were no differences in these results based on level of training, and 25% of physicians considered using Facebook to learn about a patient “very unethical.” The most frequent ethical concerns were with violation of patient confidentiality, dignity, and consent. The practice was usually not disclosed to patients (14%, but often disclosed to senior colleagues (83%. Conclusion: This is the first study examining the prevalence of and attitudes towards online searching for obtaining patient information in the ED. This practice occurs among staff physicians and trainees despite ethical concerns. Future work should explore the utility and desirability of searching for patient information online. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:234–239.

  2. Does Targeted Education of Emergency Physicians Improve Their Comfort Level in Treating Psychiatric Patients?

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    Brenda J Walker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We determined if targeted education of emergency physicians (EPsregarding the treatment of mental illness will improve their comfort level in treatingpsychiatric patients boarding in the emergency department (ED awaiting admission.Methods: We performed a pilot study examining whether an educational interventionwould change an EP’s comfort level in treating psychiatric boarder patients (PBPs. Weidentified a set of psychiatric emergencies that typically require admission or treatmentbeyond the scope of practice of emergency medicine. Diagnoses included majordepression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar affective disorder, generalanxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and criminal behavior. We designed equivalentsurveys to be used before and after an educational intervention. Each survey consistedof 10 scenarios of typical psychiatric patients. EPs were asked to rate their comfort levelsin treating the described patients on a visual analogue scale. We calculated summaryscores for the non intervention survey group (NINT and intervention survey group (INTand compared them using Student’s t-test.Results: Seventy-nine percent (33/42 of eligible participants completed the preinterventionsurvey (21 attendings, 12 residents and comprised the NINT group. Fiftyfivepercent (23/42 completed the post-intervention survey (16 attendings, 7 residentscomprising the INT group. A comparison of summary scores between ‘NINT’ and ‘INT’groups showed a highly significant improvement in comfort levels with treating thepatients described in the scenarios (P = 0.003. Improvements were noted on separateanalysis for faculty (P = 0.039 and for residents (P = 0.012. Results of a sensitivityanalysis excluding one highly significant scenario showed decreased, but still importantdifferences between the NINT and INT groups for all participants and for residents, butnot for faculty (all: P = 0.05; faculty: P = 0.25; residents: P = 0

  3. A survey of national physicians working in an active conflict zone: the challenges of emergency medical care in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ross I; Shanovich, Patrick; Shetty, Pranav; Clark, Emma; Aziz, Sharaf; Morton, Melinda; Hasoon, Tariq; Evans, Gerald

    2012-04-01

    There has been limited research on the perspectives and needs of national caregivers when confronted with large-scale societal violence. In Iraq, although the security situation has improved from its nadir in 2006-2007, intermittent bombings, and other hostilities continue. National workers remain the primary health resource for the affected populace. To assess the status and challenges of national physicians working in the Emergency Departments of an active conflict area. This study was a survey of civilian Iraqi doctors working in Emergency Departments (EDs) across Iraq, via a convenience sample of physicians taking the International Medical Corps (IMC) Doctor Course in Emergency Medicine, given in Baghdad from December 2008 through August 2009. The 148 physician respondents came from 11 provinces and over 50 hospitals in Iraq. They described cardiovascular disease, road traffic injuries, and blast and bullet injuries as the main causes of death and reasons for ED utilization. Eighty percent reported having been assaulted by a patient or their family member at least once within the last year; 38% reported they were threatened with a gun. Doctors reported seeing a median of 7.5 patients per hour, with only 19% indicating that their EDs had adequate physician staffing. Only 19% of respondents were aware of an established triage system for their hospital, and only a minority had taken courses covering ACLS- (16%) or ATLS-related (24%) material. Respondents reported a wide diversity of prior training, with only 3% having some type of specialized emergency medicine degree. The results of this study describe some of the challenges faced by national health workers providing emergency care to a violence-stricken populace. Study findings demonstrate high levels of violent behavior directed toward doctors in Iraqi Emergency Departments, as well as staffing shortages and a lack of formal training in emergency medical care.

  4. Australasian respiratory and emergency physicians do not use the pneumonia severity index in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serisier, David J; Williams, Sophie; Bowler, Simon D

    2013-02-01

    The value of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity scoring tools is almost exclusively reliant upon regular and accurate application in clinical practice. Until recently, the Australasian Therapeutic Guidelines has recommended the use of the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) in spite of poor user-friendliness. Electronic and postal survey of respiratory and emergency medicine physician and specialist registrar members of the Royal Australasian College was undertaken to assess the use of the PSI and the accuracy of its application to hypothetical clinical CAP scenarios. The confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age 65 or older (CURB-65) score was also assessed as a simpler alternative. Five hundred thirty-six (228 respiratory, 308 emergency) responses were received. Only 12% of respiratory and 35% of emergency physicians reported using the PSI always or frequently. The majority were unable to accurately approximate PSI scores, with significantly fewer respiratory than emergency physicians recording accurate severity classes (11.8% vs 21%, OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.37-0.68, P Australasian specialist physicians primarily responsible for the acute management of CAP report infrequent use of the PSI and are unable to accurately apply its use to hypothetical scenarios. Furthermore, respiratory and emergency physicians contrasted distinctly in their use and application of the two commonest severity scoring systems--the recent recommendation of two further alternative scoring tools by Australian guidelines may add to this confusion. A simple, coordinated approach to pneumonia severity assessment across specialties in Australasia is needed. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. Effects of making emergency contraception available without a physician's prescription: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Judith A; Levine, Marc; Osmond, Brenda L; Ensom, Mary H H; Fielding, David W

    2005-03-29

    Timely access to emergency contraception has the potential to reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and subsequent abortions. A public health policy initiative in British Columbia beginning in December 2000 allowed pharmacists to provide emergency contraceptives (ECs) without a prescription. We sought to determine changes in EC use after the policy was introduced and to analyze EC use with data generated by the policy. All Ovral, Preven and Plan B EC prescriptions from Jan. 1, 1996, to Dec. 31, 2003, were identified through the BC PharmaNet and Medical Services Plan administrative databases and the data analyzed to determine changes between 1996 and 2002. Changes over time were determined in the frequency of EC provision, choice of EC agent, frequency of EC use by age group, repeat use and geographic distribution of EC prescription for the pre- and post-policy periods. Anonymized patient-specific data from treatment consent forms were used to describe the reason for EC use, interval between unprotected intercourse and EC prescription, proportion prescribed for immediate or future use, referrals for regular birth control and STD screening and concomitant antiemetic use. Consent data also provided the time in the menstrual cycle that the EC was requested. The number of EC prescriptions increased from a pre-policy mean of 8805 (99% confidence interval 7823-9787) in the years 1996 to 2000 to a post-policy total in 2002 of 17 794. Physicians prescribed the levonorgestrel regimen (Plan B) less frequently than did pharmacists. The frequency of EC use was highest among women aged 20-24 years across all study years, and all age groups demonstrated a post-policy increase in use. On average, 2.1% of the women received an EC 3 or more times a year over the period of the study. More women in urban regions received ECs than women in more rural areas of the province. Analysis of pharmacist treatment consent forms used in 2001 and 2002 showed that 56.2% of women receiving an

  6. Non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic disease: A review for emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Adrianna; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2018-03-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a life-threatening disease frequently managed in the Emergency Department (ED). Risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and smoking are classically associated with atherosclerosis and ACS. This review evaluates non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic disease and seeks to inform physicians of their potential danger, particularly in vulnerable patient populations. Traditional risk factors are commonly utilized in the evaluation of patients with concern for ACS and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), though these may not be as useful for individual patient assessment. Heart disease accounts for a significant number of deaths in the U.S. Awareness of disease presentation and risk factors is important; however, several non-traditional risk factors are associated with atherosclerosis. Vasculitides, as well as immunologic medications used to treat these patients, increase atherosclerosis. Specific types of cancer and some therapies used to treat cancer are associated with atherosclerosis development and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heavy alcohol use increases atherosclerosis and risk of AMI. Pregnancy also increases risk of AMI. Patients with HIV develop atherosclerosis at higher rates, and antiretroviral therapy predisposes patients to early development of coronary disease. Infections such as pneumonia and sepsis, associated with elevated inflammation, increase rate of ACS events during illness and throughout the one-year period after diagnosis of infection. Several non-traditional factors are associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis and ACS. Knowledge of these risk factors is important in the ED to minimize the potential of missing ACS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians

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    W. Frank Peacock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF- related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban—have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed.

  8. Analysis of patients with bodyboarding injuries transported by physician-staffed emergency helicopter

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    Kazuhiko Omori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There have been no reports that have studied the characteristics specific to bodyboard injuries. Aims: To clarify characteristics to bodyboard injuries. Settings and Design: A retrospective medical chart review. Materials and Methods: A medical chart review was retrospectively performed for all patients with spinal cord injuries transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters between January 2009 and October 2013. The subjects were divided into two groups based on whether they had a spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding (Bodyboard group, n = 14 or not (Control group, n = 14. Statistical Analysis Used: Using a χ2 -test, Mann-Whitney U-test and non-paired Student′s t-test. Results: All but one of the subjects had spinal canal stenosis. The age of the patients in the Bodyboard group was younger than that of the Control group. The ratio of males and Glasgow Coma Scale of the Bodyboard group were higher than those on the Control group. The spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding typically occurred after impacts of the head or face with the sea bottom while the subject was being buffeted by the waves. The severity of the spinal cord injury in the Bodyboard group was lower than that in the Control group. Conclusion: Bodyboarding tended to induce spinal cord injuries after the head or face collided with the sea bottom, and was more common in middle-aged males during the summer season, and was associated with a favorable outcome.

  9. Screening for iron deficiency anemia in at risk children in the pediatric emergency department: a survey of Canadian pediatric emergency department physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Roberta; Matsui, Doreen; Lynch, Tim

    2007-05-01

    To determine the attitudes and reported practices of physicians regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia in at-risk children in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) across Canada. A standardized survey was mailed to 183 PED physicians at 10 tertiary care PED across Canada. The practices and attitudes regarding screening for iron deficiency anemia were collected via a questionnaire consisting of single select closed-ended items and items which required ranking in order of importance. Sixty-one percent (111/183) of physicians responded to the survey. Ninety-six percent of respondents do not routinely screen for iron deficiency anemia. One third of respondents believed that screening for iron deficiency anemia in the PED is possible. The remaining stated lack of time, difficulty with follow-up, it not being an emergent issue and cost as prohibitive factors. One third of participants stated that 21% to 40% of the pediatric patients seen in their PED did not have a primary care physician. The main considerations in deciding on whom to perform venipuncture were based on dietary history and physical examination with a history of consumption of milk greater than 24 ounces per day (94%) and conjunctival or skin pallor (97%, 94%, respectively) selected as the most important items. The results of this study indicate that Canadian PED physicians are not routinely screening for iron deficiency anemia, although they demonstrate knowledge of the risk factors for iron deficiency anemia and recognize the importance of diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term morbidity.

  10. [Needs and expectations of general physicians exposed to emergency medicine: a study in Neuchâtel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhart, W-A; Gusmini, W; Kehtari, R

    2008-11-12

    The emergency ward constitutes the main extra/intra-hospital interface most in demand by general physicians (GP). In order to evaluate the needs and the expectations of GP and, thus, to improve the cooperation between different partners, we underwent a study over 150 GP in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. The rate of participation within the time limit was 61.3%. The results showed that only 49% of GP find an interest in emergency medicine and less than a half (43%) feel not at ease when facing to vital emergencies. However 67% of GP confirmed being highly interested to attend special training in emergency field. The cooperation with medical emergency team (SMUR) and paramedics came out to be satisfactory. Facilities to access to the medico-technical platform of the emergency ward is also highly requested.

  11. Point-of-care ultrasound education for non-physician clinicians in a resource-limited emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Lori A; Muruganandan, Krithika M; Bisanzo, Mark C; Sebikali, Mugisha J; Dreifuss, Bradley A; Hammerstedt, Heather S; Nelson, Sara W; Nayabale, Irene; Adhikari, Srikar; Shah, Sachita P

    2015-08-01

    To describe the outcomes and curriculum components of an educational programme to train non-physician clinicians working in a rural, Ugandan emergency department in the use of POC ultrasound. The use of point-of-care ultrasound was taught to emergency care providers through lectures, bedsides teaching and hands-on practical sessions. Lectures were tailored to care providers' knowledge base and available therapeutic means. Every ultrasound examination performed by these providers was recorded over 4.5 years. Findings of these examinations were categorised as positive, negative, indeterminate or procedural. Other radiologic studies ordered over this same time period were also recorded. A total of 22,639 patients were evaluated in the emergency department by emergency care providers, and 2185 point-of-care ultrasound examinations were performed on 1886 patients. Most commonly used were the focused assessment with sonography in trauma examination (53.3%) and echocardiography (16.4%). Point-of-care ultrasound studies were performed more frequently than radiology department-performed studies. Positive findings were documented in 46% of all examinations. We describe a novel curriculum for point-of-care ultrasound education of non-physician emergency practitioners in a resource-limited setting. These non-physician clinicians integrated ultrasound into clinical practice and utilised this imaging modality more frequently than traditional radiology department imaging with a large proportion of positive findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M.; Brunett, Patrick H.; Promes, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together – Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  13. The Market for Academic Knowledge: Its Historical Emergence and Inherent Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weik, Elke

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the discussion about the marketisation of universities by providing a historical perspective. Going back to the time when the market for academic knowledge emerged, I argue that it was created through incorporating a number of inherent tensions that have been, and still are, shaping its development. I show how these…

  14. Knowledge and awareness of first aid of avulsed tooth among physicians and nurses of hospital emergency department

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    Sudeep Sreepad Iyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians and nurses of emergency department are often the first line of qualified health-care providers attending the patient in person or parent's query over phone reporting immediately following the dental avulsion. Prompt action by them becomes the decisive factor in survival and prognosis of the tooth. Although a few researchers have evaluated knowledge of emergency room physicians, there is scanty of reports concerning nurses who play a climacteric role. Materials and Methods: A 10-item questionnaire regarding clinical situation apropos dental injury and tooth avulsion, inquiring knowledge of physicians and nurses was administered to 150 each of nursing professionals and physicians of the emergency department. Results: With 100% response rate, the data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results showed lack of knowledge and confidence in both groups. About 66.7% (n = 100 nurses and 74.7% (n = 112 considered reimplantation of avulsed tooth. There was overbalanced confusion regarding storage/transport media and handling of avulsed tooth. Conclusion: The findings from the results suggested a definite inadequacy in knowledge, demanding need for appropriate training for delivering treatment with more predictability and better prognosis.

  15. Task errors by emergency physicians are associated with interruptions, multitasking, fatigue and working memory capacity: a prospective, direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Raban, Magdalena Z; Walter, Scott R; Douglas, Heather

    2018-01-09

    Interruptions and multitasking have been demonstrated in experimental studies to reduce individuals' task performance. These behaviours are frequently used by clinicians in high-workload, dynamic clinical environments, yet their effects have rarely been studied. To assess the relative contributions of interruptions and multitasking by emergency physicians to prescribing errors. 36 emergency physicians were shadowed over 120 hours. All tasks, interruptions and instances of multitasking were recorded. Physicians' working memory capacity (WMC) and preference for multitasking were assessed using the Operation Span Task (OSPAN) and Inventory of Polychronic Values. Following observation, physicians were asked about their sleep in the previous 24 hours. Prescribing errors were used as a measure of task performance. We performed multivariate analysis of prescribing error rates to determine associations with interruptions and multitasking, also considering physician seniority, age, psychometric measures, workload and sleep. Physicians experienced 7.9 interruptions/hour. 28 clinicians were observed prescribing 239 medication orders which contained 208 prescribing errors. While prescribing, clinicians were interrupted 9.4 times/hour. Error rates increased significantly if physicians were interrupted (rate ratio (RR) 2.82; 95% CI 1.23 to 6.49) or multitasked (RR 1.86; 95% CI 1.35 to 2.56) while prescribing. Having below-average sleep showed a >15-fold increase in clinical error rate (RR 16.44; 95% CI 4.84 to 55.81). WMC was protective against errors; for every 10-point increase on the 75-point OSPAN, a 19% decrease in prescribing errors was observed. There was no effect of polychronicity, workload, physician gender or above-average sleep on error rates. Interruptions, multitasking and poor sleep were associated with significantly increased rates of prescribing errors among emergency physicians. WMC mitigated the negative influence of these factors to an extent. These

  16. A concise evaluation and management curriculum for physicians in training improved billing at an outpatient academic rheumatology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Joel M; Collier, David H; Boyle, Dennis J; Gardner, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    To study whether providing house staff with a brief lecture and handout about proper documentation could improve billing at an academic rheumatology clinic. The authors created an educational sheet about documentation and billing after a review of the common documentation omissions responsible for down coding (Appendix, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/RHU/A8). Beginning in November of 2006, the house staff were provided with this sheet and a brief lecture regarding how outpatient evaluation and management levels of service are coded. The results of clinic billing from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2006 and November 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 were obtained from the physician billing office. The authors compared the average level of service, by appointment type, in the prepost comparison periods using the student t test. There was a significant improvement in the level of service billed for new visits (P billed as consults improved from 15% to 78% (P billing during the postintervention period. A simple strategy for educating the house staff about proper documentation of the history, physical examination, and clinical decision making resulted in a significant improvement in an academic rheumatology division's outpatient billing.

  17. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

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    Nnaemeka G. Okafor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods: A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results: The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion: Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, userfriendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system.

  18. The management of cellulitis and erysipelas at an academic emergency department: current practice versus the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulitis and erysipelas are common presentations to emergency departments and family physicians. Evidence-based guidelines for appropriate management of these infections exist in Canada, but inconsistent practices persist. Our objective was to determine the level of adherence to current evidence and guidelines by emergency physicians at the two hospitals in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. We identified all of the electronic medical records of patients who were seen at Kingston General Hospital or Hotel Dieu Hospital between January 1, 2015 and June 30, 2015 and given a diagnosis of cellulitis or erysipelas. We randomly selected 182 charts and conducted a retrospective chart review, manually collecting data for patient demographics, medical history, and medical management. Oral cephalexin alone was given to 44% of our sample, and it was the most common form of therapy for uncomplicated cellulitis. 36% of patients given any antibiotics at all received at least one dose of parenteral antibiotics, despite only 6.7% of these patients showing systemic signs of illness. 88% of those receiving parenteral antibiotics received ceftriaxone, a broad-spectrum, third generation cephalosporin. We found wide variation in antibiotic selection and route of administration for patients presenting to the emergency department with cellulitis or erysipelas. Overuse of antibiotics is common, and we believe the use of parenteral antibiotics may have been unnecessary for some patients in our sample. Emergency physicians should align their management plans more closely with the current guidelines to improve practice and reduce unnecessary administration of broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotics.

  19. Defining the learning curve of point-of-care ultrasound for confirming endotracheal tube placement by emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenkin, Jordan; McCartney, Colin J L; Jelic, Tomislav; Romano, Michael; Heslop, Claire; Bandiera, Glen

    2015-12-01

    Unrecognized esophageal intubations are associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality. No single confirmatory device has been shown to be 100 % accurate at ruling out esophageal intubations in the emergency department. Recent studies have demonstrated that point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) may be a useful adjunct for confirming endotracheal tube placement; however, the amount of practice required to become proficient at this technique is unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine the amount of practice required by emergency physicians to become proficient at interpreting ultrasound video clips of esophageal and endotracheal intubations. Emergency physicians and emergency medicine residents completed a baseline interpretation test followed by a 10 min online tutorial. They then interpreted POCUS clips of esophageal and endotracheal intubations in a randomly selected order. If an incorrect response was provided, the participant completed another practice session with feedback. This process continued until they correctly interpreted ten consecutive ultrasound clips. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Of the 87 eligible physicians, 66 (75.9 %) completed the study. The mean score on the baseline test was 42.9 % (SD 32.7 %). After the tutorial, 90.9 % (60/66) of the participants achieved proficiency after one practice attempt and 100 % achieved proficiency after two practice attempts. Six intubation ultrasound clips were misinterpreted, for a total error rate of 0.9 % (6/684). Overall, the participants had a sensitivity of 98.3 % (95 % CI 96.3-99.4 %) and specificity of 100 % (95 % CI 98.9-100 %) for detecting correct tube location. Scans were interpreted within an average of 4 s (SD 2.9 s) of the intubation. After a brief online tutorial and only two practice attempts, emergency physicians were able to quickly and accurately interpret ultrasound intubation clips of esophageal and endotracheal intubations.

  20. What are you waiting for? A study of resident physician-parent communication in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Kelly J; Dowd, Mary D

    2008-04-01

    This study measures the degree to which parents of patients, in the course of evaluation and treatment in a pediatric emergency department (ED), could report what they were waiting for. Brief in-person interviews were conducted with parents of nonemergency patients during an ED visit. After the patient had been seen by a resident physician and evaluation and treatment were in progress, parents were asked to report what they were waiting for. The patient's physician was also asked to report what the patient was waiting for. These answers were compared and coded as complete agreement, partial agreement, or disagreement. Association between lack of agreement and patient factors (age, sex), parent factors (sex, education, age), physician factors (sex, postgraduate year), and system factors (wait time, time of day, number of patients in the department) was examined. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. A total of 200 paired surveys were included in the data analysis. Two thirds of parental reports completely agreed with physician reports, 11.5% partially agreed, and 21.5% completely disagreed. Multivariate analysis revealed that disagreement between resident physician and parents was associated with parental educational level and physician training level. Parents with less than a high school education were more than 9 times more likely to disagree than those with at least some college education (odds ratio 9.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4 to 35.7). As the postgraduate level of the physician decreased, disagreement was more common; disagreement for patients of postgraduate level 1 residents was 5 times more likely (95% CI 1.8 to 14.5) than that of postgraduate level 3 and higher residents. As measured by asking the question "what are you waiting for," significant communication gaps were identified between physicians and the parents of their patients in this emergency department. One in five parents could not report what they were waiting

  1. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout - Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Ivana M; Arandjelović, Mirjana Ž; Jovanović, Jovica M; Nešić, Milkica M

    2017-03-24

    Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS). We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI). A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M) ± standard deviation (SD) = 74.57±16.85) and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74) demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60). Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2):178-178. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout – Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana M. Ilić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS. Material and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI. Results: A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M ± standard deviation (SD = 74.57±16.85 and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74 demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60. Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Conclusions: Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2:167–178

  3. Comparison of physician staffed emergency teams with paramedic teams assisted by telemedicine--a randomized, controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rörtgen, Daniel; Bergrath, Sebastian; Rossaint, Rolf; Beckers, Stefan K; Fischermann, Harold; Na, In-Sik; Peters, David; Fitzner, Christina; Skorning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMSs) vary considerably. While some are physician staffed, most systems are run by paramedics. The objective of this randomized, controlled simulation study was to compare the emergency care between physician staffed EMS teams (control group) and paramedic teams that were supported telemedically by an EMS physician (telemedicine group). Overall 16 teams (1 EMS physician, 2 paramedics) were randomized to the control group or the telemedicine group. Telemedical functionalities included two-way audio communication, transmission of vital data (numerical values and curves) and video streaming from the scenario room to the remotely located EMS physician. After a run-in scenario all teams completed four standardized scenarios, in which no highly invasive procedures (e.g. thoracic drain) were required, two using high-fidelity simulation (burn trauma, intoxication) and two using standardized patients (renal colic, barotrauma). All scenarios were videotaped and analyzed by two investigators using predefined scoring items. Non case-specific items (31 vs. 31 scenarios): obtaining of 'symptoms', 'past medical history' and 'events' were carried out comparably, but in the telemedicine group 'allergies' (17 vs. 28, OR 7.69, CI 2.1-27.9, p=0.002) and 'medications' (17 vs. 27, OR 5.55, CI 1.7-18.0, p=0.004) were inquired more frequently. No significant differences were found regarding the case-specific items and in both groups no potentially dangerous mistreatments were observed. Telemedically assisted paramedic care was feasible and at least not inferior compared to standard EMS teams with a physician on-scene in these scenarios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided nerve block for management of limb injuries by emergency care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Bhoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients require procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA for the treatment of acute traumatic injuries. PSA has complications. Ultrasound (US guided peripheral nerve block is a safe alternative. Aim: Ultrasound guided nerve blocks for management of traumatic limb emergencies in Emergency Department (ED. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in ED. Materials and Methods: Patients above five years requiring analgesia for management of limb emergencies were recruited. Emergency Physicians trained in US guided nerve blocks performed the procedure. Statistical analysis: Effectiveness of pain control, using visual analogue scale was assessed at baseline and at 15 and 60 minutes after the procedure. Paired t test was used for comparison. Results: Fifty US guided nerve blocks were sciatic- 4 (8%, femoral-7 (14%, brachial- 29 (58%, median -6 (12%, and radial 2 (4% nerves. No patients required rescue PSA. Initial median VAS score was 9 (Inter Quartile Range [IQR] 7-10 and at 1 hour was 2(IQR 0-4. Median reduction in VAS score was 7.44 (IQR 8-10(75%, 1-2(25% (P=0.0001. Median procedure time was 9 minutes (IQR 3, 12 minutes and median time to reduction of pain was 5 minutes (IQR 1,15 minutes. No immediate or late complications noticed at 3 months. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks can be safely and effectively performed for upper and lower limb emergencies by emergency physicians with adequate training.

  5. Multicountry survey of emergency and critical care medicine physicians' fluid resuscitation practices for adult patients with early septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Rowe, Brian H; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    administered in early septic shock to inform the design of future septic shock fluid resuscitation trials. METHODS: Using a web-based survey tool, we invited critical care and emergency physicians in Canada, the UK, Scandinavia and Saudi Arabia to complete a self-administered electronic survey. RESULTS...... that a large randomised controlled trial comparing 5% albumin to a crystalloid fluid in early septic shock was important to conduct. CONCLUSIONS: Critical care and emergency physicians stated that they rapidly infuse volumes of 500-1000 mL of resuscitation fluid in early septic shock. Colloid use, specifically...... the use of albumin, was infrequently reported. Our survey identifies the need to conduct a trial on the efficacy of albumin and crystalloids on 90-day mortality in patients with early septic shock....

  6. A call to arms: the emergency physician, international perspectives on firearm injury prevention and the Canadian gun control debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, H; Drummond, A

    1999-01-01

    There are more than seven million firearms in Canada and approximately 1400 firearm-related deaths per year. These figures are far greater than those for most European countries, but far less than those for the United States. This article will discuss the different classes of firearm deaths and the associated costs. Public health issues will be explored, especially as they relate to the involvement of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, as well as injury control recommendations.

  7. Management and Outcomes of Acute Surgical Patients at a District Hospital in Uganda with Non-physician Emergency Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Caleb; Periyanayagam, Usha; Dreifuss, Brad; Wangoda, Robert; Luyimbaazi, Julius; Bisanzo, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Acute surgical care services in rural Sub-Saharan Africa suffer from human resource and systemic constraints. Developing emergency care systems and task sharing aspects of acute surgical care addresses many of these issues. This paper investigates the degree to which specialized non-physicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department contribute to the effective and efficient management of acute surgical patients. This is a retrospective review of an electronic quality assurance database of patients presenting to an Emergency Department in rural Uganda staffed by non-physician clinicians trained in emergency care. Relevant de-identified clinical data on patients admitted directly to the operating theater from 2011 to 2014 were analyzed in Microsoft Excel. Overall, 112 Emergency Department patients were included in the analysis and 96% received some form of laboratory testing, imaging, medication, or procedure in the ED, prior to surgery. 72% of surgical patients referred by ED received preoperative antibiotics, and preoperative fluid resuscitation was initiated in 65%. Disposition to operating theater was accomplished within 3 h of presentation for 73% of patients. 79% were successfully followed up to assess outcomes at 72 h. 92% of those with successful follow-up reported improvement in their clinical condition. The confirmed mortality rate was 5%. Specialized non-physician clinicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department can perform resuscitation, bedside imaging and laboratory studies to aid in diagnosis of acute surgical patients and arrange transfer to an operating theater in an efficient fashion. This model has the potential to sustainably address structural and human resources problems inherent to Sub-Saharan Africa's current acute surgical care model and will benefit from further study and expansion.

  8. Work-related fear and the threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Huhtala, Heini; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-10-01

    To describe fear, the threats causing fear and the occurrence of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. The emergency department is a challenging workplace where the staff is often confronted by factors that cause fear. A cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted in 16 hospitals (n = 544). Nurses, practical nurses, orderlies and physicians from those hospitals participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was based on the analysis of interviews of 30 nurses from one university hospital and one central hospital. The results of the interviews were analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The analysis of the survey was performed using statistical methods, such as frequencies, cross-tabulation and principal component analysis. The results showed that nearly all of the emergency department personnel had experienced work-related fear. Generally, the fear had been momentary. According to the survey results, fear was most often caused by medication errors, the resuscitation of a child, a catastrophic accident, urgent or violent situations or patients armed with weapons. Threats that caused fear included insecurity, danger in the work environment, threat of loss of one's health and threat of the consequences of one's mistakes and actions. The staff of emergency departments often encountered factors or situations that caused fear. The main threats causing fear that were raised by the respondents were insecurity and danger in the work environment. The data obtained from this study can be utilised in identifying and describing work-related fear and threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. Based on the information herein, it will be possible to develop methods to prevent situations that cause fear in emergency departments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [National physician master Jin Shiyuan's dispensing technology of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata based on Li Shizhen's pharmaceutical academic thought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi-Ping; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Guo, Zhao-Juan; Zhang, Tian; Kong, Li-Ting; Jia, Xiao-Yu; Tian, Wei-Lan; Li, Rui

    2016-05-01

    To collect Li Shizhen's experience in Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata identification and clinical application, compare and analyze national physician master Jin Shiyuan's practical operation and theoretical knowledge, which is beneficial for the inheritance and improvement of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata clinical dispensing technology. In the analysis process, CNKI, Wanfang and other databases were searched with "Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata", "Li Shizhen", "pharmacological method state theory" "Jin Shiyuan" and "Chinese medicine dispensing technology" as the key words. In addition, Treatise on Febrile Disease, Compendium of Materia Medica, Chinese Pharmacopoeia(2015 edition), Notes to Medical Professions(Yi Zong Shuo Yue), and other medicine books were accessed to summarize the processing methods and decoction dosage of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata in both ancient and modern medicine, and in consideration of technical research and practice operation, Li Shizhen's description of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata and Professor Jin Shiyuan's research on Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata dispensing technology were analyzed and collected. Li Shizhen recorded the nature identification and clinical application of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata by using pharmacological method state theory in Compendium of Materia Medica. National physician master Jin Shiyuan carries forward the essence of Li Shizhen's pharmaceutical academic thought with his own proficient knowledge structure in medicine, providing scientific pharmaceutical service for clinical application of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata Professor. Jin Shiyuan put forward the dispensing technology for the first time, including nature identification technology, clinical processing technology, clinical decocting technology, prescription coping technology, and class specifications of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata. In this paper, Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata was used as an example

  10. Human factors in the emergency department: Is physician perception of time to intubation and desaturation rate accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemalovic, Nail; Scoccimarro, Anthony; Arslan, Albert; Fraser, Robert; Kanter, Marc; Caputo, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the present study was to examine the perceived versus actual time to intubation (TTI) as an indication to help determine the situational awareness of Emergency Physicians during rapid sequence intubation and, additionally, to determine the physician's perception of desaturation events. A timed, observation prospective cohort study was conducted. A post-intubation survey was administered to the intubating physician. Each step of the procedure was timed by an observer in order to determine actual TTI. The number of desaturation events was also recorded. One hundred individual intubations were included. The provider perceived TTI was significantly different and underestimated when compared with the actual TTI (23 s, 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.4-25.49 vs 45.5 s, 95% CI 40.2-50.7, P time to desaturation was 65.1 s. Our findings have shown that provider's perception of TTI occurs sooner than actually observed. Also, the providers were less aware of desaturation during the procedure. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Stress-coping styles of 459 emergency care physicians in Germany : A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, M; Hessam, S; Sand, D; Bechara, F G; Vorstius, C; Bromba, M; Stockfleth, E; Shiue, I

    2016-11-01

    In addition to assessing stress-coping strategies in patients, equal attention should be paid to health-care professionals. The literature on the stress-coping strategies of emergency physicians - health-care professionals who are frequently subject to stress in a fast-paced clinical setting - is scant. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the stress-coping strategies of emergency-care physicians (ECPs) in Germany. We conducted a cross-sectional study by approaching German Associations of Emergency Medicine Physicians and the two largest ECP recruitment agencies in Germany to invite their members to participate. We used the German Stress Coping Strategies Inventory ("Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen" SVF-78) to generate stress-coping scores that would cover both positive and negative strategies. Differences according to sex were also examined. Analyses including chi-square test, t test, and multinomial logistic regression modeling were performed. A total of 459 German ECPs were included in the study. Compared with men, women tended to have negative coping strategies (beta = 1.77, p resignation (beta = 2.09, p psychological support should be considered, which may be of particular benefit for female ECPs.

  12. Physician Practice Participation in Accountable Care Organizations: The Emergence of the Unicorn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M; McClellan, Sean R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide the first nationally based information on physician practice involvement in ACOs. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data from the third National Survey of Physician Organizations (January 2012–May 2013). Study Design We conducted a 40-minute phone survey in a sample of physician practices. A nationally representative sample of practices was surveyed in order to provide estimates of organizational characteristics, care management processes, ACO participation, and related variables for four major chronic illnesses. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We evaluated the associations between ACO participation, organizational characteristics, and a 25-point index of patient-centered medical home processes. Principal Findings We found that 23.7 percent of physician practices (n = 280) reported joining an ACO; 15.7 percent (n = 186) were planning to become involved within the next 12 months and 60.6 percent (n = 717) reported no involvement and no plans to become involved. Larger practices, those receiving patients from an IPA and/or PHO, those that were physician-owned versus hospital/health system-owned, those located in New England, and those with greater patient-centered medical home (PCMH) care management processes were more likely to have joined an ACO. Conclusions Physician practices that are currently participating in ACOs appear to be relatively large, or to be members of an IPA or PHO, are less likely to be hospital-owned and are more likely to use more care management processes than nonparticipating practices. PMID:24628449

  13. Improving year-end transfers of care in academic ambulatory clinics: a survey of pediatric resident physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resident primary care continuity clinics, at the end of each academic year, continuity of care is disrupted when patients cared for by the graduating class are redistributed to other residents. Yet, despite the recent focus on the transfers of care between resident physicians in inpatient settings, there has been minimal attention given to patient care transfers in academic ambulatory clinics. We sought to elicit the views of pediatric residents regarding year-end patient handoffs in a pediatric resident continuity clinic.Methods: Residents assigned to a continuity clinic of a large pediatric residency program completed a questionnaire regarding year-end transfers of care.Results: Thirty-one questionnaires were completed out of a total 45 eligible residents (69% response. Eighty seven percent of residents strongly or somewhat agreed that it would be useful to receive a written sign-out for patients with complex medical or social issues, but only 35% felt it would be useful for patients with no significant issues. Residents more frequently reported having access to adequate information regarding their new patients’ medical summary (53% and care plan (47% than patients’ functional abilities (30%, social history (17%, or use of community resources (17%. When rating the importance of receiving adequate sign-out in each those domains, residents gave most importance to the medical summary (87% of residents indicating very or somewhat important and plan of care (84%. Residents gave less importance to receiving sign-out regarding their patients’ functional abilities (71% social history (58%, and community resources (58%. Residents indicated that lack of access to adequate patient information resulted in additional work (80%, delays or omissions in needed care (56%, and disruptions in continuity of care (58%.Conclusions: In a single-site study, residents perceive that they lack adequate information during year-end patient transfers

  14. Development and Feasibility of an Academic Detailing Intervention to Improve Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Use Among Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Kelly S; Ball, Sarah; Adams, Rachel S; Nikitin, Ruslan; Wooten, Nikki R; Qureshi, Zaina P; Larson, Mary J

    2017-01-01

    South Carolina (SC) ranks 10th in opioid prescriptions per capita-33% higher than the national average. SC is also home to a large military and veteran population, and prescription opioid use for chronic pain is alarmingly common among veterans, especially those returning from Afghanistan and Iraq. This article describes the background and development of an academic detailing (AD) educational intervention to improve use of a Prescription Drug Monitoring Program among SC physicians who serve military members and veterans. The aim of this intervention was to improve safe opioid prescribing practices and prevent prescription opioid misuse among this high-risk population. A multidisciplinary study team of physicians, pharmacists, psychologists, epidemiologists, and representatives from the SC's Prescription Monitoring Program used the Medical Research Council complex interventions framework to guide the development of the educational intervention. The theoretical and modeling phases of the AD intervention development are described and preliminary evidence of feasibility and acceptability is provided. Ninety-three physicians consented to the study from 2 practice sites. Eighty-seven AD visits were completed, and 59 one-month follow-up surveys were received. Participants rated the AD intervention high in helpfulness of information, intention to use information, and overall satisfaction with the intervention. The component of the intervention felt to be most helpful was the AD visit itself. Characteristics of the participants and the intervention, as well as anticipated barriers to behavior change are detailed. Preliminary results support the feasibility of AD delivery to veteran and community patient settings, the feasibility of facilitating Prescription Drug Monitoring Program registration during an AD visit, and that AD visits were generally found satisfying to participants and helpful in improving knowledge and confidence about safe opioid prescribing practices. The

  15. Physician-led team triage based on lean principles may be superior for efficiency and quality? A comparison of three emergency departments with different triage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of emergency departments (EDs) principally involves maintaining effective patient flow and care. Different triage models are used today to achieve these two goals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different triage models used in three Swedish EDs. Using efficiency and quality indicators, we compared the following triage models: physician-led team triage, nurse first/emergency physician second, and nurse first/junior physician second. Methods All data of patients arriving at the three EDs between 08:00- and 21:00 throughout 2008 were collected and merged into a database. The following efficiency indicators were measured: length of stay (LOS) including time to physician, time from physician to discharge, and 4-hour turnover rate. The following quality indicators were measured: rate of patients left before treatment was completed, unscheduled return within 24 and 72 hours, and mortality rate within 7 and 30 days. Results Data from 147,579 patients were analysed. The median length of stay was 158 minutes for physician-led team triage, compared with 243 and 197 minutes for nurse/emergency physician and nurse/junior physician triage, respectively (p triage, 5.3% for nurse/emergency physician, and 9.6% for nurse/junior physician triage (p triage, 1.0%, compared with 2.1%, and 2.5% for nurse/emergency physician, and nurse/junior physician, respectively (p triage and 1.0% for the two other triage models (p triage seemed advantageous, both expressed as efficiency and quality indicators, compared with the two other models. PMID:22905993

  16. Stabilization and treatment of dental avulsions and fractures by emergency physicians using just-in-time training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Mark S; Konzelmann, Jason; Smith, Jeffrey; Kalynych, Colleen J; Wears, Robert L; Schneider, Howard; Wylie, Todd; Kaminski, Anne; Matar-Joseph, Madeline

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to use a dental simulation model to compare splinting and bandaging methods for managing tooth avulsions and fractures, as measured by dentist evaluators for quality and time to complete each stabilization procedure. This was a randomized crossover study comparing 3 splinting techniques for managing a traumatically avulsed tooth (periodontal pack, wire, and bondable reinforcement ribbon) and 2 bandage techniques for managing a fractured tooth (calcium hydroxide paste and light-cured composite). After viewing a Just-in-Time training video, a convenience sample of emergency physicians performed the 5 stabilization techniques on dental models containing extracted teeth embedded in clay to simulate a segment of the human dentition. Data collected included time to complete each procedure, the evaluation of dentists about whether the procedure was performed satisfactorily or unsatisfactorily, and the ranking of dentists' and participants' preferred technique. Twenty-five emergency physicians participated in the study: 17 residents, 2 pediatric emergency medicine fellows, and 6 attending physicians. Reported median time, as well as minimum and maximum times to complete each splinting technique for an avulsed tooth, was as follows: periodontal pack 4.4 minutes (2.5 to 6.5 minutes), wire 8.6 minutes (5.8 to 12.9 minutes), and bondable reinforcement ribbon 8.9 minutes (5.6 to 15 minutes). Median time (and minimum and maximum times) to complete each protective bandaging technique for a fractured tooth was calcium hydroxide paste 4.6 minutes (3 to 9.6 minutes) and light-cured composite 7.1 minutes (5.5 to 14.1 minutes). When asked to choose a preferred splinting and bandaging technique according to the performance of the physicians, the dentists chose the bondable reinforcement ribbon 96% (24/25) and the light-cured composite 100% (25/25) of the time. Study participants had no measurable or agreeable preference for a particular splinting

  17. How and when do expert emergency physicians generate and evaluate diagnostic hypotheses? A qualitative study using head-mounted video cued-recall interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccia, Thierry; Tardif, Jacques; Triby, Emmanuel; Ammirati, Christine; Bertrand, Catherine; Dory, Valérie; Charlin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    The ability to make a diagnosis is a crucial skill in emergency medicine. Little is known about the way emergency physicians reach a diagnosis. This study aims to identify how and when, during the initial patient examination, emergency physicians generate and evaluate diagnostic hypotheses. We carried out a qualitative research project based on semistructured interviews with emergency physicians. The interviews concerned management of an emergency situation during routine medical practice. They were associated with viewing the video recording of emergency situations filmed in an "own-point-of-view" perspective. The emergency physicians generated an average of 5 diagnostic hypotheses. Most of these hypotheses were generated before meeting the patient or within the first 5 minutes of the meeting. The hypotheses were then rank ordered within the context of a verification procedure based on identifying key information. These tasks were usually accomplished without conscious effort. No hypothesis was completely confirmed or refuted until the results of investigations were available. The generation and rank ordering of diagnostic hypotheses is based on the activation of cognitive processes, enabling expert emergency physicians to process environmental information and link it to past experiences. The physicians seemed to strive to avoid the risk of error by remaining aware of the possibility of alternative hypotheses as long as they did not have the results of investigations. Understanding the diagnostic process used by emergency physicians provides interesting ideas for training residents in a specialty in which the prevalence of reasoning errors leading to incorrect diagnoses is high. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the effectiveness of peer pressure to change disposition decisions and patient throughput by emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuan-Han; Cheng, Fu-Jen; Li, Chao-Jui; Cheng, Hsien-Hung; Lee, Wen-Huei; Lee, Chi-Wei

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a strategy for imposing peer pressure on emergency physicians to discharge patients and to evaluate patient throughput before and after intervention. A before-and-after study was conducted in a medical center with more than 120 000 annual emergency department (ED) visits. All nontraumatic adult patients who presented to the ED between 7:30 and 11:30 am Wednesday to Sunday were reviewed. We created a "team norm" imposed peer-pressure effect by announcing the patient discharge rate of each emergency physician through monthly e-mail reminders. Emergency department length of stay (LOS) and 8-hour (the end of shift) and final disposition of patients before (June 1, 2011-September 30, 2011) and after (October 1, 2011-January 30, 2012) intervention were compared. Patients enrolled before and after intervention totaled 3305 and 2945. No differences existed for age, sex, or average number of patient visits per shift. The 8-hour discharge rate increased significantly for all patients (53.5% vs 48.2%, P peer pressure to enhance patient flow and throughput. More patients were discharged at the end of shifts, particularly triage level III patients. The ED LOS for patients whose final disposition was discharge decreased significantly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep pattern and decision-making in physicians from mobile emergency care service with 12-h work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eleni de Araújo Sales; de Almondes, Katie Moraes

    2018-06-01

    Shift work schedules are biological standpoint worse because compel the body to anticipate periods of wakefulness and sleep and thus eventually cause a disruption of biological rhythms. The objective of this study is to evaluate the sleep pattern and decision-making in physicians working in mobile units of emergency attention undergoing day shift and rotating shift. The study included 26 physicians. The instruments utilized were a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Sleep Habits Questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Chronotype Identification Questionnaire of Horne-Ostberg, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and hypothetical scenarios of decision-making created according to the Policy-Capturing Technique. For inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants answered the Chalder Fatigue Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Inventory of Stress Symptoms for adults of Lipp. It was found good sleep quality for physicians on day shift schedule and bad sleep quality for physicians on rotating shift schedule. The IGT measure showed no impairment in decision-making, but the hypothetical scenarios revealed impairment decision-making during the shift for both schedules. Good sleep quality was related to a better performance in decision-making. Good sleep quality seems to influence a better performance in decision-making.

  20. Physician-led team triage based on lean principles may be superior for efficiency and quality? A comparison of three emergency departments with different triage models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burström Lena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of emergency departments (EDs principally involves maintaining effective patient flow and care. Different triage models are used today to achieve these two goals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different triage models used in three Swedish EDs. Using efficiency and quality indicators, we compared the following triage models: physician-led team triage, nurse first/emergency physician second, and nurse first/junior physician second. Methods All data of patients arriving at the three EDs between 08:00- and 21:00 throughout 2008 were collected and merged into a database. The following efficiency indicators were measured: length of stay (LOS including time to physician, time from physician to discharge, and 4-hour turnover rate. The following quality indicators were measured: rate of patients left before treatment was completed, unscheduled return within 24 and 72 hours, and mortality rate within 7 and 30 days. Results Data from 147,579 patients were analysed. The median length of stay was 158 minutes for physician-led team triage, compared with 243 and 197 minutes for nurse/emergency physician and nurse/junior physician triage, respectively (p  Conclusions Physician-led team triage seemed advantageous, both expressed as efficiency and quality indicators, compared with the two other models.

  1. Oiling the gate: a mobile application to improve the admissions process from the emergency department to an academic community hospital inpatient medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Russell; Hyde, Jensen Hart; Davis, Mike

    2018-01-01

    The process of admitting patients from the emergency department (ED) to an academic internal medicine (AIM) service in a community teaching hospital is one fraught with variability and disorder. This results in an inconsistent volume of patients admitted to academic versus private hospitalist services and results in frustration of both ED and AIM clinicians. We postulated that implementation of a mobile application (app) would improve provider satisfaction and increase admissions to the academic service. The app was designed and implemented to be easily accessible to ED physicians, regularly updated by academic residents on call, and a real-time source of the number of open AIM admission spots. We found a significant improvement in ED and AIM provider satisfaction with the admission process. There was also a significant increase in admissions to the AIM service after implementation of the app. We submit that the implementation of a mobile app is a viable, cost-efficient, and effective method to streamline the admission process from the ED to AIM services at community-based hospitals.

  2. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  3. Thyroid Storm in a Patient with Trauma - A Challenging Diagnosis for the Emergency Physician: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-I; Yiang, Giou-Teng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chen, Yu-Long

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is recognized to develop as a result of several factors, including infection, surgery, acute illness, and rarely, trauma. Recognition of thyroid storm in a trauma patient is difficult because the emergency physician usually focuses on managing more obvious injuries. We present a case of trauma-related thyroid storm and review the previous literature on posttraumatic thyroid storm to delineate risk factors of the disease. The case occurred in a 32-year-old man after a motorcycle accident. Careful investigation of patient history and risk factors of trauma-related thyroid storms and utilization of the scoring system may facilitate early diagnosis. Traumatically induced thyroid storm usually responds to medical treatment developed for hyperthyroidism. Surgical intervention may be needed for patients who failed medical treatment or those with direct thyroid gland injuries. The outcome is usually fair under appropriate management. We present a case of trauma-related thyroid storm to illustrate the diagnostic and therapeutic approach with a summary of the previous literature. Emergency physicians should be aware of the clinical presentation and risk factors of patients with trauma-related thyroid storm to reduce the rate of misdiagnosis and prevent catastrophic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [National physician master Jin Shiyuan's dispensing technology of Rehmanniae Radix Praeparata based on Li Shizhen's pharmaceutical academic thought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhao-Juan; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Yuan, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Tian; Li, Rui; Kong, Li-Ting; Jia, Xiao-Yu

    2016-05-01

    To collect the historical origin, processing methods and clinical application of Rehmanniae Radix Preparata in Compendium of Materia Medica, compare and analyze the theoretical knowledge and relevant practical operation of national physician master Jin Shiyuan, which is beneficial for the inheritance and development of Rehmanniae Radix Preparata's clinical dispensing technology. In the analysis process, CNKI was searched with "Rehmanniae Radix Preparata", "Processing method", "Clinical application" "Li Shizhen", "Jin Shiyuan", and "Dispensing technology" as keywords. In addition, Shennong's Herbal Classic, Bencao Tujing (illustrated Classics of Materia Medica), Compendium of Materia Medica, Jingyue Quanshu (Jingyue's Complete Works) and related ancient books were accessed systematically to summarize the historical change of processing methods and efficacy of Rehmanniae Radix Praeparata. Professor Jin Shiyuan emphasizes the clinical dispensing technology of Rehmanniae Radix Praeparata, including its nature identification technology, clinical processing technology, prescription audit technology, prescription coping technology, drug delivery technology, clinical decocting technology, purchasing management technology as well as storage, maintenance and supply technology. Through the collation and research, it was confirmed that historical origin, processing methods and clinical application of Rehmanniae Radix Preparata were recorded in details in Compendium of Materia Medica. Steaming method of Rehmanniae Radix Preparata was originated from Synopsis of Golden Chamber. Li Shizhen attached great importance to the processing method of "steaming and drying alternatively for nine times" for Rehmanniae Radix Preparata, and differentiated it from Radix Rehmanniae Recen and fresh rehmannia root in clinical applications. Professor Jin Shiyuan has developed and improved the clinical dispensing technology of Rehmanniae Radix Praeparata, and carried forward the essence of Li

  5. Expertise in prehospital endotracheal intubation by emergency medicine physicians-Comparing 'proficient performers' and 'experts'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Jan; Klemstein, Sebastian; Brunne, Bergit; Schnitzer, Luise; Arntz, Hans-Richard; Mochmann, Hans-Christian

    2012-04-01

    Training requirements to perform safe prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) are not clearly known. This study aimed to determine differences in ETI performance between 'proficient performers' and 'experts' according to the Dreyfus & Dreyfus framework of expertise. As a model for 'proficient performers' EMS physicians with a clinical background in internal medicine were compared to EMS physicians with a background in anaesthesiology as a model for 'experts'. Over a one-year period all ETIs performed by the EMS physicians of our institution were prospectively evaluated. 'Proficient performers' and 'experts' were compared regarding incidence of difficult ETI, ability to predict difficult ETI, and decision for ETI. Mean years of professional experience were similar between the physician groups, but the median ETI experience differed significantly with 18/year for 'proficients' and 304/year for 'experts' (pperformers' intubated 130 of their 2170 treated patients (6.0%), while 'experts' did so in 146 of 1809 cases (8.1%, p=0.01 for difference). The incidence of difficult ETI was 17.7% for 'proficient performers', and 8.9% for 'experts' (pperformers', but all patients could be ventilated sufficiently. Unexpected difficult ETI occurred in 6.1% for 'proficient performers', and 2.0% for 'experts' (p=0.08). In a prehospital setting 'expert' status was associated with a significantly lower incidence of 'difficult ETI' and a higher proportion of ETI decisions. In addition, ability to predict difficult ETI was higher, although non-significant. There was no difference in the incidence of impossible ventilation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  7. Academic career intentions in the life sciences: Can research self-efficacy beliefs explain low numbers of aspiring physician and female scientists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nurith; Fischer, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    A lack of physician scientists as well as a high female dropout rate from academic medicine and basic life sciences is a concern in many countries. The current study analyzes academic career intentions within a sample of recent doctoral graduates from medicine and basic life sciences (N = 1109), focusing on research self-efficacy beliefs as explanatory variable of gender and disciplinary differences. To ensure that differences in research self-efficacy could not be attributed solely to objective scientific performance, we controlled for number of publications and dissertation grade. The results of multivariate analyses pointed to a strong and significant association between research self-efficacy and academic career intentions (ß = 0.49, pacademic career intentions of medical doctoral graduates were no longer significant when controlling for research self-efficacy. Within the field of medicine, female doctoral graduates expressed lower research self-efficacy beliefs and academic career intentions. When controlling for research self-efficacy, the correlation between gender and academic career intention was no longer significant. In contrast, no gender differences were found within the basic life sciences with respect to neither academic career intentions nor research self-efficacy.

  8. Contributions of Academic Emergency Medicine Programs to U.S. Health Care: Summary of the AAAEM-AACEM Benchmarking Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznek, Martin A; Scheulen, James J; Harbertson, Cathi A; Kotkowski, Kevin A; Kelen, Gabor D; Volturo, Gregory A

    2018-04-01

    The societal contribution of emergency care in the United States has been described. The role and impact of academic emergency departments (EDs) has been less clear. Our report summarizes the results of a benchmarking effort specifically focused on academic emergency medicine (EM) practices. From October through December 2016, the Academy of Academic Administrators of Emergency Medicine (AAAEM) and the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine (AACEM) jointly administered a benchmarking survey to allopathic, academic departments and divisions of emergency medicine. Participation was voluntary and nonanonymous. The survey queried various aspects of the three components of the tripartite academic mission: clinical care, education and research, and faculty effort and compensation. Responses reflected a calendar year from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016. Of 107 eligible U.S. allopathic, academic departments and divisions of emergency medicine, 79 (74%) responded to the survey overall, although individual questions were not always answered by all responding programs. The 79 responding programs reported 6,876,189 patient visits at 97 primary and affiliated academic clinical sites. A number of clinical operations metrics related to the care of these patients at these sites are reported in this study. All responding programs had active educational programs for EM residents, with a median of 37 residents per program. Nearly half of the overall respondents reported responsibility for teaching medical students in mandatory EM clerkships. Fifty-two programs reported research and publication activity, with a total of $129,494,676 of grant funding and 3,059 publications. Median faculty effort distribution was clinical effort, 66.9%; education effort, 12.7%; administrative effort, 12.0%; and research effort, 6.9%. Median faculty salary was $277,045. Academic EM programs are characterized by significant productivity in clinical operations, education, and research. The

  9. Pre-hospital severe traumatic brain injury - comparison of outcome in paramedic versus physician staffed emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Toni; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti; Huhtala, Heini; Silfvast, Tom; Virta, Janne; Randell, Tarja; Yli-Hankala, Arvi

    2016-04-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel are often the first healthcare providers attending patients with TBI. The level of available care varies, which may have an impact on the patient's outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate mortality and neurological outcome of TBI patients in two regions with differently structured EMS systems. A 6-year period (2005 - 2010) observational data on pre-hospital TBI management in paramedic-staffed EMS and physician-staffed EMS systems were retrospectively analysed. Inclusion criteria for the study were severe isolated TBI presenting with unconsciousness defined as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score ≤ 8 occurring either on-scene, during transportation or verified by an on-call neurosurgeon at admission to the hospital. For assessment of one-year neurological outcome, a modified Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) was used. During the 6-year study period a total of 458 patients met the inclusion criteria. One-year mortality was higher in the paramedic-staffed EMS group: 57 % vs. 42 %. Also good neurological outcome was less common in patients treated in the paramedic-staffed EMS group. We found no significant difference between the study groups when considering the secondary brain injury associated vital signs on-scene. Also on arrival to ED, the proportion of hypotensive patients was similar in both groups. However, hypoxia was common in the patients treated by the paramedic-staffed EMS on arrival to the ED, while in the physician-staffed EMS almost none of the patients were hypoxic. Pre-hospital intubation by EMS physicians probably explains this finding. The results suggest to an outcome benefit from physician-staffed EMS treating TBI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01454648.

  10. Evaluation of self-perception of mechanical ventilation knowledge among Brazilian final-year medical students, residents and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Fernando Sabia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; de Andrade Negri, Alexandre Jorgi; Cesar, Paulo; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Lopes, Antônio Carlos

    2017-02-01

    To present self-assessments of knowledge about mechanical ventilation made by final-year medical students, residents, and physicians taking qualifying courses at the Brazilian Society of Internal Medicine who work in urgent and emergency settings. A 34-item questionnaire comprising different areas of knowledge and training in mechanical ventilation was given to 806 medical students, residents, and participants in qualifying courses at 11 medical schools in Brazil. The questionnaire's self-assessment items for knowledge were transformed into scores. The average score among all participants was 21% (0-100%). Of the total, 85% respondents felt they did not receive sufficient information about mechanical ventilation during medical training. Additionally, 77% of the group reported that they would not know when to start noninvasive ventilation in a patient, and 81%, 81%, and 89% would not know how to start volume control, pressure control and pressure support ventilation modes, respectively. Furthermore, 86.4% and 94% of the participants believed they would not identify the basic principles of mechanical ventilation in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome, respectively, and would feel insecure beginning ventilation. Finally, 77% said they would fear for the safety of a patient requiring invasive mechanical ventilation under their care. Self-assessment of knowledge and self-perception of safety for managing mechanical ventilation were deficient among residents, students and emergency physicians from a sample in Brazil.

  11. Are Pediatric Emergency Physicians More Knowledgeable and Confident to Respond to a Pediatric Disaster after an Experiential Learning Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Ilana; Khalil, Elene

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric hospital disaster responders must be well-trained and prepared to manage children in a mass-casualty incident. Simulations of various types have been the traditional way of testing hospital disaster plans and training hospital staff in skills that are used in rare circumstances. The objective of this longitudinal, survey-based, observational study was to assess the effect of disaster response and management-based experiential learning on the knowledge and confidence of advanced learners. A simulation-based workshop was created for practicing Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) physicians, senior PEM physicians, and critical care and pediatric surgery residents to learn how to manage a disaster response. Given that this particular group of learners had never been exposed to such a disaster simulation, its educational value was assessed with the goal of improving the quality of the hospital pediatric medical response to a disaster by increasing the responders' knowledge and confidence. Objective and subjective measures were analyzed using both a retrospective, pre-post survey, as well as case-based evaluation grids. The simulation workshop improved the learners' perceived ability to manage patients in a disaster context and identified strengths and areas needing improvement for patient care within the disaster context. Advanced learners exposed to an experiential learning activity believed that it improved their ability to manage patients in a disaster situation and felt that it was valuable to their learning. Their confidence was preserved six months later. Bank I , Khalil E . Are pediatric emergency physicians more knowledgeable and confident to respond to a pediatric disaster after an experiential learning experience? Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(5):551-556.

  12. How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Simon; Laing, Simon

    2018-03-01

    As the Royal College of Emergency Medicine looks back on 50 years of progress towards the future it is clear that new and emerging technologies have the potential to substantially change the practice of emergency medicine. Education, diagnostics, therapeutics are all likely to change as algorithms, personalised medicine and insights into complexity become more readily available to the emergency clinician. This paper outlines areas of our practice that are already changing and speculates on how we might need to prepare our workforce for a technologically enhanced future. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Psychiatry and emergency medicine: medical student and physician attitudes toward homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden curriculum" in medical education, in which values are communicated from teacher to student outside of the formal instruction. A group of 79 students on Psychiatry and 66 on Emergency Medicine clerkships were surveyed at the beginning and end of their rotation regarding their attitudes toward homeless persons by use of the Health Professionals' Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI). The HPATHI was also administered to 31 Psychiatry residents and faculty and 41 Emergency Medicine residents and faculty one time during the course of this study. For Psychiatry clerks, t-tests showed significant differences pre- and post-clerkship experiences on 2 of the 23 items on the HPATHI. No statistically significant differences were noted for the Emergency Medicine students. An analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences on 7 out of the 23 survey questions for residents and faculty in Psychiatry, as compared with those in Emergency Medicine. Results suggest that medical students showed small differences in their attitudes toward homeless people following clerkships in Psychiatry but not in Emergency Medicine. Regarding resident and faculty results, significant differences between specialties were noted, with Psychiatry residents and faculty exhibiting more favorable attitudes toward homeless persons than residents and faculty in Emergency Medicine. Given that medical student competencies should be addressing the broader social issues of homelessness, medical schools need to first understand the attitudes of medical students to such issues, and then develop curricula to overcome inaccurate or stigmatizing beliefs.

  14. The McKesson prop--an essential tool for the emergency physician?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A P

    2010-02-01

    Facial trauma is a commonly encountered presentation to emergency departments. When associated airway compromise occurs, co-existing head and neck injuries serve to produce a challenging clinical situation. We describe two patients who suffered multi-system trauma, with severe maxillofacial injuries that necessitated prompt definitive airway management and mid-face stabilisation in the pre-hospital and emergency department phases of resuscitation. The McKesson prop is a simple yet highly effective tool for use in these injuries.

  15. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all psurgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p surgery and general surgery, whereas transplant had fewer. Emergency general surgery patients have increased ICU needs in terms of length of stay, ventilator usage, and continuous renal replacement therapy usage compared with other services, perhaps due to the higher percentage of transfers and emergent surgery required. These patients represent a distinct population. Understanding their resource needs

  16. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinkelbein J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jochen Hinkelbein,1,2 Christopher Neuhaus,2,3 Lennert Böhm,1 Steffen Kalina,1 Stefan Braunecker1,2 1Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, 2Working group “Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue”, German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society.Materials and methods: Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany, an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Altogether, 121 members of the society responded to the survey (n=335 sent out. Of the 121 respondents, n=54 (44.6% of the participants (89.9% male and 10.1% female; mean age, 54.1 years; n=121 were involved in at least one in-flight medical emergency. Demographic parameters in this survey were in concordance with the society members’ demographics. The mean duration of flights was 5.7 hours and the respondents performed 7.1 airline flights per year (median. Cardiovascular (40.0% and neurological disorders (17.8% were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7% provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was

  17. What makes a top research medical school? A call for a new model to evaluate academic physicians and medical school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Lunn, Mitchell R; Peng, Lily

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication of the Flexner Report in 1910, the medical education enterprise has undergone many changes to ensure that medical schools meet a minimum standard for the curricula and clinical training they offer students. Although the efforts of the licensing and accrediting bodies have raised the quality of medical education, the educational processes that produce the physicians who provide the best patient care and conduct the best biomedical research have not been identified. Comparative analyses are powerful tools to understand the differences between institutions, but they are challenging to carry out. As a result, the analysis performed by U.S. News & World Report (USN&WR) has become the default tool to compare U.S. medical schools. Medical educators must explore more rigorous and equitable approaches to analyze and understand the performance of medical schools. In particular, a better understanding and more thorough evaluation of the most successful institutions in producing academic physicians with biomedical research careers are needed. In this Perspective, the authors present a new model to evaluate medical schools' production of academic physicians who advance medicine through basic, clinical, translational, and implementation science research. This model is based on relevant and accessible objective criteria that should replace the subjective criteria used in the current USN&WR rankings system. By fostering a national discussion about the most meaningful criteria that should be measured and reported, the authors hope to increase transparency of assessment standards and ultimately improve educational quality.

  18. Development of a novel information and communication technology system to compensate for a sudden shortage of emergency department physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kumiko; Nakada, Taka-Aki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Nakao, Shota; Masunaga, Naohisa; Tomita, Keisuke; Matsumura, Yosuke; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2017-01-23

    A sudden shortage of physician resources due to overwhelming patient needs can affect the quality of care in the emergency department (ED). Developing effective response strategies remains a challenging research area. We created a novel system using information and communication technology (ICT) to respond to a sudden shortage, and tested the system to determine whether it would compensate for a shortage. Patients (n = 4890) transferred to a level I trauma center in Japan during 2012-2015 were studied. We assessed whether the system secured the necessary physicians without using other means such as phone or pager, and calculated fulfillment rate by the system as a primary outcome variable. We tested for the difference in probability of multiple casualties among total casualties transferred to the ED as an indicator of ability to respond to excessive patient needs, in a secondary analysis before and after system introduction. The system was activated 24 times (stand-by request [n = 12], attendance request [n = 12]) in 24 months, and secured the necessary physicians without using other means; fulfillment rate was 100%. There was no significant difference in the probability of multiple casualties during daytime weekdays hours before and after system introduction, while the probability of multiple casualties during night or weekend hours after system introduction significantly increased compared to before system introduction (4.8% vs. 12.9%, P < 0.0001). On the whole, the probability of multiple casualties increased more than 2 times after system introduction 6.2% vs. 13.6%, P < 0.0001). After introducing the system, probability of multiple casualties increased. Thus the system may contribute to improvement in the ability to respond to sudden excessive patient needs in multiple causalities. A novel system using ICT successfully secured immediate responses from needed physicians outside the hospital without increasing user workload, and increased

  19. Use of Physician-in-Triage Model in the Management of Abdominal Pain in an Emergency Department Observation Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John R; Katzer, Robert; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shastry, Siri; Andrusaitis, Jessica; Anderson, Craig L; Barton, Erik D

    2017-02-01

    Given the nationwide increase in emergency department (ED) visits it is of paramount importance for hospitals to find efficient ways to manage patient flow. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference in success rates, length of stay (LOS), and other demographic factors in two cohorts of patients admitted directly to an ED observation unit (EDOU) under an abdominal pain protocol by a physician in triage (bypassing the main ED) versus those admitted via the traditional pathway (evaluated and treated in the main ED prior to EDOU admission). This was a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to a protocol-driven EDOU with a diagnosis of abdominal pain in a single university hospital center ED. We obtained compiled data for all patients admitted to the EDOU with a diagnosis of abdominal pain that met EDOU protocol admission criteria. We divided data for each cohort into age, gender, payer status, and LOS. The data were then analyzed to assess any significant differences between the cohorts. A total of 327 patients were eligible for this study (85 triage group, 242 main ED group). The total success rate was 90.8% (n=297) and failure rate was 9.2% (n=30). We observed no significant differences in success rates between those dispositioned to the EDOU by triage physicians (90.6%) and those via the traditional route (90.5 % p) = 0.98. However, we found a significant difference between the two groups regarding total LOS with significantly shorter main ED times and EDOU times among patients sent to the EDOU by the physician-in-triage group (ptriage or via the traditional route. However, there were statistically significant shorter LOSs in patients admitted to the EDOU by triage physicians. The data from this study support the implementation of a physician-in-triage model in combination with the EDOU in improving efficiency in the treatment of abdominal pain. This knowledge may spur action to cut healthcare costs and improve

  20. A survey of the knowledge, use, and adoption of emerging technologies by academics in an Open Distance Learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Chimbo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The realisation of the advantages offered by e-learning accompanied by the use of various emerging information technologies has resulted in a noticeable shift by academia towards e-learning. An analysis of the use, knowledge and adoption of emerging technologies by academics in an Open Distance Learning (ODL environment at the University of South Africa (UNISA was undertaken in this study. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use, knowledge and adoption of emerging e-learning technologies by the academics from the selected schools. The academics in the Schools of Arts, Computing and Science were purposively selected in order to draw on views of academics from different teaching and educational backgrounds. Questionnaires were distributed both electronically and manually. The results showed that academics in all the Schools were competent at the use of information technology tools and applications such as emailing, word-processing, Internet, myUnisa (UNISA’s online teaching platform, and Microsoft PowerPoint and Excel. An evaluation of the awareness of different emerging technological tools showed that most academics were aware of Open Access Technologies, Social Networking Sites, Blogs, Video Games and Microblogging Platforms. While the level of awareness was high for these technologies, the use by the academics was low. At least 62.3% of the academics indicated willingness to migrate to online teaching completely and also indicated the need for further training on new technologies. A comparison of the different schools showed no statistically significant difference in the use, knowledge and willingness to adopt technology amongst the academics.

  1. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Böhm, Lennert; Kalina, Steffen; Braunecker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society. Materials and methods Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany), an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM) were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015). Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (pemergency. Demographic parameters in this survey were in concordance with the society members’ demographics. The mean duration of flights was 5.7 hours and the respondents performed 7.1 airline flights per year (median). Cardiovascular (40.0%) and neurological disorders (17.8%) were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7%) provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was undertaken in 10.6% of the cases. Although using a different method of data acquisition, this survey confirms previous data on the nature of emergencies and gives plausible numbers. Conclusion Our data strongly argue for the establishment of a standardized database for recording the incidence and nature of in-flight medical emergencies. Such a database could inform on required medical equipment and cabin crew training. PMID:28260956

  2. Financing U.S. Graduate Medical Education: A Policy Position Paper of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine and the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, Renee; Lane, Susan; Steinmann, Alwin F; Caverzagie, Kelly J; Tape, Thomas G; Hingle, Susan T; Moyer, Darilyn V

    2016-07-19

    In this position paper, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine and the American College of Physicians examine the state of graduate medical education (GME) financing in the United States and recent proposals to reform GME funding. They make a series of recommendations to reform the current funding system to better align GME with the needs of the nation's health care workforce. These recommendations include using Medicare GME funds to meet policy goals and to ensure an adequate supply of physicians, a proper specialty mix, and appropriate training sites; spreading the costs of financing GME across the health care system; evaluating the true cost of training a resident and establishing a single per-resident amount; increasing transparency and innovation; and ensuring that primary care residents receive training in well-functioning ambulatory settings that are financially supported for their training roles.

  3. Case Study of an Unsustainable Community-Academic Partnership: Toward Core Standards for the Structure of Emerging Participatory Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, José L; Norris, Keith C; Hardigan, Patrick C; Calderón, Lorrin A; Hays, Ron D

    2015-08-07

    This report retrospectively examines the structure of an emerging community-academic participatory research (PR) partnership that was not sustainable, despite attempts to adhere to PR principles and demonstrable success in research outcomes. The influence of community and academic parent organizations on the PR process and outcomes is presented in the context of the Donabedian Model. We dissected the structural elements contributed by parent organizations to forming the structure of the PR partnership (memorandum of understanding, policy environment, human resources and effort, community and academic resources, expertise and experience, and funding) and explored the influence of potential and actual conflicts on the PR partnership's sustainability. The effect of potential and actual conflict on the PR process and quality of PR outcomes is discussed. Based on this, we conclude by proposing seven core standards for the establishment and development of emerging community-academic PR partnerships.

  4. Ischaemic stroke management by emergency care physicians at public sector hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luni, F.K.; Hamid, S.A.; Mamji, S.; Baig, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the clinicians management of patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke in the emergency departments of two large state run hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. A questionnaire was filled by 59 registered medical practitioners working at these two government hospitals who would be managing stroke patients presenting in the emergency. It was a descriptive cross sectional study designed to assess the methods used by the doctors for diagnosing and treating stroke patients. The data was collected from October to November 2007 and entered using Epi Data Entry and analyzed by SPSS 13.0. Results: The preferred overall investigation for a suspected stroke patient in an emergency ward was an ECG (98%). 51% of the respondents would prescribe aspirin to most patients (300 mg by 40% respondents). Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was thought to be beneficial by 43% of doctors, low molecular weight heparin by 91%, subcutaneous heparin by 86.5%, intravenous Vitamin B complex by 20% and steroids by 39% of respondents. Regarding elevated blood pressure, 60% answered that they would manage the blood pressure according to the type of stroke and 73% responded that they would lower blood pressure when it reached greater than 150/80. 88% of the doctors answered that they would use cholesterol lowering drugs in the management of stroke patients in an emergency. 97% of the doctors recommended rehabilitation and 88% of the respondents believed that there should be separate stroke units. Conclusion: The development of a standardized protocol and stroke team is recommended which should speed the clinical assessment, decisions for early management and also increase the performance of diagnostic studies. (author)

  5. Community pediatric hospitalists providing care in the emergency department: an analysis of physician productivity and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudas, Robert A; Monroe, David; McColligan Borger, Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Community hospital pediatric inpatient programs are being threatened by current financial and demographic trends. We describe a model of care and report on the financial implications associated with combining emergency department (ED) and inpatient care of pediatric patients. We determine whether this type of model could generate sufficient revenue to support physician salaries for continuous in-house coverage in community hospitals. Financial productivity and selected performance indicators were obtained from a retrospective review of registration and billing records. Data were obtained from 2 community-based pediatric hospitalist programs, which are part of a single health system and included care delivered in the ED and inpatient settings during a 1-year period from July 1, 2008, to July 1, 2009. Together, the combined programs were able to generate 6079 total relative value units and collections of $244,828 annually per full-time equivalent (FTE). Salary, benefits, and practice expenses totaled $235,674 per FTE. Thus, combined daily revenues exceeded expenses and provided 104% of physician salary, benefits, and practice expenses. However, 1 program generated a net profit of $329,715 ($40,706 per FTE), whereas the other recorded a loss of $207,969 ($39,994 per FTE). Emergency department throughput times and left-without-being-seen rates at both programs were comparable to national benchmarks. Incorporating ED care into a pediatric hospitalist program can be an effective strategy to maintain the financial viability of pediatric services at community hospitals with low inpatient volumes that seek to provide 24-hour pediatric staffing.

  6. Quantifying federal funding and scholarly output related to the academic emergency medicine consensus conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Dinh, Tu; May, Larissa; Yadav, Kabir; Gaddis, Gary M; Cone, David C

    2014-01-01

    Every year since 2000, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) has presented a one-day consensus conference to generate a research agenda for advancement of a scientific topic. One of the 12 annual issues of AEM is reserved for the proceedings of these conferences. The purpose of this study was to measure academic productivity of these conferences by evaluating subsequent federal research funding received by authors of conference manuscripts and calculating citation counts of conference papers. This was a cross-sectional study. In 2012, the NIH RePORTER system was searched to identify subsequent federal funding obtained by authors of the consensus conference issues from 2000 to 2010. Funded projects were coded as related or unrelated to conference topic. Citation counts for all conference manuscripts were quantified using Scopus and Google Scholar. Simple descriptive statistics were reported. Eight hundred fifty-two individual authors contributed to 280 papers published in the 11 consensus conference issues. One hundred thirty-seven authors (16%) obtained funding for 318 projects. A median of 22 topic-related projects per conference (range 10-97) accounted for a median of $20,488,331 per conference (range $7,779,512 to $122,918,205). The average (± SD) number of citations per paper was 15.7 ± 20.5 in Scopus and 23.7 ± 32.6 in Google Scholar. The authors of consensus conference manuscripts obtained significant federal grant support for follow-up research related to conference themes. In addition, the manuscripts generated by these conferences were frequently cited. Conferences devoted to research agenda development appear to be an academically worthwhile endeavor.

  7. Physician perceptions and recommendations about pre-hospital emergency medical services for patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction in Abu Dhabi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callachan, Edward L; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Physician perceptions about emergency medical services (EMS) are important determinants of improving pre-hospital care for cardiac emergencies. No data exist on physician attitudes towards EMS care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. To describe the perceptions towards EMS among physicians caring for patients with STEMI in Abu Dhabi. We surveyed a convenience sample of physicians involved in the care of patients with STEMI (emergency medicine, cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery and intensive care) in four government facilities with 24/7 Primary PCI in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Surveys were distributed using dedicated email links, and used 5-point Likert scales to assess perceptions and attitudes to EMS. Of 106 physician respondents, most were male (82%), practicing in emergency medicine (47%) or cardiology (44%) and the majority (63%) had been in practice for >10 years. Less than half of the responders (42%) were "Somewhat Satisfied" (35%) or "Very Satisfied" (7%) with current EMS level of care for STEMI patients. Most respondents were "Very Likely" (67%) to advise a patient with a cardiac emergency to use EMS, but only 39% felt the same for themselves or their family. Most responders were supportive (i.e. "Strongly Agree") of the following steps to improve EMS care: 12-lead ECG and telemetry to ED by EMS (69%), EMS triage of STEMI to PCI facilities (65%), and activation of PCI teams by EMS (58%). Only 19% were supportive of pre-hospital fibrinolytics by EMS. There were no significant differences in the responses among the specialties. Most physicians involved in STEMI care in Abu Dhabi are very likely to advise patients to use EMS for a cardiac emergency, but less likely to do so for themselves or their families. Different specialties had concordant opinions regarding steps to improve pre-hospital EMS care for STEMI.

  8. A multicentre observational study to evaluate a new tool to assess emergency physicians' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowerdew, Lynsey; Gaunt, Arran; Spedding, Jessica; Bhargava, Ajay; Brown, Ruth; Vincent, Charles; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate a new tool to assess emergency physicians' non-technical skills. This was a multicentre observational study using data collected at four emergency departments in England. A proportion of observations used paired observers to obtain data for inter-rater reliability. Data were also collected for test-retest reliability, observability of skills, mean ratings and dispersion of ratings for each skill, as well as a comparison of skill level between hospitals. Qualitative data described the range of non-technical skills exhibited by trainees and identified sources of rater error. 96 assessments of 43 senior trainees were completed. At a scale level, intra-class coefficients were 0.575, 0.532 and 0.419 and using mean scores were 0.824, 0.702 and 0.519. Spearman's ρ for calculating test-retest reliability was 0.70 using mean scores. All skills were observed more than 60% of the time. The skill Maintenance of Standards received the lowest mean rating (4.8 on a nine-point scale) and the highest mean was calculated for Team Building (6.0). Two skills, Supervision & Feedback and Situational Awareness-Gathering Information, had significantly different distributions of ratings across the four hospitals (ptechnical skills, especially in relation to leadership. The framework of skills may be used to identify areas for development in individual trainees, as well as guide other patient safety interventions.

  9. Assessment of the level of knowledge of Physicians in Bushehr Province about preparedness and response for Nuclear Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshagh Abbasi

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Responses to recent incidents involving radiation indicate that most general practitioners are uncertain about the health consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and the medical management of exposed patients. Acute radiation syndrome is an acute illness caused by irradiation of the entire body by a high dose of penetrating radiation in a very short period of time. In order to assess the level of knowledge of physicians in Bushehr province about preparedness and response for nuclear emergency, we used a questionnaire based on IAEA-WHO protocol. A total of 233 doctors (47 of specialist and 186 of general practitioners participated in a cross-sectional study. The mean of score for doctors was 3.99 (from 13 3.7 score for general practitioners and 4.28 scores for specialists. Overall, the doctors did not gain the acceptable scores in subjects like physics of radiation, diagnosis and management of acute radiation syndrome, triage and management of nuclear accidents. In conclusion, the level of doctors’ knowledge in Bushehr province about preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergency is deficient. Therefore, medical education and postgraduate training programs for doctors should be designed.

  10. A review of hemodynamic monitoring techniques, methods and devices for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Abdullah E; Watermeyer, Matthew J; Buchanan, Sean K; Dippenaar, Nicole; Simo, Nelly Clotilde Tchouambou; Motara, Feroza; Moolla, Muhammed

    2017-09-01

    The emergency department (ED) is frequently the doorway to the intensive care unit (ICU) for a significant number of critically ill patients presenting to the hospital. Hemodynamic monitoring (HDM) which is a key component in the effective management of the critically ill patient presenting to the ED, is primarily concerned with assessing the performance of the cardiovascular system and determining the correct therapeutic intervention to optimise end-organ oxygen delivery. The spectrum of hemodynamic monitoring ranges from simple clinical assessment and routine bedside monitoring to point of care ultrasonography and various invasive monitoring devices. The clinician must be aware of the range of available techniques, methods, interventions and technological advances as well as possess a sound approach to basic hemodynamic monitoring prior to selecting the optimal modality. This article comprises an in depth discussion of an approach to hemodynamic monitoring techniques and principles as well as methods of predicting fluid responsiveness as it applies to the ED clinician. We review the role, applicability and validity of various methods and techniques that include; clinical assessment, passive leg raising, blood pressure, finger based monitoring devices, the mini-fluid challenge, the end-expiratory occlusion test, central venous pressure monitoring, the pulmonary artery catheter, ultrasonography, bioreactance and other modern invasive hemodynamic monitoring devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The academic health center in complex humanitarian emergencies: lessons learned from the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Christine; Theodosis, Christian; Bills, Corey; Kim, Jimin; Kinet, Melodie; Turner, Madeleine; Millis, Michael; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Olopade, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The event disrupted infrastructure and was marked by extreme morbidity and mortality. The global response to the disaster was rapid and immense, comprising multiple actors-including academic health centers (AHCs)-that provided assistance in the field and from home. The authors retrospectively examine the multidisciplinary approach that the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) applied to postearthquake Haiti, which included the application of institutional structure and strategy, systematic deployment of teams tailored to evolving needs, and the actual response and recovery. The university mobilized significant human and material resources for deployment within 48 hours and sustained the effort for over four months. In partnership with international and local nongovernmental organizations as well as other AHCs, the UCM operated one of the largest and more efficient acute field hospitals in the country. The UCM's efforts in postearthquake Haiti provide insight into the role AHCs can play, including their strengths and limitations, in complex disasters. AHCs can provide necessary intellectual and material resources as well as technical expertise, but the cost and speed required for responding to an emergency, and ongoing domestic responsibilities, may limit the response of a large university and hospital system. The authors describe the strong institutional backing, the detailed predeployment planning and logistical support UCM provided, the engagement of faculty and staff who had previous experience in complex humanitarian emergencies, and the help of volunteers fluent in the local language which, together, made UCM's mission in postearthquake Haiti successful.

  12. The Attitudes of Physicians, Nurses, Physical Therapists, and Midwives Toward Complementary Medicine for Chronic Pain: A Survey at an Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, Eléonore; Bauer, Brent; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Kottelat, Yolande; Decosterd, Isabelle; Finti, Guillaume; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Bonvin, Eric; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and midwives toward complementary medicine (CM) at a Swiss academic hospital and toward its use for treating chronic pain. The cross-sectional survey took place from October to December 2013. An e-mail sent to 4925 healthcare professionals (1969 physicians, 2372 nurses, 145 physical therapists, and 111 midwives) working at Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, invited them to answer a web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire was answered by 1247 healthcare professionals (response rate: 25.3%). Of these, 96.1% strongly agreed or agreed that CM could be useful for the treatment of chronic pain, with more nurses (96.7%) and midwives (100%) than physicians (93.8%) agreeing that CM could be useful (P chronic pain. Respondents listed migraine (74.7%), tension headaches (70.6%), and low back pain (70.1%) as three main conditions for which they would refer patients for acupuncture. The three therapies with which respondents were the most unfamiliar were neuraltherapy (57.2%), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) (54.1%), and biofeedback (51.9%). Over half of respondents, 58.3%, had never referred a patient to a CM practitioner. A total of 84.3% of the respondents felt that they lacked the knowledge to inform their patients about CM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of a Dedicated, Non-Physician-led Mental Health Team to Reduce Pediatric Emergency Department Lengths of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspal, Neil G; Rutman, Lori E; Kodish, Ian; Moore, Ann; Migita, Russell T

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of emergency departments (EDs) for pediatric mental health (MH) complaints is increasing. These patients require more resources and have higher admission rates than those with nonpsychiatric complaints. A multistage, multidisciplinary process to reduce length of stay (LOS) and improve the quality of care for patients with psychiatric complaints was performed at a tertiary care children's hospital's ED using Lean methodology. This process resulted in the implementation of a dedicated MH team, led by either a social worker or a psychiatric nurse, to evaluate patients, facilitate admissions, and arrange discharge planning. We conducted a retrospective, before-and-after study analyzing data 1 year before through 1 year after new process implementation (March 28, 2011). Our primary outcome was mean ED LOS. After process implementation there was a statistically significant decrease in mean ED LOS (332 minutes vs. 244 minutes, p vs. 204 minutes, p = 0.001), security physical interventions (2.0% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.004), and restraint use (1.7% vs. 0.1%, p safety. Use of quality improvement methodology led to a redesign that was associated with a significant reduction in mean LOS of patients with psychiatric complaints and improved ED staff perception of care. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  14. How do nurses in England and Norway perceive that the organization of tasks between physicians and nurses in an Emergency Department influences the patients waiting time?

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Patients often have long waiting time in the Emergency Departments to be seen, which in itself is considered a risk of less successful outcome. The aim of this study was to get the perception of how nurses in Norwegian Emergencies believe task shifts between physicians and nurses can influence the patients waiting time, and if the nurses are willing to take on more responsibilities. The study also aim to investigate how nurses in England, and who are practising task shifts, believe this ...

  15. Evaluation of the performance of French physician-staffed emergency medical service in the triage of major trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Sophie Rym; Gauss, Tobias; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Truchot, Jennifer; Harrois, Anatole; Raux, Mathieu; Duranteau, Jacques; Mantz, Jean; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    Proper prehospital triage of trauma patients is a cornerstone for the process of care of trauma patients. In France, emergency physicians perform this process according to a national triage algorithm called Vittel Triage Criteria (VTC), introduced in 2002 to help the triage decision-making process. The aim of this two-center study was to evaluate the performance of the triage process based on the VTC to identify major trauma patients in the Paris area. This was a retrospective analysis of two cohorts. The first cohort consisted of all patients admitted between January 2011 and September 2012 in two trauma referral centers in the region of Paris (Ile de France) and allowed estimation of overtriage. Undertriage was assessed in a second cohort made up of all prehospital trauma interventions from one emergency medicine sector during the same period. Adequate triage was defined by a direct admission of patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 15 into one of the regional trauma centers, and undertriage was defined as an initial nonadmission to a trauma center. Overtriage was defined by an admission of patients with an ISS of 15 or lower to a trauma center. The performance of the VTC was evaluated according to a strict to-the-letter application of the VTC and termed as theoretical triage. Logistic regression was performed to identify VTC criteria able to predict major trauma. Among 998 admitted patients of the first cohort, 173 patients (17%) were excluded because they were not directly admitted in the first 24 hours. In the first cohort (n = 825), adequate triage was 58% and overtriage was 42%. In the second cohort (n = 190), adequate triage was 40%, overtriage was 60%, and undertriage was less than 1%. Theoretical triage generated a nonsignificantly lower overtriage and a higher undertriage compared with observed triage. The most powerful predictors of major trauma were paralysis (odds ratio [OR,] 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.22), flail

  16. Missed opportunities for concurrent HIV-STD testing in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Pamela W; Martin, Ian B K; Quinlivan, Evelyn B; Gay, Cynthia L; Leone, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated emergency department (ED) provider adherence to guidelines for concurrent HIV-sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing within an expanded HIV testing program and assessed demographic and clinical factors associated with concurrent HIV-STD testing. We examined concurrent HIV-STD testing in a suburban academic ED with a targeted, expanded HIV testing program. Patients aged 18-64 years who were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, or chlamydia in 2009 were evaluated for concurrent HIV testing. We analyzed demographic and clinical factors associated with concurrent HIV-STD testing using multivariate logistic regression with a robust variance estimator or, where applicable, exact logistic regression. Only 28.3% of patients tested for syphilis, 3.8% tested for gonorrhea, and 3.8% tested for chlamydia were concurrently tested for HIV during an ED visit. Concurrent HIV-syphilis testing was more likely among younger patients aged 25-34 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78, 2.10) and patients with STD-related chief complaints at triage (AOR=11.47, 95% CI 5.49, 25.06). Concurrent HIV-gonorrhea/chlamydia testing was more likely among men (gonorrhea: AOR=3.98, 95% CI 2.25, 7.02; chlamydia: AOR=3.25, 95% CI 1.80, 5.86) and less likely among patients with STD-related chief complaints at triage (gonorrhea: AOR=0.31, 95% CI 0.13, 0.82; chlamydia: AOR=0.21, 95% CI 0.09, 0.50). Concurrent HIV-STD testing in an academic ED remains low. Systematic interventions that remove the decision-making burden of ordering an HIV test from providers may increase HIV testing in this high-risk population of suspected STD patients.

  17. Gender Differentiation and New Trends Concerning the Division of Household Labour within Couples: The Case of Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Delaunay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an account of the division of household labour (i.e., housework and childcarebased on the results of a doctoral research project on time management among couples, in relationto a specific professional group: emergency physicians. It is tested the suitability of some generaltheoretical approaches for the explanation of housework time, namely rational choice theory andrelative resources theory. The gender dimension is still an important variable to describe andunderstand attitudes and behaviours within the couple, even in upper socio-economical categories,largely recognised to be usually more democratic and egalitarian in what regards the tasks and selfperceptionsof women and men inside and outside home. However, along with the persistence of‘traditional’ gender roles in unpaid work, especially at some stages of the family life cycle, there arenew trends of ‘modernisation’ concerning sex-role attitudes. This is translated into changes in theeconomic resources ratio between spouses, such as the appearance of a relative female breadwinnermodel in dual-earner couples. Therefore, it is important to deepen the social research onthese issues by pursuing qualitative studies and articulating different analytical perspectives, inorder to understand how they may interact in a more sophisticated explanation of the participationin domestic labour.

  18. The challenges of emerging HISs in bridging the communication gaps among physicians and nurses in China: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dong; Zhang, Xingting; Wan, Jie; Fu, Jing; Lei, Jianbo

    2017-06-12

    To explore the current situation, existing problems and possible causes of said problems with regards to physician-nurse communication under an environment of increasingly widespread usage of Hospital Information Systems and to seek out new potential strategies in information technology to improve physician-nurse communication. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 physicians and nurses in five leading tertiary grade A hospitals in Beijing, China (two physicians and two nurses in each hospital). The interviews primarily included three aspects comprising the current situation and problems of clinical physician-nurse communication, the application and problems of Hospital Information Systems, and assessments on the improvement of physician-nurse communication through the usage of information technology. The inductive conventional content analysis approach was employed. (1) Physicians and nurses are generally quite satisfied with the current situation of communication. However, the information needs of nurses are prone to being overlooked, and the communication methods are primarily synchronous communication such as face-to-face and phone communication. (2) Hospital Information Systems are gradually being used for physician-nurse communication; in the meantime, physicians and nurses face challenges with regards to the improvement of physician-nurse communication through the usage of information technology. Challenges differ based on the different stages of using the system and the different levels of understanding of physicians and nurses towards information technology. Their dissatisfaction mainly deals with system errors and the level of convenience in using the system. (3) In-depth interviews found that in general, physicians and nurses have a strong interest and trust in improving physician-nurse communication through appropriate information technology, e.g., communication methods such as information reminders for physicians and nurses through mobile

  19. Inter-Observer Agreement on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation for Diagnosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke Among Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz ORAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is a highly sensitive tool for the detection of early ischemic stroke and is excellent at detecting small and early infarcts. Nevertheless, conflict may arise and judgments may differ among different interpreters. Inter-observer variability shows the systematic difference among different observers and is expressed as the kappa (Κ coefficient. In this study, we aimed to determinate the inter-observer variability among emergency physicians in the use of DW-MRI for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Cranial DW-MRI images of 50 patients were interpreted in this retrospective observational cross-sectional study. Patients who were submitted to DW-MRI imaging for a suspected acute ischemic stroke were included in the study, unless the scans were ordered by any of the reviewers or they were absent in the system. The scans were blindly and randomly interpreted by four emergency physicians. Inter-observer agreement between reviewers was evaluated using Fleiss’ Κ statistics. Results: The mean kappa value for high signal on diffusion-weighted images (DWI and for reduction on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were substantial (k=0.67 and moderate (k=0.60 respectively. The correlation for detection of the presence of ischemia and location was substantial (k: 0.67. There were 18 false-positive and 4 false-negative evaluations of DWI, 15 false positive and 8 false-negative evaluations of ADC. Conclusions: Our data suggest that DW-MRI is reliable in screening for ischemic stroke when interpreted by emergency physicians in the emergency department. The levels of stroke identification and variability show that emergency physicians may have an acceptable level of agreement. Key words: Emergency department, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, inter-observer agreement, ischemic stroke

  20. External validation of the ROSC after cardiac arrest (RACA) score in a physician staffed emergency medical service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupari, Petteri; Skrifvars, Markus; Kuisma, Markku

    2017-03-29

    The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (RACA) score may have implications as a quality indicator for the emergency medical services (EMS) system. We aimed to validate this score externally in a physician staffed urban EMS system. We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Data on resuscitation attempts from the Helsinki EMS cardiac arrest registry from 1.1.2008 to 31.12.2010 were collected and analyzed. For each attempted resuscitation the RACA score variables were collected and the score calculated. The endpoint was ROSC defined as palpable pulse over 30 s. Calibration was assessed by comparing predicted and observed ROSC rates in the whole sample, separately for shockable and non-shockable rhythm, and separately for resuscitations lead by a specialist, registrar or medical supervisor (i.e., senior paramedic). Data are presented as medians and interquartile ranges. Statistical testing included chi-square test, the Mann-Whitney U test, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and calculation of 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions. A total of 680 patients were included of whom 340 attained ROSC. The RACA score was higher in patients with ROSC (0.62 [0.46-0.69] than in those without (0.46 [0.36-0.57]) (p system for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients would allow patient heterogeneity adjustment and measurement of quality of care in analogy to commoly used severity-of-illness- scores developed for the similar purposes for the general intensive care unit population. However, transferring RACA score to another country with different population and EMS system might affect the performance and generalizability of the score. This study found a good overall calibration and moderate discrimination of the RACA score in a physician staffed urban EMS system which suggests external validity of the score. Calibration was suboptimal in patients with a non-shockable rhythm which may due to a local do-not-attempt-resuscitation policy. The lower

  1. What is the impact of an electronic test result acknowledgement system on Emergency Department physicians' work processes? A mixed-method pre-post observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andrew; McCaughey, Euan J; Tariq, Amina; Walter, Scott R; Li, Julie; Callen, Joanne; Paoloni, Richard; Runciman, William B; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2017-03-01

    To examine the impact of an electronic Results Acknowledgement (eRA) system on emergency physicians' test result management work processes and the time taken to acknowledge microbiology and radiology test results for patients discharged from an Emergency Department (ED). The impact of the eRA system was assessed in an Australian ED using: a) semi-structured interviews with senior emergency physicians; and b) a time and motion direct observational study of senior emergency physicians completing test acknowledgment pre and post the implementation of the eRA system. The eRA system led to changes in the way results and actions were collated, stored, documented and communicated. Although there was a non-significant increase in the average time taken to acknowledge results in the post period, most types of acknowledgements (other than simple acknowledgements) took less time to complete. The number of acknowledgements where physicians sought additional information from the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) rose from 12% pre to 20% post implementation of eRA. Given that the type of results are unlikely to have changed significantly across the pre and post implementation periods, the increase in the time physicians spent accessing additional clinical information in the post period likely reflects the greater access to clinical information provided by the integrated electronic system. Easier access to clinical information may improve clinical decision making and enhance the quality of patient care. For instance, in situations where a senior clinician, not initially involved in the care process, is required to deal with the follow-up of non-normal results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The emerging role of respiratory physiotherapy: A profile of the attitudes of nurses and physicians in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Al Mohammedali

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Physiotherapy in respiratory care settings was positively regarded by nurses and physicians working in hospitals and health-care facilities in Saudi Arabia. The need for further education for physicians and nurses on the role of physiotherapy in respiratory care was highlighted; this would enable physiotherapy to develop and be further integrated into the respiratory care multidisciplinary team.

  3. Experimental comparison of 2D and 3D technology mediated paramedic-physician collaboration in remote emergency medical situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maurin, Hanna; Cairns, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    and remote, consulting physician. Post-questionnaire data illustrate that the information provided by the consulting physician was perceived to be more useful by the paramedic in the 3D condition than the 2D condition. However, the data pertaining to the quality of interaction and trust between...

  4. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India′s Education Development Committee (EDC White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers′ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE′s Education Development Committee (EDC was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  5. Balancing Academic Teaching, Research, and Service: a Paradigm Emerging from NSF-TUES Sponsored Project Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    training. Our policy has lead to the emergence of a paradigm for academic inquiry. We develop and test learning resources to cover the gamut of earth and planetary sciences, which we view as the science of four-dimensional place-time. Our learning objects emphasize the role of visualization in promoting understanding. If these resources fail to achieve desired outcomes, we look into their design but also examine our own understanding of topics, since instructor misconceptions are an obvious hindrance to learning. Redesign of visualizations may improve outcomes but sometimes the problem lies not with presentation or content knowledge, but rather with gaps in the science itself. Thus teaching and public outreach can become vehicles for the discovery of fertile research questions. Dissemination of a policy that eastablishes teaching and service as bridges leading to research products has the potential to generate transformative changes in the education that graduate students deliver and thus the education that undergraduate students receive.

  6. Description and Yield of Current Quality and Safety Review in Selected US Academic Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Richard Thomas; Schneider, Ryan M; Sharp, Brian R; Pothof, Jeffrey J; Hodkins, Sheridan; Capp, Roberta; Wiler, Jennifer L; Sreshta, Neil; Sather, John E; Sampson, Christopher S; Powell, Jonathan T; Groner, Kathryn Y; Adler, Lee M

    2017-06-29

    Quality and safety review for performance improvement is important for systems of care and is required for US academic emergency departments (EDs). Assessment of the impact of patient safety initiatives in the context of increasing burdens of quality measurement compels standardized, meaningful, high-yield approaches for performance review. Limited data describe how quality and safety reviews are currently conducted and how well they perform in detecting patient harm and areas for improvement. We hypothesized that decades-old approaches used in many academic EDs are inefficient and low yield for identifying patient harm. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the efficiency and yield of current quality review processes at five academic EDs for a 12-month period. Sites provided descriptions of their current practice and collected summary data on the number and severity of events identified in their reviews and the referral sources that led to their capture. Categories of common referral sources were established at the beginning of the study. Sites used the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's definition in defining an adverse event and a modified National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (MERP) Index for grading severity of events. Participating sites had similar processes for quality review, including a two-level review process, monthly reviews and conferences, similar screening criteria, and a grading system for evaluating cases. In 60 months of data collection, we reviewed a total of 4735 cases and identified 381 events. This included 287 near-misses, errors/events (MERP A-I) and 94 adverse events (AEs) (MERP E-I). The overall AE rate (event rate with harm) was 1.99 (95% confidence interval = 1.62%-2.43%), ranging from 1.24% to 3.47% across sites. The overall rate of quality concerns (events without harm) was 6.06% (5.42%-6.78%), ranging from 2.96% to 10.95% across sites. Seventy-two-hour returns were the

  7. Relationship between primary care physician visits and hospital/emergency use for uncomplicated hypertension, an ambulatory care-sensitive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin L; Chen, Guanmin; McAlister, Finlay A; Campbell, Norm R C; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Rabi, Doreen; Tu, Karen; Jette, Nathalie; Quan, Hude

    2014-12-01

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) represent an indirect measure of access and quality of community care. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between one ACSC, uncomplicated hypertension, and previous primary care physician (PCP) utilization. A cohort of patients with hypertension was identified using administrative databases in Alberta between fiscal years 1994 and 2008. We applied the Canadian Institute for Health Information's case definition to detect patients with uncomplicated hypertension as the most responsible reason for hospitalization and/or Emergency Department (ED) visit. We assessed hypertension-related and all-cause PCP visits. The overall adjusted rate of ACSC hospitalizations and ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension was 7.1 and 13.9 per 10,000 hypertensive patients, respectively. The likelihood of ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension was associated with age, household income quintile, region of residence, and Charlson comorbidity status (all P hypertension increased from 4.8 per 10,000 hypertensive patients for those without hypertension-related PCP visits before diagnosis to 10.5 per 10,000 hypertensive patients for those with 5 or more hypertension-related PCP visits. The rate of ACSC hospitalizations and/or ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension increased as the number of hypertension-related PCP visits increased even after stratifying according to demographic and clinical characteristics. As the frequency of hypertension-related PCP visits increased, the rate of ACSC hospitalizations and/or ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension increased. This suggests that ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension might not be a particularly good indicator for access to primary care. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program – DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children. PMID:26807394

  9. An Innovative Educational and Mentorship Program for Emergency Medicine Women Residents to Enhance Academic Development and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Arbelaez, Christian; Peak, David; Nadel, Eric S

    2015-11-01

    Given the discrepancy between men and women's equal rates of medical school matriculation and their rates of academic promotion and leadership role acquisition, the need to provide mentorship and education to women in academic medicine is becoming increasingly recognized. Numerous large-scale programs have been developed to provide support and resources for women's enrichment and retention in academic medicine. Analyses of contributory factors to the aforementioned discrepancy commonly cite insufficient mentoring and role modeling as well as challenges with organizational navigation. Since residency training has been shown to be a critical juncture for making the decision to pursue an academic career, there is a need for innovative and tailored educational and mentorship programs targeting residents. Acknowledging residents' competing demands, we designed a program to provide easily accessible mentorship and contact with role models for our trainees at the departmental and institutional levels. We believe that this is an important step towards encouraging women's pursuit of academic careers. Our model may be useful to other emergency medicine residencies looking to provide such opportunities for their women residents.

  10. The emerging role of respiratory physiotherapy: A profile of the attitudes of nurses and physicians in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mohammedali, Zainab; O'Dwyer, Tom K; Broderick, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory physiotherapy plays a key role in the management and treatment of patients with respiratory diseases worldwide, yet this specialty is not well established in Saudi Arabia. To profile the attitudes among physicians and nurses toward physiotherapists working in respiratory care settings in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted. A questionnaire was developed consisting of 23 items, which was distributed both electronically and in paper form to physicians and nurses working in hospitals and health-care centers in Saudi Arabia. Physicians and nurses working outside of Saudi Arabia, and other health professionals, were excluded from the study. A total of 284 questionnaires were returned (nurses: n = 158; physicians: n = 126). The majority believed that physiotherapists have the skills to be involved in respiratory care (79.9%, n = 226) and that physiotherapists are an important member of the Intensive Care Unit team (90.4%, n = 255). Most respondents ( n = 232, 82.9%) felt in need of more information regarding the role of physiotherapy within respiratory care; significantly more nurses than physicians believed they needed additional education ( P = 0.002). Specialized physicians were more likely than nonspecialized physicians to refer respiratory patients to physiotherapy ( P Physiotherapy in respiratory care settings was positively regarded by nurses and physicians working in hospitals and health-care facilities in Saudi Arabia. The need for further education for physicians and nurses on the role of physiotherapy in respiratory care was highlighted; this would enable physiotherapy to develop and be further integrated into the respiratory care multidisciplinary team.

  11. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the "knowledge nexus" for their academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or "nexus" for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process.

  12. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  13. Evaluation of Physicians' and Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Compliance With Family Presence During Resuscitation in an Emergency Department Setting After an Educational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Gineen; Ramponi, Denise; Cline, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) has been an ongoing topic of discussion in many hospital emergency departments throughout the United States. With the current emphasis promoting patient- and family-centered care, families are now exercising their right to be present at the bedside during resuscitation. With or without a policy, there is continued resistance to allow families to remain with their loved ones during resuscitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if an evidence-based educational intervention would increase physicians' and nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with allowing FPDR. This quasi-experimental study evaluated 30 attending physicians' and 65 registered nurses' knowledge of an existing family presence policy and their attitudes toward family presence post-educational intervention in an emergency department setting. Compliance of family presence was observed for 2 months pre- and post-educational intervention. Results show that most physicians and nurses either were not sure or were not aware that there was an existing written policy. The study demonstrated that nurses agree more than physicians that the option of FPDR is a patient/family right. The results also showed that the educational intervention had no effect on the physicians and nurses attitudes for FPDR, but it did change behaviors. Of the events involving professionals who were exposed to the educational intervention, family members were present 87.5% of the time. In contrast, only 23% of the events involving professionals who did not receive the educational intervention had families present. Ongoing staff education will heighten awareness to FPDR, make the staff more comfortable with families being present, and will presumably continue to increase invitations for FPDR.

  14. The Relation of Home Language and Literacy to Three-Year-Old Children's Emergent Academic Language in Narrative and Instruction Genres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Anna F.; Leseman, Paul P. M.; Mayo, Aziza Y.; Elbers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations between the home language and literacy environment and emergent skill to use academic language in a sample of 58 3-year-old Dutch children, focusing on production and comprehension in 3 genres: personal narrative, impersonal narrative, and instruction in play. Regarding production, children used academic language…

  15. PDA Use by Physicians: Where Do They Fit with Emerging Technologies and Use of Electronic Health Records in Office Practices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Galt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores physicians' attitudes and beliefs about the use of personal digital assistant (PDA in the context of other health information technology (HIT use and HIT-based applications safety in ambulatory care practices. The relationship of PDA use and patient safety is also explored. Ambulatory care physicians in Nebraska and South Dakota were surveyed from July to November of 2007 using a modified Dillman technique. Respondents were in one of three groups: PDA Users (those using a PDA for patient care, Other Technology Users (those not using a PDA, but using other technologies for patient care, and Non-Users (those not using any technology for patient care. PDAs are used by 43% of responding physicians, who tend to be younger and salaried. PDA Users exposed to PDAs during training continued use in practice. PDA Users believed the device enabled them to provide more efficient and better care, reduce errors, and improve patient safety.

  16. Perceptions on the Impact of a Just-in-Time Room on Trainees and Supervising Physicians in a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anita A; Uspal, Neil G; Oron, Assaf P; Klein, Eileen J

    2016-12-01

    Just-in-time (JIT) training refers to education occurring immediately prior to clinical encounters. An in situ JIT room in a pediatric emergency department (ED) was created for procedural education. We examined trainee self-reported JIT room use, its impact on trainee self-perception of procedural competence/confidence, and the effect its usage has on the need for intervention by supervising physicians during procedures. Cross-sectional survey study of a convenience sample of residents rotating through the ED and supervising pediatric emergency medicine physicians. Outcomes included JIT room use, trainee procedural confidence, and frequency of supervisor intervention during procedures. Thirty-one of 32 supervising physicians (97%) and 122 of 186 residents (66%) completed the survey, with 71% of trainees reporting improved confidence, and 68% reporting improved procedural skills ( P  JIT room use ( P  = .30, paired difference -0.0 points). Nearly all supervisors reported improved trainee procedural confidence, and 77% reported improved trainee procedural skills after JIT room use ( P  JIT room use, compared with 42% with JIT room use ( P  JIT room led to improved trainee confidence and supervisor reports of less procedural intervention. Although it carries financial and time costs, an in situ JIT room may be important for convenient JIT training.

  17. Learner deficits and academic outcomes of medical students, residents, fellows, and attending physicians referred to a remediation program, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrasio, Jeannette; Garrity, Maureen J; Aagaard, Eva M

    2014-02-01

    To identify deficit types and predictors of poor academic outcomes among students, residents, fellows, and physicians referred to the University of Colorado School of Medicine's remediation program. During 2006-2012, 151 learners were referred. After a standardized assessment process, program faculty developed individualized learning plans that incorporated deliberate practice, feedback, and reflection, followed by independent reassessment. The authors collected data on training levels, identified deficits, remediation plan details, outcomes, and faculty time invested. They examined relationships between gender, training level, and specific deficits. They analyzed faculty time by deficit and explored predictors of negative outcomes. Most learners had more than one deficit; medical knowledge, clinical reasoning, and professionalism were most common. Medical students were more likely than others to have mental well-being issues (P = .03), whereas the prevalence of professionalism deficits increased steadily as training level increased. Men struggled more than women with communication (P = .01) and mental well-being. Poor professionalism was the only predictor of probationary status (P learners. Future studies should compare remediation strategies and assess how to optimize faculty time.

  18. The impact of emerging safety and effectiveness evidence on the use of physician-administered drugs: the case of bevacizumab for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Rena M; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Herbert, Ann C; Berndt, Ernst R; Huskamp, Haiden A; Keating, Nancy L

    2013-07-01

    Spending on physician-administered drugs is high and uses not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are frequent. Although these drugs may be targets of future policy efforts to rationalize use, little is known regarding how physicians respond to emerging safety and effectiveness evidence. We analyzed changes in bevacizumab (Avastin) use for breast cancer in response to its market launch (February 2008), 2 FDA meetings reviewing data suggesting that its risks exceed its benefits (July 2010 and June 2011), and the FDA's withdrawal of approval (November 2011). Data from a population-based audit of oncologists' prescribing (IntrinsiQ Intellidose) were used to measure the monthly number of breast cancer patients treated with bevacizumab (January 2008-April 2012). The number of bevacizumab patients following each regulatory action was estimated using negative binomial regression, compared with patients before the first FDA meeting, adjusting for cancer stage, treatment line, patient age, and outpatient office affiliation. Bevacizumab use for breast cancer increased significantly after FDA approval. After all regulatory actions, there was a 65% decline (95% CI, 64%-65%) in use compared with the period before the first meeting. The largest decline was in the 6-month period after the first meeting (37%; 95% CI, 28%-47%). The rate of decline did not differ by patient or cancer characteristics and differed minimally by office affiliation. Bevacizumab use for breast cancer declined dramatically after FDA meetings and regulatory actions, a period without changes in guideline recommendations or insurance coverage. Physicians seem to be responsive to emerging evidence concerning physician-administered drug safety and effectiveness.

  19. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16 on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018. Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146, triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050, and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714 were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875, triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11, self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5, and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713 were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not

  20. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  1. The Impact of Racial Socialization on the Academic Performance and Prosocial Involvement of Black Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Johnson, Rhonda L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence linking racial socialization processes to the functioning of Black youth, the effect of these parenting practices among Black college students is less clear. This study examined the relationship among racial socialization messages, academic performance, and prosocial involvement for 295 Black college students. Results revealed…

  2. Behavioral Self-Regulation and Relations to Emergent Academic Skills among Children in Germany and Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Suchodoletz, Antje; Gestsdottir, Steinunn; Wanless, Shannon B.; McClelland, Megan M.; Birgisdottir, Freyja; Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Ragnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated a direct assessment of behavioral self-regulation (the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders; HTKS) and its contribution to early academic achievement among young children in Germany and Iceland. The authors examined the psychometric properties and construct validity of the HTKS, investigated gender differences in young…

  3. Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to develop and promote an innovative enhanced nursing administration master's program targeted to young emerging nurse leaders, who have not yet moved into formal leadership roles. An action research design is being used in program development and evaluation. Qualities needed by emerging leaders identified through research included a need to be politically astute, competency with business skills required of nurse leaders today, comfort with ambiguity, use of a caring approach, and leadership from a posture of innovation. The current curriculum was revised to include clinical immersion with a nurse leader from the first semester in the program, a change from all online to online/hybrid courses, innovative assignments, and a strong mentorship component. Eighteen young emerging nurse leaders began the program in January 2012. Early outcomes are positive. The emerging nurse leaders may be uniquely positioned, given the right skills sets, to be nurse leaders in the new age.

  4. Assessing physician-parent communication during emergency medical procedures in children: an observational study in a low-literacy Latino patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Aaron; Sinha, Madhumita; Rosenberg, David I; Tran, Melissa; Valdez, André

    2015-05-01

    Effective physician-patient communication is critical to the clinical decision-making process. We studied parental recall of information provided during an informed consent discussion process before performance of emergency medical procedures in a pediatric emergency department of an inner-city hospital with a large bilingual population. Fifty-five parent/child dyads undergoing emergency medical procedures were surveyed prospectively in English/Spanish postprocedure for recall of informed consent information. Exact logistic regression was used to predict the ability to name a risk, benefit, and alternative to the procedure based on a parent's language, education, and acculturation. Among English-speaking parents, there tended to be higher proportions that could name a risk, benefit, or alternative. Our regression models showed overall that the parents with more than a high school education tended to have nearly 5 times higher odds of being able to name a risk. A gap in communication may exist between physicians and patients (or parents of patients) during the consent-taking process, and this gap may be impacted by socio-demographic factors such as language and education level.

  5. Attention Problems and Academic Achievement: Do Persistent and Earlier-Emerging Problems Have More Adverse Long-Term Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiner, David L; Carrig, Madeline M; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2016-11-01

    This study examined whether the negative association between children's attention difficulties and their academic functioning is largely confined to children whose attention problems persist across early grades and whether it depends on when attention problems emerge in children's schooling. Children from the normative sample of the Fast Track study were classified into four attention problem groups based on the presence versus absence of attention problems in first and second grade. Those with attention problems in both grades showed a decline in reading and math achievement during the K-5 interval relative to children with attention problems in first grade only. Both groups of inattentive first graders also performed worse than comparison children. In contrast, children whose attention problems emerged in second grade did not differ from comparison children on any achievement outcome performed significantly better than inattentive first graders. The implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Opportunities for Academic Language and Literacy Development for Emergent Bilingual Students during Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Daniella; Lee, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    The present paper argues for a shift in teacher knowledge and beliefs about the role of group work in the teaching and learning of emergent bilingual students. Using case study data from an eighth grade classroom, the authors analyze the role of collaboration in the interaction with grade-level text of emergent bilingual students. The analysis…

  7. Organization, execution and evaluation of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care - an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R

    2014-12-01

    With the goal of reducing inequalities in patient care, the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," convened a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, health care providers, patients, and representatives of federal agencies and policy-makers in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014. The executive and steering committees identified seven clinical domains as key to gender-specific emergency care: cardiovascular, neurological, trauma/injury, substance abuse, pain, mental health, and diagnostic imaging. The main aims of the conference were to: 1) summarize and consolidate current data related to sex- and gender-specific research for acute care and identify critical gender-related gaps in knowledge to inform an EM research agenda; 2) create a consensus-driven research agenda that advances sex- and gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases and identify strategies to investigate them; and 3) build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to disseminate and study the sex and gender medicine of acute conditions. Over a 2-year period, this collaborative network of stakeholders identified key areas where sex- and gender-specific research is most likely to improve clinical care and ultimately patient outcomes. The iterative consensus process culminated in a daylong conference on May 13, 2014, with a total of 133 registrants, with the majority being between ages 31 and 50 years (57%), females (71%), and whites (79%). Content experts led the consensus-building workshops at the conference and used the nominal group technique to consolidate consensus recommendations for priority research. In addition, panel sessions addressed funding mechanisms for gender-specific research as well as gender-specific regulatory challenges to product development and approval. This special issue of AEM reports the

  8. Are patients who call a primary care office referred to the emergency department by non-healthcare personnel without the input of a physician?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Hill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We hypothesized that a significant percentage of patients who are referred to the Emergency Department (ED after calling their primary care physician’s (PCP office receive such instructions without the input of a physician. Methods. We enrolled a convenience sample of stable adults at an inner-city ED. Patients provided written answers to structured questions regarding PCP contact prior to the ED visit. Continuous data are presented as means ± standard deviation; categorical data as frequency of occurrence. 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results. The study group of 660 patients had a mean age of 41.7 ± 14.7 years and 72.6% had income below $20,000/year. 472 patients (71.51%; 67.9%–74.8% indicated that they had a PCP. A total of 155 patients (23.0%; 19.9%–26.4% called to contact their PCP prior to ED visit. For patients who called their PCP office and were directed by phone to the ED, the referral pattern was observed as follows: 31/98 (31.63%; 23.2%–41.4% by a non-health care provider without physician input, 11/98 (11.2%; 6.2%–19.1% by a non-healthcare provider after consultation with a physician, 12/98 (12.3%; 7.7%–20.3% by a nurse without physician input, and 14/98 (14.3%; 8.6%–22.7% by a nurse after consultation with physician. An additional 11/98, 11.2%; 6.2–19.1% only listened to a recorded message and felt the message was directing them to the ED. Conclusion. A relatively small percentage of patients were referred to the ED without the consultation of a physician in our overall population. However, over half of those that contacted their PCP’s office felt directed to the ED by non-health care staff.

  9. Potential benefit of physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service for regional trauma care system activation: An observational study in rural Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nagano, Takehiko; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-05-01

    Objective: Involvement of all regional medical facilities in a trauma system is challenging in rural regions. We hypothesized that the physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service potentially encouraged local facilities to participate in trauma systems by providing the transport of patients with trauma to those facilities in a rural setting. Materials and Methods: We performed two retrospective observational studies. First, yearly changes in the numbers of patients with trauma and destination facilities were surveyed using records from the Miyazaki physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service from April 2012 to March 2014. Second, we obtained data from medical records regarding the mechanism of injury, severity of injury, resuscitative interventions performed within 24 h after admission, secondary transports owing to undertriage by attending physicians, and deaths resulting from potentially preventable causes. Data from patients transported to the designated trauma center and those transported to non-designated trauma centers in Miyazaki were compared. Results: In total, 524 patients were included. The number of patients transported to non-designated trauma centers and the number of non-designated trauma centers receiving patients increased after the second year. We surveyed 469 patient medical records (90%). There were 194 patients with major injuries (41%) and 104 patients with multiple injuries (22%), and 185 patients (39%) received resuscitative interventions. The designated trauma centers received many more patients with trauma (366 vs. 103), including many more patients with major injuries (47% vs. 21%, p service potentially encouraged non-designated trauma centers to participate in trauma systems while maintaining patient safety.

  10. Pilot study comparing sepsis management with and without electronic clinical practice guidelines in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Christopher M; Djogovic, Dennis; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Bullard, Michael J; Meurer, David P; Rowe, Brian H

    2013-03-01

    Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires urgent management in an Emergency Department (ED). Evidence-based guidelines for managing sepsis have been developed; however, their integration into routine practice is often incomplete. Care maps may help clinicians meet guideline targets more often. To determine if electronic clinical practice guidelines (eCPGs) improve management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (SS/SS). The impact of an eCPG on the management of patients presenting with SS/SS over a 3-year period at a tertiary care ED was evaluated using retrospective case-control design and chart review methods. Cases and controls, matched by age and sex, were chosen from an electronic database using physician sepsis diagnoses. Data were compared using McNemar tests or paired t-tests, as appropriate. Overall, 51 cases and controls were evaluated; the average age was 62 years, and 60% were male. eCPG patients were more likely to have a central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation measured; however, lactate measurement, blood cultures, and other investigations were similarly ordered (all p > 0.05). The administration of antibiotics within 3 h (63% vs. 41%; p = 0.03) and vasopressors (45% vs. 20%; p = 0.02) was more common in the eCPG group; however, use of corticosteroids and other interventions did not differ between the groups. Overall, survival was high and similar between groups. A sepsis eCPG experienced variable use; however, physicians using the eCPG achieved more quality-of-care targets for SS/SS. Strategies to increase the utilization of eCPGs in Emergency Medicine seem warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Academic Primer Series: Five Key Papers about Team Collaboration Relevant to Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael; Grossman, Catherine; Rose, Emily; Sanderson, William; Ankel, Felix; Swaminathan, Anand; Chan, Teresa M

    2017-02-01

    Team collaboration is an essential for success both within academics and the clinical environment. Often, team collaboration is not explicitly taught during medical school or even residency, and must be learned during one's early career. In this article, we aim to summarize five key papers about team collaboration for early career clinician educators. We conducted a consensus-building process among the writing team to generate a list of key papers that describe the importance or significance of team collaboration, seeking input from social media sources. The authors then used a three-round voting methodology akin to a Delphi study to determine the most important papers from the initially generated list. The five most important papers on the topic of team collaboration, as determined by this mixed group of junior faculty members and faculty developers, are presented in this paper. For each included publication, a summary was provided along with its relevance to junior faculty members and faculty developers. Five key papers about team collaboration are presented in this publication. These papers provide a foundational background to help junior faculty members with collaborating in teams both clinically and academically. This list may also inform senior faculty and faculty developers about the needs of junior faculty members.

  12. If At First You Don't Succeed: The Fate of Manuscripts Rejected by Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William D; Cone, David C

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the publication fate of a recent 2-year sample of manuscripts declined by Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), the journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. This was a retrospective analysis of manuscripts submitted to AEM in 2010 and 2011 that were declined by the AEM editorial review process. An online search was conducted for each declined paper, to determine whether or not it was published in another clinical/scientific journal after being declined by AEM. The investigators used Scopus and Google Scholar, using the submitting author's name, the verbatim title, and key words and phrases from the title, to search for subsequent publication of each paper. Of 1,542 manuscript submissions to the journal in 2010 and 2011, 1,052 papers were declined. Of these, 693 (65.9%) were subsequently published elsewhere, in a total of 229 journals: 362 papers in 22 different EM journals, 81 in 14 EM subspecialty journals, 237 in 185 non-EM journals, and 13 in eight nursing journals. Papers were published a median of 16.7 months (interquartile range [IQR] = 11.8 to 22.0 months) after being declined at AEM. Of the 229 journals, 19 do not have h-indices. The median h-index of the remaining 210 journals is 36 (IQR = 17 to 64; maximum = 229; AEM's h-index is 78). Thirty of these 210 journals, publishing 43 papers, have higher h-indices than AEM; the other 650 papers were published in journals either with lower h-indices than AEM's (n = 180 journals) or in journals without h-indices (n = 19 journals). U.S. and non-U.S. authors had similar rates of subsequent publication (65.3% vs 66.6%, p = 0.69) for papers initially declined by AEM. Papers in the educational advances category were less likely to be subsequently published than those in the original contributions (p journal are eventually published elsewhere, in a large number and wide variety of both EM and non-EM journals, in a median of 16.7 months. Authors of manuscripts

  13. The Relative Influence of Sensation Seeking and Normal Narcissism on Academic Cheating in Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous research studies reveal that cheating is a significant problem on the campuses of American colleges and universities. Traditional college-aged students (aged 18-25) fall within a time-frame of the life-span that has been labeled emerging adulthood, a time in which risk-taking behavior is common. The present study conceptualized academic…

  14. Effective antibiotic treatment prescribed by emergency physicians in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with severe sepsis or septic shock: where is the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capp, Roberta; Chang, Yuchiao; Brown, David F M

    2011-12-01

    Antibiotic selection made within the first hour of recognition of severe sepsis and septic shock has been shown to decrease mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine what antibiotics are being prescribed and to identify factors influencing ineffective antibiotic coverage in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. In addition, we explore an alternative method for antibiotic selection that could improve organism coverage. This was a retrospective review of emergency department (ED) patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) over a 12-month period with a culture-positive diagnosis of either severe sepsis or septic shock. Appropriate antibiotic therapy was defined as effective coverage of the offending organism based on final culture results. Of the 1400 patients admitted to the ICU, 137 patients were culture positive and met the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. Effective antibiotic coverage was prescribed by emergency physicians in 82% (95% confidence interval [CI] .74-.88) of cases. Of the 25 patients who received ineffective antibiotics, the majority had infections caused by resistant Gram-negative organisms. Health care-associated pneumonia guidelines were applied to all patients, regardless of the source of infection, and were 100% sensitive (95% CI .93-1) for selecting patients who had infections caused by highly resistant organisms. Emergency physicians achieved 82% effective antibiotic coverage in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The gap seems to be in coverage of highly resistant Gram-negative organisms. An alternative approach to antibiotic prescription, utilizing a set of guidelines for community- and health care-associated infections, was found to be 100% sensitive in selecting patients who had infections caused by the more resistant organisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transient ischemic attack: reviewing the evolution of the definition, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siket, Matthew S; Edlow, Jonathan A

    2012-08-01

    A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is an episode of reversible neurologic deficit caused by temporary focal central nervous system hypoperfusion. TIA is a medical emergency. Because patients with TIA in the emergency department (ED) have a high risk for stroke within the next 48 hours, it is imperative for the clinician to recognize this golden opportunity to prevent a disabling stroke. This article reviews our conceptual understanding of TIA, its definition, diagnosis, ways to stratify stroke risk, the acute management and disposition in the ED, and the potential future role of diagnostic biomarkers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure : a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M. Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W. Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D.; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D.; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to

  17. Experience-based teaching of acute medicine for extra motivated medical students and young physicians – 4th Emergency Medicine Course and 6th AKUTNĚ.CZ Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Štourač

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty of Medicine of the Masaryk University (MU, and especially its departments focusing on acute medicine, make an active effort to find and to support extra motivated students by organising courses and congresses with simulation-based learning sessions for them. 4th Emergency Medicine Course (EMC and 6th AKUTNĚ.CZ Congress were organised during 2014. EMC was held during a weekend in mid-April for 80 medical students. The congress was held on 22nd November 2014. A group of more than 700 enthusiastic professionals including physicians, nursing staff and medical students interested in acute medicine met again in Brno at the University Campus Bohunice. We also report the evaluation of effectiveness of different types of sessions, as well as its influence on practical skills and the fixation of memory footprint. The website AKUTNĚ.CZ (www.akutne.cz is freely accessible, and anyone can find and watch all the videos and presentations there.

  18. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu-Reis, Phillipe; Oliveira, Guilherme Czelusniak; Curtarelli de Oliveira, Arthur; Sadique, Hammad; Nasr, Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich, Flávio Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the ext...

  19. Physician staffed helicopter emergency medical service dispatch via centralised control or directly by crew - case identification rates and effect on the Sydney paediatric trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; Lee, Anna; Weatherall, Andrew

    2012-12-18

    Severe paediatric trauma patients benefit from direct transport to dedicated Paediatric Trauma Centres (PTC). Parallel case identification systems utilising paramedics from a centralised dispatch centre versus the crew of a physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) allowed comparison of the two systems for case identification rates and subsequent timeliness of direct transfer to a PTC. Paediatric trauma patients over a two year period from the Sydney region with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were retrospectively identified from a state wide trauma registry. Overall paediatric trauma system performance was assessed by comparisons of the availability of the physician staffed HEMS for patient characteristics, transport mode (direct versus indirect) and the times required for the patient to arrive at the paediatric trauma centre. The proportion of patients transported directly to a PTC was compared between the times that the HEMS service was available versus the time that it was unavailable to determine if the HEMS system altered the rate of direct transport to a PTC. Analysis of variance was used to compare the identifying systems for various patient characteristics when the HEMS was available. Ninety nine cases met the inclusion criteria, 44 when the HEMS system was operational. Patients identified for physician response by the HEMS system were significantly different to those that were not identified with higher median ISS (25 vs 18, p = 0.011), and shorter times to PTC (67 vs 261mins, p = 0.015) and length of intensive care unit stays (2 vs 0 days, p = 0.045). Of the 44 cases, 21 were not identified, 3 were identified by the paramedic system and 20 were identified by the HEMS system, (P system was available (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.73). The median time (minutes) to arrival at the PTC was shorter when HEMS available (HEMS available 92, IQR 50-261 versus HEMS unavailable 296, IQR 84-583, P < 0.01). Physician staffed

  20. Application Of The American College Of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Recommendations And a Risk Stratification Score (OESIL) For Patients With Syncope Admitted From The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranchuk, Adrian; McIntyre, William; Harper, William; Morillo, Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    The goals of this study were to apply the 2001 ACEP recommendations for admission to hospital after a syncopal event and to validate the OESIL risk stratification score, in patients with syncope admitted to a general internal medicine ward. A retrospective study applied the 2001 ACEP recommendations and OESIL score to all the patients admitted from the emergency department to a general internal medicine ward with a diagnosis of syncope during a 12-month period. The patients were classified as meeting criteria for 2001 ACEP class B or C recommendations and OESIL score 0-1 (low-risk for a major cardiac event) or 2-4 (high-risk for a major cardiac event). The sensitivity and specificity of each group for predicting high-risk patients was calculated. After applying the 2001 ACEP recommendations to our population, 25% (19 patients) were classified as level B, whereas 68% of the patients were classified as Level C. Sensitivity for ACEP level B recommendations was 100% and specificity was 81%. The ACEP level C recommendations also had 100% sensitivity but markedly reduced specificity at 26%. An OESIL score of 0-1 points was calculated for 30.6% of the population, identifying them as low-risk. An OESIL score of 2-4 points was documented in the remaining 69.4% with a mortality risk of 20 % /year. A significant proportion (30%) of patients presenting with syncope to a tertiary care University Hospital emergency department and admitted to an Internal Medicine ward were retrospectively classified as low-risk and could have potentially been managed as outpatients. Implementing current guidelines and clinical pathways for the management of syncope may improve this approach.

  1. The experience of an Academic League: the positive impact on knowledge about trauma and emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCIANA THURLER TEDESCHI

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the knowledge growth of the members of the Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency League in comparison with a nonparticipating group, with similar characteristics, at the Fluminense Federal University. Methods: we evaluated 50 league members and 50 non-members (control group through questionnaires applied at the beginning and end of a school year. We used a generalized linear model, with interaction effect between groups and tests (multiple comparisons with Bonferroni correction. We included the following control variables: gender, period, age, and attendance to some other course on a similar topic. Results: there was an increase of 22 percentage points (p<0.001 for the group with more than 75% presence in the League compared with the eight points in the control group (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant growth for the group with less than 75% presence. Conclusion: the growth of knowledge was significantly higher in the group that assiduously participated in the League, which reinforces its importance in complementing the traditional content of medical courses.

  2. Scleral Contact Lenses in an Academic Oculoplastics Clinic: Epidemiology and Emerging Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Harinder S; Estrada, Marcela; Sindt, Christine W; Boehme, Jacob A; Greiner, Mark A; Nerad, Jeffrey A; Carter, Keith D; Allen, Richard C; Shriver, Erin M

    2017-05-22

    ) had progressive corneal decompensation despite primary oculoplastics procedures to protect the cornea and ultimately benefitted from SCL treatment secondarily. Fourteen of these 16 patients demonstrated an improved visual acuity of 1 line or more using SCLs. Procedures performed before referral for SCLs included tarsorrhaphies, gold weights, ectropion repair with lateral tarsal strip, retraction repair with spacer grafts, full-thickness skin grafts, cheek lifts, and punctal occlusion. The total RVUs of these procedures performed per patient were tabulated. The RVU range was 10.47-33.96 with an average of 19.5 RVUs (standard deviation = 9.4 RVUs) per patient. Scleral contact lenses may offer a useful alternative to stabilize the ocular surface, improve vision, and minimize the financial impact and morbidity of multiple periocular procedures in select patients with progressive keratopathy of varying etiologies. The therapeutic indications and utilization of SCLs are likely to increase in oculoplastic practices with optometric support, particularly in academic settings. Surgical correction of eyelid and eyebrow malposition, as well as epiphora, may also be useful adjunctive procedures to optimize SCL fit.

  3. An evaluation of adherence to the patient's rights charter among patients and physicians at the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available It is the cherished goal of the health care providers to observe the patient rights. An official order to install the patient rights charter in all crowded places of hospitals motivated us to evaluate the patient rights both from the patients' and resident points of view. "nThis is a descriptive survey with cross-sectional method. The research was conducted to examine the patients and residents awareness of the contents of "Patients' Rights Charter" in emergency department of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran and their views on the adherence of the cares to the articles of the charter. 140 patients and 70 residents were chosen by simple randomized method by Cochrane formula and the data was gathered by questionnaires. "n57.9% of patients were not aware of this announcement. 78% of patients believed that patients' rights is being carried out relatively. 88.6% of residents believed that they complied with the rights of patients. The patients were relatively satisfied with the nursing cares, medical services and hospital equipments (69% were satisfied with availability of physicians in necessary situations, 47% satisfied with the nursing cares and 93.6% satisfied with the hospital equipments."nTwo years after installation of the charter, patients and residents awareness of installation were low. According to the patient views, patients' rights were relatively adhered. Unawareness of patients of their rights may limit their expectations from physicians and if they become aware of the contents of charter, their satisfaction from current situation may alter.

  4. The evolution of academic performance in emergency medicine journals: viewpoint from 2000 to 2009 journal citation reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Hsing; Shih, Chia-Pang; Chang, Yu-Che; Chaou, Chung-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is a young but rapidly growing field. An evaluation of academic performance and the growing impact of EM journals would help to elucidate the increase in the number of EM scientific studies. The authors used the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) database to investigate the scientific achievements of EM journals in the past 10 years. This was a literature review study. All data were collected from the JCR database. Journals listed in the EM category from 2000 to 2009 were included. Eleven categories that were considered most closely related to EM by a consensus of the authors were chosen for comparison, including cardiac and cardiovascular systems, clinical neurology, critical care medicine, gastroenterology and hepatology, infectious diseases, general and internal medicine, pediatrics, respiratory system, surgery, toxicology, and urology and nephrology. Data on journals in the EM category were collected, including journal title, language, journal country or territory, impact factor for each year, total number of EM journals for each year, and the EM category aggregate impact factor (available from 2003 to 2009). The variables in the comparison group included the number of journals in each of the 11 clinical medicine categories from 2000 to 2009 and the aggregate impact factors for 2003 to 2009. The category aggregate impact factor and journal impact factor were adopted as representative of category and journal academic performance. Linear regression was used to assess the trend of aggregate impact factor and journal impact factor. The slope (β) of the linear regression was used to represent the evolution of performance. The relationship between the 2000 EM journal impact factor and the impact factor trend of EM journals between 2000 and 2009 was measured by Pearson correlation coefficient to evaluate the evolution difference between journals with different initial impact factors. In 2000, all 12 EM journals were published in the United States

  5. Are mothers��� and fathers��� parenting characteristics associated with emerging adults��� academic engagement?

    OpenAIRE

    Waterman, Emily A.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2016-01-01

    Although parenting is clearly linked to academic engagement in adolescence, less is known about links between parenting and academic engagement in emerging adulthood. A diverse sample of college students (N = 633; 53.1% female, 45.7% White/European American, 28.3% Asian American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 26.4% Hispanic/Latino American, 21.6% Black/African American, and 2.8% Native American/American Indian) answered surveys about mothers��� and fathers��� parenting style,...

  6. A pilot single-centre cross-sectional study to determine the knowledge and management of sports concussion by emergency physicians: an experience from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisena, Dinesh; Walter, Joy; Ong, Joo Haw; Probert, Joanne

    2017-11-13

    Sports concussion remains a challenging condition to manage despite changes to policy and practice since the 2012 Concussion in Sport Group consensus meeting. Emergency physicians (EPs) are often the first line of medical care for athletes in amateur and youth collision sports. This single-centre cross-sectional study aimed to establish the understanding and management of concussion by EPs in Singapore. An anonymised 17-item online questionnaire was sent out to EPs using the Google Forms application, requesting information on clinical experience, training, exposure to concussion cases in the emergency department (ED) and assessed knowledge of the condition. 52 clinicians responded, with 25 (48.1%) being medical officers. Over 90% had not received formal training in concussion management and 27 (73.1%) assessed concussion regularly. 40 (76.9%) recognised loss of consciousness as not being essential for diagnosis but only 24 (46.2%) knew the most common symptom. 26 (50.0%) reported that they would perform brain imaging and among those who referred onwards, 29 (55.8%) made referrals were to neurosurgery. There was no significant difference between the clinical grade or training in concussion and positive responses for definition, indication for imaging or most common symptom. Concussion is a common presentation to this ED in Singapore. However, understanding of the condition, its clinical diagnosis, investigation and onward management is limited. Although EPs reported training in the subject matter, it is likely that this was insufficient. Perhaps commencing relevant education programmes as undergraduate and postgraduate medical students would enable progressive acquisition of knowledge and thereby improve patient management in the future.

  7. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Are emergency physicians competent to interpret the cranial CT of patients younger than the age of 2 years with mild head trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    İdil, Hasan; Kırımlı, Güven; Korol, Güler; Ünlüer, Erden Erol

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the accuracy rate of emergency physicians' (EPs') interpretations of cranial computed tomography (CT) of a special patient group, the patients younger than the age of 2 years with mild head trauma. The study took place in a research and training hospital within a period of 3 months and included a total of 156 patients. The scans were interpreted by the EPs, and the predicted results were recorded in the patients' files; simultaneous interpretations of the on-call radiologist were also recorded. The interpretations were scanned retrospectively at the end of each month, compared, and recorded. With reference to the radiologists' reports, the sensitivity and the specificity of EPs' interpretations of cranial CT were 76.9% and 95.1%, respectively. Concordance of both groups' interpretations was 93.6%. The area under the curve (AUC) value in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, which reflects these results, was calculated as 0.860 (95% confidence interval, 0.740-0.981). This value was found to be statistically significant (P mild head trauma, until the radiologists' reports are obtained. However, the anatomic diversities of these patients' age group should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Teacher-and child-managed academic activities in preschool and kindergarten and their influence on children's gains in emergent academic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, Annika K E; Elbers, Ed; Leseman, Paul P M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether children's development benefited from teacher-and child-managed academic activities in the preschool and kindergarten classroom. Extensive systematic observations during four half-days in preschool (n = 8) and kindergarten (n = 8) classrooms revealed that

  10. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews.

  11. The learning environment as a mediating variable between self-directed learning readiness and academic performance of a sample of saudi nursing and medical emergency students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Khaled N

    2016-01-01

    There has been some ground-breaking research on self-directed learning (SDL) in nursing education which reveals the superiority of SDL to traditional learning methods in terms of students' academic performance and the development of positive attitudes toward the learning process on the part of both students and teachers. The relationship between students' self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and students' academic performance, and the mediating role of students' perceptions of the learning environment needs further investigation. In this study, it is proposed that students' perceptions of their learning environment could enhance their SDLR and thus boost their academic performance (in terms of their GPA). A descriptive design was used to examine the relationships between the domains of SDLR, which are self-management, desire to learn and self-control and students' perceptions of the learning environment (SPLE) and students' GPA. A survey involving 342 [Corrected] Saudi students from nursing and emergency medical services undergraduate programs in King Saud University was used for this research. The results showed that SDLR level positively influenced students' academic performance positively, and that students' perceptions of their learning environment played a significant role in determining their level of SDLR and academic performance. It is recommended that nursing and emergency medical services educators provide a supportive learning environment in terms of good teaching, clear goals and standards, appropriate assessment, appropriate workload, and emphasis on independence to encourage students to engage in the process of SDL which can, in turn, enhance their academic performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physician Order Entry Clerical Support Improves Physician Satisfaction and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contratto, Erin; Romp, Katherine; Estrada, Carlos A; Agne, April; Willett, Lisa L

    2017-05-01

    To examine the impact of clerical support personnel for physician order entry on physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with electronic health record (EHR) documentation, and physician attitudes. All seven part-time physicians at an academic general internal medicine practice were included in this quasi-experimental (single group, pre- and postintervention) mixed-methods study. One full-time clerical support staff member was trained and hired to enter physician orders in the EHR and conduct previsit planning. Physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with EHR documentation, and physician attitudes toward the intervention were measured. Four months after the intervention, physicians reported improvements in overall quality of life (good quality, 71%-100%), personal balance (43%-71%), and burnout (weekly, 43%-14%; callousness, 14%-0%). Matched for quarter, productivity increased: work relative value unit (wRVU) per session increased by 20.5% (before, April-June 2014; after, April-June 2015; range -9.2% to 27.5%). Physicians reported feeling more supported, more focused on patient care, and less stressed and fatigued after the intervention. This study supports the use of physician order entry clerical personnel as a simple, cost-effective intervention to improve the work lives of primary care physicians.

  13. The future for physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, J F; Ott, J E; DeAtley, C A

    1983-06-01

    Physician assistants were intended to be assistants to primary care physicians. Physicians in private practice have only moderately responded to the availability of these professionals. Cutbacks in the numbers of foreign medical graduates entering American schools for graduate medical education, concern for overcrowding in some specialties, and the economic and clinical capabilities of physician assistants have lead to new uses for these persons. Physician assistants are employed in surgery and surgical subspecialties; in practice settings in institutions such as medical, pediatric, and surgical house staff; and in geriatric facilities, occupational medicine clinics, emergency rooms, and prison health systems. The projected surplus of physicians by 1990 may affect the use of physician assistants by private physicians in primary care.

  14. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Attention Problems and Expressive Language and Emerging Academic Skills in Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevenbergen, Andrea A.; Ryan, Meghan M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between attention problems and expressive language and academic readiness skills in preschool-aged children from middle-class families. Forty-three children (44% female) were assessed individually for expressive language skills and knowledge of basic academic concepts (e.g. colours, letters and numbers). The…

  15. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  16. The test characteristics of physician clinical gestalt for determining the presence and severity of anaemia in patients seen at the emergency department of a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry Robert; Mfinanga, Juma A; Mwafongo, Victor; Reynolds, Teri A; Runyon, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the test characteristics of clinical gestalt for detecting the presence and severity of anaemia in emergency department patients at a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania. This prospective study enrolled a convenience sample of emergency department patients who had a complete blood count ordered by the treating physician in the course of their clinical care. Physicians recorded their impression of the presence and severity of anaemia before viewing the laboratory results. To assess interobserver agreement, a second physician provided their blinded gestalt impression of the patient's haemoglobin level. We enrolled 216 patients and complete data were available for 210 patients (97%), 59% male, median age 30 years. The range of measured haemoglobin values was 1.5-15.4 g/dL. The physicians rated anaemia mild or absent in 74 (35%), moderate in 72 (34%) and severe in 64 patients (30%). These estimates were significantly concordant with the laboratory haemoglobin measurements (Kendall's τ b=0.63, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.69, pgestalt estimates for severe anaemia were: sensitivity 64% (95% CI 53% to 74%), specificity 91% (95% CI 85% to 96%), positive likelihood ratio of 7.4 (95% CI 4.2 to 13.3) and negative likelihood ratio of 0.40 (0.3 to 0.5). The weighted Cohen's κ for interobserver agreement between physicians on the gestalt estimate of the degree of anaemia was 0.87 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.98). Physicians' estimates of the severity of anaemia were significantly concordant with laboratory haemoglobin measurements. Sensitivity of the gestalt estimate for severe anaemia was moderate. Interobserver agreement was 'almost perfect'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Emergency medicine career change: associations with performances in medical school and in the first postgraduate year and with indebtedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G; Hojat, M; Veloski, J J

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine has been identified as the specialty that has gained the most young physicians who have changed their careers. To identify factors that may have contributed to such career changes, the authors compared the characteristics of three groups of physicians trained at their medical school: those who chose and stayed in emergency medicine, those who migrated into emergency medicine from other specialties, and those who moved out of emergency medicine. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted. The sample consisted of physicians who chose emergency medicine as their careers at graduation and stayed in the specialty (n = 24), those who migrated from other specialties into emergency medicine (n = 51), and those who moved out of emergency medicine (n = 10). This sample was obtained from a total of 2,173 graduates of Jefferson Medical College between 1978 and 1987. The three groups of physicians were compared according to their academic performances both during medical school and after graduation. The dependent variables were freshmen and sophomore grade point averages (GPAs), written clinical examination scores, scores on National Board of Medical Examiners examination (Parts I, II, and III), and residency program directors' ratings. Age and indebtedness at medical school graduation and board certification status also were examined. Those physicians who stayed in emergency medicine and those who migrated from other specialties into emergency medicine had similar measures of academic performance, but both of these groups had higher academic performance measures and higher board certification rates than did the physicians who moved out of emergency medicine. Those who stayed in emergency medicine had the highest mean debt in the senior year of medical school. High academic performance and high indebtedness are factors associated with choosing or staying in the specialty of emergency medicine.

  18. Characterizing the Posttransfer Period Among Patients with Pediatric Onset IBD: The Impact of Academic Versus Community Adult Care on Emergent Health Resource Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollegala, Natasha; Benchimol, Eric I; Griffiths, Anne M; Kovacs, Adrienne; Steinhart, Allan H; Zhao, Xinbei; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2017-09-01

    Patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during childhood require transfer to an adult gastroenterologist, in Ontario usually just before their 18th birthday. Pediatric onset IBD is a complex phenotype with demonstrated noncompliance risk that may require targeted measures to optimize health care outcomes in the adult care setting. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of posttransfer health care setting (academic versus community gastroenterologist) on emergent health resource utilization. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study using health care administrative data from Ontario, Canada. A cohort of patients with Pediatric onset IBD was identified and health resource utilization during a 2-year pretransfer period, transfer of care period and 2-year posttransfer period was analyzed. Posttransfer health care setting was defined as academic (i.e., gastroenterologists providing care in a university affiliated tertiary care center) versus community. A third comparator group, loss to follow-up, was also identified. The primary outcome of this study comprised emergency department utilization. Secondary outcomes included hospitalizations, surgeries, ambulatory visits, endoscopic investigations, and radiological investigations. Overall, there were no significant differences found in emergency department use, ambulatory care visits (aside from the expected drop in the lost to follow-up group), hospitalizations, endoscopic procedures, or radiological procedures between exposure groups. Posttransfer health care setting does not seem to significantly impact emergent health resource utilization in the posttransfer period.

  19. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marke

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  20. End-of-life care at an academic medical center: are attending physicians, house staff, nurses, and bereaved family members equally satisfied? Implications for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanos, Anthony Nicholas; Morris, Deborah A; Pieper, Carl F; Poppe-Ries, Angela M; Steinhauser, Karen E

    2012-02-01

    End-of-life care is deemed to be poor in the United States - particularly in large teaching hospitals. Via a brief survey, we examined satisfaction with end-of-life care for those patients who died in our academic medical center from provider and family perspectives. To assess the correlation between overall satisfaction between providers (attending, housestaff, and nurses) as well as family members for decedents who died in our hospital, we conducted a satisfaction survey regarding care in the last three days of life. The nine item survey was administered within 1 week of the patient s death to care providers and approximately 8 to 12 weeks to next of kin. There were 166 deaths examined over the four month study period. Overall satisfaction with care was 3.02 out of 4.0, and differed by respondent group (p= 0.035). Correlation between respondents was very low (range 0.02 to 0.51). The least discordance was between residents and interns (0.5), who had the lowest level of satisfaction (2.72). Housestaff and attendings had the lowest overall correlation in mean satisfaction scores (0.05). Most providers knew their patients for 24 hours or less. Overall satisfaction was high, but there was discordance among different providers. Continuity of care was limited. Age and location of death alone did not significantly affect satisfaction with end-of-life care. Implications of this type of research for improving end of life care at academic centers are discussed.

  1. Physicians under the influence: social psychology and industry marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Sunita; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and medical device companies apply social psychology to influence physicians' prescribing behavior and decision making. Physicians fail to recognize their vulnerability to commercial influences due to self-serving bias, rationalization, and cognitive dissonance. Professionalism offers little protection; even the most conscious and genuine commitment to ethical behavior cannot eliminate unintentional, subconscious bias. Six principles of influence - reciprocation, commitment, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity - are key to the industry's routine marketing strategies, which rely on the illusion that the industry is a generous avuncular partner to physicians. In order to resist industry influence, physicians must accept that they are vulnerable to subconscious bias and have both the motivation and means to resist industry influence. A culture in which accepting industry gifts engenders shame rather than gratitude will reduce conflicts of interest. If greater academic prestige accrues to distant rather than close relationships with industry, then a new social norm may emerge that promotes patient care and scientific integrity. In addition to educating faculty and students about the social psychology underlying sophisticated but potentially manipulative marketing and about how to resist it, academic medical institutions should develop strong organizational policies to counteract the medical profession's improper dependence on industry. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  2. Tackling Communication Barriers Between Long-Term Care Facility and Emergency Department Transfers to Improve Medication Safety in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Stephanie M; Brandt, Nicole J

    2015-07-01

    In 2013, the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine created geriatric emergency department guidelines, making recommendations for staffing/administration, follow up and transitions of care, education, quality improvement, equipment/supplies, and other policies, procedures, and protocols to be implemented. Awareness of these guidelines, as well as communication barriers, can help improve the delivery of care for older adults during transitions in care, particularly regarding medication safety. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Characteristics of evidence-based medicine training in Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada emergency medicine residencies - a national survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Joseph; Pauls, Merril; Fridfinnson, Jason; Weldon, Erin

    2014-03-21

    Recent surveys suggest few emergency medicine (EM) training programs have formal evidence-based medicine (EBM) or journal club curricula. Our primary objective was to describe the methods of EBM training in Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) EM residencies. Secondary objectives were to explore attitudes regarding current educational practices including e-learning, investigate barriers to journal club and EBM education, and assess the desire for national collaboration. A 16-question survey containing binary, open-ended, and 5-pt Likert scale questions was distributed to the 14 RCPSC-EM program directors. Proportions of respondents (%), median, and IQR are reported. The response rate was 93% (13/14). Most programs (85%) had established EBM curricula. Curricula content was delivered most frequently via journal club, with 62% of programs having 10 or more sessions annually. Less than half of journal clubs (46%) were led consistently by EBM experts. Four programs did not use a critical appraisal tool in their sessions (31%). Additional teaching formats included didactic and small group sessions, self-directed e-learning, EBM workshops, and library tutorials. 54% of programs operated educational websites with EBM resources. Program directors attributed highest importance to two core goals in EBM training curricula: critical appraisal of medical literature, and application of literature to patient care (85% rating 5 - "most importance", respectively). Podcasts, blogs, and online journal clubs were valued for EBM teaching roles including creating exposure to literature (4, IQR 1.5) and linking literature to clinical practice experience (4, IQR 1.5) (1-no merit, 5-strong merit). Five of thirteen respondents rated lack of expert leadership and trained faculty educators as potential limitations to EBM education. The majority of respondents supported the creation of a national unified EBM educational resource (4, IQR 1) (1-no support, 5- strongly

  4. Grooming Future Physician-scientists: Evaluating the Impact of Research Motivations, Practices, and Perceived Barriers Towards the Uptake of an Academic Career Among Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood Shah, Sayed Mustafa; Sohail, Mahnoor; Ahmad, Khwaja Mubeen; Imtiaz, Fouzia; Iftikhar, Sundus

    2017-12-27

    To evaluate the research trends and underlying motivations that shape intentions for the future uptake of an academic career among medical students. Further, to investigate the barriers and sought-after interventions which may optimise research outcomes in a resource-limited setting. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 294 undergraduate (UG) medical students in Karachi, Pakistan. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess current research practices and future intentions, and to evaluate related motivations, barriers, and sought-after interventions. Almost two-thirds of medical students reported some form of involvement in medical research and expressed positive attitudes towards the same. However, intentions to pursue research at a professional level not only remained low (19.7%) but were found to decrease with each passing year of study (pmotivation for pursuing research was "admission into a residency program" (71.8%), and was associated with a decreased likelihood of pursuing research professionally. The most cited barriers to conducting UG research were a "lack of time" (72.4%), "lack of supervisors" (50.3%) and a "lack of opportunities in the university" (48.3%). A dichotomy in sought-after interventions was observed among research-naïve and research-experienced students. Despite promising trends in UG medical research, the intentions for uptake of an academic career remain low. Research practices driven by career enhancement alone may be detrimental. Interventions to increase research output must promote the capacity building of research-naïve students and facilitate the ongoing practices of research-experienced students.

  5. Sex- and gender-specific research priorities in cardiovascular resuscitation: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Resuscitation Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigginton, Jane G; Perman, Sarah M; Barr, Gavin C; McGregor, Alyson J; Miller, Andrew C; Napoli, Anthony M; Napoli, Anthony F; Safdar, Basmah; Weaver, Kevin R; Deutsch, Steven; Kayea, Tami; Becker, Lance

    2014-12-01

    Significant sex and gender differences in both physiology and psychology are readily acknowledged between men and women; however, data are lacking regarding differences in their responses to injury and treatment and in their ultimate recovery and survival. These variations remain particularly poorly defined within the field of cardiovascular resuscitation. A better understanding of the interaction between these important factors may soon allow us to dramatically improve outcomes in disease processes that currently carry a dismal prognosis, such as sudden cardiac arrest. As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Medicine: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," our group sought to identify key research questions and knowledge gaps pertaining to both sex and gender in cardiac resuscitation that could be answered in the near future to inform our understanding of these important issues. We combined a monthly teleconference meeting of interdisciplinary stakeholders from largely academic institutions with a focused interest in cardiovascular outcomes research, an extensive review of the existing literature, and an open breakout session discussion on the recommendations at the consensus conference to establish a prioritization of the knowledge gaps and relevant research questions in this area. We identified six priority research areas: 1) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest epidemiology and outcome, 2) customized resuscitation drugs, 3) treatment role for sex steroids, 4) targeted temperature management and hypothermia, 5) withdrawal of care after cardiac arrest, and 6) cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and implementation. We believe that exploring these key topics and identifying relevant questions may directly lead to improved understanding of sex- and gender-specific issues seen in cardiac resuscitation and ultimately improved patient outcomes. © 2014 by the Society

  6. Physician advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, C W

    1993-04-01

    Practically nonexistent until the late 1970s, advertising by physicians has become commonplace. Although informational and educational advertising may contain information that potential patients may find to be useful, laudatory and predatory advertising are unethical and may be patently illegal. There is a conflict between the obligations of a physician to his patients and the intentions of advertising. The role of the Federal Trade Commission and state regulations are discussed.

  7. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 3: a "how-to" guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Farhan; Cheng, Adam; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Successful emergency medicine (EM) education scholarship requires a systematic approach that includes searching the (grey) literature, mobilizing resources, adopting frameworks to focus the innovation, integrating a component of program evaluation, and disseminating the innovation via traditional and emerging avenues. This paper provides direction for EM teachers and educators looking to transform their education innovation into scholarship. Recommendations on producing EM education scholarship from the 2013 consensus conference of the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians are presented.

  8. Does the presence of an emergency physician influence pre-hospital time, pre-hospital interventions and the mortality of severely injured patients? A matched-pair analysis based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Dan; Franke, Axel; Lefering, Rolf; Hentsch, Sebastian; Willms, Arnulf; Kulla, Martin; Kollig, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    The role of emergency physicians in the pre-hospital management of severely injured patients remains controversial. In Germany and Austria, an emergency physician is present at the scene of an emergency situation or is called to such a scene in order to provide pre-hospital care to severely injured patients in approximately 95% of all cases. By contrast, in the United States and the United Kingdom, paramedics, i.e. non-physician teams, usually provide care to an injured person both at the scene of an incident and en route to an appropriate hospital. We investigated whether physician or non-physician care offers more benefits and what type of on-site care improves outcome. In a matched-pair analysis using data from the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society, we retrospectively (2002-2011) analysed the pre-hospital management of severely injured patients (ISS ≥16) by physician and non-physician teams. Matching criteria were age, overall injury severity, the presence of relevant injuries to the head, chest, abdomen or extremities, the cause of trauma, the level of consciousness, and the presence of shock. Each of the two groups, i.e. patients who were attended by an emergency physician and those who received non-physician care, consisted of 1235 subjects. There was no significant difference between the two groups in pre-hospital time (61.1 [SD 28.9] minutes for the physician group and 61.9 [SD 30.9] minutes for non-physician group). Significant differences were found in the number of pre-hospital procedures such as fluid administration, analgosedation and intubation. There was a highly significant difference (ppre-hospital care. It shows, however, that there was no significant difference in mortality although patients who were attended by non-physician teams received fewer pre-hospital interventions with similar scene times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An exploration of nurse-physician perceptions of collaborative behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Alice E; Wann, Kristen; Nevin, Meredith L; Rique, Karen; Tarrant, Grant; Hickey, Lorraine A; Stichler, Jaynelle F; Toole, Belinda M; Thomason, Tanna

    2017-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is a key element in providing safe, holistic patient care in the acute care setting. Trended data at a community hospital indicated opportunities for improvement in collaboration on micro, meso, and macro levels. The aim of this survey study was to assess the current state of collaboration between frontline nurses and physicians at a non-academic acute care hospital. A convenience sample of participants was recruited with a final respondent sample of 355 nurses and 82 physicians. The results indicated that physicians generally perceived greater collaboration than nurses. Physician ratings did not vary by primary practice area, whereas nurse ratings varied by clinical practice area. Nurse ratings were the lowest in the operating room and the highest in the emergency department. Text-based responses to an open-ended question were analysed by role and coded by two independent research teams. Emergent themes emphasised the importance of rounding, roles, respect, and communication. Despite recognition of the need for improved collaboration and relational behaviours, strategies to improve collaborative practice must be fostered at the meso level by organisational leaders and customised to address micro-level values. At the study site, findings have been used to address and improve collaboration towards the goal of becoming a high reliability organisation.

  10. A survey of Physicians' Perspectives on the New York State Mandatory Prescription Monitoring Program (ISTOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cary J; Nelson, Lewis S; Hoffman, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have emerged as one tool to combat prescription drug misuse and diversion. New York State mandates that prescribers use its PDMP (called ISTOP) before prescribing controlled substances. We surveyed physicians to assess their experiences with mandatory PDMP use. Electronic survey of attending physicians, from multiple clinical specialties, at one large urban academic medical center. Of 207 responding physicians, 89.4% had heard of ISTOP, and of those, 91.1% were registered users. 45.7% of respondents used the system once per week or more. There was significant negative feedback, with 40.4% of respondents describing ISTOP as "rarely" or "never helpful," and 39.4% describing it as "difficult" or "very difficult" to use. Physicians expressed frustration with the login process, the complexity of querying patients, and the lack of integration with electronic medical records. Only 83.1% knew that ISTOP use is mandated in almost all situations. A minority agreed with this mandate (44.2%); surgeons, males, and those who prescribe controlled substances at least once per week had significantly lower rates of agreement (22.6%, 36.2%, and 33.0%, respectively). The most common reasons for disagreement were: time burden, concerns about helpfulness, potential for under-treatment, and erosion of physician autonomy. Emergency physicians, who are largely exempt from the mandate, were the most likely to believe that ISTOP was helpful, yet the least likely to be registered users. 48.4% of non-emergency physicians reported perfect compliance with the mandate; surgeons and males reported significantly lower rates of perfect compliance (18.2% and 36.8%, respectively). This study offers a unique window into how one academic medical faculty has experienced New York's mandatory PDMP. Many respondents believe that ISTOP is cumbersome and generally unhelpful. Furthermore, many disagree with, and don't comply with, its mandatory use. Copyright

  11. Is a management degree worth the investment for physicians? A survey of members of the American College of Physician Executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William B; Lazarus, Arthur; Wallace, Amy E

    2008-01-01

    In a survey of 568 physician members of the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE), most of whom had advanced management degrees (MBA, MMM, MPH), approximately 90% of respondents reported that their investment in the education was "worth it." The return on investment was independent of the quality of the academic institution, although primary care physicians stood to gain more relative to specialists. Salary comparisons showed that female physicians had approximately 20% lower incomes than male physicians, confirming the presence of a "glass ceiling" for female physician executives as seen in other medical specialties. These findings have implications for early and mid-career physicians and physician recruiters.

  12. The 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Shared Decision Making in the Emergency Department: Development of a Policy-relevant Patient-centered Research Agenda May 10, 2016, New Orleans, LA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzen, Corita R; Anderson, Jana R; Carpenter, Christopher R; Hess, Erik P

    2016-12-01

    Shared decision making in emergency medicine has the potential to improve the quality, safety, and outcomes of emergency department (ED) patients. Given that the ED is the gateway to care for patients with a variety of illnesses and injuries and the safety net for patients otherwise unable to access care, shared decision making in the ED is relevant to numerous disciplines and the interests of the United States (U.S.) public. On May 10, 2016 the 16th annual Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Shared Decision Making: Development of a Policy-Relevant Patient-Centered Research Agenda" was held in New Orleans, Louisiana. During this one-day conference clinicians, researchers, policy-makers, patient and caregiver representatives, funding agency representatives, trainees, and content experts across many areas of medicine interacted to define high priority areas for research in 1 of 6 domains: 1) diagnostic testing; 2) policy, 3) dissemination/implementation and education, 4) development and testing of shared decision making approaches and tools in practice, 5) palliative care and geriatrics, and 6) vulnerable populations and limited health literacy. This manuscript describes the current state of shared decision making in the ED context, provides an overview of the conference planning process, the aims of the conference, the focus of each respective breakout session, the roles of patient and caregiver representatives and an overview of the conference agenda. The results of this conference published in this issue of AEM provide an essential summary of the future research priorities for shared decision making to increase quality of care and patient-centered outcomes. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Opinion: redefining the role of the physician in laboratory medicine in the context of emerging technologies, personalised medicine and patient autonomy ('4P medicine').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Matthias; Averina, Maria; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Faure, Gilbert; Haushofer, Alexander; Kusec, Vesna; Machado, Augusto; Misbah, Siraj A; Oosterhuis, Wytze; Pulkki, Kari; Twomey, Patrick J; Wieland, Eberhard

    2017-12-22

    The role of clinical pathologists or laboratory-based physicians is being challenged on several fronts-exponential advances in technology, increasing patient autonomy exercised in the right to directly request tests and the use of non-medical specialists as substitutes. In response, clinical pathologists have focused their energies on the pre-analytical and postanalytical phases of Laboratory Medicine thus emphasising their essential role in individualised medical interpretation of complex laboratory results. Across the European Union, the role of medical doctors is enshrined in the Medical Act. This paper highlights the relevance of this act to patient welfare and the need to strengthen training programmes to prevent an erosion in the quality of Laboratory Medicine provided to patients and their physicians. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Systems-based practice: Summary of the 2010 Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors Academic Assembly Consensus Workgroup--teaching and evaluating the difficult-to-teach competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ernest E; Dyne, Pamela L; Du, Hongyan

    2011-10-01

    The development of robust Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) systems-based practice (SBP) training and validated evaluation tools has been generally challenging for emergency medicine (EM) residency programs. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a consensus workgroup session of the 2010 Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) Academic Assembly with the following objectives: 1) to discuss current and preferred local and regional methods for teaching and assessing SBP and 2) to develop consensus within the CORD community using the modified Delphi method with respect to EM-specific SBP domains and link these domains to specific SBP educational and evaluative methods. Consensus was developed using a modified Delphi method. Previously described taxonomy generation methodology was used to create a SBP taxonomy of EM domain-specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA). The steps in the process consisted of: 1) an 11-question preconference survey, 2) a vetting process conducted at the 2010 CORD Academic Assembly, and 3) the development and ranking of domain-specific SBP educational activities and evaluation criteria for the specialty of EM. Rank-order lists were created for preferred SBP education and evaluation methods. Expert modeling, informal small group discussion, and formal small group activities were considered to be the optimal methods to teach SBP. Kruskal-Wallis testing revealed that these top three items were rated significantly higher than self-directed learning projects and lectures (p = 0.0317). Post hoc test via permutation testing revealed that the difference was significant between expert modeling and formal small group activity (adjusted p = 0.028), indicating that expert modeling was rated significantly higher than formal small group activity. Direct observation methods were the preferred methods for evaluation. Multiple barriers to training and evaluation were elucidated. We developed a

  15. A Qualitative Analysis of Attending Physicians' Use of Shared Decision-Making: Implications for Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Elizabeth M; Goff, Sarah L; Elia, Tala R; Khordipour, Errel R; Poronsky, Kye E; Nault, Kelly A; Lindenauer, Peter K; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    Physicians need to rapidly and effectively facilitate patient-centered, shared decision-making (SDM) conversations, but little is known about how residents or attending physicians acquire this skill. We explored emergency medicine (EM) attending physicians' use of SDM in the context of their experience as former residents and current educators and assessed the implications of these findings on learning opportunities for residents. We used semistructured interviews with a purposeful sample of EM physicians. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and 3 research team members performed iterative, open coding of transcripts, building a provisional codebook as work progressed. We analyzed the data with a focus on participants' acquisition and use of skills required for SDM and their use of SDM in the context of resident education. Fifteen EM physicians from academic and community practices were interviewed. All reported using SDM techniques to some degree. Multiple themes noted had negative implications for resident acquisition of this skill: (1) the complex relationships among patients, residents, and attending physicians; (2) residents' skill levels; (3) the setting of busy emergency departments; and (4) individual attending factors. One theme was noted to facilitate resident education: the changing culture-with a cultural shift toward patient-centered care. A constellation of factors may diminish opportunities for residents to acquire and practice SDM skills. Further research should explore residents' perspectives, address the modifiable obstacles identified, and examine whether these issues generalize to other specialties.

  16. Teachers' Use of Linguistic Scaffolding to Support the Academic Language Development of First-Grade Emergent Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that teachers need to scaffold emergent bilingual students as they develop the complex language associated with school success. This may especially be true in dual language settings, where children are learning two languages simultaneously. In this study, therefore, I investigate the linguistic scaffolding practices of…

  17. [Are American physicians more satisfied?--results from an International Study of Physicians in University Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, K; Amelung, V E; Baker, L C; Gaitanides, M; Rundall, T G; Schwartz, F W

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the factors that affect physicians' job satisfaction is important not only to physicians themselves, but also to patients, health system managers, and policy makers. Physicians represent the crucial resource in health-care delivery. In order to enhance efficiency and quality in health care, it is indispensable to analyse and consider the motivators of physicians. Physician job satisfaction has significant effects on productivity, the quality of care, and the supply of physicians. The purpose of our study was to assess the associations between work-related monetary and non-monetary factors and physicians' work satisfaction as perceived by similar groups of physicians practicing at academic medical centres in Germany and the U.S.A., two countries that, in spite of differing health-care systems, simultaneously experience problems in maintaining their physician workforce. We used descriptive statistics, factor and correlation analyses to evaluate physicians' responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Our study revealed that overall German physicians were less satisfied than U.S. physicians. With respect to particular work-related predictors of job satisfaction we found that similar factors contributed to job satisfaction in both countries. To improve physicians' satisfaction with working conditions, our results call for the implementation of policies that reduce the time burden on physicians to allow more time for interaction with patients and colleagues, increase monetary incentives, and enhance physicians' participation in the development of care management processes and in managerial decisions that affect patient care.

  18. Physician health and wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brown, Oscar W

    2014-10-01

    Physician health and wellness is a critical issue gaining national attention because of the high prevalence of physician burnout. Pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout at levels equivalent to other medical specialties, highlighting a need for more effective efforts to promote health and well-being in the pediatric community. This report will provide an overview of physician burnout, an update on work in the field of preventive physician health and wellness, and a discussion of emerging initiatives that have potential to promote health at all levels of pediatric training. Pediatricians are uniquely positioned to lead this movement nationally, in part because of the emphasis placed on wellness in the Pediatric Milestone Project, a joint collaboration between the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Pediatrics. Updated core competencies calling for a balanced approach to health, including focus on nutrition, exercise, mindfulness, and effective stress management, signal a paradigm shift and send the message that it is time for pediatricians to cultivate a culture of wellness better aligned with their responsibilities as role models and congruent with advances in pediatric training. Rather than reviewing programs in place to address substance abuse and other serious conditions in distressed physicians, this article focuses on forward progress in the field, with an emphasis on the need for prevention and anticipation of predictable stressors related to burnout in medical training and practice. Examples of positive progress and several programs designed to promote physician health and wellness are reviewed. Areas where more research is needed are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  20. Hospital characteristics and patient populations served by physician owned and non physician owned orthopedic specialty hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan-Sarrazin Mary S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of physician owned specialty hospitals focusing on high margin procedures has generated significant controversy. Yet, it is unclear whether physician owned specialty hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty hospitals and thus merit the additional scrutiny that has been proposed. Our objective was to assess whether physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ with respect to hospital characteristics and patient populations served. Methods We conducted a descriptive study using Medicare data of beneficiaries who underwent total hip replacement (THR (N = 10,478 and total knee replacement (TKR (N = 15,312 in 29 physician owned and 8 non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals during 1999–2003. We compared hospital characteristics of physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals including procedural volumes of major joint replacements (THR and TKR, hospital teaching status, and for profit status. We then compared demographics and prevalence of common comorbid conditions for patients treated in physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals. Finally, we examined whether the socio-demographic characteristics of the neighborhoods where physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals differed, as measured by zip code level data. Results Physician owned specialty hospitals performed fewer major joint replacements on Medicare beneficiaries in 2003 than non physician owed specialty hospitals (64 vs. 678, P Conclusion Physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and may warrant the additional scrutiny policy makers have proposed.

  1. Academic detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  2. Residents and teaching physicians' perception about bedside teaching in non-clinical shift in the emergency department of King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Azzah Aljabarti

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Bedside teaching (BT) is teaching in the presence of the patients which allows direct observation of the learner. It is a very crucial educational modality, which has declined significantly over the last decades. It is under-utilised and under-studied in Emergency Medicine. Although time constraints in the emergency department (ED) is associated with efficient and effective patient management; it exerts a negative influence on the time spent on bedside teaching. Objective: To...

  3. The search for common ground: developing emergency medicine in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey P; Shokoohi, Hamid; Holliman, James C

    2007-05-01

    Academic ties between Iran and the United States were extensive before the 1979 revolution in Iran. After 20 years of negligible academic exchanges, there has been a growing trend of professional contacts between the two countries over the past few years. The genuine warmth of friendship and commitment to excellence in emergency medicine (EM) among Iranians has transcended the political barriers to allow international contribution of EM development in the country. Since 1999, there has been a successful academic collaboration between Iranian and U.S. universities to help develop EM in Iran. Today, remarkable progresses have been achieved through recognition of EM as a distinct profession, developing EM residency programs, improving emergency medical services, establishing qualified emergency departments, training faculty and staff, starting physician exchange programs, and building mutual contributions with professionals throughout the world. A supportive policy environment and a high-quality health care system have had incredible impacts on EM development in the country.

  4. Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club. Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: Social media responses to the November 2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Ryan P; Rezaie, Salim R; Lin, Michelle

    2014-04-01

    The Annals November 2013 Journal Club issue marked one of the first collaborations with Academic Life in Emergency Medicine, a medical education blog, in an effort to promote a worldwide, transparent, online effort to perform critical appraisals of journal articles. The Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club was hosted on the blog for 1 week during November 18 to 24, 2013, with comments moderated on the blog and on Twitter. This summary article compiles the discussion and insights. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethical concerns related to grateful patient philanthropy: the physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott M; Wolfe, Leah; Stewart, Rosalyn; Flynn, John A; Paisner, Richard; Rum, Steve; Parson, Gregory; Carrese, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Philanthropic contributions to academic medical centers from grateful patients support research, patient care, education, and capital projects. The goal of this study was to identify the ethical concerns associated with philanthropic gifts from grateful patients. A qualitative study design was selected. Investigators conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 Department of Medicine physicians at Johns Hopkins who were identified by Development Office staff as experienced and successful in this realm-those having relationships with multiple patients who have made philanthropic contributions. Interview transcripts were independently coded by two investigators. Content analysis identified several themes related to ethical concerns. Eighteen informants (90 %) were Associate Professors or Professors; two (10 %) were females. Four thematic domains emerged related to ethical concerns associated with philanthropy from grateful patients: (i) impact of gift on the doctor-patient relationship; (ii) gift acquisition considered beyond the physician's professional role; (iii) justice and fairness; and (iv) vulnerability of patients. Despite acknowledging at least one of the aforementioned concerns, eleven physician informants (55 %) expressed the view that there were no ethical issues involved with grateful patient philanthropy. In this paper, we report that physicians involved in grateful patient philanthropy are aware of, and in some cases troubled by, the ethical concerns related to this activity. Further studies could examine how best to prepare faculty for the challenges that may accompany these gifts so as to help them maintain expected professional and ethical standards when accepting grateful patient philanthropy.

  6. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Sensitivity and Specificity of Emergency Physicians and Trainees for Identifying Internally Concealed Drug Packages on Abdominal Computed Tomography Scan: Do Lung Windows Improve Accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Stephen Edward; Cooke, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Suspected body packers may be brought to emergency departments (EDs) close to international airports for abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning. Senior emergency clinicians may be asked to interpret these CT scans. Missing concealed drug packages have important clinical and forensic implications. The accuracy of emergency clinician interpretation of abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs is not known. Limited evidence suggests that accuracy for identification of concealed packages can be increased by viewing CT images on "lung window" settings. To determine the accuracy of senior emergency clinicians in interpreting abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs, and to determine if this accuracy was improved by viewing scans on both abdominal and lung window settings. Emergency clinicians blinded to all patient identifiers and the radiology report interpreted CT scans of suspected body packers using standard abdominal window settings and then with the addition of lung window settings. The reference standard was the radiologist's report. Fifty-five emergency clinicians reported 235 CT scans. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of interpretation using abdominal windows was 89.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.0-94.7), 81.9% (95% CI 73.7-88.4), and 86.0% (95% CI 81.5-90.4), respectively, and with both window settings was 94.1% (95% CI 88.3-97.6), 76.7% (95% CI 68.0-84.1), 85.5% (95% CI 81.0-90.0), respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was similar regardless of the clinician's experience. Interrater reliability was moderate (kappa 0.46). The accuracy of interpretation of abdominal CT scans performed for the purpose of detecting concealed drug packages by emergency clinicians is not high enough to safely discharge these patients from the ED. The use of lung windows improved sensitivity, but at the expense of specificity. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Longevity of Thai physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithisarankul, Pornchai; Piyasing, Veera; Boontheaim, Benjaporn; Ratanamongkolgul, Suthee; Wattanasirichaigoon, Somkiat

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore characteristics of the long-lived Thai physicians. We sent 983 posted questionnaires to 840 male and 143 female physicians. We obtained 327 of them back after 2 rounds of mailing, yielding a response rate of 33.3 percents. The response rate of male physicians was 32.4 percents and that of female physicians was 38.5 percents. Their ages were between 68-93 years (75.1 +/- 4.86 years on average). The majority were married, implying that their spouses were also long-lived. Around half of them still did some clinical work, one-fourth did some charity work, one-fourth did various voluntary works, one-fifth did some business, one-fifth did some academic work, and some did more than one type of work. Most long-lived physicians were not obese, with BMI of 16.53-34.16 (average 23.97 +/- 2.80). Only 8 had BMI higher than 30. BMIs were not different between male and female physicians. However, four-fifths of them had diseases that required treatment, and some of them had more than one disease. The five most frequent diseases were hypertension, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, dyslipidemia, and benign prostate hypertrophy, respectively. Most long-lived physicians did exercise (87.8%), and some did more than one method. The most frequent one was walking (52.3%). Most did not drink alcohol or drank occasionally, only 9.0% drank regularly. Most of them slept 3-9 hours per night (average 6.75 +/- 1.06). Most (78.3%) took some medication regularly; of most were medicine for their diseases. Most did not eat macrobiotic food, vegetarian food, or fast food regularly. Most long-lived physicians practiced some religious activities by praying, paying respect to Buddha, giving food to monks, practicing meditation, and listening to monks' teaching. They also used Buddhist practice and guidelines for their daily living and work, and also recommended these to their younger colleagues. Their recreational activities were playing musical instruments

  9. Should physicians have facial piercings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. Survey. Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence in them as a clinician.

  10. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 2: supporting and developing scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Glen; Leblanc, Constance; Regehr, Glenn; Snell, Linda; Frank, Jason R; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is defined, in part, by clinical excellence across an immense breadth of content and the provision of exemplary bedside teaching to a wide variety of learners. The specialty is also well-suited to a number of emerging areas of education scholarship, particularly in relation to team-based learning, clinical reasoning, acute care response, and simulation-based teaching. The success of EM education scholarship will be predicated on systematic, collective attention to providing the infrastructure for this to occur. Specifically, as a new generation of emergency physicians prepares for education careers, academic organizations need to develop means not only to identify potential scholars but also to mentor, support, and encourage their careers. This paper summarizes the supporting literature and presents related recommendations from a 2013 consensus conference on EM education scholarship led by the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians.

  11. Integrated care coordination by an interprofessional team reduces emergency department visits and hospitalisations at an academic health centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Anne H; Barlow, Patrick; Thoma, Kate DuChene; Bergus, George R

    2017-09-01

    People with chronic behavioural and physical health conditions have higher healthcare costs and mortality rates than patients with chronic physical conditions alone. As a result, there has been promotion of integrated care for this group. It is important to train primary care residents to practice in integrated models of care with interprofessional teams and to evaluate the effectiveness of integrated care models to promote high-quality care for this at-risk group. We implemented an integrated, interprofessional care management programme for adults with chronic mental and physical health needs as part of a curriculum for family medicine and family medicine psychiatry residents. We then evaluated the clinical effectiveness of this programme by describing participants' healthcare utilisation patterns pre- and post-enrolment. Patients enrolled in the programme were approximately 60-70% less likely to utilise the emergency room and 50% less likely to be admitted to the hospital after enrolment in the programme compared to before enrolment. The odds of individual attendance at outpatient primary care and mental health visits improved after enrolment. In the context of the implementation of integrated behavioural and physical healthcare in primary care, this interprofessional care management programme reduced emergency department utilisation and hospitalisations while improving utilisation of primary care and psychiatry outpatient care. Further studies should focus on replication of this model to further discern the model's cost-savings and health promotion effects.

  12. Laboratory Tests Turnaround Time in Outpatient and Emergency Patients in Nigeria: Results of A Physician Survey on Point of Care Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolodeoku J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory analytical turnaround time is a well-recognised indicator of how well a laboratory is performing and is sometimes regarded as the benchmark for laboratory performance. Methods: Total 104 doctors in public and private health institutions in Nigeria, spread across all six geo-political zones participated in survey requesting information on their experience with laboratory turnaround times in emergency situations (emergency room, special care baby unit, intensive care unit, dialysis unit and outpatient situations (general medicine and diabetes. Results: The average turnaround time in hours was 5.12, 8.35, 7.32 and 8.33 for the emergency room, special care baby unit, intensive care unit and dialysis unit, respectively. For the outpatient situations, the average turnaround time in hours was 10.74 and 15.70 hours for the diabetes and general medical outpatients. The median range (hours and modal range (hours for: the emergency room was 2-4 and <2; the special care baby unit was 4-8 and 4-8; the intensive care unit was 2-4 and 2-4; the dialysis unit was 4-8 and 4-8. The median range (hours and modal range (hours for: the general outpatient clinic was 12-24 and 12-24; the diabetic clinic was 4-8 and 12-24 hours. Conclusion: These turnaround time results are quite consistent with published data from other countries. However, there is some measure of improvement that is required in some areas to reduce the laboratory turnaround in the emergency situations. This could be overcome with the introduction of more point of care testing devices into emergency units.

  13. The Emergence of Industrial Marketing Management as the Leading Academic Journal in Business-to-Business Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Benedetto, C. Anthony; Lindgreen, Adam

    2018-01-01

    During 1994–2016, Peter LaPlaca served as editor-in-chief of Industrial Marketing Management, an era in which the research discipline surrounding business-to-business marketing showed remarkable growth and attracted the attention of scholars worldwide. This article traces the evolving maturity...... and editorial board members, and the arrival of meta-analyses and special issues on emerging research topics all indicate the level of maturity and scope of the business-to-business marketing research discipline attained during this period— thanks to the expert guidance and tireless efforts of Professor La...... of the discipline during these years by analyzing not just statistics but also the content of the premier journal in this area, Industrial Marketing Management. The number of papers submitted and articles published per year, the growth in the journal's impact factor, the increased presence of international authors...

  14. The Emergency Public Relations Protocol: How to Work Effectively on Controversial Projects in an Academic Health Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, B R Simon; Kilian, Gunna; West, William G

    2013-03-01

    Certain research topics - including studies of sexual behavior, substance use, and HIV risk -- are more likely to be scrutinized by the media and groups opposed to this area of research. When studying topics that others might deem controversial, it is critical that researchers anticipate potential negative media events prior to their occurrence. By developing an Emergency Public Relations Protocol at the genesis of a study, researchers can identify and plan for events that might result in higher scrutiny. For each identified risk, a good protocol details procedures to enact before, during and after a media event. This manuscript offers recommendations for developing a protocol based on both Situational Crisis Communication Theory and our experience as an HIV prevention research group who recently experienced such an event. The need to have procedures in place to monitor and address social media is highlighted.

  15. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 1: innovating and improving teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan; Van Melle, Elaine; Bandiera, Glen; McEwen, Jill; Leblanc, Constance; Bhanji, Farhan; Frank, Jason R; Regehr, Glenn; Snell, Linda

    2014-05-01

    As emergency medicine (EM) education evolves, a more advanced understanding of education scholarship is required. This article is the first in a series of three articles that reports the recommendations of the 2013 education scholarship consensus conference of the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians. Adopting the Canadian Association for Medical Education's definition, education scholarship (including both research and innovation) is defined. A rationale for why education scholarship should be a priority for EM is discussed.

  16. Ethical principles for physician rating sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, Daniel

    2011-12-06

    During the last 5 years, an ethical debate has emerged, often in public media, about the potential positive and negative effects of physician rating sites and whether physician rating sites created by insurance companies or government agencies are ethical in their current states. Due to the lack of direct evidence of physician rating sites' effects on physicians' performance, patient outcomes, or the public's trust in health care, most contributions refer to normative arguments, hypothetical effects, or indirect evidence. This paper aims, first, to structure the ethical debate about the basic concept of physician rating sites: allowing patients to rate, comment, and discuss physicians' performance, online and visible to everyone. Thus, it provides a more thorough and transparent starting point for further discussion and decision making on physician rating sites: what should physicians and health policy decision makers take into account when discussing the basic concept of physician rating sites and its possible implications on the physician-patient relationship? Second, it discusses where and how the preexisting evidence from the partly related field of public reporting of physician performance can serve as an indicator for specific needs of evaluative research in the field of physician rating sites. This paper defines the ethical principles of patient welfare, patient autonomy, physician welfare, and social justice in the context of physician rating sites. It also outlines basic conditions for a fair decision-making process concerning the implementation and regulation of physician rating sites, namely, transparency, justification, participation, minimization of conflicts of interest, and openness for revision. Besides other issues described in this paper, one trade-off presents a special challenge and will play an important role when deciding about more- or less-restrictive physician rating sites regulations: the potential psychological and financial harms for

  17. Linking social media and medical record data: a study of adults presenting to an academic, urban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrez, Kevin A; Ungar, Lyle; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Smith, Robert J; Hill, Shawndra; Antanavicius, Tadas; Brown, Dana M; Crutchley, Patrick; Asch, David A; Merchant, Raina M

    2016-06-01

    Social media may offer insight into the relationship between an individual's health and their everyday life, as well as attitudes towards health and the perceived quality of healthcare services. To determine the acceptability to patients and potential utility to researchers of a database linking patients' social media content with their electronic medical record (EMR) data. Adult Facebook/Twitter users who presented to an emergency department were queried about their willingness to share their social media data and EMR data with health researchers for the purpose of building a databank for research purposes. Shared posts were searched for select terms about health and healthcare. Of the 5256 patients approached, 2717 (52%) were Facebook and/or Twitter users. 1432 (53%) of those patients agreed to participate in the study. Of these participants, 1008 (71%) consented to share their social media data for the purposes of comparing it with their EMR. Social media data consisted of 1 395 720 posts/tweets to Facebook and Twitter. Participants sharing social media data were slightly younger (29.1±9.8 vs 31.9±10.4 years old; ppost at least once a day (42% vs 29%; p=0.003) and more likely to present to the emergency room via self-arrival mode and have private insurance. Of Facebook posts, 7.5% (95% CI 4.8% to 10.2%) were related to health. Individuals with a given diagnosis in their EMR were significantly more likely to use terms related to that diagnosis on Facebook than patients without that diagnosis in their EMR (p<0.0008). Many patients are willing to share and link their social media data with EMR data. Sharing patients have several demographic and clinical differences compared with non-sharers. A database that merges social media with EMR data has the potential to provide insights about individuals' health and health outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Predicting Fluid Responsiveness Using Bedside Ultrasound Measurements of the Inferior Vena Cava and Physician Gestalt in the Emergency Department of an Urban Public Hospital in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry Robert; Haeffele, Cathryn; Mfinanga, Juma A; Mwafongo, Victor G; Reynolds, Teri A

    Bedside inferior vena cava (IVC) ultrasound has been proposed as a non-invasive measure of volume status. We compared ultrasound measurements of the caval index (CI) and physician gestalt to predict blood pressure response in patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation. This was a prospective study of adult emergency department patients requiring fluid resuscitation. A structured data sheet was used to record serial vital signs and the treating clinician's impression of patient volume status and cause of hypotension. Bedside ultrasound CI measurements were performed at baseline and after each 500mL of fluid. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to characterize the relationship between CI and Physician gestalt, and the change in mean arterial pressure (MAP). We enrolled 364 patients, 52% male, mean age 36 years. Indications for fluid resuscitation were haemorrhage (54%), dehydration (30%), and sepsis (17%). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found optimal CI cut-off values of 45%, 52% and 53% to predict a MAP rise of 5, 8 and 10 mmHg per litre of fluid, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CI of 50% for predicting a 10mmHg increase in MAP per litre were 88% (95%CI 81-93%) and 73% (95%CI 67-79%), respectively, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.81-0.89). The sensitivity and specificity of physician gestalt estimate of volume depletion severity were 68% (95%CI 60-75%) and 86% (95%CI 80-90%), respectively, AUC = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79-0.87). Those with a baseline CI ≥ 50% (51% of patients) had a 2.8-fold greater fluid responsiveness than those with a baseline CI<50% (p<0.0001). Ultrasound measurement of the CI can predict blood pressure response among patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation and may be useful in early identification of patients who will benefit most from volume resuscitation, and those who will likely require other interventions.

  19. Barriers to the Use of Trastuzumab for HER2+ Breast Cancer and the Potential Impact of Biosimilars: A Physician Survey in the United States and Emerging Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lammers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy has become a standard of care for patients with HER2+ breast cancer. The cost of therapy, however, can limit patient access to trastuzumab in areas with limited financial resources for treatment reimbursement. This study examined access to trastuzumab and identified potential barriers to its use in the United States, Mexico, Turkey, Russia and Brazil via physician survey. The study also investigated if the availability of a biosimilar to trastuzumab would improve access to and use of HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy. Across all countries, a subset of oncologists reported barriers to the use of trastuzumab in a neoadjuvant, adjuvant or metastatic setting. Common barriers to the use of trastuzumab included issues related to insurance coverage, drug availability and cost to the patient. Overall, nearly half of oncologists reported that they would increase the use of HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy across all treatment settings if a lower cost biosimilar to trastuzumab were available. We conclude that the introduction of a biosimilar to trastuzumab may alleviate cost-related barriers to treatment and could increase patient access to HER2-directed therapy in all countries examined.

  20. Emergency department information system implementation and process redesign result in rapid and sustained financial enhancement at a large academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Jason S; Baumlin, Kevin M; Chawla, Neal; Genes, Nicholas; Godbold, James; Ye, Fen; Richardson, Lynne D

    2010-05-01

    The objectives were to measure the financial impact of implementing a fully integrated emergency department information system (EDIS) and determine the length of time to "break even" on the initial investment. A before-and-after study design was performed using a framework of analysis consisting of four 15-month phases: 1) preimplementation, 2) peri-implementation, 3) postimplementation, and 4) sustained effects. Registration and financial data were reviewed. Costs and rates of professional and facility charges and receipts were calculated for the phases in question and compared against monthly averages for covariates such as volume, collections rates, acuity, age, admission rate, and insurance status with an autoregressive time series analysis using a segmented model. The break-even point was calculated by measuring cumulative monthly receipts for the last three study phases in excess of the average monthly receipts from the preimplementation phase, corrected for change in volume, and then plotting this against cumulative overall cost. Time to break even on the initial EDIS investment was less than 8 months. Total revenue enhancement at the end of the 5-year study period was $16,138,953 with an increase of 69.40% in charges and 70.06% in receipts. This corresponds to an increase in receipts per patient from $50 to $90 for professional services and $131 to $183 for facilities charges. Other than volume, there were no significant changes in trends for covariates between the preimplementation and sustained-effects periods. A comprehensive EDIS implementation with process redesign resulted in sustained increases in professional and facility revenues and a rapid initial break-even point. .

  1. Developments in Surge Research Priorities: A Systematic Review of the Literature Following the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, 2007-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Melinda J; DeAugustinis, Matthew L; Velasquez, Christina A; Singh, Sonal; Kelen, Gabor D

    2015-11-01

    In 2006, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) published a special issue summarizing the proceedings of the AEM consensus conference on the "Science of Surge." One major goal of the conference was to establish research priorities in the field of "disasters" surge. For this review, we wished to determine the progress toward the conference's identified research priorities: 1) defining criteria and methods for allocation of scarce resources, 2) identifying effective triage protocols, 3) determining decision-makers and means to evaluate response efficacy, 4) developing communication and information sharing strategies, and 5) identifying methods for evaluating workforce needs. Specific criteria were developed in conjunction with library search experts. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library databases were queried for peer-reviewed articles from 2007 to 2015 addressing scientific advances related to the above five research priorities identified by AEM consensus conference. Abstracts and foreign language articles were excluded. Only articles with quantitative data on predefined outcomes were included; consensus panel recommendations on the above priorities were also included for the purposes of this review. Included study designs were randomized controlled trials, prospective, retrospective, qualitative (consensus panel), observational, cohort, case-control, or controlled before-and-after studies. Quality assessment was performed using a standardized tool for quantitative studies. Of the 2,484 unique articles identified by the search strategy, 313 articles appeared to be related to disaster surge. Following detailed text review, 50 articles with quantitative data and 11 concept papers (consensus conference recommendations) addressed at least one AEM consensus conference surge research priority. Outcomes included validation of the benchmark of 500 beds/million of population for disaster surge capacity, effectiveness of simulation- and Internet

  2. Roles of the Team Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderknecht, James

    2016-07-01

    The roles of the team physician are much more than providing medical coverage at a sport's event. The team physician has numerous administrative and medical responsibilities. The development of an emergency action plan is an essential administrative task as an example. The implementation of the components of this plan requires the team physician to have the necessary medical knowledge and skill. An expertise in returning an athlete to play after an injury or other medical condition is a unique attribute of the trained team physician. The athlete's return to participation needs to start with the athlete's safety and best medical interests but not inappropriately restrict the individual from play. The ability to communicate on numerous levels needs to be a characteristic of the team physician. There are several potential ethical conflicts the team physician needs to control. These conflicts can create unique medicolegal issues. The true emphasis of the team physician is to focus on what is best for the athlete. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Simulating the behavior of patients who leave a public hospital emergency department without being seen by a physician: a cellular automaton and agent-based framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Yousefi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop an agent based modeling (ABM framework to simulate the behavior of patients who leave a public hospital emergency department (ED without being seen (LWBS. In doing so, the study complements computer modeling and cellular automata (CA techniques to simulate the behavior of patients in an ED. After verifying and validating the model by comparing it with data from a real case study, the significance of four preventive policies including increasing number of triage nurses, fast-track treatment, increasing the waiting room capacity and reducing treatment time were investigated by utilizing ordinary least squares regression. After applying the preventing policies in ED, an average of 42.14% reduction in the number of patients who leave without being seen and 6.05% reduction in the average length of stay (LOS of patients was reported. This study is the first to apply CA in an ED simulation. Comparing the average LOS before and after applying CA with actual times from emergency department information system showed an 11% improvement. The simulation results indicated that the most effective approach to reduce the rate of LWBS is applying fast-track treatment. The ABM approach represents a flexible tool that can be constructed to reflect any given environment. It is also a support system for decision-makers to assess the relative impact of control strategies.

  4. Simulating the behavior of patients who leave a public hospital emergency department without being seen by a physician: a cellular automaton and agent-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Milad; Yousefi, Moslem; Fogliatto, F S; Ferreira, R P M; Kim, J H

    2018-01-11

    The objective of this study was to develop an agent based modeling (ABM) framework to simulate the behavior of patients who leave a public hospital emergency department (ED) without being seen (LWBS). In doing so, the study complements computer modeling and cellular automata (CA) techniques to simulate the behavior of patients in an ED. After verifying and validating the model by comparing it with data from a real case study, the significance of four preventive policies including increasing number of triage nurses, fast-track treatment, increasing the waiting room capacity and reducing treatment time were investigated by utilizing ordinary least squares regression. After applying the preventing policies in ED, an average of 42.14% reduction in the number of patients who leave without being seen and 6.05% reduction in the average length of stay (LOS) of patients was reported. This study is the first to apply CA in an ED simulation. Comparing the average LOS before and after applying CA with actual times from emergency department information system showed an 11% improvement. The simulation results indicated that the most effective approach to reduce the rate of LWBS is applying fast-track treatment. The ABM approach represents a flexible tool that can be constructed to reflect any given environment. It is also a support system for decision-makers to assess the relative impact of control strategies.

  5. [Family and career planning in young physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates in what way physicians integrate their desire to have children into their career planning. Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates on career development of young physicians, beginning in 2001, 534 participants (285 women, 249 men) were assessed in January 2007, in terms of having children, planning to have children, the career aspired to and the work-family balance used or planned. Among the study participants, 19% (54) of the women and 24% (59) of the men have children. Of the others 88% plan to start a family in the future. Female physicians with children are less advanced in their careers than women without children; for male physicians no such difference can be observed. Of the female physicians with children or the desire for children 42% aspire to work in a practice, 28% to a clinical and only 4% to an academic career. Of the male physicians with children or the desire for children one third aspire to work in a practice, one third to a clinical and 14% to an academic career. The preferred model of work repartition of female physicians with children is father full time/mother part time or both parents part time; the preferred model of male physicians is father full time/mother part time or not working. Children are an important factor in the career and life planning of physicians, female physicians paying more attention to an even work-family balance than male physicians. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Reis, Phillipe; Oliveira, Guilherme Czelusniak; Curtarelli de Oliveira, Arthur; Sadique, Hammad; Nasr, Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich, Flávio Daniel

    2012-08-22

    Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours). Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours) had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001), Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively) ( p = 0.00003). To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117). Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of training hours served). Two hundred hours appeared to be a

  7. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu-Reis Phillipe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours. Results Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001, Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively ( p = 0.00003. To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117. Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. Conclusions The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of

  8. Authorship Trends of Emergency Medicine Publications over the Last Two Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Richard; Simunich, Thomas; Ashurst, John

    2016-05-01

    With the recent merger of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) a heightened pressure for publication may become evident. Our objective was to determine whether there was a gap in the type of both medical degree designation and advanced degree designation among authorship in three United States-based academic emergency medicine journals. We reviewed the Journal of Emergency Medicine, Academic Emergency Medicine and Annals of Emergency Medicine for the type of degree designation that the first and senior authors had obtained for the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2014. A total of 2.48% of all authors held a degree in osteopathic medicine. Osteopathic physician first authors contributed to 3.26% of all publications while osteopathic physician senior authors contributed 1.53%. No statistical trend could be established for the years studied for osteopathic physicians. However, we noted an overall trend for increased publication for allopathic senior authors (p=0.001), allopathic first authors with a dual degree (p=0.003) and allopathic senior authors with a dual degree (p=0.005). For each journal studied, no statistical trend could be established for osteopathic first or senior authors but a trend was noted for allopathic first and senior authors in the Journal of Emergency Medicine (p-value=0.020 and 0.006). Of those with dual degrees, osteopathic physicians were in the minority with 1.85% of osteopathic first authors and 0.60% of osteopathic senior authors attaining a dual degree. No statistical trend could be established for increased dual degree publications for osteopathic physicians over the study period, nor could a statistical trend be established for any of the journals studied. Very few osteopathic physicians have published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, Academic Emergency Medicine or Annals of Emergency Medicine over the last two decades. Despite a trend for increased

  9. Scaling Up HIV Testing in an Academic Emergency Department: An Integrated Testing Model with Rapid Fourth-Generation and Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Danielle; Peterson, Stephen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Haider, Somiya; Saheed, Mustapha; Neira, Paula; Wicken, Cassie; Rothman, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated two approaches for implementing routine HIV screening in an inner-city, academic emergency department (ED). These approaches differed by staffing model and type of HIV testing technology used. The programmatic outcomes assessed included the total number of tests performed, proportion of newly identified HIV-positive patients, and proportion of newly diagnosed individuals who were linked to care. This study examined specific outcomes for two distinct, successive approaches to implementing HIV screening in an inner-city, academic ED, from July 2012 through June 2013 (Program One), and from August 2013 through July 2014 (Program Two). Program One used a supplementary staff-only HIV testing model with point-of-care (POC) oral testing. Program Two used a triage-integrated, nurse-driven HIV testing model with fourth-generation blood and POC testing, and an expedited linkage-to-care process. During Program One, 6,832 eligible patients were tested for HIV with a rapid POC oral HIV test. Sixteen patients (0.2%) were newly diagnosed with HIV, of whom 13 were successfully linked to care. During Program Two, 8,233 eligible patients were tested for HIV, of whom 3,124 (38.0%) received a blood test and 5,109 (62.0%) received a rapid POC test. Of all patients tested in Program Two, 29 (0.4%) were newly diagnosed with HIV, four of whom had acute infections and 27 of whom were successfully linked to care. We found a statistically significant difference in the proportion of the eligible population tested-8,233 of 49,697 (16.6%) in Program Two and 6,832 of 46,818 (14.6%) in Program One. These differences from Program One to Program Two corresponded to increases in testing volume (n=1,401 tests), number of patients newly diagnosed with HIV (n=13), and proportion of patients successfully linked to care (from 81.0% to 93.0%). Integrating HIV screening into the standard triage workflow resulted in a higher proportion of ED patients being tested for HIV as compared with the

  10. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syn