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Sample records for abutment screw loosening

  1. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  2. Does Abutment Collar Length Affect Abutment Screw Loosening After Cyclic Loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Pirmoazen, Salma; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2015-07-01

    A significant vertical space that is corrected with vertical ridge augmentation may necessitate selection of longer abutments, which would lead to an increased vertical cantilever. This study investigated the influence of different abutment collar heights on single-unit dental implant screw-loosening after cyclic loading. Fifteen implant-abutment assemblies each consisted of an internal hexagonal implant were randomly assigned to 3 groups: Group1, consisting of 5 abutments with 1.5 mm gingival height (GH); Group2, 5 abutments with 3.5 mm GH; and Group3, 5 abutments with 5.5 mm GH. Each specimen was mounted in transparent auto-polymerizing acrylic resin block, and the abutment screw was tightened to 35 Ncm with an electric torque wrench. After 5 minutes, initial torque loss (ITL) was recorded for all specimens. Metal crowns were fabricated with 45° occlusal surface and were placed on the abutments. A cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 1 Hz were applied perpendicular to the long axis of each specimen. After 500 000 cycles, secondary torque loss (STL) was recorded. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate the effects of abutment collar height before and after cyclic loading. One-way ANOVA showed that ITL among the groups was not significantly different (P = .52), while STL was significantly different among the groups (P = .008). Post-hoc Tukey HSD tests showed that STL values were significantly different between the abutments with 1.5 mm GH (Group1) and with 5.5 mm GH (Group3) (P = .007). A paired comparison t-test showed that cyclic loading significantly influenced the STL in comparison with the ITL in each group. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increase in height of the abutment collar could adversely affect the torque loss of the abutment screw.

  3. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  4. The influence of implant-abutment connection on the screw loosening and microleakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Katsuhiro; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Matsuzaki, Tatsuya; Kihara, Masafumi; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2018-04-09

    There are some spaces between abutment and implant body which can be a reservoir of toxic substance, and they can penetrate into subgingival space from microgap at the implant-abutment interface. This penetration may cause periimplantitis which is known to be one of the most important factors associated with late failure. In the present study, three kinds of abutment connection system, external parallel connection (EP), internal parallel connection (IP), and internal conical connection (CC), were studied from the viewpoint of microleakage from the gap between the implant and the abutment and in connection with the loosening of abutment screw. We observed dye leakage from abutment screw hole to outside through microgap under the excessive compressive and tensile load and evaluated the anti-leakage characteristics of these connection systems. During the experiment, one abutment screw for EP and two screws for IP, out of seven samples in each group, were fractured. After the 2000 cycles of compressive tensile loadings, removal torque value (RTV) of abutment screw represented no statistical differences among three groups. Standard deviation was largest in the RTV of EP and smallest in that of CC. The results of microleakage of toluidine blue from implant-abutment connection indicated that microleakage generally increased as loading procedure progressed. The amount of microleakage was almost plateau at 2000 cycles in CC, but still increasing in other two groups. The value of microleakage greatly scattered in EP, but the deviation of that in CC is significantly smaller. At 500 cycles of loading, there were no significant differences in the amount of microleakage among the groups, but at 1000, 1500, and 2000 cycles of loading, the amount of microleakage in CC was significantly smaller than that in IP. Throughout the experiment, the amount of microleakage in EP was largest, but no statistical difference was indicated due to the high standard deviation. Within the

  5. In Vitro Evaluation of Manual Torque Values Applied to Implant-Abutment Complex by Different Clinicians and Abutment Screw Loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Sabit; Cene, Erhan; Aya, Serhan Aydın; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2017-01-01

    Preload is applied to screws manually or using a torque wrench in dental implant systems, and the preload applied must be appropriate for the purpose. The aim of this study was to assess screw loosening and bending/torsional moments applied by clinicians of various specialties following application of manual tightening torque to combinations of implants and abutments. Ten-millimeter implants of 3.7 and 4.1 mm diameters and standard or solid abutments were used. Each group contained five implant-abutment combinations. The control and experimental groups comprised 20 and 160 specimens, respectively. Implants in the experimental group were tightened by dentists of different specialties. Torsional and bending moments during tightening were measured using a strain gauge. Control group and implants with preload values close to the ideal preload were subjected to a dynamic loading test at 150 N, 15 Hz, and 85,000 cycles. The implants that deformed in this test were examined using an optical microscope to assess deformities. Manual tightening did not yield the manufacturer-recommended preload values. Dynamic loading testing suggested early screw loosening/fracture in samples with insufficient preload. PMID:28473988

  6. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Sook; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at ...

  7. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  8. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti; Dileep Nag Vinnakota; Srinivas Rao Pottem; Mahesh Pulagam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled t...

  9. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Krishna Chaitanya; Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Pottem, Srinivas Rao; Pulagam, Mahesh

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled to form 8 simulations. After discretization, the contact stresses developed for 150 N vertical and 100 N oblique load applications were analyzed, using ABAQUS. By assessing damage initiation and shortest fatigue load on screw threads, the SL for 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cyclic loads were estimated, using fe-safe program. The obtained values were compared for influence of connection design, abutment angulation, and screw length. In straight abutment models, conical connection showed more damage (14.3%-72.3%) when compared to trilobe (10.1%-65.73%) at 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cycles for both vertical and oblique loads, whereas in angulated abutments, trilobe (16.1%-76.9%) demonstrated more damage compared to conical (13.5%-70%). Irrespective of the connection type and abutment angulation, short screws showed more percentage of damage compared to long screws. The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  10. Carbon film coating of abutment surfaces: effect on the abutment screw removal torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Pedro Henrique; de Moura Silva, Alecsandro; Cavalcanti Queiroz, José Renato; Salazar Marocho, Susana María; Bottino, Marco Antonia; Massi, Marcos; de Assunção e Souza, Rodrigo Othávio

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating of prefabricated implant abutment on screw removal torque (RT) before and after mechanical cycling (MC). Fifty-four abutments for external-hex implants were divided among 6 groups (n = 9): S, straight abutment (control); SC, straight coated abutment; SCy, straight abutment and MC; SCCy, straight coated abutment and MC; ACy, angled abutment and MC; and ACCy, angled coated abutment and MC. The abutments were attached to the implants by a titanium screw. RT values were measured and registered. Data (in Newton centimeter) were analyzed with analysis of variance and Dunnet test (α = 0.05). RT values were significantly affected by MC (P = 0.001) and the interaction between DLC coating and MC (P = 0.038). SCy and ACy showed the lowest RT values, statistically different from the control. The abutment coated groups had no statistical difference compared with the control. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed DLC film with a thickness of 3 μm uniformly coating the hexagonal abutment. DLC film deposited on the abutment can be used as an alternative procedure to reduce abutment screw loosening.

  11. The Effect of Tissue Entrapment on Screw Loosening at the Implant/Abutment Interface of External- and Internal-Connection Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeno, Helios A; Buitrago, Renan L; Sternberger, Sidney S; Patt, Marisa E; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo; Kurtz, Kenneth S; Tuminelli, Frank J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the removal of torque values of machined implant abutment connections (internal and external) with and without soft tissue entrapment using an in vitro model. Thirty external- and 30 internal-connection implants were embedded in urethane dimethacrylate. Porcine tissue was prepared and measured to thicknesses of 0.5 and 1.0 mm. Six groups (n = 10) were studied: External- and internal-connection implants with no tissue (control), 0.5, and 1.0 mm of tissue were entrapped at the implant/abutment interface. Abutments were inserted to 20 Ncm for all six groups. Insertion torque values were recorded using a digital torque gauge. All groups were then immersed in 1 M NaOH for 48 hours to dissolve tissue. Subsequent reverse torque measurements were recorded. Mean and standard deviation were determined for each group, and one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test were used for statistical analysis. All 60 specimens achieved a 20-Ncm insertion torque, despite tissue entrapment. Reverse torque measurements for external connection displayed a statistically significant difference (p internal-connection groups. In all specimens, tissue did not completely dissolve after 48 hours. External-connection implants were significantly affected by tissue entrapment; the thicker the tissue, the lower the reverse torque values noted. Internal-connection implants were less affected by tissue entrapment. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access ...

  13. Effectiveness of screw surface coating on the stability of zirconia abutments after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Butignon, Luis Eduardo; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2012-01-01

    Different surface treatments have been developed in attempts to prevent the loosening of abutment screws. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of titanium alloy screws with tungsten-doped diamond-like carbon (W-DLC) coating and uncoated screws in providing stability to zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic abutments after cyclic loading. Twenty prefabricated ZrO2 ceramic abutments on their respective external-hex implants were divided into two groups of equal size according to the type of screw used: uncoated titanium alloy screw (Ti) or titanium alloy screw with W-DLC coating (W-DLC/Ti). The removal torque value (preload) of the abutment screw was measured before and after loading. Cyclic loading between 11 and 211 N was applied at an angle of 30 degrees to the long axis of the implants at a frequency of 15 Hz. A target of 0.5 X 106 cycles was defined. Group means were calculated and compared using analysis of variance and the F test (α = .05). Before cyclic loading, the preload for Ti screws was significantly higher than that for W-DLC/Ti screws (P = .021). After cyclic loading, there was no significant difference between them (P = .499). Under the studied conditions, it can be concluded that, after cyclic loading, both abutment screws presented a significant reduction in the mean retained preload and similar effectiveness in maintaining preload.

  14. Measurements of Repeated Tightening and Loosening Torque of Seven Different Implant/Abutment Connection Designs and Their Modifications: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevica, Alena; Nathanson, Dan; Pober, Richard; Strating, Herman

    2018-02-01

    Repeated tightening and loosening of the abutment screw may alter its mechanical and physical properties affecting the optimal torque and ultimate reliability of an implant/abutment connection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated tightening and loosening of implant/abutment screws on the loosening torque of implant/abutment connections of commercially available implant systems. Seven different implant/abutment connections and their modifications were tested. The screws of each system were tightened according to the manufacturer's specifications. After 20 minutes the screws were loosened. This procedure was repeated ten times, and the differences between the 1st and 10th cycle were expressed as a percentage change RTq(%) and correlated with initial torque, the number of threads, the length of shank, and thread surface area employing Spearman's analysis. All systems showed significant differences in residual torque (RTq) value (p 0.05). All connections but group 3 (p = 1.000) showed a significant change from the initial torque (ITq) to the RTq values. The first successive RTq values increased in two connection groups 1 and 2. The remaining connections showed reduced RTq values ranging from -1.2 % (group 5) to -23.5% (group 6). The RTq values declined gradually with every repeated tightening in groups 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 11, 12. In group 2, after the tenth tightening the RTq was still above the ITq value. Only length of shank demonstrated a correlation with the RTq(%) change over the successive tightening loosening cycles (p abutment screws caused varying torque level changes among the different systems. These observations can probably be attributed to connection design. Limiting the number of tightening/loosening cycles in clinical and laboratory procedures is advisable for most of the implant systems tested. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  16. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  17. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  18. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongju; Shin, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA. PMID:29065610

  19. Effects of Screw Configuration on the Preload Force of Implant-Abutment Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Holger; Rathe, Florian; Pinz, Sören; Schlotmann, Luca; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Ratka, Christoph

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tightening torque, screw head angle, and thread number on the preload force of abutment screws. The test specimens consisted of three self-manufactured components (ie, a thread sleeve serving as an implant analog, an abutment analog, and an abutment screw). The abutment screws were fabricated with metric M1.6 external threads. The thread number varied between one and seven threads. The screw head angles were produced in eight varying angles (30 to 180 degrees). A sensor unit simultaneously measured the preload force of the screw and the torsion moment inside the screw shank. The tightening of the screw with the torque wrench was performed in five steps (15 to 35 Ncm). The torque wrench was calibrated before each step. Only the tightening torque and screw head angle affected the resulting preload force of the implant-abutment connection. The thread number had no effect. There was an approximately linear correlation between tightening torque and preload force. The tightening torque and screw head angle were the only study parameters that affected the resulting preload force of the abutment screw. The results obtained from this experiment are valid only for a single torque condition. Further investigations are needed that analyze other parameters that affect preload force. Once these parameters are known, it will add value for a strong, but detachable connection between the implant and abutment. Short implants and flat-to-flat connections especially will benefit significantly from this knowledge.

  20. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abutments with reduced diameter for both cement and screw retentions: analysis of failure modes and misfit of abutment-crown-connections after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Izabela Cristina Maurício; Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze failure modes and misfit of abutments with reduced diameter for both cement and screw retentions after cyclic loading. Forty morse-taper abutment/implant sets of titanium were divided into four groups (N = 10): G4.8S-4.8 abutment with screw-retained crown; G4.8C-4.8 abutment with cemented crown; G3.8S-3.8 abutment with screw-retained crown; and G3.8C-3.8 abutment with cemented crown. Copings were waxed on castable cylinders and cast by oxygen gas flame and injected by centrifugation. After, esthetic veneering ceramic was pressed on these copings for obtaining metalloceramic crowns of upper canine. Cemented crowns were cemented on abutments with provisional cement (Temp Bond NE), and screw-retained crowns were tightened to their abutments with torque recommended by manufacturer (10 N cm). The misfit was measured using a stereomicroscope in a 10× magnification before and after cyclic loading (300,000 cycles). Tests were visually monitored, and failures (decementation, screw loosening and fractures) were registered. Misfit was analyzed by mixed linear model while failure modes by chi-square test (α = 0.05). Cyclic loading affected misfit of 3.8C (P ≤ 0.0001), 3.8S (P = 0.0055) and 4.8C (P = 0.0318), but not of 4.8S (P = 0.1243). No differences were noted between 3.8S with 4.8S before (P = 0.1550) and after (P = 0.9861) cyclic loading, but 3.8C was different from 4.8C only after (P = 0.0015) loading. Comparing different types of retentions at the same diameter abutment, significant difference was noted before and after cyclic loading for 3.8 and 4.8 abutments. Analyzing failure modes, retrievable failures were present at 3.8S and 3.8C groups, while irretrievable were only present at 3.8S. The cyclic loading decreased misfit of cemented and screw-retained crowns on reduced diameter abutments, and misfit of cemented crowns is greater than screw-retained ones. Abutments of reduced diameter failed more than

  2. In vitro effect of chlorhexidine gel on torque and detorque values of implant abutment screw

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    Hamid Neshandar Asli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Use of chlorhexidine (CHX gel to eliminate the malodor of implant cavity may decrease the friction coefficient and effective preload and result in abutment screw loosening. This study aimed to assess the effect of CHX gel on the preload, torque, and detorque values. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on three groups of five implants. Group A (G1 was the control group and no material was applied to the implant cavity. In Group B (G2, implant cavity was filled with saliva before abutment screw tightening. In Group C (G3, implant cavity was first filled with saliva and then with CHX gel. The abutments were torqued to 24 N/cm2 according to the manufacturer's instructions and were then loosened. These processes were repeated five times. The ratio of the mean percentage of detorque to torque values was measured in all groups. The collected data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: No significant difference was noted between G1 and G2. Group G2 had significantly higher detorque value (p < 0.05. ANOVA detected a significant difference in the mean torque (p < 0.05 and detorque (p < 0.001 values among the three groups. G3 showed maximum difference between torque and detorque values; the minimum difference was noted in G2. Conclusion: Application of CHX gel (to decrease the malodor of the implant cavity decreases the detorque and preload values and increases the risk of screw loosening.

  3. Tightening techniques for the retaining screws of universal abutment

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    Alexandre Wittcinski REGALIN

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study evaluated the torque maintenance of universal abutment retaining screws using different tightening techniques, and coated or uncoated screws. Material and method The screws were tightened to implants as following: Control – 32 Ncm torque; H20 – holding 32 Ncm torque for 20 s; R – 32 Ncm torque, repeated after 10 min (retorque; and H20+R – combining the two tightening techniques. Titanium and coated screws were also evaluated. Result Statistical analysis showed higher maintained torque for titanium screws (p<0.001. The H20+R technique showed the highest maintained torque (p=0.003, but the H20 technique’s maintained torque was similar. Conclusion Titanium screws associating the two tightening techniques can improve maintained torque.

  4. Effect of lubricant on the reliability of dental implant abutment screw joint: An in vitro laboratory and three-dimension finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingting; Fan, Hongyi; Ma, Ruiyang; Chen, Hongyu; Li, Zhi; Yu, Haiyang

    2017-06-01

    Biomechanical factors play a key role in the success of dental implants. Fracture and loosening of abutment screws are major issues. This study investigated the effect of lubricants on the stability of dental implant-abutment connection. As lubricants, graphite and vaseline were coated on the abutment screw surface, respectively, and a blank without lubricant served as the control. The total friction coefficient (μ tot ), clamping force, fatigue behavior and detorque of the joint combined with dynamic cyclic loading were measured under different lubricating conditions. Further, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to investigate stress distribution, in conjunction with experimental images. The results showed that the lubricant reduced μ tot , which in turn led to an increase in clamping force. Decrease in loading increased the fatigue life of the screw. However, use of lubricant at high load reduced the fatigue life. Ductile fracture at the first thread of the screw was the chief failure mode, which was due to maximum von Mises stress. Higher stress levels occurred in the lubricant groups. Lubricated screws resulted in lower detorque which made the joint easier to loosen. In conclusion, the lubricant cannot effectively improve the reliability of dental implant-abutment connection. Keeping the interfaces of implant-screw uncontaminated and strengthening the surface of the screw may be recommend for clinical operation and future design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pedicle screw loosening is correlated to chronic subclinical deep implant infection: a retrospective database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Lukas; Malaj, Isabella; Sadoghi, Patrick; Amerstorfer, Florian; Glehr, Mathias; Vander, Klaus; Leithner, Andreas; Radl, Roman

    2018-04-13

    Spinal fusion is used for treatment of spinal deformities, degeneration, infection, malignancy, and trauma. Reduction of motion enables osseous fusion and permanent stabilization of segments, compromised by loosening of the pedicle screws (PS). Deep implant infection, biomechanical, and chemical mechanisms are suspected reasons for loosening of PS. Study objective was to investigate the frequency and impact of deep implant infection on PS loosening. Intraoperative infection screening from wound and explanted material sonication was performed during revision surgeries following dorsal stabilization. Case history events and factors, which might promote implant infections, were included in this retrospective survey. 110 cases of spinal metal explantation were included. In 29.1% of revision cases, infection screening identified a germ, most commonly Staphylococcus (53.1%) and Propionibacterium (40.6%) genus. Patients screened positive had a significant higher number of previous spinal operations and radiologic loosening of screws. Patients revised for adjacent segment failure had a significantly lower rate of positive infection screening than patients revised for directly implant associated reasons. Removal of implants that revealed positive screening effected significant pain relief. Chronic implant infection seems to play a role in PS loosening and ongoing pain, causing revision surgery after spinal fusion. Screw loosening and multiple prior spinal operations should be suspicious for implant infection after spinal fusion when it comes to revision surgery. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  6. Probabilistic analysis of preload in the abutment screw of a dental implant complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Teja; Ross, Thomas A; Lang, Lisa A; Millwater, Harry R

    2008-09-01

    Screw loosening is a problem for a percentage of implants. A probabilistic analysis to determine the cumulative probability distribution of the preload, the probability of obtaining an optimal preload, and the probabilistic sensitivities identifying important variables is lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the inherent variability of material properties, surface interactions, and applied torque in an implant system to determine the probability of obtaining desired preload values and to identify the significant variables that affect the preload. Using software programs, an abutment screw was subjected to a tightening torque and the preload was determined from finite element (FE) analysis. The FE model was integrated with probabilistic analysis software. Two probabilistic analysis methods (advanced mean value and Monte Carlo sampling) were applied to determine the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of preload. The coefficient of friction, elastic moduli, Poisson's ratios, and applied torque were modeled as random variables and defined by probability distributions. Separate probability distributions were determined for the coefficient of friction in well-lubricated and dry environments. The probabilistic analyses were performed and the cumulative distribution of preload was determined for each environment. A distinct difference was seen between the preload probability distributions generated in a dry environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 347 (61.9) N) compared to a well-lubricated environment (normal distribution, mean (SD): 616 (92.2) N). The probability of obtaining a preload value within the target range was approximately 54% for the well-lubricated environment and only 0.02% for the dry environment. The preload is predominately affected by the applied torque and coefficient of friction between the screw threads and implant bore at lower and middle values of the preload CDF, and by the applied torque and the elastic modulus of the abutment

  7. Effects of Repeated Screw Tightening on Implant Abutment Interfaces in Terms of Bacterial and Yeast Leakage in Vitro: One-Time Abutment Versus the Multiscrewing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Roberta; Di Girolamo, Michele; Mirisola, Concetta; Baggi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Screw loosening can damage the interfaces of implant components, resulting in susceptibility to contamination of the internal parts by microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of abutment screw retightening on the leakage of two different types of bacteria, Streptococcus sanguinis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and of the yeast Candida albicans. Two types of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces were tested. Groups A and B each used a different type of system that consisted of 20 different pieces that were assembled according to the manufacturer's torque recommendations; four samples in each group were closed just one time, four samples three times, four samples five times, four samples seven times, and four samples nine times. The implants of groups A and B were contaminated with 0.1 μL of microbial solution just before being assembled for the last time to minimize the possibility of contamination. Results showed a direct correlation between the number of colony-forming units grown in the plates and the closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment systems. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate the possibility that repeated closing/opening cycles of the implant-abutment unit may influence bacterial/yeast leakage, most likely as a consequence of decreased precision of the coupling between the abutment and the internal part of the dental implant. These findings suggest that a one-time abutment technique may avoid microbiologic leakage in cases of implant-abutment systems with tube-in-tube interfaces.

  8. Preload, Coefficient of Friction, and Thread Friction in an Implant-Abutment-Screw Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentaschek, Stefan; Tomalla, Sven; Schmidtmann, Irene; Lehmann, Karl Martin

    To examine the screw preload, coefficient of friction (COF), and tightening torque needed to overcome the thread friction of an implant-abutment-screw complex. In a customized load frame, 25 new implant-abutment-screw complexes including uncoated titanium alloy screws were torqued and untorqued 10 times each, applying 25 Ncm. Mean preload values decreased significantly from 209.8 N to 129.5 N according to the number of repetitions. The overall COF increased correspondingly. There was no comparable trend for the thread friction component. These results suggest that the application of a used implant-abutment-screw complex may be unfavorable for obtaining optimal screw preload.

  9. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Aloisio Fleck NEUMANN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1, polyetheretherketone (PEEK screws (Group 2, and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3. The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05. Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  10. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  11. The effect of polyethylene creep on tibial insert locking screw loosening and back-out in prosthetic knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-10-01

    A prosthetic knee joint typically comprises a cobalt-chromium femoral component that articulates with a polyethylene tibial insert. A locking screw may be used to prevent micromotion and dislodgement of the tibial insert from the tibial tray. Screw loosening and back-out have been reported, but the mechanism that causes screw loosening is currently not well understood. In this paper, we experimentally evaluate the effect of polyethylene creep on the preload of the locking screw. We find that the preload decreases significantly as a result of polyethylene creep, which reduces the torque required to loosen the locking screw. The torque applied to the tibial insert due to internal/external rotation within the knee joint during gait could thus drive locking screw loosening and back-out. The results are very similar for different types of polyethylene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Repeated Screw Joint Closing and Opening Cycles and Cyclic Loading on Abutment Screw Removal Torque and Screw Thread Morphology: Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mahnaz; Mahgoli, Hosseinali; Payaminia, Leila

    To evaluate the effect of repeated screw joint closing and opening cycles and cyclic loading on abutment screw removal torque and screw thread morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three groups (n = 10 in each group) of implant-abutment-abutment screw assemblies were created. There were also 10 extra abutment screws as new screws in group 3. The abutment screws were tightened to 12 Ncm with an electronic torque meter; then they were removed and removal torque values were recorded. This sequence was repeated 5 times for group 1 and 15 times for groups 2 and 3. The same screws in groups 1 and 2 and the new screws in group 3 were then tightened to 12 Ncm; this was also followed by screw tightening to 30 Ncm and retightening to 30 Ncm 15 minutes later. Removal torque measurements were performed after screws were subjected to cyclic loading (0.5 × 10⁶ cycles; 1 Hz; 75 N). Moreover, the surface topography of one screw from each group before and after cyclic loading was evaluated with SEM and compared with an unused screw. All groups exhibited reduced removal torque values in comparison to insertion torque in each cycle. However, there was a steady trend of torque loss in each group. A comparison of the last cycle of the groups before loading showed significantly greater torque loss value in the 15th cycle of groups 2 and 3 compared with the fifth cycle of group 1 (P abutment is definitively placed.

  13. Evaluation of torque loss value of MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Alikhasi; Roshanak Baghaie; Nasim khosronejad

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: In response to esthetic demand of patients, ceramic abutments have been developed. Despite esthetic of zirconia abutments, machining accuracy of these abutments has always been a question. Any misfit in the abutment-implant interface connection can lead to detorque and screw loosening. The aim of this study was to compare torque loss value of manually aided design/manually aided manufacture (MAD/MAM) zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments. Materials and ...

  14. Influence of abutment type and esthetic veneering on preload maintenance of abutment screw of implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2014-02-01

    The effect of veneering materials on screw joint stability remains inconclusive. Thus, this study evaluated the preload maintenance of abutment screws of single crowns fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials. Sixty crowns were divided into five groups (n = 12): UCLA abutment in gold alloy with ceramic (group GC) and resin (group GR) veneering, UCLA abutment in titanium with ceramic (group TiC) and resin (group TiR) veneering, and zirconia abutment with ceramic veneering (group ZiC). Abutment screws made of gold were used with a 35 Ncm insertion torque. Detorque measurements were obtained initially and after mechanical cycling. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's exact test at a significance level of 5%. For the initial detorque means (in Ncm), group TiC (21.4 ± 1.78) exhibited statistically lower torque maintenance than groups GC (23.9 ± 0.91), GR (24.1 ± 1.34), and TiR (23.2 ± 1.33) (p abutment type and veneering material. More irregular surfaces in the hexagon area of the castable abutments were observed. The superiority of any veneering material concerning preload maintenance was not established. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Use of next generation sequencing to detect biofilm bacteria in a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Lorenzen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    2. Center for Microbial Communities, Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark 3. Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Magdeburg, Germany 4. Eifelklinik St. Brigida, Simmerath, Germany Aim: ”Hidden deep...... implant-related infection is believed to be linked to pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery. Low-grade bacterial infection can be hard to diagnose and may be undetected by conventional culture based methods. Next generation sequencing (NGS) could help to uncover hidden bacterial infections...... as a possible cause for implant loosening. This case report describes the use of NGS in the diagnostic work-up of a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery.” Method: ”A 60 y/o male had to undergo revision spine surgery for pedicle screw loosening and adjacent segment disease 3 years after...

  16. Influence of abutment screw preload on stress distribution in marginal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraisat, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Changes in an implant assembly after abutment connection might possibly cause deformation in the implant/abutment joint and even in the marginal bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of abutment screw preload through the implant collar on marginal bone stress without external load application. Models of three implant parts made of titanium (implant, abutment, and abutment screw) and cortical bone were built and positioned with computer-aided design software. Meshing and generation of boundary conditions, loads, and interactions were performed. Each part was meshed independently. The sole load applied to the model was a torque of 32 Ncm on the abutment screw about its axis of rotation. The implant collar was deformed axially after the screw was tightened (3 μm). This deformation resulted in 60 MPa of stress in the marginal bone. Moreover, pressure on the marginal bone in a radial direction was observed. It can be concluded that, without any external load application, abutment screw preload exerts stresses on the implant collar and the marginal bone. These findings should help guide the development of new implant/abutment joint designs that exert less stress on the marginal bone.

  17. Removal torque evaluation of three different abutment screws for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paepoemsin, T; Reichart, P A; Chaijareenont, P; Strietzel, F P; Khongkhunthian, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque of three different abutment screws and pull out strength of implant-abutment connection for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading. The study was performed in accordance with ISO 14801:2007. Three implant groups (n=15) were used: group A, PW Plus® with flat head screw; group B, PW Plus® with tapered screw; and group C, Conelog® with flat head screw. All groups had the same implant-abutment connection feature: cone with mandatory index. All screws were tightened with manufacturer's recommended torque. Ten specimens in each group underwent cyclic loading (1×106 cycles, 10 Hz, and 250 N). Then, all specimens were un-tightened, measured for the removal torque, and underwent a tensile test. The force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture was recorded. The data were analysed using independent sample t-test, ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Before cyclic loading, removal torque in groups A, B and C were significantly different (B> A> C, Pabutment from implant fixture increased immensely after cyclic loading.

  18. The value of 18F-fluoride PET/CT in the assessment of screw loosening in patients after intervertebral fusion stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifen, Tanja; Rodrigues, Margarida; Rettenbacher, Lukas; Holzmannhofer, Johannes; Pirich, Christian; Piotrowski, Wolfgang; Mc Coy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for the diagnosis of screw loosening after intervertebral fusion stabilization and compared the results with those from functional radiography. A group of 59 patients with pain in the region of previous intervertebral fusion stabilization and suspicion of implant instability due to screw loosening were investigated with 18 F-fluoride PET/CT and functional radiography, 30.1 ± 3.4 and 29.3 ± 3.2 months, respectively, after surgery. The criterion for loosening was increased focal uptake surrounding the screw entry point and shaft. SUV max and SUV mean were measured in a region of interest (ROI) drawn around each screw (334 screws analysed). The final diagnosis was established by surgical exploration in 27 patients and clinical follow-up after intervertebral fusion stabilization in 32 patients. Of the 59 patients, 20 were proven positive for implant failure due to screw loosening and 39 were confirmed negative. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18 F-fluoride PET/CT were 75 %, 97.4 % and 89.8 % in the patient-based analysis, and 45.6 %, 100 % and 80 % in the screw-based analysis, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 93.8 % and 100 % in the patient-based analysis, and 88.4 and 76 % in the screw-based analysis, respectively. CT signs in PET/CT allowed screw breakage to be detected in three patients. SUV max , SUV mean and SUV max /SUV mean ratios in screw ROIs and respective values in reference regions were all found to be significantly different between screws positive for loosening (58 screws) and screws negative for loosening (276 screws). The ratio between SUV max in screw ROIs and the values in reference regions was the most significant parameter for distinguishing screws positive and screws negative for loosening. 18 F-Fluoride PET/CT imaging is useful for the diagnosis of screw loosening in patients with persistent symptoms after intervertebral fusion stabilization. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of torque loss value of MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In response to esthetic demand of patients, ceramic abutments have been developed. Despite esthetic of zirconia abutments, machining accuracy of these abutments has always been a question. Any misfit in the abutment-implant interface connection can lead to detorque and screw loosening. The aim of this study was to compare torque loss value of manually aided design/manually aided manufacture (MAD/MAM zirconia abutments with prefabricated titanium abutments. Materials and Methods: Seven titanium abutments (Branemark RP, Easy abutment and seven copy milled abutments which were duplicated from the prefabricated Zirkonzhan (ZirkonZahn, Sand in Taufers, Italy were prepared. After sintering process of zirconia abutment, all abutments were fastened with a torque screw under 35 Ncm. Detorque measurements were performed per group pushing the reverse button of the Torque controller soon after screw tightening with values registered. The mean torque loss were calculated and compared using Student's t test. Results: The mean of torque loss was 12.71 Ncm with standard deviation of 1.70 for prefabricated titanium abutments and 15.50 Ncm with standard deviation of 4.67 for MAD-MAM abutments. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.23. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, MAD-MAM ceramic abutments could maintain the applied torque comparing to the prefabricated abutments.

  20. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  1. Experimental conical-head abutment screws on the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface: an in vitro analysis using target-specific DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Murillo S; do Nascimento, Cássio; Dos Santos, Carla G P; Pires, Isabela M; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to identify and quantify up to 38 microbial species from human saliva penetrating through the implant-abutment interface in two different implant connections, external hexagon and tri-channel internal connection, both with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head abutment screws. Forty-eight two-part implants with external hexagon (EH; n = 24) or tri-channel internal (TI; n = 24) connections were investigated. Abutments were attached to implants with conventional flat-head or experimental conical-head screws. After saliva incubation, Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was used to identify and quantify up to 38 bacterial colonizing the internal parts of the implants. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni's post-tests for multiple comparisons was used for statistical analysis. Twenty-four of thirty-eight species, including putative periodontal pathogens, were found colonizing the inner surfaces of both EH and TI implants. Peptostreptococcus anaerobios (P = 0.003), Prevotella melaninogenica (P abutment screws have impacted the microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface. Implants attached with experimental conical-head abutment screws showed lower counts of microorganisms when compared with conventional flat-head screws. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Accuracy of bone SPECT/CT for identifying hardware loosening in patients who underwent lumbar fusion with pedicle screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudyana, Hendrah; Maes, Alex [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Thierry; Fidlers, Luc [AZ Groeninge, Department of Neurosurgery, Kortrijk (Belgium); Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nicolai, Daniel [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of bone SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) in diagnosing loosening of fixation material in patients with recurrent or persistent back pain that underwent lumbar arthrodesis with pedicle screws using surgery and clinical follow-up as gold standard A total of 48 patients (median age 49 years, range 21-81 years; 17 men) who had undergone lumbar spinal arthrodesis were included in this retrospective analysis. SPECT/CT results were compared to the gold standard of surgical evaluation or clinical follow-up. Positive SPECT/CT results were considered true positives if findings were confirmed by surgery or if clinical and other examinations were completely consistent with the positive SPECT/CT finding. They were considered false positives if surgical evaluation did not find any loose pedicle screws or if symptoms subsided with non-surgical therapy. Negative SPECT/CT scans were considered true negatives if symptoms either improved without surgical intervention or remained stable over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Negative SPECT/CT scans were determined to be false negatives if surgery was still required and loosening of material was found. The median length of time from primary surgery to bone SPECT/CT referral was 29.5 months (range 12-192 months). Median follow-up was 18 months (range 6-57) for subjects who did not undergo surgery. Thirteen of the 48 patients were found to be positive for loosening on bone SPECT/CT. Surgical evaluation (8 patients) and clinical follow-up (5 patients) showed that bone SPECT/CT correctly predicted loosening in 9 of 13 patients, while it falsely diagnosed loosening in 4 patients. Of 35 negative bone SPECT/CT scans, 12 were surgically confirmed. In 18 patients, bone SPECT/CT revealed lesions that could provide an alternative explanation for the symptoms of pain (active facet degeneration in 14 patients, and disc and sacroiliac

  3. The Effect of Lumbar Lordosis on Screw Loosening in Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization: Four-Year Follow-Up with Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hung Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS on clinical and radiographic outcomes, including spinal pelvic alignment. Method. Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level DDS for lumbar spondylosis, mild degenerative spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed by radiographs and computed tomography. Pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (LL were also compared. Results. In 206 patients with an average follow-up of 51.1 ± 20.8 months, there were 87 screws (8.2% in 42 patients (20.4% that were loose. All clinical outcomes improved at each time point after operation. Patients with loosened screws were 45 years older. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of screw loosening in DDS involving S1, and these patients were more likely to have loosened screws if the LL failed to increase after the operation. Conclusions. The DDS screw loosening rate was overall 8.2% per screw and 20.4% per patient at more than 4 years of follow-up. Older patients, S1 involvement, and those patients who failed to gain LL postoperatively were at higher risk of screw loosening.

  4. Effect of modifying the screw access channels of zirconia implant abutment on the cement flow pattern and retention of zirconia restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2014-07-01

    The effect of managing the screw access channels of zirconia implant abutments in the esthetic zone has not been extensively evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an insert placed within the screw access channel of an anterior zirconia implant abutment on the amount of cement retained within the restoration-abutment system and on the dislodging force. Thirty-six paired zirconia abutments and restorations were fabricated by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing and were divided into 3 groups: open abutment, with the screw access channel unfilled; closed abutment, with the screw access channel sealed; and insert abutment, with a thin, tubular metal insert projection continuous with the screw head and placed into the abutment screw access channel. The restorations were cemented to the abutments with preweighed eugenol-free zinc oxide cement (TempBond NE). Excess cement was removed, and the weight of the cement that remained in the restoration-abutment system was measured. Vertical tensile dislodging forces were recorded at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min after incubation in a 37°C water bath for 24 hours. The specimens were examined for the cement flow pattern into the screw access channel after dislodgement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, followed by multiple comparisons by using the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = .05). The mean (standard deviation) of retentive force values ranged from 108.1 ± 29.9 N to 148.3 ± 21.0 N. The retentive force values differed significantly between the insert abutment and both the open abutment (P abutment groups (P abutment and insert abutment being greater than closed abutment (P abutment with a metal insert significantly affected both the cement retained within the abutment itself and the retention capabilities of the zirconia restoration cemented with TempBond NE cement. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier

  5. Torque Removal Evaluation of Screw in One-Piece and Two-Piece Abutments Tightened with a Handheld screwdriver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some clinicians use a handheld screw driver instead of a torque wrench to definitively tighten abutment screws. The aim of this study was to compare the removal torque of one-piece and two-piece abutments tightened with a handheld driver and a torque control ratchet. Methods: 40 ITI implants were placed in acrylic blocks and divided into 4 groups. In groups one and two, 10 ITI one-piece abutments (Solid® and in groups three and four, 10 ITI two-piece abutments (Synocta® were placed on the implants. In groups one and three abutments were tightened by 5 experienced males and 5 experienced females using a handheld driver. In groups two and four abutments were tightened using a torque wrench with torque values of 10, 20 and 35 N.cm. Insertion torque and removal torque values of the abutments were measured with a digital torque meter. Results: The insertion torque values (ITVs of males in both abutments were significantly higher than those of females. ITVs in both Solid® and Synocta® abutments tightened with a handheld screwdriver were similar to the torque of 20 N.cm in the torque wrench. Removal torque values (RTVs of solid® abutments were higher than those of synocta® abutments. Conclusion: The one- piece abutments (solid® showed higher RTVs than the two-piece abutments (synocta®. Hand driver does not produce sufficient preload force for the final tightening of the abutment

  6. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  7. Coating dental implant abutment screws with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles: the effect on maintaining torque after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesqueur, Laura Soares; de Figueiredo, Viviane Maria Gonçalves; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Massi, Marcos; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of maintaining torque after mechanical cycling of abutment screws that are coated with diamondlike carbon and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles, with external and internal hex connections. Sixty implants were divided into six groups according to the type of connection (external or internal hex) and the type of abutment screw (uncoated, coated with diamondlike carbon, and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles). The implants were inserted into polyurethane resin and crowns of nickel chrome were cemented on the implants. The crowns had a hole for access to the screw. The initial torque and the torque after mechanical cycling were measured. The torque values maintained (in percentages) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test, with a significance level of 5%. The largest torque value was maintained in uncoated screws with external hex connections, a finding that was statistically significant (P = .0001). No statistically significant differences were seen between the groups with and without coating in maintaining torque for screws with internal hex connections (P = .5476). After mechanical cycling, the diamondlike carbon with and without diamond doping on the abutment screws showed no improvement in maintaining torque in external and internal hex connections.

  8. Influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyon-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jeong; Jeon, Young-Chan; Chang, Brian Myung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Regular and wide-diameter implant systems with three different joint connection designs: an external butt joint, a one-stage internal cone, and a two-stage internal cone were divided into seven groups (n=5, in each group). The initial removal torque values of the abutment screw were measured with a digital torque gauge. The postload removal torque values were measured after 100,000 cycles of a 150 N and a 10 Hz cyclic load had been applied. Subsequently, the rates of the initial and postload removal torque losses were calculated to evaluate the effect of the joint connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Each group was compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test as post-hoc test (α=0.05). THE POSTLOAD REMOVAL TORQUE VALUE WAS HIGH IN THE FOLLOWING ORDER WITH REGARD TO MAGNITUDE: two-stage internal cone, one-stage internal cone, and external butt joint systems. In the regular-diameter group, the external butt joint and one-stage internal cone systems showed lower postload removal torque loss rates than the two-stage internal cone system. In the wide-diameter group, the external butt joint system showed a lower loss rate than the one-stage internal cone and two-stage internal cone systems. In the two-stage internal cone system, the wide-diameter group showed a significantly lower loss rate than the regular-diameter group (P<.05). The results of this study showed that the external butt joint was more advantageous than the internal cone in terms of the postload removal torque loss. For the difference in the implant diameter, a wide diameter was more advantageous in terms of the torque loss rate.

  9. Influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyon-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jeong; Jeon, Young-Chan; Chang, Brian Myung

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the implant-abutment connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. MATERIALS AND METHODS Regular and wide-diameter implant systems with three different joint connection designs: an external butt joint, a one-stage internal cone, and a two-stage internal cone were divided into seven groups (n=5, in each group). The initial removal torque values of the abutment screw were measured with a digital torque gauge. The postload removal torque values were measured after 100,000 cycles of a 150 N and a 10 Hz cyclic load had been applied. Subsequently, the rates of the initial and postload removal torque losses were calculated to evaluate the effect of the joint connection design and diameter on the screw joint stability. Each group was compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test as post-hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The postload removal torque value was high in the following order with regard to magnitude: two-stage internal cone, one-stage internal cone, and external butt joint systems. In the regular-diameter group, the external butt joint and one-stage internal cone systems showed lower postload removal torque loss rates than the two-stage internal cone system. In the wide-diameter group, the external butt joint system showed a lower loss rate than the one-stage internal cone and two-stage internal cone systems. In the two-stage internal cone system, the wide-diameter group showed a significantly lower loss rate than the regular-diameter group (P<.05). CONCLUSION The results of this study showed that the external butt joint was more advantageous than the internal cone in terms of the postload removal torque loss. For the difference in the implant diameter, a wide diameter was more advantageous in terms of the torque loss rate. PMID:24843398

  10. [Dynamic analysis of the rigid fixed bridge and related tissue after intrusion of abutment with micro screw implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Xu, Pei-cheng; Lu, Liu-lei

    2013-08-01

    To study the variety of mechanical behavior of fixed bridge after abutments being intruded by micro screw implant and to provide theoretical principles for clinical practice of teeth preparation after intrusion of abutments under dynamic loads. Two-dimensional images of maxilla, teeth and supporting tissues of healthy people were scanned by spiral CT and were synthesized by Mimics10.01, Ansys13.0, etc. The three-dimensional finite element mathematical model of rigid fixed bridge repairing on double end of maxillary molar was developed. Under the condition of 10% simulative abutment alveolar absorption, vertical and oblique dynamic forces were applied in a circle of mastication(0.875 s) to build mathematical model after the abutment had been intruded for 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm. Stress variety of prosthesis, teeth, periodontal ligaments and supporting tissues were compared before and after intrusion of abutments. Stress variety of the prosthesis occurred, which had close relationship with the structure of prosthesis and teeth, the areas of periodontal ligaments increased, stress on the whole decreased along with the increase of the length of intrusion. With time accumulating, the stress value in prosthesis, teeth, periodontal ligaments and supporting tissues increased gradually and loads in oblique direction induced peak value stress in a masticatory cycle. Some residual stress left after unloading. By preparing the fixed bridge after abutment intrusion by micro screw implant, the service life of abutment and fixed bridge prosthesis can be reduced. The abutment and its related tissue have time-dependent mechanical behaviors during one mastication. The influence of oblique force on stress was greater than vertical force. There is some residual stress left after one mastication period. With the increase of the intrusion on abutment, residual stress reduced.

  11. Effect of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on removal torque in external and internal hex implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hnd Hadi; Lee, Jin-Han; Bae, Ji-Myung; Cho, Hye-Won

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on the removal torque (RTV) in external hex (EH) and internal hex (IH) implants. Forty screw-retained single crowns were connected to external and internal hex implants. The prepared titanium abutment screws were classified into 8 groups based on the number of threads (n = 5 per group): EH 12.5, 6.5, 3.5, 2.5 and IH 6.5, 5, 3.5, 2.5 threads. The abutment screws were tightened with 20 Ncm torque twice with 10-minute intervals. After 5 minutes, the initial RTVs of the abutment screws were measured with a digital torque gauge (MGT12). A customized jig was constructed to apply a load along the implant long axis at the central fossa of the maxillary first molar. The post-loading RTVs were measured after 16,000 cycles of mechanical loading with 50 N at a 1-Hz frequency. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The post-loading RTVs were significantly lower than the initial RTVs in the EH 2.5 thread and IH 2.5 thread groups (P<.05). The initial RTVs exhibited no significant differences among the 8 groups, whereas the post-loading RTVs of the EH 6.5 and EH 3.5 thread groups were higher than those of the IH 3.5 thread group (P<.05). Within the limitations of this study, the external hex implants with short screw lengths were more advantageous than internal hex implants with short screw lengths in torque maintenance after cyclic loading.

  12. Evaluation of stability of interface between CCM (Co-Cr-Mo) UCLA abutment and external hex implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Joon; Park, Young-Bum; Choi, Hyunmin; Cho, Youngsung; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Keun-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the stability of interface between Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) UCLA abutment and external hex implant. Sixteen external hex implant fixtures were assigned to two groups (CCM and Gold group) and were embedded in molds using clear acrylic resin. Screw-retained prostheses were constructed using CCM UCLA abutment and Gold UCLA abutment. The external implant fixture and screw-retained prostheses were connected using abutment screws. After the abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm torque, 5 kg thermocyclic functional loading was applied by chewing simulator. A target of 1.0 × 10 6 cycles was applied. After cyclic loading, removal torque values were recorded using a driving torque tester, and the interface between implant fixture and abutment was evaluated by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The means and standard deviations (SD) between the CCM and Gold groups were analyzed with independent t-test at the significance level of 0.05. Fractures of crowns, abutments, abutment screws, and fixtures and loosening of abutment screws were not observed after thermocyclic loading. There were no statistically significant differences at the recorded removal torque values between CCM and Gold groups ( P >.05). SEM analysis revealed that remarkable wear patterns were observed at the abutment interface only for Gold UCLA abutments. Those patterns were not observed for other specimens. Within the limit of this study, CCM UCLA abutment has no statistically significant difference in the stability of interface with external hex implant, compared with Gold UCLA abutment.

  13. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Miguel Saliba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm, with p=0.001. CONCLUSION: This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws.

  14. The effects of loading on the preload and dimensions of the abutment screw for a 3-unit cantilever-fixed prosthesis design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Gaurav; Yousef, Hoda; Ehrenberg, David; Luke, Allyn; Weiner, Saul

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an in vitro model system to compare the effects on the screw torque and screw dimensions within 2 commercially available implant systems from occlusal loading on a cantilevered-fixed partial denture. Cantilevered implant-supported 3-unit prostheses with 2 premolar abutments and 1 premolar pontic (7.3 mm in length) were made on resin casts containing 2 implant analogs for 2 implant systems: BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant System (Birmingham, AL) and Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant System (Carlsbad, CA) with 10 samples in each group. Each sample was loaded with either of 2 protocols: (1) a load of 50 N on the cantilevered pontic unit and (2) a loading of 150 N on all 3 units. The outcome measures were (1) changes in residual torque of the abutment screws and (2) changes in screw dimension. The BioLok Silhouette Tapered Implant group demonstrated slight but statistically significant torque loss 18.8% to 28.5% in both abutment screws for both protocols, P ≤ 0.05, without any changes in screw dimension. In the Zimmer Tapered Screw-Vent Implant group, there was a significant elongation of the abutment screws and a markedly significant 44.4%, (P ≤ 0.01) loss in torque in the mesial screw and a 28.5%, (P ≤ 0.05) loss in torque in the distal screw when the cantilever alone was loaded. Differences in screw design influence the maintenance of preload and distortion of the shank. The influence of the interface design, namely an internal hex of 1 mm versus an external hex did not influence the preload. Cantilevered prostheses can cause loss of torque and dimensional changes in abutment screws.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF SCREW TYPE, ALLOY AND CYLINDER POSITION ON THE MARGINAL FIT OF IMPLANT FRAMEWORKS BEFORE AND AFTER LASER WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-01-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. METHODS: After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected p...

  16. The effect of DLC-coating deposition method on the reliability and mechanical properties of abutment's screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Dimorvan; Coelho, Paulo G; Bergamo, Edmara T P; Bonfante, Estevam A; Witek, Lukasz; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2018-04-10

    To characterize the mechanical properties of different coating methods of DLC (diamond-like carbon) onto dental implant abutment screws, and their effect on the probability of survival (reliability). Seventy-five abutment screws were allocated into three groups according to the coating method: control (no coating); UMS - DLC applied through unbalanced magnetron sputtering; RFPA-DLC applied through radio frequency plasma-activated (n=25/group). Twelve screws (n=4) were used to determine the hardness and Young's modulus (YM). A 3D finite element model composed of titanium substrate, DLC-layer and a counterpart were constructed. The deformation (μm) and shear stress (MPa) were calculated. The remaining screws of each group were torqued into external hexagon abutments and subjected to step-stress accelerated life-testing (SSALT) (n=21/group). The probability Weibull curves and reliability (probability survival) were calculated considering the mission of 100, 150 and 200N at 50,000 and 100,000 cycles. DLC-coated experimental groups evidenced higher hardness than control (p1 indicating that fatigue contributed to failure. High reliability was depicted at a mission of 100N. At 200N a significant decrease in reliability was detected for all groups (ranging from 39% to 66%). No significant difference was observed among groups regardless of mission. Screw fracture was the chief failure mode. DLC-coating have been used to improve titanium's mechanical properties and increase the reliability of dental implant-supported restorations. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of torque loss in Co-Cr castable abutments after cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Zeighami

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Misfit between the castable implant components can cause torque loss before and after cyclic loading. However, it is more appropriate to relate the results of this study to the screw loosening of the above mentioned abutments than judging their clinical performance.

  18. Axial displacement of abutments into implants and implant replicas, with the tapered cone-screw internal connection, as a function of tightening torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Bruno; Jordan, Laurence; Blind, Olivier; Tavernier, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The passive fit of a superstructure on implant abutments is essential to success. One source of error when using a tapered cone-screw internal connection may be the difference between the tightening torque level applied to the abutments by the laboratory technician compared to that applied by the treating clinician. The purpose of this study was to measure the axial displacement of tapered cone-screw abutments into implants and their replicas as a function of the tightening torque level. Twenty tapered cone-screw abutments were selected. Two groups were created: 10 abutments were secured into 10 implants, and 10 abutments were secured into 10 corresponding implant replicas. Each abutment was tightened in increasing increments of 5 Ncm, from 0 Ncm to 45 Ncm, with a torque controller. The length of each sample was measured repeatedly with an Electronic Digital Micrometer. The mean axial displacement for the implant group and the replica group was calculated. The data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney and Spearman tests. For both groups, there was always an axial displacement of the abutment upon each incremental application of torque. The mean axial displacement values varied between 7 and 12 microm for the implant group and between 6 and 21 microm for the replica group at each 5-Ncm increment. From 0 to 45 Ncm, the total mean axial displacement values were 89 microm for the implant group and 122 microm for the replica group. There was a continuous axial displacement of the abutments into implants and implant replicas when the applied torque was raised from 0 to 45 Ncm. Torque applied above the level recommended by the manufacturer increased the difference in displacement between the two groups.

  19. Implant-abutment connections on single crowns: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, F M; Barnaba, P; Mazzoleni, S; Ottria, L; Gargari, M; Zuccon, A; Bruno, G; DI Fiore, A

    2017-01-01

    Different implant-abutment connections have been developed in the effort of reducing mechanical and biological failure. The most frequent complications are screw loosening, abutment or implant fracture and marginal bone loss due to overload and bacterial micro-leakage. Ideal connection should work as a one-piece implant avoiding the formation of a micro-gap at the implant-abutment interface. Different in vitro and in vivo researches have been published to compare the implant-abutment connections actually available: external hexagon, internal hexagon and conical finding different amount of micro-gap, micro-leakage and marginal bone loss. The aim of this article is to describe, according to the most recent literature, different kind of fixture-abutment connections and their clinical and mechanical advantages or disadvantages.

  20. Influence of space size of abutment screw access channel on the amount of extruded excess cement and marginal accuracy of cement-retained single implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Al-Qarni, Mohammed N; Al-Bakri, Ahmed S; Al-Maflehi, Nassr S; Abualsaud, Haythem S

    2018-02-01

    The detrimental effect of extruded excess cement on peri-implant tissue has been well documented. Although several techniques have been proposed to reduce this effect by decreasing the amount of extruded cement, how the space size of the abutment screw access channel (SAC) affects the amount of extruded cement and marginal accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the size of the unfilled space of the abutment SAC on the amount of extruded excess cement and the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings. Twelve implant replicas and corresponding standard abutments were attached and embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) zirconia copings with a uniform 30-μm cement space were fabricated by 1 dental technician using the standard method. The copings were temporarily cemented 3 times at different sizes of the left space of the SAC as follows: the nonspaced group (NS), in which the entire SAC was completely filled, the 1-mm-spaced group (1MMS), and the 2-mm-spaced group (2MMS). Abutments and crowns were ultrasonically cleaned, steam cleaned, and air-dried. The excess cement was collected and weighed. To measure the marginal accuracy, 20 measurements were made every 18 degrees along the coping margin at ×300 magnification and compared with the pre-cementation readings. One-way ANOVA was calculated to determine whether the amount of extruded excess cement differed among the 3 groups, and the Tukey test was applied for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The mean weights (mg) of extruded excess cement were NS (33.53 ±1.5), 1MMS (22.97 ±5.4), and 2MMS (15.17 ±5.9). Multiple comparisons showed significant differences in the amount of extruded excess cement among the 3 test groups (Pcemented group (29.5 ±8.2) was significantly different (Pcement by 55% in comparison with the nonspaced abutments. However, no effect was found on the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of different abutment-implant connections - A nonlinear finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Muhammad Ikman; Shafi, Aisyah Ahmad; Rosli, M. U.; Khor, C. Y.; Zakaria, M. S.; Rahim, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Abd; Jamalludin, Mohd Riduan

    2017-09-01

    The success of dental implant surgery is majorly dependent on the stability of prosthesis to anchor to implant body as well as the integration of implant body to bone. The attachment between dental implant body and abutment plays a vital role in attributing to the stability of dental implant system. A good connection between implant body cavity to abutment may minimize the complications of abutment loosening and implant fractures as widely reported in clinical findings. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of different abutment-implant connections on stress dispersion within the abutment and implant bodies as well as displacement of implant body via three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA). A 3-D model of mandible was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) image datasets using an image-processing software with the selected region of interest was the left side covering the second premolar, first molar and second molar regions. The bone was modelled as compact (cortical) and porous (cancellous) structures. Besides, three implant bodies and three generic models of abutment with different types of connections - tapered interference fit (TIF), tapered integrated screwed-in (TIS) and screw retention (SR) were created using computer-aided design (CAD) software and all models were then analysed via 3D FEA software. Occlusal forces of 114.6 N, 17.2 N and 23.4 N were applied in the axial, lingual and mesio-distal directions, respectively, on the top surface of first molar crown. All planes of the mandibular bone model were rigidly fixed. The result exhibited that abutment with TIS connection produced the most favourable stress and displacement outcomes as compared to other attachment types. This is due to the existence of integrated screw at the bottom portion of tapered abutment which increases the motion resistance.

  2. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all Pabutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  3. Prospective assessment of CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations: 2.4 year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lyndon F; Stanford, Clark; Feine, Jocelyne; McGuire, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Single-tooth implant restorations are commonly used to replace anterior maxillary teeth. The esthetic, functional, and biologic outcomes are, in part, a function of the abutment and crown. The purpose of this clinical study was to describe the implant, abutment, and crown survival and complication rates for CAD/CAM zirconia abutment and lithium disilicate crown restorations for single-tooth implants. As part of a broader prospective investigation that enrolled and treated 141 participants comparing tissue responses at the conical interface (CI; AstraTech OsseoSpeed), flat-to-flat interface (FI; NobelSpeedy), and platform-switch interface (PS; NanoTite Certain Prevail) of single-tooth implants, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia abutments (ATLANTIS Abutment) and cemented lithium disilicate (e.max) crowns were used in the restoration of all implants. After 2.4 years in function (3 years after implant placement), the implant, abutment, and crown of 110 participants were evaluated. Technical and biologic complications were recorded. Demographic results were tabulated as percentages with mean values and standard deviations. Abutment survival was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. After 2.4 years, no abutments or crowns had been lost. Abutment complications (screw loosening, screw fracture, fracture) were absent for all 3 implant groups. Crown complications were limited to 2 crowns debonding and 1 with excess cement (2.5%). Five biological complications (4.0%) were recorded. The overall complication rate was 6.5%. CAD/CAM zirconia abutments restored with cemented lithium disilicate crowns demonstrated high survival on 3 different implant-abutment interface designs. No abutment or abutment screw fracture occurred. The technical complications observed after 2.4 years were minor and reversible. The use of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments with cemented lithium disilicate crowns is associated with high technical and biologic success at 2

  4. Clinical Performance of One-Piece, Screw-Retained Implant Crowns Based on Hand-Veneered CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments After a Mean Follow-up Period of 2.3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, Nicole; Forrer, Fiona Alena; Brägger, Urs; Hicklin, Stefan Paul

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns based on hand-veneered computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection at least 1 year after insertion of the crown. Consecutive patients who had received at least one Straumann bone level implant and one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns fabricated with CARES zirconium dioxide abutments were reexamined. Patient satisfaction, occlusal and peri-implant parameters, mechanical and biologic complications, radiologic parameters, and esthetics were recorded. A total of 50 implant crowns in the anterior and premolar region were examined in 41 patients. The follow-up period of the definitive reconstructions ranged from 1.1 to 3.8 years. No technical and no biologic complications had occurred. At the reexamination, 100% of the implants and reconstructions were in situ. Radiographic evaluation revealed a mean distance from the implant shoulder to the first visible bone-to-implant contact of 0.06 mm at the follow-up examination. Screw-retained crowns based on veneered CAD/CAM zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection seem to be a promising way to replace missing teeth in the anterior and premolar region. In the short term, neither failures of components nor complications were noted, and the clinical and radiographic data revealed stable hard and soft tissue conditions.

  5. Influence of implant location on the clinical outcomes of implant abutments: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElHoussiney, Amr G; Zhang, He; Song, Jinlin; Ji, Ping; Wang, Lu; Yang, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To compare the failure events and incidence of complications of different abutment materials in anterior and posterior regions. Failure was defined as complete loss of the abutment requiring replacement by a new abutment. Materials and methods Electronic searches using PubMed/Medline and Google Scholar complemented with manual searches were performed with specific search terms. Searches were restricted to publications in English between January 2006 and March 2016. Results A total of 863 and 1,264 implants were inserted in the anterior and posterior regions, respectively, in a total of 1,529 patients. No titanium abutments failed in anterior or posterior regions. On the other hand, 1.6% of zirconia abutments failed in the anterior region and 1.5% failed in the posterior region. Technical complications occurred mostly in the posterior region and mostly involved zirconia abutment. Meta-analysis was possible only for zirconia-abutment failure, due to considerable heterogeneity of studies and outcome variables. No significant difference in failure rate was found between anterior and posterior zirconia abutments (risk ratio 1.53, 95% CI 0.49–4.77; P=0.47). Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis showed similar outcomes of different abutment materials when used in anterior and posterior regions in terms of failure events and biological and aesthetic complications. The only significant finding was the increased incidence of technical complications in the posterior region, mostly involving zirconia abutments. Abutment-screw loosening was the most common technical complication. PMID:29520162

  6. The Influence of Torque Tightening on the Position Stability of the Abutment in Conical Implant-Abutment Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Wiebke Semper; Zulauf, Kris; Mehrhof, Jürgen; Nelson, Katja

    2015-01-01

    The influence of repeated system-specific torque tightening on the position stability of the abutment after de- and reassembly of the implant components was evaluated in six dental implant systems with a conical implant-abutment connection. An established experimental setup was used in this study. Rotation, vertical displacement, and canting moments of the abutment were observed; they depended on the implant system (P = .001, P abutment screw does not eliminate changes in position of the abutment.

  7. Influence of abutment materials on the implant-abutment joint stability in internal conical connection type implant systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Jae-Young; Yang, Dong-Seok; Huh, Jung-Bo; Heo, Jae-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the influence of abutment materials on the stability of the implant-abutment joint in internal conical connection type implant systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS Internal conical connection type implants, cement-retained abutments, and tungsten carbide-coated abutment screws were used. The abutments were fabricated with commercially pure grade 3 titanium (group T3), commercially pure grade 4 titanium (group T4), or Ti-6Al-4V (group TA) (n=5, each). In order to assess ...

  8. Dynamic locking screw improves fixation strength in osteoporotic bone: an in vitro study on an artificial bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlemann, Tim; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Agarwal, Yash; Wahl, Dieter; Sprecher, Christoph; Schwieger, Karsten; Lenz, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The novel dynamic locking screw (DLS) was developed to improve bone healing with locked-plate osteosynthesis by equalising construct stiffness at both cortices. Due to a theoretical damping effect, this modulated stiffness could be beneficial for fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the DLS at the screw-bone interface was investigated in an artificial osteoporotic bone model and compared with conventional locking screws (LHS). Osteoporotic surrogate bones were plated with either a DLS or a LHS construct consisting of two screws and cyclically axially loaded (8,500 cycles, amplitude 420 N, increase 2 mN/cycle). Construct stiffness, relative movement, axial screw migration, proximal (P) and distal (D) screw pullout force and loosening at the bone interface were determined and statistically evaluated. DLS constructs exhibited a higher screw pullout force of P 85 N [standard deviation (SD) 21] and D 93 N (SD 12) compared with LHS (P 62 N, SD 28, p = 0.1; D 57 N, SD 25, p LHS (p = 0.01). DLS constructs showed significantly lower axial construct stiffness (403 N/mm, SD 21, p LHS (529 N/mm, SD 27; 0.8 mm, SD 0.04). Based on the model data, the DLS principle might also improve in vivo plate fixation in osteoporotic bone, providing enhanced residual holding strength and reducing screw cutout. The influence of pin-sleeve abutment still needs to be investigated.

  9. The influence of screw type, alloy and cylinder position on the marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-04-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5mm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13 microm) than the hexagonal screws (27.93 microm). Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. 1) The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2) The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3) cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values.

  10. Torque loss of different abutment sizes before and after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Izabela Cristina; Faria, Adriana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3.8- and 4.8-mm abutments submitted to simulations of masticatory cycles to examine whether abutment diameter and cemented vs screw-retained crowns affect torque loss of the abutments and crowns. Forty implant/abutment sets were divided into the following groups (n = 10 in each group): (1) G4.8S included 4.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; (2) G4.8C included 4.8-mm abutment with cemented crown; (3) G3.8S included 3.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; and (4) G3.8C included 3.8-mm abutment with cemented crown. All abutments were tightened with torque values of 20 Ncm, and 10 Ncm for screw-retained crowns. Torque loss was measured before and after cycling loading (300,000 cycles). Torque loss of screw-retained crowns significantly increased after cycling in abutments of groups G3.8S (P ≤ .05) and G4.8S (P = .001). No difference was noted between the abutments before cycling (P = .735), but G3.8S abutments presented greater torque loss than the other groups after cycling (P = .008). Significant differences were noted in the abutment torque loss before and after cycling loading only for the G3.8C group (P ≤ .05). The abutment diameter affects torque loss of screw-retained crowns and leads to failure during the test; mechanical cycling increases torque loss of abutment screw and screw-retained crowns.

  11. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  12. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  13. Custom-made laser-welded titanium implant prosthetic abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A

    2005-10-01

    A technique to create an individually modified implant prosthetic abutment is described. An overcasting is waxed onto a machined titanium abutment, cast in titanium, and joined to it with laser welding. With the proposed technique, a custom-made titanium implant prosthetic abutment is created with adequate volume and contour of metal to support a screw-retained, metal-ceramic implant-supported crown.

  14. Does Ferrule Effect Affect Implant-Abutment Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerfar, Maryam; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Geramy, Allahyar; Siadat, Hakimeh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of placing implant-supported crowns on the torque loss of the abutment screw before and after loading. Twenty implant-abutment assemblies were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group was consisted of abutments with abutment-level finishing line (abutment-level), and in the second group the crown margin was placed on the implant shoulder (implant-level). Initial torque loss was recorded for all specimens. After 500000 cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 2 Hz, post loading torque loss was recorded. Finite element model of each group was also modeled and screw energy, and stress were analyzed and compared between two groups. ANOVA for repeated measurements showed that the torque loss did not change significantly after cyclic loading (P=0.73). Crown margin also had no significant effect on the torque loss (P=0.56). However, the energy and stress of screw in abutment-level model (4.49 mJ and 22.74 MPa) was higher than implant-level model (3.52 mJ and 20.81 MPa). Although embracing the implant with crown produced less stress and energy in the abutment-implant screw, it did not have any significant influence on the torque loss of the screw. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  15. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, L; Brückmann, C I; Gilg, M M; Bratschitsch, G; Sadoghi, P; Leithner, A; Radl, R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose . Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods . We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results . A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion . Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  16. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leitner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods. We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results. A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion. Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  17. Radionuclide arthrogram to evaluate knee prostheses loosening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, U.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:This case is about a 78 year old lady who had 3TKRs on her left knee. The 2nd revision surgery was performed due to infection. After 6 weeks long procedure, that patient was discharged with satisfactory movement without sign of infection. 15 months after the surgery, the orthopaedic surgeon found that some pressure wave effects and pain with walking. There was no sign of infection clinically. Once X-ray could not confirm any micro-loosening, the surgeon wanted to investigate with radionuclide arthrogram for this difficult case. 40 MBq in 2mls of Calcium phytate colloid (from RADPHARM Australia) was injected into the knee joint space. 30 minutes static views revealed the tracer started to travel below the tibial component. 4 hours statics views clearly indicate the tibial component loosening also there was leakage of tracer through anterior tibial osteotomy screws into the level of ankle subcutaneously. Cobalt57 flood images provided the anatomical localisation. While the surgeon was planning new component for the 3rd revision surgery, the patient's pain disappeared with time. No more revision was considered with satisfactory level of movement. This was the first and only case of radio arthogram to our department, although we perform many bone scans with same reason. On published articles, overall sensitivity and specificity are variable from 85% to 100%. When we take look at other clinical experience, there are a number of reasons in the high accuracy and reliability of radionuclide arthrogram especially for knee prosthesis loosening. Therefore I want to emphasise the benefit of radionuclide arthrogram for both patient and surgeon as a reliable diagnosis with minimum discomfort.

  18. Reliability and Failure Modes of a Hybrid Ceramic Abutment Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson Rfa; Teixeira, Hellen S; Silveira, Lucas M; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P

    2018-01-01

    A ceramic and metal abutment prototype was fatigue tested to determine the probability of survival at various loads. Lithium disilicate CAD-milled abutments (n = 24) were cemented to titanium sleeve inserts and then screw attached to titanium fixtures. The assembly was then embedded at a 30° angle in polymethylmethacrylate. Each (n = 24) was restored with a resin-cemented machined lithium disilicate all-ceramic central incisor crown. Single load (lingual-incisal contact) to failure was determined for three specimens. Fatigue testing (n = 21) was conducted employing the step-stress method with lingual mouth motion loading. Failures were recorded, and reliability calculations were performed using proprietary software. Probability Weibull curves were calculated with 90% confidence bounds. Fracture modes were classified with a stereomicroscope, and representative samples imaged with scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue results indicated that the limiting factor in the current design is the fatigue strength of the abutment screw, where screw fracture often leads to failure of the abutment metal sleeve and/or cracking in the implant fixture. Reliability for completion of a mission at 200 N load for 50K cycles was 0.38 (0.52% to 0.25 90% CI) and for 100K cycles was only 0.12 (0.26 to 0.05)-only 12% predicted to survive. These results are similar to those from previous studies on metal to metal abutment/fixture systems where screw failure is a limitation. No ceramic crown or ceramic abutment initiated fractures occurred, supporting the research hypothesis. The limiting factor in performance was the screw failure in the metal-to-metal connection between the prototyped abutment and the fixture, indicating that this configuration should function clinically with no abutment ceramic complications. The combined ceramic with titanium sleeve abutment prototype performance was limited by the fatigue degradation of the abutment screw. In fatigue, no ceramic crown or ceramic

  19. Sinking and fit of abutment of locking taper implant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seung-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jung; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Unlike screw-retention type, fixture-abutment retention in Locking taper connection depends on frictional force so it has possibility of abutment to sink. PURPOSE In this study, Bicon® Implant System, one of the conical internal connection implant system, was used with applying loading force to the abutments connected to the fixture. Then the amount of sinking was measured. MATERIAL AND METHODS 10 Bicon® implant fixtures were used. First, the abutment was connected to the fixture with finger force. Then it was tapped with a mallet for 3 times and loads of 20 kg corresponding to masticatory force using loading application instrument were applied successively. The abutment state, slightly connected to the fixture without pressure was considered as a reference length, and every new abutment length was measured after each load's step was added. The amount of abutment sinking (mm) was gained by subtracting the length of abutment-fixture under each loading condition from reference length. RESULTS It was evident, that the amount of abutment sinking in Bicon® Implant System increased as loads were added. When loads of 20 kg were applied more than 5 - 7 times, sinking stopped at 0.45 ± 0.09 mm. CONCLUSION Even though locking taper connection type implant shows good adaption to occlusal force, it has potential for abutment sinking as loads are given. When locking taper connection type implant is used, satisfactory loads are recommended for precise abutment location. PMID:21165262

  20. FEA and microstructure characterization of a one-piece Y-TZP abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Lucas Hian; Ribeiro, Sebastião; Borges, Alexandre Luís Souto; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Tango, Rubens Nisie

    2014-11-01

    The most important drawback of dental implant/abutment assemblies is the need for a fixing screw. This study aimed to develop an esthetic one-piece Y-TZP abutment to suppress the use of the screw. Material characterization was performed using a bar-shaped specimen obtained by slip-casting to validate the method prior to prototype abutment fabrication by the same process. The mechanical behavior of the prototype abutment was verified and compared with a conventional abutment by finite element analysis (FEA). The abutment was evaluated by micro-CT analysis and its density was measured. FEA showed stress concentration at the first thread pitch during installation and in the cervical region during oblique loading for both abutments. However, stress concentration was observed at the base of the screw head and stem in the conventional abutment. The relative density for the fabricated abutment was 95.68%. Micro-CT analysis revealed the presence of elongated cracks with sharp edges over the surface and porosity in the central region. In the light of these findings, the behavior of a one-piece abutment is expected to be better than that of the conventional model. New studies should be conducted to clarify the performance and longevity of this one-piece Y-TZP abutment. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of abutment materials on the implant-abutment joint stability in internal conical connection type implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jae-Young; Yang, Dong-Seok; Huh, Jung-Bo; Heo, Jae-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the influence of abutment materials on the stability of the implant-abutment joint in internal conical connection type implant systems. Internal conical connection type implants, cement-retained abutments, and tungsten carbide-coated abutment screws were used. The abutments were fabricated with commercially pure grade 3 titanium (group T3), commercially pure grade 4 titanium (group T4), or Ti-6Al-4V (group TA) (n=5, each). In order to assess the amount of settlement after abutment fixation, a 30-Ncm tightening torque was applied, then the change in length before and after tightening the abutment screw was measured, and the preload exerted was recorded. The compressive bending strength was measured under the ISO14801 conditions. In order to determine whether there were significant changes in settlement, preload, and compressive bending strength before and after abutment fixation depending on abutment materials, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test was performed. Group TA exhibited the smallest mean change in the combined length of the implant and abutment before and after fixation, and no difference was observed between groups T3 and T4 (P>.05). Group TA exhibited the highest preload and compressive bending strength values, followed by T4, then T3 (Pabutment material can influence the stability of the interface in internal conical connection type implant systems. The strength of the abutment material was inversely correlated with settlement, and positively correlated with compressive bending strength. Preload was inversely proportional to the frictional coefficient of the abutment material.

  2. A comparative study of gold UCLA-type and CAD/CAM titanium implant abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Man; Lee, Jai-Bong; Heo, Seong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the interface accuracy of computer-assisted designed and manufactured (CAD/CAM) titanium abutments and implant fixture compared to gold-cast UCLA abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS An external connection implant system (Mark III, n=10) and an internal connection implant system (Replace Select, n=10) were used, 5 of each group were connected to milled titanium abutment and the rest were connected to the gold-cast UCLA abutments. The implant fixture and abutment were tightened to torque of 35 Ncm using a digital torque gauge, and initial detorque values were measured 10 minutes after tightening. To mimic the mastication, a cyclic loading was applied at 14 Hz for one million cycles, with the stress amplitude range being within 0 N to 100 N. After the cyclic loading, detorque values were measured again. The fixture-abutment gaps were measured under a microscope and recorded with an accuracy of ±0.1 µm at 50 points. RESULTS Initial detorque values of milled abutment were significantly higher than those of cast abutment (P.05). After cyclic loading, detorque values of cast abutment increased, but those of milled abutment decreased (Pabutment group and the cast abutment group after cyclic loading. CONCLUSION In conclusion, CAD/CAM milled titanium abutment can be fabricated with sufficient accuracy to permit screw joint stability between abutment and fixture comparable to that of the traditional gold cast UCLA abutment. PMID:24605206

  3. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.; Silva, Wander José da; Faot, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the dental implant system. • The highest stress was located at first thread of the abutment's screw. • The preload is the main factor in the abutment's screw stress. • Abutment configuration and material can have a positive contribution for the stress distribution

  5. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  6. The fracture strength by a torsion test at the implant-abutment interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumihiko; Hiroyasu, Kazuhiko; Ueda, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Fractured connections between implants and implant abutments or abutment screws are frequently encountered in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate fracture strength using a torsion test at the interface between the implant and the abutment. Thirty screw-type implant with diameters of 3.3, 3.8, 4.3, 5.0, and 6.0 mm were submitted to a torsion test. Implants of each size were connected to abutments with abutment screws tightened to 20 N · cm. Mechanical stress was applied with a rotational speed of 3.6 °/min until fracture occurred, and maximum torque (fracture torque) and torsional yield strength were measured. The mean values were calculated and then compared using Tukey's test. The abutments were then removed, and the implant-abutment interfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). No significant differences in mean fracture torque were found among 3.3, 3.8, and 4.3 mm-diameter implants, but significant differences were found between these sizes and 5.0 and 6.0 mm-diameter implants (p abutment corresponding to the internal notches of the implant body had been destroyed. Smaller diameter implants demonstrated lower fracture torque and torsional yield strength than implants with larger diameters. In internal tube-in-tube connections, three abutment projections corresponding to rotation-prevention notches were destroyed in each implant.

  7. Cone-morse implant connection system significantly reduces bacterial leakage between implant and abutment: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, A; Bolzoni, A; Russillo, A; Lauritano, D; Palmieri, A; Cura, F; Silvestre, F J; Giannì, A B

    2017-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants are very popular dental treatments today in the world. In osseointegrated implants, the occlusal forces are transmitted from prosthesis through an abutment to a dental implant. The abutment is connected to the implant by mean of a screw. A screw is the most used mean for connecting an implant to an abutment. Frequently the screws break and are lost. There is an alternative to screw retained abutment systems: the cone-morse connection (CMC). The CMC, thanks to the absence of the abutment screw, guarantees no micro-gaps, no micro-movements, and a reduction of bacterial leakage between implant and abutment. As P. gingivalis and T. forsythia penetration might have clinical relevance, it was the purpose of this investigation to evaluate molecular leakage of these two bacteria in a new CMC implants systems (Leone Spa®, Florence, Italy). To identify the capability of the implant to protect the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified Escherichia coli across implant-abutment interface was evaluated. Four cone-morse Leone implants (Leone® Spa, Florence, Italy) were immerged in a bacterial culture for 24 h and bacteria amount was then measured inside implant-abutment interface with Real-time PCR. Bacteria were detected inside all studied implants, with a median percentage of 3% for P. gingivalis and 4% for T. forsythia. Cone-morse connection implant system has very low bacterial leakage percentage and is similar to one-piece implants.

  8. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  9. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis on Stress Distribution of Internal Implant-Abutment Engagement Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yun-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    To investigate the stress distribution in an implant-abutment complex with a preloaded abutment screw by comparing implant-abutment engagement features using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). For FEA modeling, two implants-one with a single (S) engagement system and the other with a double (D) engagement system-were placed in the human mandibular molar region. Two types of abutments (hexagonal, conical) were connected to the implants. Different implant models (a single implant, two parallel implants, and mesial and tilted distal implants with 1-mm bone loss) were assumed. A static axial force and a 45-degree oblique force of 200 N were applied as the sum of vectors to the top of the prosthetic occlusal surface with a preload of 30 Ncm in the abutment screw. The von Mises stresses at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces were measured. In the single implant model, the S-conical abutment type exhibited broader stress distribution than the S-hexagonal abutment. In the double engagement system, the stress concentration was high in the lower contact area of the implant-abutment engagement. In the tilted implant model, the stress concentration point was different from that in the parallel implant model because of the difference in the bone level. The double engagement system demonstrated a high stress concentration at the lower contact area of the implant-abutment interface. To decrease the stress concentration, the type of engagement features of the implant-abutment connection should be carefully considered.

  10. Marginal Vertical Fit along the Implant-Abutment Interface: A Microscope Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mobilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the marginal vertical fit along two different implant-abutment interfaces: (1 a standard abutment on an implant and (2 a computer-aided-design/computer-aided-machine (CAD/CAM customized screw-retained crown on an implant. Four groups were compared: three customized screw-retained crowns with three different “tolerance” values (CAD-CAM 0, CAD-CAM +1, CAD-CAM −1 and a standard titanium abutment. Qualitative analysis was carried out using an optical microscope. Results showed a vertical gap significantly different from both CAD-CAM 0 and CAD-CAM −1, while no difference was found between standard abutment and CAD-CAM +1. The set tolerance in producing CAD/CAM screw-retained crowns plays a key role in the final fit.

  11. Implant-Abutment Contact Surfaces and Microgap Measurements of Different Implant Connections Under 3-Dimensional X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Degidi, Marco; Pecci, Raffaella; Piattelli, Adriano; de Oliveira, P S; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2016-10-01

    The presence of a microgap between implant and abutment could produce a bacterial reservoir which could interfere with the long-term health of the periimplant tissues. The aim of this article was to evaluate, by x-ray 3-dimensional microtomography, implant-abutment contact surfaces and microgaps at the implant-abutment interface in different types of implant-abutment connections. A total of 40 implants were used in this in vitro study. Ten implants presented a screw-retained internal hexagon abutment (group I), 10 had a Morse Cone taper internal connection (group II), 10 another type of Morse Cone taper internal connection (group III), and 10 had a screwed trilobed connection (group IV). In both types of Morse Cone internal connections, there was no detectable separation at the implant-abutment in the area of the conical connection, and there was an absolute congruity without any microgaps between abutment and implant. No line was visible separating the implant and the abutment. On the contrary, in the screwed abutment implants, numerous gaps and voids were present. The results of this study support the hypothesis that different types of implant-abutment joints are responsible for the observed differences in bacterial penetration.

  12. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement-retained crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C; Saba, Juliana N; Meyer, Clark A; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-11-01

    Recent literature indicates that the long-term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment - cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri-implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown-abutment margins post-crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D-printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck-margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post-cement-retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall.

  13. A finite element analysis of novel vented dental abutment geometries for cement‐retained crown restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lucas C.; Saba, Juliana N.; Meyer, Clark A.; Chung, Kwok‐Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent literature indicates that the long‐term success of dental implants is, in part, attributed to how dental crowns are attached to their associated implants. The commonly utilized method for crown attachment – cementation, has been criticized because of recent links between residual cement and peri‐implant disease. Residual cement extrusion from crown‐abutment margins post‐crown seating is a growing concern. This study aimed at (1) identifying key abutment features, which would improve dental cement flow characteristics, and (2) understanding how these features would impact the mechanical stability of the abutment under functional loads. Computational fluid dynamic modeling was used to evaluate cement flow in novel abutment geometries. These models were then evaluated using 3D‐printed surrogate models. Finite element analysis also provided an understanding of how the mechanical stability of these abutments was altered after key features were incorporated into the geometry. The findings demonstrated that the key features involved in improved venting of the abutment during crown seating were (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of the vents, (3) location of the vents, (4) addition of a plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of the abutment wall. This study culminated in a novel design for a vented abutment consisting of 8 vents located radially around the abutment neck‐margin plus a plastic insert to guide the cement during seating and provide retrievability to the abutment system.Venting of the dental abutment has been shown to decrease the risk of undetected residual dental cement post‐cement‐retained crown seating. This article will utilize a finite element analysis approach toward optimizing dental abutment designs for improved dental cement venting. Features investigated include (1) addition of vents, (2) diameter of vents, (3) location of vents, (4) addition of plastic screw insert, and (5) thickness of abutment wall. PMID

  14. Detection of fastener loosening in simple lap joint based on ultrasonic wavefield imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooda Sahib, M. I.; Leong, S. J.; Chia, C. C.; Mustapha, F.

    2017-12-01

    Joints in aero-mechanical structures are critical elements that ensure the structural integrity but they are prone to damages. Inspection of such joints that have no prior baseline data is really challenging but it can be possibly done using the Ultrasonic Propagation Imager (UPI). The feasibility of applying UPI for detection of loosened fastener is investigated in this study. A simple lap joint specimen made by connecting two pieces of 2.5mm thick SAE304 stainless steel plates using five M6 screws and nuts has been used in this study. All fasteners are tightened to 10Nm but one of them is completely loosened to simulate the damage. The wavefield data is processed into ultrasonic wavefield propagation video and a series of spectral amplitude images. The spectral images showed noticeable amplitude difference at the loosened fastener, hence confirmed the feasibility of using UPI for structural joints inspection. A simple contrast maximization method is also introduced to improve the result.

  15. Fracture strength and failure mode of maxillary implant-supported provisional single crowns: a comparison of composite resin crowns fabricated directly over PEEK abutments and solid titanium abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik Jacob; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the fracture strength of implant-supported composite resin crowns on PEEK and solid titanium temporary abutments, and to analyze the failure types. Three types of provisional abutments, RN synOcta Temporary Meso Abutment (PEEK; Straumann), RN synOcta Titanium Post for Temporary Restorations (Straumann), and Temporary Abutment Engaging NobRplRP (Nobel Biocare) were used, and provisional screw-retained crowns using composite resin (Solidex) were fabricated for four different locations in the maxilla. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until fracture occurred. The failure types were analyzed and further categorized as irreparable (Type 1) or reparable (Type 2). No significant difference was found between different abutment types. Only for the position of the maxillary central incisor, composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments showed significantly lower (p Provisional crowns on PEEK abutments showed similar fracture strength as titanium temporary abutments except for central incisors. Maxillary right central incisor composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments fractured below the mean anterior masticatory loading forces reported to be approximately 206 N. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of the Stress Distribution at the Internal Implant-Abutment Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yong; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated stress distribution in four different implant-abutment interface conditions in the internal tapered connection implant system. Four different implant diameters (3.5 mm, 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, and 5.0 mm) and two abutment types (hexagonal and conical) were simulated. Four unique implant-abutment interface conditions were assumed based on wall thickness, mating surface length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape. Axial and oblique loading was applied during abutment screw preload, and the Von Mises stresses were measured at the implant-abutment and abutment-screw interfaces. The implant-abutment interface stress decreased as the wall thickness increased. As the mating surface increased, the stress distribution trended downward, and when the distance to the implant vertical stop was 0 μm, the Von Mises stress was extremely high at the vertical stop. Despite their different shapes, the abutments showed similar stress distributions. However, the maximum Von Mises stress was higher in the conical connection than in the hexagonal connection, particularly at the contralateral side to loading. To decrease the stress distribution at the implant-abutment interface, the implant wall thickness, mating surface contact length, distance to the vertical stop, and abutment shape should be carefully considered.

  17. Effect of Cyclic Loading on Micromotion at the Implant-Abutment Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Taylor, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic loading may cause settling of abutments mounted on dental implants, potentially affecting screw joint stability and implant-abutment micromotion. It was the goal of this in vitro study to compare micromotion of implant-abutment assemblies before and after masticatory simulation. Six groups of abutments (n = 5) for a specific tissue-level implant system with an internal octagon were subject to micromotion measurements. The implant-abutment assemblies were loaded in a universal testing machine, and an apparatus and extensometers were used to record displacement. This was done twice, in the condition in which they were received from the abutment manufacturer and after simulated loading (100,000 cycles; 100 N). Statistical analysis was based on analysis of variance, two-sample t tests (Welch tests), and Pearson product moment correlation (α = .05). The mean values for micromotion ranged from 33.15 to 63.41 μm and from 30.03 to 42.40 μm before and after load cycling. The general trend toward reduced micromotion following load cycling was statistically significant only for CAD/CAM zirconia abutments (P = .036) and for one type of clone abutment (P = .012), with no significant correlation between values measured before and after cyclic loading (Pearson product moment correlation; P = .104). While significant differences in micromotion were found prior to load cycling, no significant difference among any of the abutment types tested could be observed afterward (P > .05 in all cases). A quantifiable settling effect at the implant-abutment interface seems to result from cyclic loading, leading to a decrease in micromotion. This effect seems to be more pronounced in low-quality abutments. For the implant system tested in this study, retightening of abutment screws is recommended after an initial period of clinical use.

  18. Three-Dimensional Displacement of Nine Different Abutments for an Implant with an Internal Hexagon Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andy B; Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians need to know whether there are any differences among the many abutment options available for restoring a particular implant. This study aims to compare nine abutments for one implant system for positional changes between hand tightening and torqueing. Nine Tapered Screw-Vent (TSV) implants were placed into a resin block. Five specimens of nine different abutments (n = 45) were tried in one of the nine implants. Initially, the abutments were torqued to 20 Ncm to represent hand tightening. Abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm using a torque driver as recommended by the manufacturer for final seating. Images were recorded in 12-second intervals for approximately 10 minutes after the torque was applied. The spatial relationship of the abutments to the resin block was determined using three-dimensional digital image correlation. Commercial image correlation software was used to analyze the displacements. Mean displacements for the nine different abutments were calculated in all three dimensions and for overall displacement in space. A t test with a step-down Bonferroni correction was used for a pairwise comparison of each abutment's mean displacements to the other abutments to determine statistical differences (α = .05). The Atlantis titanium, Inclusive titanium, and Legacy zirconia abutments showed mean displacements that were statistically significantly higher than other abutments in the horizontal direction. The overall three-dimensional displacement of the Atlantis titanium abutment after an applied 30-Ncm torque was significantly higher than that of six of the other eight abutments (P displacement between hand tightening and torqueing than the Atlantis titanium or Inclusive titanium abutments when used to restore a TSV implant.

  19. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE JESUS TAVAREZ, Rudys Rodolfo; BONACHELA, Wellington Cardoso; XIBLE, Anuar Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. Material and Methods Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10) of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricated abutment; Group 4, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; and Group 5, external hexagon implant and Ceraone abutment. For groups 1, 2, 3 and 5, the crowns were cemented on the abutments and in group 4 crowns were screwed directly on the implant. The specimens were subjected to 500,000 cycles at 19.1 Hz of frequency and non-axial load of 133 N in a MTS 810 machine. The vertical misfit (μm) at the implant/abutment interface was evaluated before (B) and after (A) application of the cyclic loading. Data were analyzed statistically by using two-away ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (pabutment connection may develop a role on the vertical misfit at the implant/abutment interface. PMID:21437464

  20. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Femoral component loosening after hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zustin, Jozef; Sauter, Guido; Hahn, Michael; Morlock, Michael M.; Ruether, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Before the re-introduction of the current generation of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty, component loosening and osteolysis were of great concern to the orthopaedic community. Early, mid- and long-term clinical results are encouraging, but component loosening still exists. Macroscopic, contact radiographic and histopathological analyses after undecalcified preparation of bone tissue specimens were performed. To investigate the frequency and morphological patterns of the loosening of the femoral component, we analysed a series of 190 retrieved femoral remnants that were revised for aseptic failures. Thirty-five (18.4%) hips were revised for clinical and/or radiographic loosening of the femoral component. Pseudoarthrosis (n = 17; median in situ time: 16 weeks, interquartile range [IQR]: 9 to 34), collapsed osteonecrosis (n = 5; median in situ time: 79 weeks, IQR: 63 to 97), cement-socket debonding (n = 3; median in situ time: 89 weeks, IQR: 54 to 97) and at later follow-up bone-cement loosening (n = 10; median in situ time: 175 weeks; IQR 112 to 198; p =0.005) were distinct patterns of the femoral remnant-implant loosening. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia of interface bone trabeculae (n = 38; median in situ time: 61 weeks, IQR: 32 to 138) was strongly associated with femoral component loosening (p = 0.009). Both the trabecular hyperosteoidosis (n = 32; median in situ time: 71 weeks, IQR 50 to 129) and excessive intraosseous lymphocyte infiltration (n = 12; median in situ time: 75 weeks, IQR 51 to 98) at the bone-cement interface correlated strongly with fibrocartilaginous metaplasia (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016 respectively) and all three lesions were associated with the female gender (p = 0.021, p = 0.009, and p = 0.051). Femoral component loosening at early follow-up was mostly caused by pathological changes of the femoral remnant bone tissue: pseudoarthrosis and collapsed osteonecrosis. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia was frequently observed in hips with femoral

  2. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%. None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6% after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726.

  3. Effect of intentional abutment disconnection on the micro-movements of the implant-abutment assembly: a 3D digital image correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Ana; Rocha, Salomão; Calha, Nuno; Neto, Maria Augusta; Nicolau, Pedro; Guerra, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Implant-abutment assembly stability is critical for the success of implant-supported rehabilitation. The intentional removal of the prosthetic components may hamper the achievement of the essential stability due to preload reduction in the screw joint and implant-screw mating surface changes. To evaluate the effect of intentional abutment disconnection and reconnection in the stability of internal locking hex implants and corresponding abutments using the method of 3D digital image correlation. Ten conical shape and internal hexagon connection implants were embedded in acrylic resin and assembled to prosthetic abutments with 30 Ncm torque and assigned to two groups: group 1 - tested for static load-bearing capacity at 30° off-axis for two times and group 2 - underwent intentional disconnection and reconnection between tests. Micro-movements were captured with two high-speed photographic cameras and analyzed with video correlation system in three spacial axes U, V and W. Screw abutment and internal implant thread morphology was observed with a field-emission scanning electron microscopy. After the intentional disconnection of the abutment, group 2 showed generally higher maximum displacements for U and V directions. Under 50N load, mean difference was 24.7 μm (P = 0.008) for U direction and -7.7 μm (P = 0.008) for V direction. No significant differences were found for maximum and minimum displacements in the W direction. Mean displacement of the speckle surface presented was statistically different in the two groups (P = 0.016). SEM revealed non-homogenous screw surfaces with scoring on group 2 plus striations and debris in the implant threads. Micro-movements were higher for the group submitted to intentional disconnection and reconnection of the abutment, particularly under average bite forces. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Simple Method for Making Diagnostic Casts for Dental Implants Using Acrylic Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Siadat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of multiple implants in the same jaw requires a detailed knowledge of abutment angulation. The position and angulation of the abutments play an important role in treatment planning and fabrication of the custom tray. Therefore diagnostic casts thatcontain cover screws may cause problems during implant therapy.The current article describes a technique for making a preliminary cast with acrylic custom abutments in order to help the clinician select an appropriate impression technique and evaluate the location and angulations of the implant bodies. This method can also aid the technician to provide adequate and proper space for the fabrication of an open custom tray.

  5. A prospective, split-mouth study comparing tilted implants with angulated connection versus conventional implants with angulated abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weehaeghe, Manú; De Bruyn, Hugo; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    An angulation of the implant connection could overcome the problems related to angulated abutments. This study compares conventional implants with angulated abutment to tilted implants with an angulated connection. Twenty patients were treated in the edentulous mandible. In the posterior jaw locations, one conventional tilted implant with angulated abutment and one angulated implant without abutment were placed. In the anterior jaw, two conventional implants were placed, one with and one without abutment. Implants were immediately loaded and 3 months later, the final bridge (PFM or monolithic zirconia) was placed. After a follow-up of 48 months, 17 patients were available for clinical examination. The mean overall marginal bone loss (MBL) was 1.26 mm. No significant differences in implant survival, MBL, periodontal indices, patients' satisfaction, or complications was found between implants restored on abutment or implant level, between the posteriorly located angulated implant nor angulated abutment, and between both anterior implants with or without abutment. The posterior implants demonstrated less MBL compared to the anterior implants (P abutment were replaced and four loose bridge screws connected to the angulated abutments had to be tightened. Patients were overall satisfied (4.74/5). An implant with angulated connection may results in a stronger connection but does not affect the marginal bone loss. No difference in MBL was seen between implants restored on abutment or implant level. Zirconia seems to reduce the amount of plaque. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The role of prosthetic abutment material on the stress distribution in a maxillary single implant-supported fixed prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Hugo Eduardo, E-mail: hugo.e.peixoto@hotmail.com [Implantology Team, Latin American Institute of Research and Education in Dentistry, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Bordin, Dimorvan, E-mail: dimorvan_bordin@hotmail.com [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Del Bel Cury, Altair A., E-mail: altcury@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Silva, Wander José da, E-mail: wanderjose@fop.unicamp.br [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Limeira avenue, 901-Vila Rezende, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Faot, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.faot@gmail.com [Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Gonçalves Chaves, 457, 2nd floor, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul 96015-560 (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the influence of abutment's material and geometry on stress distribution in a single implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models were made based on tomographic slices of the upper middle incisor area, in which a morse taper implant was positioned and a titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrN) universal abutments was installed. The commercially available geometry of titanium (T) and zirconia (Z) abutments were used to draw two models, TM1 and ZM1 respectively, which served as control groups. These models were compared with 2 experimental groups were the mechanical properties of Z were applied to the titanium abutment (TM2) and vice versa for the zirconia abutment (ZM2). Subsequently, loading was simulated in two steps, starting with a preload phase, calculated with the respective friction coefficients of each materials, followed by a combined preload and chewing force. The maximum von Mises stress was described. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA that considered material composition, geometry and loading (p < 0.05). Results: Titanium and zirconia abutments showed similar von Mises stresses in the mechanical part of the four models. The area with the highest concentration of stress was the screw thread, following by the screw body. The highest stress levels occurred in screw thread was observed during the preloading phase in the ZM1 model (931 MPa); and during the combined loading in the TM1 model (965 MPa). Statistically significant differences were observed for loading, the material × loading interaction, and the loading × geometry interaction (p < 0.05). Preloading contributed for 77.89% of the stress (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences to the other factors (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The screw was the piece most intensely affected, mainly through the preload force, independent of the abutment's material. - Highlights: • The abutment's screw was the most impaired piece of the

  7. Loosening Psychometric Constraints on Educational Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    In response to an argument by Baird, Andrich, Hopfenbeck and Stobart (2017), Michael Kane states that there needs to be a better fit between educational assessment and learning theory. In line with this goal, Kane will examine how psychometric constraints might be loosened by relaxing some psychometric "rules" in some assessment…

  8. The bacterial sealing capacity of morse taper implant-abutment systems in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Rogerio; Ferreira, Andreia; Souza, Emmanuel; Arcoverde, Joao; Dametto, Fabio; Gade-Neto, Cicero; Seabra, Flavio; Sarmento, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    The use of Morse taper systems in dental implantology has been associated widely with a more precise adaptation between implants and their respective abutments. This may lead to an increase in the stability of the implant system and may also prevent microbial invasion through the implant-abutment interface. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the ability of four commercially available Morse taper system units to impede bacterial penetration through their implant-abutment interfaces. Abutments were screwed onto the implants, and the units were subsequently immersed in Streptococcus sanguinis bacterial broth (1 × 10(8) colony forming units/mL) for 48 hours. The units were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under three conditions: 1) with the implant-abutment components assembled as units to investigate for both the existence of microgaps and the presence of bacteria; 2) with the implants and abutments separated for examination of internal surfaces; and 3) with the implant-abutment components again assembled as units to measure any microgaps detected. The mean size of the microgaps in each unit was determined by measuring, under SEM, their width in four equidistant points. Microgaps were detected in all units with no significant differences in dimension (Kruskal-Wallis test, P >0.05). Within all units, the presence of bacteria was also observed. The seals provided by the interfaces of the commercially available Morse taper implant-abutment units tested were not sufficiently small to shield the implant from bacterial penetration.

  9. Development of an anti-loosening fastener and comparing its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikash Panja

    2017-09-08

    Sep 8, 2017 ... MS received 13 November 2013; revised 20 June 2016; accepted 30 April ... However, threaded fasteners may have the problem of loosening under vibrating ..... [7] Junker G H 1969 New criteria for self-loosening of fasteners.

  10. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). Conclusion: The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal. PMID:25628660

  11. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  12. Custom anatomic healing abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Gowda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants with their increasing success rates and predictability of final outcome are fast becoming the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth. Considering the success of immediate implant placement in reducing tissue loss and achieving good esthetic results, is making it a more popular treatment modality in implant dentistry. Understanding the management of gingival tissues in relation to implants to obtain maximum esthetics is of utmost importance. The use of provisional abutments and immediate temporization has a proven track record of their ability to produce optimal esthetics and to guide the tissue response during the healing phase. With careful patient selection and execution, customized healing abutments can provide an effective method to enhance the esthetic and emergence profile for anterior implant restorations.

  13. Impact of Intentional Overload on Joint Stability of Internal Implant-Abutment Connection System with Different Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2017-09-05

    To evaluate the axial displacement of the implant-abutment assembly of different implant diameter after static and cyclic loading of overload condition. An internal conical connection system with three diameters (Ø 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0) applying identical abutment dimension and the same abutment screw was evaluated. Axial displacement of abutment and reverse torque loss of abutment screw were evaluated under static and cyclic loading conditions. Static loading test groups were subjected to vertical static loading of 250, 400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 N consecutively. Cyclic loading test groups were subjected to 500 N cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of excessive masticatory loading. After abutment screw tightening for 30 Ncm, axial displacement was measured upon 1, 3, 10, and 1,000,000 cyclic loadings of 500 N. Repeated-measure ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). The increasing magnitude of vertical load and thinner wall thickness of implant increased axial displacement of abutment and reverse torque loss of abutment screw (p < 0.05). Implants in the Ø 5.0 diameter group demonstrated significantly low axial displacement, and reverse torque loss after static loading than Ø 4.0 and Ø 4.5 diameter groups (p < 0.05). In the cyclic loading test, all diameter groups of implant showed significant axial displacement after 1 cycle of loading of 500 N (p < 0.05). There was no significant axial displacement after 3, 10, or 1,000,000 cycles of loading (p = 0.603). Implants with Ø 5.0 diameter demonstrated significantly low axial displacement and reverse torque loss after the cyclic and static loading of overload condition. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Short-term retrospective case series of implant-assisted removable partial dentures with locator abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Puigpelat, Octavi; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Cabratosa-Termes, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case series was to report on the clinical performance of implant-assisted removable partial dentures (IARPDs) with Locator abutments in different partial edentulism situations, with a mean follow-up period of 28.6 months. Twelve consecutive patients were treated with IARPDs. A total of 24 implants were placed in the edentulous area. Minimum follow-up period was 12 months. Overall patient satisfaction, health of peri-implant tissues, survival of implants and abutments, and prosthetic complications were reported. Overall implant survival was 91.6%; two implants failed. No major complications were reported-only one IARPD metal framework broke. No Locator abutment loosening was reported. Within the limitations of this retrospective study, treatment with IARPDs can improve the patient's function, phonetics, and esthetics without the need for extensive bone regeneration surgeries and prosthodontic rehabilitations. However, well-designed prospective clinical studies on IARPDs are needed to support their long-term use.

  15. Connective Tissue Characteristics around Healing Abutments of Different Geometries: New Methodological Technique under Circularly Polarized Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Abboud, Marcus; Ramirez-Fernandez, Maria Piedad; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Negri, Bruno; Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo; Markovic, Aleksa

    2015-08-01

    To describe contact, thickness, density, and orientation of connective tissue fibers around healing abutments of different geometries by means of a new method using coordinates. Following the bilateral extraction of mandibular premolars (P2, P3, and P4) from six fox hound dogs and a 2-month healing period, 36 titanium implants were inserted, onto which two groups of healing abutments of different geometry were screwed: Group A (concave abutments) and Group B (wider healing abutment). After 3 months the animals were sacrificed and samples extracted containing each implant and surrounding soft and hard tissues. Histological analysis was performed without decalcifying the samples by means of circularly polarized light under optical microscope and a system of vertical and horizontal coordinates across all the connective tissue in an area delimited by the implant/abutment, epithelium, and bone tissue. In no case had the connective tissue formed a connection to the healing abutment/implant in the internal zone; a space of 35 ± 10 μm separated the connective tissue fibers from the healing abutment surface. The total thickness of connective tissue in the horizontal direction was significantly greater in the medial zone in Group B than in Group A (p connective tissue thickness. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effect of photodynamic therapy on pathogenic bacteria around peri-implant sulcus and in the cavity between abutment and implant after healing phase: A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin-Yi; Shi, Jun-Yu; Zhu, Yu; Qian, Shu-Jiao; Lai, Hong-Chang; Gu, Ying-Xin

    2018-05-14

    To compare levels of pathogens from peri-implant sulcus versus abutment screw cavities after photodynamic therapy. Twenty patients were included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was applied both in sulcus and cavities after sampling following suprastructures loading, and repeated after 2 weeks. Two samples each containing four paper points were collected for each implant at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 months: (i) peri-implant sulcus and (ii) abutment screw cavities. Seventy-five percent ethanol was applied in another 20 patients as the control group in the same way. qPCR was used to quantify periodontal pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans. PDT showed a better bacterial reduction than ethanol. P. g. and F. n. were most frequently detected, while less for S. m. P. gingivalis' proportion from both sites was significantly higher than the other two bacteria (P abutment screw cavities were always less than those from peri-implant sulcus and was significantly lower for total bacteria at 3 months (P abutment screw cavities significantly reduced at 3 months compared to baseline (P abutment screw cavities in the long run, suggesting PDT an effective way sterilizing inner surface of oral implant suprastrutures. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Displacement comparison of CAD-CAM titanium and zirconia abutments to implants with different conical connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Hashemzadeh, Shervin; Seidt, Jeremy D; Clelland, Nancy L

    2018-04-01

    To compare the displacements of CAD-CAM zirconia and titanium abutments into different internal connection systems after torquing. OsseoSpeed EV and OsseoSpeed TX implants (n=10) were placed in resin blocks. Zirconia and titanium abutments (n=5) were first hand tightened and then tightened to the recommended torque (20Ncm for TX and 25Ncm for EV). Displacements of abutments between screw tightening by hand and torque driver was measured using three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) technique. Displacements were measured in U (front/back), V (into/outward), W (right/left) directions and 3-dimensionally (3D). ANOVA with restricted maximum likelihood estimation method was used to analyze the data. Bonferroni-corrected t tests was used to determine the statistical differences (α=0.05). 3D displacement of zirconia and titanium abutments was significantly greater in OsseoSpeed EV implant (PDisplacement of zirconia and titanium abutments was not significantly different within implant systems, 3D (P≥0.386) and in each direction (P≥0.382). In U and V directions, zirconia and titanium abutments displaced significantly more towards negative in OsseoSpeed EV implant (Pdisplaced significantly more in V direction compared to the U and W (P≤0.005), and within the Osseospeed EV system, abutment displacements were significantly different amongst directions and displacements in V were the greatest (Pdisplaced more in the implant that required higher torque values to tighten the abutment. The amount of displacement in both systems was clinically small. Abutment material did not affect the magnitude of displacement. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the micromorphological differences of the implant-abutment junction and their clinical implications: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, Nikos; Li, Xiaona; Zampelis, Antonios; Ma, Li; Janda, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the morphological micro-features of three commercially available implant-abutment joints, using compatible and original prosthetic components. Furthermore, possible correlations between the micromorphology and potential functional complications were investigated with the use of finite element analysis. Three abutments (one original and two compatibles) were torqued on original Straumann RN implants, as according to each of the manufacturer's instructions. The implant-abutment units were sliced in the microtome and photographed under different magnifications (10×-500×) through a scanning electron microscope. Finite element analysis models were reconstructed for each of the implant-abutment units using the precise measurements from the SEM. Differences in stress, strain and deformation for the three different abutments were then calculated using ANSYS Workbench v13. Major dimensional differences were identified between all studied contact areas of the three units. The tight contact in the implant shoulder was similar in all three units, but engagement of the internal connection and, in particular, the anti-rotation elements was seriously compromised in the compatible abutments. One compatible abutment demonstrated compromised engagement of the abutment screw as well. Equivalent stress and strain in the FEA were much higher for the compatible abutments. An evaluation of the sequence of preload application revealed differences in the pattern of deformation between the original and compatible abutments, which can have serious clinical implications. Compatible abutments can present critical morphological differences from the original ones. The differences in the cross-sectional geometry result in large differences in the overall contact areas, both in terms of quality and quantity which could have serious implications for the long-term stability of the prosthesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  19. A three-dimensional finite element study on the stress distribution pattern of two prosthetic abutments for external hexagon implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Wagner; Hermann, Caio; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Balbinoti, Jean Anacleto; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of two different straight prosthetic abutments (one- and two-piece) for external hex butt-joint connection implants using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Two 3D-FEA models were designed, one for the two-piece prosthetic abutment (2 mm in height, two-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent) and another one for the one-piece abutment (2 mm in height, Slim Fit one-piece mini-conical abutment, Neodent), with their corresponding screws and implants (Titamax Ti, 3.75 diameter by 13 mm in length, Neodent). The model simulated the single restoration of a lower premolar using data from a computerized tomography of a mandible. The preload (20 N) after torque application for installation of the abutment and an occlusal loading were simulated. The occlusal load was simulated using average physiological bite force and direction (114.6 N in the axial direction, 17.1 N in the lingual direction and 23.4 N toward the mesial at an angle of 75° to the occlusal plan). The regions with the highest von Mises stress results were at the bottom of the initial two threads of both prosthetic abutments that were tested. The one-piece prosthetic abutment presented a more homogeneous behavior of stress distribution when compared with the two-piece abutment. Under the simulated chewing loads, the von Mises stresses for both tested prosthetic-abutments were within the tensile strength values of the materials analyzed which thus supports the clinical use of both prosthetic abutments.

  20. Effects of artificial aging conditions on yttria-stabilized zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Cardoso, Kátia Vieira; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Rizkalla, Amin Sami; Santos Junior, Gildo Coelho; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2016-08-01

    Most ceramic abutments are fabricated from yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). However, Y-TZP undergoes hydrothermal degradation, a process that is not well understood. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of artificial aging conditions on the fracture load, phase stability, and surface microstructure of a Y-TZP abutment. Thirty-two prefabricated Y-TZP abutments were screwed and tightened down to external hexagon implants and divided into 4 groups (n = 8): C, control; MC, mechanical cycling (1×10(6) cycles; 10 Hz); AUT, autoclaving (134°C; 5 hours; 0.2 MPa); and TC, thermal cycling (10(4) cycles; 5°/55°C). A single-load-to-fracture test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min to assess the assembly's resistance to fracture (ISO Norm 14801). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was applied to observe and quantify the tetragonal-monoclinic (t-m) phase transformation. Representative abutments were examined with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the surface characteristics of the abutments. Load-to-fracture test results (N) were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test (α=.05). XRD measurements revealed the monoclinic phase in some abutments after each aging condition. All the aging conditions reduced the fracture load significantly (Paging conditions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Integral Abutment and Jointless Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian-Claudiu Comisu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral bridges, or integral abutment and jointless bridges, as they are more commonly known in the USA, are constructed without any movement joints between spans or between spans and abutments. Typically these bridges have stub-type abutments supported on piles and continuous bridge deck from one embankment to the other. Foundations are usually designed to be small and flexible to facilitate horizontal movement or rocking of the support. Integrally bridges are simple or multiple span ones that have their superstructure cast integrally with their substructure. The jointless bridges cost less to construct and require less maintenance then equivalent bridges with expansion joints. Integral bridges present a challenge for load distribution calculations because the bridge deck, piers, abutments, embankments and soil must all be considered as single compliant system. This paper presents some of the important features of integral abutment and jointless bridge design and some guidelines to achieve improved design. The goal of this paper is to enhance the awareness among the engineering community to use integral abutment and jointless bridges in Romania.

  2. Soft tissues stability of cad-cam and stock abutments in anterior regions: 2-year prospective multicentric cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lops, Diego; Bressan, Eriberto; Parpaiola, Andrea; Sbricoli, Luca; Cecchinato, Denis; Romeo, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to verify if the type of implant abutment manufacturing, stock or cad-cam, could influence the maintenance of stable gingival margins around single restorations in anterior areas. After 16 weeks of healing, implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech Dental Implant) were positioned. Depending on the different fixture inclination and the thickness of buccal peri-implant soft tissue, abutment selection resulted in four groups: Group 1 (patients with zirconia ZirDesign(®) stock abutments), Group 2 (titanium stock TiDesign(®) abutments), Group 3 (zirconia cad-cam abutments), and Group 4 (titanium cad-cam abutments). The following parameters were assessed: buccal gingival margin modification (BGM). The modification of the implant gingival margin was followed at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. A computerized analysis was performed for measurements. Differences between soft tissue margin at baseline and after 2 years measured the gingival margin recession. A general linear model was used to evaluate each group in relation to gingival recession after two years. Tukey's post hoc test was used to compare the mean REC indexes of each group of abutments. Seventy-two healthy patients (39 males and 33 females; mean age of 46 years) scheduled for single gap rehabilitation in anterior areas were enrolled. A 100% of implant survival rate was observed after 24 months of function. One failure occurred due to fracture of a Zirconia cad-cam abutment. Moreover, two abutment screw unscrewing were observed. Both for zirconia and titanium stock abutments (Group 1 and 2), the mean recession of implant buccal soft tissue was of 0.3 mm (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). Soft tissue mean recession of zirconia and titanium cad-cam abutments (Group 3 and 4) was of 0.1 and -0.3 mm, respectively (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). REC values of cad-cam titanium abutments (Group 4) were significantly lower than that of Group 1 (-0.57 mm), Group 2 (-0.61 mm), and Group 3 (-0.40 mm

  3. In vitro validation of a novel mechanical model for testing the anchorage capacity of pedicle screws using physiological load application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Zimmermann, Julia; Graf, Nicolas; Schilling, Christoph; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kienle, Annette

    2018-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro tests analysing screw loosening often include high standard deviations caused by high variabilities in bone mineral density and pedicle geometry, whereas standardized mechanical models made of PU foam often do not integrate anatomical or physiological boundary conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a most realistic mechanical model for the standardized and reproducible testing of pedicle screws regarding the resistance against screw loosening and the holding force as well as to validate this model by in vitro experiments. The novel mechanical testing model represents all anatomical structures of a human vertebra and is consisting of PU foam to simulate cancellous bone, as well as a novel pedicle model made of short carbon fibre filled epoxy. Six monoaxial cannulated pedicle screws (Ø6.5 × 45mm) were tested using the mechanical testing model as well as human vertebra specimens by applying complex physiological cyclic loading (shear, tension, and bending; 5Hz testing frequency; sinusoidal pulsating forces) in a dynamic materials testing machine with stepwise increasing load after each 50.000 cycles (100.0N shear force + 20.0N per step, 51.0N tension force + 10.2N per step, 4.2Nm bending moment + 0.8Nm per step) until screw loosening was detected. The pedicle screw head was fixed on a firmly clamped rod while the load was applied in the vertebral body. For the in vitro experiments, six human lumbar vertebrae (L1-3, BMD 75.4 ± 4.0mg/cc HA, pedicle width 9.8 ± 0.6mm) were tested after implanting pedicle screws under X-ray control. Relative motions of pedicle screw, specimen fixture, and rod fixture were detected using an optical motion tracking system. Translational motions of the mechanical testing model experiments in the point of load introduction (0.9-2.2mm at 240N shear force) were reproducible within the variation range of the in vitro experiments (0.6-3.5mm at 240N shear force). Screw loosening occurred continuously in

  4. Image Registration-Based Bolt Loosening Detection of Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Self-loosening of bolts caused by repetitive loads and vibrations is one of the common defects that can weaken the structural integrity of bolted steel joints in civil structures. Many existing approaches for detecting loosening bolts are based on physical sensors and, hence, require extensive sensor deployment, which limit their abilities to cost-effectively detect loosened bolts in a large number of steel joints. Recently, computer vision-based structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies have demonstrated great potential for damage detection due to the benefits of being low cost, easy to deploy, and contactless. In this study, we propose a vision-based non-contact bolt loosening detection method that uses a consumer-grade digital camera. Two images of the monitored steel joint are first collected during different inspection periods and then aligned through two image registration processes. If the bolt experiences rotation between inspections, it will introduce differential features in the registration errors, serving as a good indicator for bolt loosening detection. The performance and robustness of this approach have been validated through a series of experimental investigations using three laboratory setups including a gusset plate on a cross frame, a column flange, and a girder web. The bolt loosening detection results are presented for easy interpretation such that informed decisions can be made about the detected loosened bolts. PMID:29597264

  5. Image Registration-Based Bolt Loosening Detection of Steel Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian

    2018-03-28

    Self-loosening of bolts caused by repetitive loads and vibrations is one of the common defects that can weaken the structural integrity of bolted steel joints in civil structures. Many existing approaches for detecting loosening bolts are based on physical sensors and, hence, require extensive sensor deployment, which limit their abilities to cost-effectively detect loosened bolts in a large number of steel joints. Recently, computer vision-based structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies have demonstrated great potential for damage detection due to the benefits of being low cost, easy to deploy, and contactless. In this study, we propose a vision-based non-contact bolt loosening detection method that uses a consumer-grade digital camera. Two images of the monitored steel joint are first collected during different inspection periods and then aligned through two image registration processes. If the bolt experiences rotation between inspections, it will introduce differential features in the registration errors, serving as a good indicator for bolt loosening detection. The performance and robustness of this approach have been validated through a series of experimental investigations using three laboratory setups including a gusset plate on a cross frame, a column flange, and a girder web. The bolt loosening detection results are presented for easy interpretation such that informed decisions can be made about the detected loosened bolts.

  6. Tapping insertional torque allows prediction for better pedicle screw fixation and optimal screw size selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Dmitriev, Anton E; Luhmann, Scott J

    2013-08-01

    specimen. Each pedicle was incrementally tapped to increasing size (3.75, 4.00, 4.50, and 5.50 mm) until the threshold value was reached based on the assigned group. Pedicle screw size was determined by adding 1 mm to the tap size that crossed the threshold torque value. Torque measurements were recorded with each revolution during tap and pedicle screw insertion. Each specimen was then individually potted and pedicle screws pulled out "in-line" with the screw axis at a rate of 0.25 mm/sec. Peak pullout strength (POS) was measured in Newtons (N). The peak tapping IT was significantly increased (50%) in Group 2 (3.23 ± 0.65 in-lbs) compared with Group 1 (2.15 ± 0.56 in-lbs) (p=.0005). The peak screw IT was also significantly increased (19%) in Group 2 (8.99 ± 2.27 in-lbs) compared with Group 1 (7.52 ± 2.96 in-lbs) (p=.02). The pedicle screw pullout strength was also significantly increased (23%) in Group 2 (877.9 ± 235.2 N) compared with Group 1 (712.3 ± 223.1 N) (p=.017). The mean pedicle screw diameter was significantly increased in Group 2 (5.70 ± 1.05 mm) compared with Group 1 (5.00 ± 0.80 mm) (p=.0002). There was also an increased rate of optimal pedicle screw size selection in Group 2 with 9 of 15 (60%) pedicle screws compared with Group 1 with 4 of 15 (26.7%) pedicle screws within 1 mm of the measured pedicle width. There was a moderate correlation for tapping IT with both screw IT (r=0.54; p=.002) and pedicle screw POS (r=0.55; p=.002). Our findings suggest that tapping IT directly correlates with pedicle screw IT, pedicle screw pullout strength, and optimal pedicle screw size. Therefore, tapping IT may be used during thoracic pedicle screw instrumentation as an adjunct to preoperative imaging and clinical experience to maximize fixation strength and optimize pedicle "fit and fill" with the largest screw possible. However, further prospective, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the intraoperative use of tapping IT to predict screw loosening

  7. Enhancement of Orthodontic Anchor Screw Stability Under Immediate Loading by Ultraviolet Photofunctionalization Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Maiko; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Inaba, Mizuki; Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    Ultraviolet (UV)-mediated photofunctionalization technology is intended to enhance the osseointegration capability of titanium implants. There are concerns about orthodontic anchor screws loosening under immediate loading protocols in adolescent orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effects of photofunctionalization on the intrabony stability of orthodontic titanium anchor screws and bone-anchor screw contact under immediate loading in growing rats. Custom-made titanium anchor screws (1.4 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length) with or without photofunctionalization pretreatment were placed on the proximal epiphysis of the tibial bone in 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and were loaded immediately after placement. After 2 weeks of loading, the stability of the anchor screws was evaluated using a Periotest device, and the bone-anchor screw contact ratio (BSC) was assessed by a histomorphometric analysis using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. In the unloaded group, Periotest values (PTVs) were ~25 for UV-untreated screws and 13 for UVtreated screws (P < .01), while in the immediate-loading group, PTVs were 28 for UV-untreated screws and 16 for UV-treated screws (P < .05). Significantly less screw mobility was observed in both UV-treated groups regardless of the loading protocol. The BSC was increased ~1.8 fold for UV-treated screws, compared with UV-untreated screws, regardless of the loading protocol. Photofunctionalization enhanced the intrabony stability of orthodontic anchor screws under immediate loading in growing rats by increasing bone-anchor screw contact.

  8. Development of a new quantitative gas permeability method for dental implant-abutment connection tightness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Most dental implant systems are presently made of two pieces: the implant itself and the abutment. The connection tightness between those two pieces is a key point to prevent bacterial proliferation, tissue inflammation and bone loss. The leak has been previously estimated by microbial, color tracer and endotoxin percolation. Methods A new nitrogen flow technique was developed for implant-abutment connection leakage measurement, adapted from a recent, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative method used to assess endodontic sealing. Results The results show very significant differences between various sealing and screwing conditions. The remaining flow was lower after key screwing compared to hand screwing (p = 0.03) and remained different from the negative test (p = 0.0004). The method reproducibility was very good, with a coefficient of variation of 1.29%. Conclusions Therefore, the presented new gas flow method appears to be a simple and robust method to compare different implant systems. It allows successive measures without disconnecting the abutment from the implant and should in particular be used to assess the behavior of the connection before and after mechanical stress. PMID:21492459

  9. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10 of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricated abutment; Group 4, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; and Group 5, external hexagon implant and Ceraone abutment. For groups 1, 2, 3 and 5, the crowns were cemented on the abutments and in group 4 crowns were screwed directly on the implant. The specimens were subjected to 500,000 cycles at 19.1 Hz of frequency and non-axial load of 133 N in a MTS 810 machine. The vertical misfit (μm at the implant/abutment interface was evaluated before (B and after (A application of the cyclic loading. Data were analyzed statistically by using two-away ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Before loading values showed no difference among groups 2 (4.33±3.13, 3 (4.79±3.43 and 5 (3.86±4.60; between groups 1 (12.88±6.43 and 4 (9.67±3.08, and among groups 2, 3 and 4. However, groups 1 and 4 were significantly different from groups 2, 3 and 5. After loading values of groups 1 (17.28±8.77 and 4 (17.78±10.99 were significantly different from those of groups 2 (4.83±4.50, 3 (8.07±4.31 and 5 (3.81±4.84. There was a significant increase in misfit values of groups 1, 3 and 4 after cyclic loading, but not for groups 2 and 5. CONCLUSIONS: The cyclic loading and type of implant/abutment connection may develop a role on the vertical misfit at the implant/abutment interface.

  10. An introduction to single implant abutments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to single implant abutments and aims to provide basic information about abutments which are essential for all dental personnel who are involved in dental implantology. Clinical Relevance: This article provides a basic knowledge of implants and implant abutments which are of paramount importance, as replacement of missing teeth with oral implants has become a well-established clinical procedure.

  11. Effects of Cement, Abutment Surface Pretreatment, and Artificial Aging on the Force Required to Detach Cantilever Fixed Dental Prostheses from Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Chepura, Taras; Schmitter, Marc; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    To examine the in vitro effects of different cements, abutment surface preconditioning, and artificial aging on the maximum tensile force needed to detach cantilever fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) from dental implants with titanium abutments. A total of 32 tissue-level implants were combined with standardized titanium abutments. For each test group, eight cantilever FDPs were fabricated using selective laser melting (cobalt-chromium [CoCr] alloy). The inner surfaces of the cantilever FDPs and half of the abutments were sandblasted and then joined by use of four different cements (two permanent and two semi-permanent) in two different amounts per cement. Subgroups were tested after either artificial aging (thermocycling and chewing simulation) or 3 days of water storage. Finally, axial pull off-tests were performed for each abutment separately. Cement type and surface pretreatment significantly affected decementation behavior. The highest retention forces (approximately 1,200 N) were associated with sandblasted abutments and permanent cements. With unconditioned abutments, temporary cements (Fu cement (Fu ≈ 100 N), resulted in rather low retention forces. Zinc phosphate cement guaranteed high retention forces. After aging, retention was sufficient only for cementation with zinc phosphate cement and for the combination of sandblasted abutments and glass-ionomer cement. When glass-ionomer cement is used to fix cantilever FDPs on implants, sandblasting of standard titanium abutments may help prevent loss of retention. Retention forces were still high for FDPs fixed with zinc phosphate cement, even when the abutments were not pretreated. Use of permanent cements only, however, is recommended to prevent unwanted loosening of cantilever FDPs.

  12. Fracture Resistance of Implant Abutments Following Abutment Alterations by Milling the Margins: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Anuya; Kheur, Mohit; Kheur, Supriya; Lakha, Tabrez; Burhanpurwala, Murtuza

    2016-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different levels of preparation of an implant abutment on its fracture resistance. The study evaluated abutments that incorporated a platform switch (Myriad Plus Abutments, Morse Taper Connection) and Standard abutments (BioHorizons Standard Abutment, BioHorizons Inc). Each abutment was connected to an appropriate implant and mounted in a self-cured resin base. Based on the abutment preparation depths, 3 groups were created for each abutment type: as manufactured, abutment prepared 1 mm apical to the original margin, and abutment prepared 1.5 mm to the original margin. All the abutments were prepared in a standardized manner to incorporate a 0.5 mm chamfer margin uniformly. All the abutments were torqued to 30 Ncm on their respective implants. They were then subjected to loading until failure in a universal testing machine. Abutments with no preparation showed the maximum resistance to fracture for both groups. As the preparation depth increased, the fracture resistance decreased. The fracture resistance of implant abutment junction decreases as the preparation depth increases.

  13. Cement Augmentation in Sacroiliac Screw Fixation Offers Modest Biomechanical Advantages in a Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Dodd, Andrew E; Unno, Florence; Wong, Angus; Amiri, Shahram; Lefaivre, Kelly A; Guy, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Sacroiliac screw fixation in elderly patients with pelvic fractures is prone to failure owing to impaired bone quality. Cement augmentation has been proposed as a possible solution, because in other anatomic areas this has been shown to reduce screw loosening. However, to our knowledge, this has not been evaluated for sacroiliac screws. We investigated the potential biomechanical benefit of cement augmentation of sacroiliac screw fixation in a cadaver model of osteoporotic bone, specifically with respect to screw loosening, construct survival, and fracture-site motion. Standardized complete sacral ala fractures with intact posterior ligaments in combination with ipsilateral upper and lower pubic rami fractures were created in osteoporotic cadaver pelves and stabilized by three fixation techniques: sacroiliac (n = 5) with sacroiliac screws in S1 and S2, cemented (n = 5) with addition of cement augmentation, and transsacral (n = 5) with a single transsacral screw in S1. A cyclic loading protocol was applied with torque (1.5 Nm) and increasing axial force (250-750 N). Screw loosening, construct survival, and sacral fracture-site motion were measured by optoelectric motion tracking. A sample-size calculation revealed five samples per group to be required to achieve a power of 0.80 to detect 50% reduction in screw loosening. Screw motion in relation to the sacrum during loading with 250 N/1.5 Nm was not different among the three groups (sacroiliac: 1.2 mm, range, 0.6-1.9; cemented: 0.7 mm, range, 0.5-1.3; transsacral: 1.1 mm, range, 0.6-2.3) (p = 0.940). Screw subsidence was less in the cemented group (3.0 mm, range, 1.2-3.7) compared with the sacroiliac (5.7 mm, range, 4.7-10.4) or transsacral group (5.6 mm, range, 3.8-10.5) (p = 0.031). There was no difference with the numbers available in the median number of cycles needed until failure; this was 2921 cycles (range, 2586-5450) in the cemented group, 2570 cycles (range, 2500-5107) for the sacroiliac specimens, and

  14. A comparative study on microgap of premade abutments and abutments cast in base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalithamma, Jaini Jaini; Mallan, Sreekanth Anantha; Murukan, Pazhani Appan; Zarina, Rita

    2014-06-01

    The study compared the marginal accuracy of premade and cast abutments. Premade titanium, stainless steel, and gold abutments formed the control groups. Plastic abutments were cast in nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium and grade IV titanium. The abutment/implant interface was analyzed. Analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test revealed no significant difference in mean marginal microgap between premade gold and titanium abutments and between premade stainless steel and cast titanium abutments. Statistically significant differences (P < .001) were found among all other groups.

  15. A Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Constructs for Metacarpal Spiral Fracture Fixation in a Cadaver Model: 2 Large Screws Versus 3 Small Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eu-Jin Cheah, Andre; Behn, Anthony W; Comer, Garet; Yao, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Surgeons confronted with a long spiral metacarpal fracture may choose to fix it solely with lagged screws. A biomechanical analysis of a metacarpal spiral fracture model was performed to determine whether 3 1.5-mm screws or 2 2.0-mm screws provided more stability during bending and torsional loading. Second and third metacarpals were harvested from 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric hands and spiral fractures were created. One specimen from each matched pair was fixed with 2 2.0-mm lagged screws whereas the other was fixed with 3 1.5-mm lagged screws. Nine pairs underwent combined cyclic cantilever bending and axial compressive loading followed by loading to failure. Nine additional pairs were subjected to cyclic external rotation while under a constant axial compressive load and were subsequently externally rotated to failure under a constant axial compressive load. Paired t tests were used to compare cyclic creep, stiffness, displacement, rotation, and peak load levels. Average failure torque for all specimens was 7.2 ± 1.7 Nm. In cyclic torsional testing, the group with 2 screws exhibited significantly less rotational creep than the one with 3 screws. A single specimen in the group with 2 screws failed before cyclic bending tests were completed. No other significant differences were found between test groups during torsional or bending tests. Both constructs were biomechanically similar except that the construct with 2 screws displayed significantly less loosening during torsional cyclic loading, although the difference was small and may not be clinically meaningful. Because we found no obvious biomechanical advantage to using 3 1.5-mm lagged screws to fix long spiral metacarpal fractures, the time efficiency and decreased implant costs of using 2-2.0 mm lagged screws may be preferred. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sacroiliac Screw Fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. van den Bosch

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to evaluate three major aspects of the use of sacroiliac screws in patients with unstable pelvic ring fractures: the optimal technique for sacroiliac screw fixation, the reliability of peroperative fluoroscopy and the late results. We focused on the questions

  17. Salivary bacterial leakage into implant-abutment connections: preliminary results of an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencio, F; Papi, P; Di Carlo, S; Pompa, G

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of bacterial leakage in the internal surface of implants, through implant-abutment interface (IAI), is one of the parameters for analyzing the fabrication quality of the connections. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate two different types of implant-abutment connections: the screwed connection (Group 1) and the cemented connection (Group 2), analyzing the permeability of the IAI to bacterial colonization, using human saliva as culture medium. A total of twelve implants were tested, six in each experimental group. Five healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Two milliliters of non-stimulated saliva were collected from each subject and mixed in a test tube. After 14 days of incubation of the bacteria sample in the implant fixtures, a PCR-Real Time analysis was performed. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the proportions of implant-abutment assembled structures detected with bacterial leakage. Differences in the bacterial counts of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. A p value abutment connections compared to the cemented implant-abutment connections. A mean total bacterial count of 1.2E+07 (± 0.25E+07) for Group 1 and of 7.2E+04 (± 14.4E+04) for Group 2 was found, with a high level of significance, p = .0001. Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that bacterial species from human saliva may penetrate along the implant-abutment interface in both connections, however the cemented connection implants showed the lowest amount of bacterial colonization.

  18. Behavior and analysis of an integral abutment bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    As a result of abutment spalling on the integral abutment bridge over 400 South Street in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) instigated research measures to better understand the behavior of integral abutment bridges. ...

  19. Do screws and screw holes affect osteolysis in cementless cups using highly crosslinked polyethylene? A 7 to 10-year follow-up case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, N; Jinno, T; Takada, R; Koga, D; Ando, T; Okawa, A; Haro, H

    2018-05-01

    The use of screws and the presence of screw holes may cause acetabular osteolysis and implant loosening in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using conventional polyethylene. In contrast, this issue is not fully understood using highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE), particularly in large comparative study. Therefore, we performed a case-control study to assess the influence of screw usage and screw holes on: (1) implant fixation and osteolysis and (2) polyethylene steady-state wear rate, using cases with HXLPE liners followed up for 7-10 years postoperatively. The screw usage and screw holes adversely affect the implant fixation and incidence of wear-related osteolysis in THA with HXLPE. We reviewed 209 primary cementless THAs performed with 26-mm cobalt-chromium heads on HXLPE liners. To compare the effects of the use of screws and the presence of screw holes, the following groups were established: (1) with-screw (n=140); (2) without-screw (n=69); (3) no-hole (n=27) and (4) group in which a cup with screw holes, but no screw was used (n=42). Two adjunct groups (no-hole cups excluded) were established to compare the differences in the two types of HXLPE: (5) remelted group (n=100) and (6) annealed group (n=82). Implant stability and osteolysis were evaluated by plain radiography and computed tomography. The wear rate from 1 year to the final evaluation was measured using plain X-rays and PolyWare Digital software. All cups and stems achieved bony fixation. On CT-scan, no acetabular osteolysis was found, but there were 3 cases with a small area of femoral osteolysis. The mean steady-state wear rate of each group was (1) 0.031±0.022, (2) 0.033±0.035, (3) 0.031±0.024, (4) 0.029±0.018, (5) 0.030±0.018 and (6) 0.034±0.023mm/year, respectively. A comparison of the effects of screw usage or screw holes found no significant between-group differences in the implant stability, prevalence of osteolysis [no acetabular osteolysis and 3/209 at femoral side (1

  20. An in vivo assessment of the effects of using different implant abutment occluding materials on implant microleakage and the peri-implant microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Caroline

    Microleakage may be a factor in the progression of peri-implant pathology. Microleakage in implant dentistry refers to the passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules or ions between the abutment-implant interface to and from the surrounding periodontal tissues. This creates a zone of inflammation and reservoir of bacteria at the implant-abutment interface. Bone loss typically occurs within the first year of abutment connection and then stabilizes. It has not yet been definitively proven that the occurrence of microleakage cannot contribute to future bone loss or impede the treatment of peri-implant disease. Therefore, strategies to reduce or eliminate microleakage are sought out. Recent evidence demonstrates that the type of implant abutment channel occluding material can affect the amount of microleakage in an in vitro study environment. Thus, we hypothesize that different abutment screw channel occluding materials will affect the amount of observed microleakage, vis-a-vis the correlation between the microflora found on the abutment screw channel occluding material those found in the peri-implant sulcus. Additional objectives include confirming the presence of microleakage in vivo and assessing any impact that different abutment screw channel occluding materials may have on the peri-implant microbiome. Finally, the present study provides an opportunity to further characterize the peri-implant microbiome. Eight fully edentulous patients restored with at dental implants supporting screw-retained fixed hybrid prostheses were included in the study. At the initial appointment (T1), the prostheses were removed and the implants and prostheses were cleaned. The prostheses were then inserted with polytetrafluoroethylene tape (PTFE, TeflonRTM), cotton, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), or synthetic foam as the implant abutment channel occluding material and sealed over with composite resin. About six months later (T2), the prostheses were removed and the materials collected. Paper

  1. [Effect of zirconia abutment angulation on stress distribution in the abutment and the bone around implant: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-zhong; Tian, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Yan-min

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of three different zirconia angular abutments on the stress distribution in bone and abutment using three-dimensional finite element analysis, and provide instruction for clinical application. Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to analyze the stress distribution of three different zirconia/titanium angular abutments and bone around implant. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in the straight abutment model. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the 20 ° angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in 15 ° angular abutment model. There was no significant difference between zirconia abutment model and titanium abutment model. The abutment angulation has a significant influence on the stress distribution in the abutment, bolt and bone, and exacerbates as the angulation increases, which suggest that we should take more attention to the implant orientation and use straight abutment or little angular abutment. The zirconia abutment can be used safely, and there is no noticeable difference between zirconia abutment and titanium abutment on stress distribution.

  2. Local scour at abutments: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    On the other hand, live-bed scour occurs when the scour hole is ... The primary vortex is elliptical in shape, with an inner core region being a .... The primary vortex is strong upstream of the abutment (see sections A–C) ...... Cardoso A H, Bettess R 1999 Effects of time and channel geometry on scour at bridge abutments. J.

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  4. [Early aseptic loosening of the CF 30 femoral stem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanda, M; Havlícek, V; Hudec, J

    2007-02-01

    The CF 30 stem in combination with a cementless acetabulum was used at the First Department of Orthopedic Surgery in Brno in the years 1994 to 1995. From the second year following implantation, aseptic stem loosening was recorded. In order to find explanation of this early loosening, the authors, in cooperation with the Institute of Solid Mechanics, Mechatronics and Biomechanics, carried out the stress-strain analysis in a model system. Eighty patients (31 men and 49 women) received a cemented CF30 femoral component in 1994. Of them, 16 patients underwent revision arthroplasty, three died of causes unrelated to the surgery, and four were lost to follow-up. The final clinical and radiographic check-up was carried out in 2001. The results of a comprehensive examination were available in 57 patients with a CF30 stem. The patients were evaluated on the basis of the Harris hip score and anteroposterior radiographs of the hip. X-ray films obtained immediately after surgery and those taken at regular intervals during follow-up were compared. The following characteristics were noted: translucent lines in individual zones along the stem at the cement-bone interface; osteolysis, i. e., non-linear translucent areas, at least 5 mm long, at the cement-bone interface; and subsidence of the femoral component, i. e., migration of the stem distal to the tip of the greater trochanter. The CF 30 stem survival curve showed that aseptic stem loosening occurred from post-implantation year 2, and increased during the following years. At 6 years and 6 months, a total of 16 patients underwent revision surgery, involving reimplantation in 14 and implant removal in 2 patients. Potential causes of aseptic loosening: Polyethylene wear.However, no acetabular loosening was found in this group, although acetabular components are reported to become loose more often than femoral components. By comparison of the stem survival curves for Poldi and CF 30 stems it appeared that, at 6 years and 6 months

  5. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search......-abutment connection. There were no significant differences between the two treatment modalities regarding professional or patient-reported outcome measures. Meta-analysis disclosed a mean difference of peri-implant marginal bone loss of 1.56 mm (confidence interval: 0.87 to 2.25), indicating significant more bone...... loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. CONCLUSIONS: A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must...

  6. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search...... of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment...... loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. CONCLUSIONS: A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must...

  7. Evaluation of the use of intra-operative radiology for open placement of lag screws for the stabilization of sacroiliac luxation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Francisco; Quinn, Robert J; Adrian, Anna M; Owen, Martin R; Bush, Mark A

    2017-01-16

    To assess the effect of intra-operative radiology on the quality of lag screw insertion for the management of sacroiliac joint luxations in cats. In this retrospective single-centre study, the surgical, anaesthetic and imaging records of 40 screws (32 cats) placed with lag effect for management of sacroiliac luxation were reviewed. Postoperative radiographs were assessed for sacroiliac joint reduction, screw position, and sacral width purchased by each screw. Cases were divided into two groups according to the use of (IOR) or the absence of intra-operative radiology (NIOR). A total of 23 lag screws were placed with the aid of intra-operative radiology and 17 without. Three of the 23 screws placed in the IOR group exited the sacrum as opposed to eight of 17 screws in the NIOR group (p = 0.03). Mean sacral width purchased by the screws in the IOR group (70.8%) was also significantly higher (p = 0.002) than in the NIOR group (54.6%). Mean general anaesthetic times for unilateral and bilateral screw placement for the IOR group and NIOR group were not significantly different. The use of intra-operative radiology can significantly improve the quality of lag screw insertion for the stabilization of sacroiliac luxations in cats, which should lead to a reduced incidence of postoperative screw loosening.

  8. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  9. SPECT scintigraphy with HDP and Mab BW 250/183 of loosened hip endoprothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predic, P [Hospital Celje, Celje (Sierra Leone); Gregoric, E [Hospital Izola, Izola (Sierra Leone); Dodig, D [Clinical Hospital Centre, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protection

    1994-10-01

    Main problem of the loosened hip endoprothesis is in distinguishing between the aseptic and septic loosening of endoprothesis. The study involved 27 pts with a loosened hip; 15 pts with aseptic and 12 pts with septic loosening. The patients were injected 550-770 MBq Tc-99m-HDP and underwent SPECT scintigraphy of the hips to repeat then the examination with only 370 MBq Tc-99m-Mab Bw 230/183. HDP application evidenced positive accumulation at the endoprothesis in all patients with a loosened hip while Mab Bw 250/183 only in the patients with septic loosening. Conclusion: SPECT scintigraphy of hip endoprothesis with HDP and Mab BW 250/183 allows differential diagnosing between septic and aseptic hip loosening and hereby a correct therapeutical approach. (author).

  10. The influence of screw type, alloy and cylinder position on the marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding Influência do tipo de parafuso, liga e da posição do cilindro na adaptação marginal das infra-estruturas sob implantes antes e após a soldagem a laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Castilio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. METHODS: After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5mm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05. RESULTS: Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13µm than the hexagonal screws (27.93 µm. Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2 The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3 cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values.A desadaptação na interface abutment-cilindro protético pode causar perda da pré-carga, levando ao afrouxamento ou fratura dos parafusos de ouro e tit

  11. Measurement of the rotational misfit and implant-abutment gap of all-ceramic abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garine, Wael N; Funkenbusch, Paul D; Ercoli, Carlo; Wodenscheck, Joseph; Murphy, William C

    2007-01-01

    The specific aims of this study were to measure the implant and abutment hexagonal dimensions, to measure the rotational misfit between implant and abutments, and to correlate the dimension of the gap present between the abutment and implant hexagons with the rotational misfit of 5 abutment-implant combinations from 2 manufacturers. Twenty new externally hexed implants (n = 10 for Nobel Biocare; n = 10 for Biomet/3i) and 50 new abutments were used (n = 10; Procera Zirconia; Procera Alumina; Esthetic Ceramic Abutment; ZiReal; and GingiHue post ZR Zero Rotation abutments). The mating surfaces of all implants and abutments were imaged with a scanning electron microscope before and after rotational misfit measurements. The distances between the corners and center of the implant and abutment hexagon were calculated by entering their x and y coordinates, measured on a measuring microscope, into Pythagoras' theorem. The dimensional difference between abutment and implant hexagons was calculated and correlated with the rotational misfit, which was recorded using a precision optical encoder. Each abutment was rotated (3 times/session) clockwise and counterclockwise until binding. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were used to compare rotational misfit among groups (alpha = .05). With respect to rotational misfit, the abutment groups were significantly different from one another (P < .001), with the exception of the Procera Zirconia and Esthetic Ceramic groups (P = .4). The mean rotational misfits in degrees were 4.13 +/- 0.68 for the Procera Zirconia group, 3.92 +/- 0.62 for the Procera Alumina group, 4.10 +/- 0.67 for the Esthetic Ceramic group, 3.48 +/- 0.40 for the ZiReal group, and 1.61 +/- 0.24 for the GingiHue post ZR group. There was no correlation between the mean implant-abutment gap and rotational misfit. Within the limits of this study, machining inconsistencies of the hexagons were found for all implants and abutments tested. The GingiHue Post

  12. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  13. Accuracy of different abutment level impression techniques in All-On-4 dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Passive fit of prosthetic frameworks is a major concern in implant dentistry. Impression technique is one of the several variables that may affect the outcome of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to compare the three dimensional accuracy of direct and indirect abutment level implant impressions ofALL-ON-4 treatment plan.Materials and Methods: A reference acrylic resin model with four Branemark fixtures was made according to All-On-4 treatment plan. Multiunit abutments were screwed into the fixtures and two special trays were made for direct and indirect impression techniques. Ten direct and ten indirect impression techniques with respective impression transfers were made. Impressions were poured with stone and the positional accuracy of the abutment analogues in each dimension of x, y, and z axes and also angular displacement (Δθ were evaluated using a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM. Data were analyzed using T- test.Results: The results showed that direct impression technique was significantly more accurate than indirect technique (P<0.001.Conclusion: The results showed that the accuracy of direct impression technique was significantly more than that of indirect technique in Δθ and Δr coordinate and also Δx, Δy, Δz.

  14. Oral mucosa tissue response to titanium cover screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Paparella, María L; Spielberg, Martín; Brandizzi, Daniel; Guglielmotti, María B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2012-08-01

    Titanium is the most widely used metal in dental implantology. The release of particles from metal structures into the biologic milieu may be the result of electrochemical processes (corrosion) and/or mechanical disruption during insertion, abutment connection, or removal of failing implants. The aim of the present study is to evaluate tissue response of human oral mucosa adjacent to titanium cover screws. One hundred fifty-three biopsies of the supra-implant oral mucosa adjacent to the cover screw of submerged dental implants were analyzed. Histologic studies were performed to analyze epithelial and connective tissue as well as the presence of metal particles, which were identified using microchemical analysis. Langerhans cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes were studied using immunohistochemical techniques. The surface of the cover screws was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Forty-one percent of mucosa biopsies exhibited metal particles in different layers of the section thickness. Particle number and size varied greatly among specimens. Immunohistochemical study confirmed the presence of macrophages and T lymphocytes associated with the metal particles. Microchemical analysis revealed the presence of titanium in the particles. On SEM analysis, the surface of the screws exhibited depressions and irregularities. The biologic effects seen in the mucosa in contact with the cover screws might be associated with the presence of titanium or other elements, such as aluminum or vanadium. The potential long-term biologic effects of particles on soft tissues adjacent to metallic devices should be further investigated because these effects might affect the clinical outcome of the implant.

  15. Segmented abutting fields irradiation using multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of segmented abutting fields irradiation (SAFI) using multileaf collimators (MLCs), in which the target volume is divided into several segments to create complex irregular field without use of alloy blocks. A linear accelerator with 26 pairs of roundly ended MLCs of 1 cm in width was tested in this study. In SAFI, radiation leakage occurs at the abutment sites with these MLCs. Film dosimetry was used to determine the optimal length of the MLC overlap to minimize dose profile variation in abutting fields. A mantle field was investigated as a clinical application. Without overlapping the MLCs, radiation leakage at the abutments appeared as a peak of the dose profile. With more overlapping, the profile exhibited a minimized variation with a two-peak pattern. With excessive overlapping, the peak was reversed due to decreased dose. Variation of the profile was minimized with an overlap of 2.0-2.2 mm. The level of variation and the optimal length of overlap were found to be independent of the sites of measurement. Reproducibility was confirmed by repeated measurements. With the mantle field, SAFI using MLCs revealed an profile equivalent to use of alloy blocking fields in all respects other than the variations at the abutting sites. If the length of the MLC abutment overlap differs by site, clinical application of SAFI using MLCs would be quite complicated. The optimal length of the overlap was found to be 2.0 mm and to be independent of the sites of abutment. Therefore, we conclude that SAFI using MLCs of 1 cm in width is feasible for clinical use. (author)

  16. [Polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H L; Li, C D; Yang, Z C; Yi, X D; Liu, H; Lu, H L; Li, H; Wang, Y

    2016-12-18

    To describe the application of polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis. Observation group included 14 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws from November 2014 to July 2015, control group included 12 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation with traditional pedicle screws.The operation time, blood loss, number of pedicle screws and number of augmented pedicle screws in the two groups were compared. The bone cement leakage and pulmonary bone cement embolism in the two groups were also compared. The fusion rate and pedicle screws loosening by lumbar X ray and dynamic X ray were evaluated. The clinical results were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) of pain on lumbar and lower limbers, lumbar Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores (JOA), Prolo functional scores and Oswestry disability (ODI) scores. Differences of operation time and blood loss in the two groups were not statistically significant. The average number of pedicle screws was 9.9±4.7 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 5.9±2.6 in observation group while the average number of pedicle screws was 7.1±2.8 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 3.0±1.9 in control group. The ratio of augmented pedicle screws was higher in observation group than in control group (0.69±0.30 vs.0.47±0.30,Pdegenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis was effective, with simple working processes and lower risk of bone cement leakage. The short-term clinical result was good.

  17. Comparison of the fracture resistance of dental implants with different abutment taper angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Geng, Jianping; Jones, David; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of abutment taper angles on the fracture strength of dental implants with TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) connection. Thirty prototype cylindrical titanium alloy 5.0mm-diameter dental implants with different TIS-connection designs were divided into six groups and tested for their fracture strength, using a universal testing machine. These groups consisted of combinations of 3.5 and 4.0 mm abutment diameter, each with taper angles of 6°, 8° or 10°. 3-Dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was also used to analyze stress states at implant-abutment connection areas. In general, the mechanical tests found an increasing trend of implant fracture forces as the taper angle enlarged. When the abutment diameter was 3.5 mm, the mean fracture forces for 8° and 10° taper groups were 1638.9 N ± 20.3 and 1577.1 N ± 103.2, respectively, both larger than that for the 6° taper group of 1475.0 N ± 24.4, with the largest increasing rate of 11.1%. Furthermore, the difference between 8° and 6° taper groups was significant, based on Tamhane's multiple comparison test (Pabutment groups, as the taper angle was enlarged from 6° to 8° and 10°, the mean fracture value was increased from 1066.7 N ± 56.1 to 1241.4 N ± 6.4 and 1419.3 N ± 20.0, with the largest increasing rate of 33.1%, and the differences among the three groups were significant (Pabutment taper angles and supported the findings of the static tests. In conclusion, increases of the abutment taper angle could significantly increase implant fracture resistance in most cases established in the study, which is due to the increased implant wall thickness in the connection part resulting from the taper angle enlargement. The increasing effects were notable when a thin implant wall was present to accommodate wide abutments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Heat Transfer to the Implant-Bone Interface During Removal of Metal Copings Cemented onto Titanium Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakan, Umut; Cakan, Murat; Delilbasi, Cagri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the temperature increase due to heat transferred to the implant-bone interface when the abutment screw channel is accessed or a metal-ceramic crown is sectioned buccally with diamond or tungsten carbide bur using an air rotor, with or without irrigation. Cobalt-chromium copings were cemented onto straight titanium abutments. The temperature changes during removal of the copings were recorded over a period of 1 minute. The sectioning of coping with diamond bur and without water irrigation generated the highest temperature change at the cervical part of the implant. Both crown removal methods resulted in an increase in temperature at the implant-bone interface. However, this temperature change did not exceed 47°C, the potentially damaging threshold for bone reported in the literature.

  19. Implant Fixture Heat Transfer During Abutment Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Alkeraidis, Abdullah; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Altahawi, Hamdi; Lynch, Edward

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of water flow rate on the heat transmission in implants during abutment preparation using a diamond bur in a high-speed dental turbine. Titanium-alloy abutments (n = 32) were connected to a titanium-alloy implant embedded in an acrylic resin within a water bath at a controlled temperature of 37°C. The specimens were equally distributed into 2 groups (16 each) according to the water flow rate used during the preparation phase. Group 1 had a water flow rate of 24 mL/min, and group 2 had a water flow rate of 40 mL/min. Each abutment was prepared in the axial plane for 1 minute and in the occlusal plane for 1 minute with a coarse tapered diamond bur using a high-speed dental handpiece. Thermocouples embedded at the cervix of the implant surface were used to record the temperature of heat transmission from the abutment preparation. Heat generation was measured at 3 distinct times (immediately and 30 seconds and 60 seconds after the end of preparation). Statistical analyses were carried out using 2-way analysis of variance and the Student t test. Water flow rates (24 mL vs 40 mL) and time interval had no statistically significant effect on the implant's temperature change during the abutment preparation stage (P = .431 and P = .064, respectively). Increasing the water flow rate from 24 to 40 mL/min had no influence on the temperature of the implant fixture recorded during preparation of the abutment.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  1. [Clinical application of atlas translaminar screws fixation in treatment of atlatoaxial instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyou; Fu, Shijie; Shen, Huarui; Guan, Taiyuan; Xu, Ping

    2013-10-01

    To explore the effectiveness of fixation of atlas translaminar screws in the treatment of atlatoaxial instability. A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical data of 32 patients with atlatoaxial instability treated with atlantoaxial trans-pedicle screws between March 2007 and August 2009. Of them, 7 patients underwent atlas translaminar screws combined with axis transpedicle screws fixation because of fracture types, anatomic variation, and intraoperative reason, including 5 males and 2 females with an average age of 48.2 years (range, 35-69 years). A total of 9 translaminar screws were inserted. Injury was caused by traffic accident in 4 cases, falling from height in 2 cases, and crushing in 1 case. Two cases had simple odontoid fracture (Anderson type II), and 5 cases had odontoid fracture combined with other injuries (massa lateralis atlantis fracture in 2, atlantoaxial dislocation in 1, and Hangman fracture in 2). The interval between injury and operation was 4-9 days (mean, 6 days). The preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 8.29 +/- 1.60. The X-ray films showed good position of the screws. Healing of incision by first intention was obtained, and no patient had injuries of the spinal cord injury, nerve root, and vertebral artery. Seven cases were followed up 9-26 months (mean, 14 months). Good bone fusion was observed at 8 months on average (range, 6-11 months). No loosening, displacement, and breakage of internal fixation, re-dislocation and instability of atlantoaxial joint, or penetrating of pedicle screw into the spinal canal and the spinal cord occurred. The JOA score was significantly improved to 15.29 +/- 1.38 at 6 months after operation (t = 32.078, P = 0.000). Atlas translaminar screws fixation has the advantages of firm fixation, simple operating techniques, and relative safety, so it may be a remedial measure of atlatoaxial instability.

  2. The influence of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Linda J.; Shala, Kujtim Sh.; Pustina–Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of removable partial dentures (RPD) on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth. Materials and Methods: A total 107 patients with RPD participated in this study. It was examined 138 RPD, they were 87 with clasp-retained and 51 were RPD with attachments. The following periodontal parameters were evaluated for abutment and non-abutment teeth, plaque index (PLI), calculus index (CI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probin...

  3. Analytical and experimental position stability of the abutment in different dental implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection

    OpenAIRE

    Semper-Hogg, Wiebke; Kraft, Silvan; Stiller, Sebastian; Mehrhof, Juergen; Nelson, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Position stability of the abutment should be investigated in four implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection. Materials and methods Previously developed formulas and an established experimental setup were used to determine the position stability of the abutment in the four implant systems with a conical implant?abutment connection and different positional index designs: The theoretical rotational freedom was calculated by using the dimensions of one randomly selecte...

  4. Surgical treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases with expandable screws in patients with osteoporosis: 2-year follow-up clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pullout, and fixation failure. A variety of techniques have been used clinically to improve pedicle screw fixation in the presence of compromised bone. Pedicle screws may be augmented with cement, but this may lead to cement leakage and result in disastrous consequences. To avoid these complications, a multiaxial expandable pedicle screw has been developed. This was a prospective, single-center study designed to evaluate the clinical results of patients with osteoporosis with traumatic and degenerative spinal diseases treated with expandable pedicle screws. METHODS Thirty-three patients (mean age 61.4 years) with osteoporosis and traumatic or degenerative spinal diseases underwent spinal posterior fixation with expandable screws. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scores were obtained. The immediate postoperative screw position was measured and compared with the final position on lateral plain radiographs and axial CT scans at the 1- and 2-year follow-up examinations. RESULTS A total of 182 pedicle screws were used, including 174 expandable and 8 regular screws. The mean preoperative patient VAS score improved from 8.2 to 3.6 after surgery. The mean ODI score improved from 83.7% before surgery to 29.7% after the operation and to 36.1% at the final follow-up. No screw migration had occurred at the 1-year follow-up, but 1 screw breakage/migration was visualized on spinal radiography at the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study show that the multiaxial expandable pedicle screw is a safe and practical technique for patients with osteoporosis and various spinal diseases and adds a valuable tool to the armamentarium of spinal instrumentation.

  5. Biomechanical Comparison of External Fixation and Compression Screws for Transverse Tarsal Joint Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, L Daniel; Glisson, Richard R; Adams, Samuel B; Schuh, Reinhard; Narron, John A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Transverse tarsal joint arthrodesis is commonly performed in the operative treatment of hindfoot arthritis and acquired flatfoot deformity. While fixation is typically achieved using screws, failure to obtain and maintain joint compression sometimes occurs, potentially leading to nonunion. External fixation is an alternate method of achieving arthrodesis site compression and has the advantage of allowing postoperative compression adjustment when necessary. However, its performance relative to standard screw fixation has not been quantified in this application. We hypothesized that external fixation could provide transverse tarsal joint compression exceeding that possible with screw fixation. Transverse tarsal joint fixation was performed sequentially, first with a circular external fixator and then with compression screws, on 9 fresh-frozen cadaveric legs. The external fixator was attached in abutting rings fixed to the tibia and the hindfoot and a third anterior ring parallel to the hindfoot ring using transverse wires and half-pins in the tibial diaphysis, calcaneus, and metatarsals. Screw fixation comprised two 4.3 mm headless compression screws traversing the talonavicular joint and 1 across the calcaneocuboid joint. Compressive forces generated during incremental fixator foot ring displacement to 20 mm and incremental screw tightening were measured using a custom-fabricated instrumented miniature external fixator spanning the transverse tarsal joint. The maximum compressive force generated by the external fixator averaged 186% of that produced by the screws (range, 104%-391%). Fixator compression surpassed that obtainable with screws at 12 mm of ring displacement and decreased when the tibial ring was detached. No correlation was found between bone density and the compressive force achievable by either fusion method. The compression across the transverse tarsal joint that can be obtained with a circular external fixator including a tibial ring exceeds that

  6. Positioning device for screwing or unscrewing screw nut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevelinge, G.

    1987-01-01

    This automatic positioning device for screwing or unscrewing a screw nut on a closure stud has a drawed socket and means for axially centre and angularly by wedge the socket on the closure stud and generate a continuous spiral between the socket and the closure stud [fr

  7. Fracture load of different crown systems on zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, T; Kirsten, A; Kappert, H F; Fischer, H

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture load of single zirconia abutment restorations using different veneering techniques and materials. The abutment restorations were divided into 6 groups with 20 samples each: test abutments (control group A), lithium disilicate ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group B), leucite ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group C), premolar abutments directly veneered with a fluor apatite ceramic (group D (layered) and group E (pressed)) and premolar abutments bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F). The fracture load of the restorations was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Half of each group was artificially aged (chewing simulation and thermocycling) before evaluating the fracture load with the exception of the test abutments. The fracture load of the test abutments was 705 ± 43N. Incisor abutments bonded with lithium disilicate or leucite ceramic crowns (groups B and C) showed fracture loads of about 580N. Premolar restorations directly veneered with fluor apatite ceramic (groups D and E) showed fracture loads of about 850N. Premolar restorations bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F) showed fracture loads of about 1850N. The artificial ageing showed no significant influence on the strength of the examined restorations. All ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, adhesively bonded to premolar abutments showed the highest fracture loads in this study. However, all tested groups can withstand physiological bite forces. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Descending aortic injury by a thoracic pedicle screw during posterior reconstructive surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kei; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Hirano, Toru; Izumi, Tomohiro; Sano, Atsuki; Morita, Osamu; Kikuchi, Ren; Ito, Takui

    2010-09-15

    Case report. To describe an iatrogenic aortic injury by pedicle screw instrumentation during posterior reconstructive surgery of spinal deformity. Iatrogenic major vascular injuries during anterior instrumentation procedures have been reported by several authors, but there have been few reports regarding iatrogenic major vascular injuries during posterior instrumentation procedures. A 57-year-old woman with thoracolumbar kyphosis due to osteoporotic T12 vertebral fracture underwent posterior correction and fusion (T10-L2), using segmental pedicle screw construct concomitant with T12 pedicle subtraction osteotomy. Postoperative routine plain radiographs and computed tomography myelography demonstrated a misplaced left T10 pedicle screw, which was in contact with the posteromedial aspect of the thoracic aorta, and suspected penetration of the aortic wall. The patient underwent removal of the pedicle screw, and repair of the penetrated aortic wall through a simultaneous anterior-posterior approach. The patient tolerated the procedure well without neurologic sequelae, and was discharged several days after removal of a left tube thoracostomy. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid fusion at the osteotomy site and no loosening of hardware. Preoperative neurologic symptoms improved completely at 18-months follow-up. Use of pedicle screw instrumentation has the potential to cause major vascular injury during posterior spinal surgery, and measures to prevent this complication must be taken. Timely diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent both early and delayed complications and death.

  9. Upper bound of abutment scour in laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used those data to develop envelope curves that define the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand on this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment scour data from other sources and evaluate upper bound patterns with this larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements of abutment scour were compiled into a digital database. This extensive database was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment scour envelope curves and to develop additional envelope curves that reflected the upper bound of abutment scour depth for the laboratory and field data. The envelope curves provide simple but useful supplementary tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment scour depth in the field setting.

  10. Scaphoid Fracture Fixation with an Acutrak? Screw

    OpenAIRE

    Loving, Vilert A.; Richardson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of fixation of a scaphoid fracture using an Acutrak? screw. This screw is cannulated and headless, which allows it to be implanted below the surface of the bone. It uses the same concept of variable thread pitch as the Herbert screw, but unlike the Herbert screw, is fully threaded, with continuously varying pitch along its length. This variable pitch creates constant compression across a fracture as the screw is advanced, and gives the screw its unique appearance. This featur...

  11. Debris from cobalt-chrome cable may cause acetabular loosening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, S S; Johnston, R C

    1992-12-01

    To address the issue of nonunion with trochanteric osteotomy, surgeons have experimented with various modes of fixation, wire and cable being the two most popular. From a group of 643 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon via the trans-trochanteric approach, minimum four-year roentgenographic follow-up evaluations were performed on 322 hips (50%). The method of fixation was stainless steel monofilament wire in 162 cases and Co-Cr cable in 160. Trochanteric union rates were 75% (122 patients) for the wire group and 79% (126 patients) for the cable. Breakage rates of the entire trochanteric fixation construction (all three wires or cables) were 43% (68 patients) for the wire and 12% (20 patients) for the cable. Unraveled cable was seen in 56% of the hips (90 patients), and in 47% of these hips, there were no broken cables. Blinded roentgenographic analysis of the acetabulum, preformed independently, revealed that loosening of the acetabulum in the cable group was greater than in the wire group. Cables offer no significant benefit over wires and may have potential adverse effects. Generation of significant particulate debris was noted roentgenographically, and marked reaction/destruction was found at the time of revision surgery.

  12. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  13. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Support Ratio Between Abutment and Soft Tissue Under Overdentures: A Comparison Between Use of Two and Four Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Manami; Yang, Tsung-Chieh; Maeda, Yoshionobu; Ando, Takanori; Wada, Masahiro

    The purpose of this preliminary in vivo study was to compare force distribution on abutments (tooth or implant) and tissues supporting overdentures with two or four abutments. A convenience sample of five subjects with tooth and/or implant-supported overdentures was enrolled. Recordings were completed on each subject using a force-measuring system mounted on a metal framework with four anteroposterior spread abutments (A), four abutments with denture bases (B), and on two anterior abutments with denture bases (C). The tissue-support ratio (TSR) was calculated as (A-B)/A or (A-C)/A. TSR values changed 1.5 to 2 times when the number of abutments was reduced from four to two. The amount of tissue strain on the posterior residual ridge increased when the number of abutments was reduced.

  15. A New Trend in Recording Subgingival Tissue around an Implant While Making a Direct Abutment Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C. Deogade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful implant-supported restoration must provide adequate function and esthetics. Osseointegrated implants have given an alternative choice for patients who have lost their teeth. Most commonly encountered problems while doing a transfer from patient to the master cast in restoring implant-supported crowns are an uneven distribution of occlusal loads and undue torquing forces on the various elements of implant. This is caused due to poor fit of frameworks connected to implant, which further leads to marginal bone loss, loosening of screws, fatigue fracture of implant components, and ultimately implant failure. This paper presents a simplified and easy solution to overcome such problems by introducing an innovative gingival retraction system for restoring implant-supported crowns to achieve superior and predictable long-term outcomes.

  16. [Study of friction and loosening in hip endoprostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovzak Bajs, Ivana; Cvjetko, Ivan; Car, Dolores; Kokić, Visnja

    2002-01-01

    Like any other operative procedure, the implantation of hip prosthesis is associated with certain complications, which diminishes the value and purpose of such a procedure. One of the complications in artificial hip implantation is loosening of the alloplastic material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of lubrication on the torsional moment and its role in the loosening of the femoral component, using an experimental mechanical model. The following hypothesis was tested: the magnitude of torsional loading in the "bone-endoprosthesis-bone cement system" is similar to any other known loading. The testing device was constructed with the possibility of simulation of positions similar to original performances in the implanted hip prosthesis. It refers primarily to the possibilities of achieving definite forces and velocities. The intention was to point quantitatively to the role of friction moment between the acetabular and femoral endoprosthesis part. Trials were conducted by combining 7 types of loading and 4 kinds of lubrication: dry, water, plasma, and light oil. The testing joint (Ring's prosthesis) was connected through tensometric measuring shaft upon the working forepart oscillating mechanism. Graded by the changeable static loading by means of the pendulum and via lever mechanism the testing joint was loaded by force from 610 to 7137 N. As the cause of friction resistance in the moving joint, torque deformaties of the measuring shaft occurred. The testing joint enabled oscillating movement using a four-part mechanism. In this way, it was possible to define not only the maximum values of the frictional moment (or the coefficient of friction) during one movement cycle but also to examine its relation to the kind of lubrication. Change in the measuring torsional moment were computer recorded. Before each trial, the gauging of the complete outfit was performed. Thereafter, cleaning of the frictional surfaces of the whole outfit was done

  17. Mechanical properties of resin glass fiber-reinforced abutment in comparison to titanium abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasi Bassi, Mirko; Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffella; Ioppolo, Pietro; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: So far, definitive implant abutments have been performed with high elastic modulus materials, which prevented any type of shock absorption of the chewing loads and as a consequence, the protection of the bone-fixture interface. This is particularly the case when the esthetic restorative material chosen is ceramic rather than composite resin. The adoption of an anisotropic abutment, characterized by an elastic deformability, could allow decreasing the impulse of chewing forces transmitted to the crestal bone. Materials and Methods: According to research protocol, the mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment (TCFRA) prototype and compared to that of a titanium abutment (TA), thus eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging that the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. Results: In the TA group, both fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples while debonding 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited a greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group, the extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group, the intrusion was more frequent. Conclusion: The greater elasticity of TCFRA to the flexural load allows absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function, thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface. PMID:26229266

  18. Abutment Coating With Diamond-Like Carbon Films to Reduce Implant-Abutment Bacterial Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mayra; Sangalli, Jorgiana; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2016-02-01

    The influence of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on bacterial leakage through the interface between abutments and dental implants of external hexagon (EH) and internal hexagon (IH) designs was evaluated. Film deposition was performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Sets of implants and abutments (n = 30 per group, sets of 180 implants) were divided according to connection design and treatment of the abutment base: 1) no treatment (control); 2) DLC film deposition; and 3) Ag-DLC film deposition. Under sterile conditions, 1 μL Enterococcus faecalis was inoculated inside the implants, and abutments were tightened. The sets were tested for immediate external contamination, suspended in test tubes containing sterile culture broth, and followed for 5 days. Turbidity of the broth indicated bacterial leakage. At the end of the period, the abutments were removed and the internal content of the implants was collected with paper points and plated in Petri dishes. After 24-hour incubation, they were assessed for bacterial viability and colony-forming unit counting. Bacterial leakage was analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests (α = 5%). The percentage of bacterial leakage was 16.09% for EH implants and 80.71% for IH implants (P DLC and Ag-DLC films do not significantly reduce the frequency of bacterial leakage and bacteria load inside the implants.

  19. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, B; Blankestijn, J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-06-01

    A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of IMFS with the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The study population consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 31.8 years). Twenty-four (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group. Twenty-six (52%) patients were assigned to the arch bars group. In total 188 IMF-screws were used (5-12 screws per patient, mean 7.83 screws per patient). All pain scores were lower in the IMFS group. Three patients developed a malocclusion (IFMS-group: one patient, arch bars-group: two patients). Mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the IMFS group (59 vs. 126 min; pfractured on insertion (0.53%), one (0.53%) screw was inserted into a root. Six (3.2%) screws loosened spontaneously in four patients. Mucosal disturbances were seen in 22 patients, equally divided over both groups. Considering the advantages and the disadvantages of IMFS, and observing the results of this study, the authors conclude that IMFS provide a superior method for IMF. IMFS are safer for the patients and surgeons. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The screw propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1980-07-01

    Marine and air screw propellers are considered in terms of theoretical hydrodynamics as developed by Joukowsky, Prandtl, and Betz. Attention is given to the flow around wings of finite span where spanwise flow exists and where lift and the bound vorticity must all go smoothly to zero at the wing tips. The concept of a trailing vortex sheet made up of infinitesimal line vortexes roughly aligned with the direction of flight is discussed in this regard. Also considered is induced velocity, which tends to convect the sheet downward at every stage in the roll-up process, the vortex theory of propellers and the Betz-Prandtl circulation distribution. The performance of the Gossamer Albatross and of a pedal-driven biplane called the Chrysalis are also discussed.

  1. Wear at the Implant-Abutment Interface of Zirconia Abutments Manufactured by Three CAD/CAM Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro Tannure, Ana Luiza; Cunha, Alfredo Gonçalves; Borges Junior, Luiz Antônio; da Silva Concílio, Laís Regiane; Claro Neves, Ana Christina

    To evaluate the changes in the external-hexagon surface of the titanium (Ti) implant before and after mechanical cycling, when coupled with zirconia (Zr) abutments (A) manufactured by three computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems (Neodent Digital, Zirkonzahn, and AmannGirrbach) and the ZrTi abutment manufactured by Neodent. Four groups were formed (n = 6): titanium implant with Zr AmannGirrbach abutment (AZrAG), with Zr Zirkonzahn abutment (AZrZ), with Zr Neodent abutment (AZrN), and with Zr abutment with infrastructure in Ti Neodent (AZrTiN). Standardized abutments were made from three identical abutments milled in wax. Images of the surface of each side of the hexagons of the implant were obtained by scanning electron microscopy, before and after mechanical cycling, to evaluate the parameters: (1) scratches in the hexagon face; (2) hexagon superior shoulder kneading; (3) hexagon shoulder wear; (4) alterations on the hexagon base; and (5) scratches on the hexagon top. The abutments were coupled with the implants, and Cr-Co crowns were cemented. The implant/abutment/crown assemblies were submitted to mechanical cycling (400 N, 8.0 Hz) for 1 million cycles. The observed changes were classified as follows: absence (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (P abutments, the AZrN group had shown more surface alterations. Among the Zr groups, AZrZ samples had shown the most altered surfaces, suggesting that alterations on the implant/Zr abutment hexagon surfaces are related to the abutment milled hexagon shape.

  2. Abutment tooth loss in patients with overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Qian, Fang

    2004-06-01

    Since the 1960s, the use of natural teeth as overdenture abutments has become part of accepted clinical practice. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted, but tooth loss has not been reported to be a significant problem. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of tooth loss in a prospective cohort study of subjects wearing overdentures. The study, conducted between 1973 and 1994, evaluated 273 subjects (62.3 percent male) with a mean age of 59.6 years. Of the 273 subjects with 666 abutments, 74 lost 133 abutments. The most common cause of tooth loss was periodontal disease (29.3 percent) followed by periapical lesions (18.8 percent) and caries (16.5 percent). Through logistic regression, the authors found that subjects who lost teeth were more likely to have medical problems that could cause soft-tissue lesions of the oral mucosa, were less likely to use fluoride daily and were less likely to return for yearly recall visits. The authors found 22 vertical fractures in 17 subjects. Chi2 analysis revealed that overdenture teeth in the maxillary arch that were opposed by natural teeth were more likely to experience vertical fractures. In a study that followed up some patients for as long as 22 years, the rate of tooth loss was 20.0 percent. Many of these failures could have been prevented if patients had practiced better oral hygiene. The findings suggest that if a dentist recommends overdenture therapy, the patient needs to be examined regularly to reduce the risk of experiencing caries and periodontal disease. Also, if the abutments are in the maxilla and are opposed by natural teeth, the dentist should consider using thimble crowns to reduce the risk of vertical fractures.

  3. Fixture-abutment connection surface and micro-gap measurements by 3D micro-tomographic technique analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Meleo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT is a miniaturized form of conventional computed axial tomography (CAT able to investigate small radio-opaque objects at a-few-microns high resolution, in a nondestructive, non-invasive, and tri-dimensional way. Compared to traditional optical and electron microscopy techniques, which provide two-dimensional images, this innovative investigation technology enables a sample tri-dimensional analysis without cutting, coating or exposing the object to any particular chemical treatment. X-ray micro-tomography matches ideal 3D microscopy features: the possibility of investigating an object in natural conditions and without any preparation or alteration; non-invasive, non-destructive, and sufficiently magnified 3D reconstruction; reliable measurement of numeric data of the internal structure (morphology, structure and ultra-structure. Hence, this technique has multi-fold applications in a wide range of fields, not only in medical and odontostomatologic areas, but also in biomedical engineering, materials science, biology, electronics, geology, archaeology, oil industry, and semi-conductors industry. This study shows possible applications of micro-CT in dental implantology to analyze 3D micro-features of dental implant to abutment interface. Indeed, implant-abutment misfit is known to increase mechanical stress on connection structures and surrounding bone tissue. This condition may cause not only screw preload loss or screw fracture, but also biological issues in peri-implant tissues.

  4. Prosthetic Hip Loosening Due to Brucellar Infection: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Tebourbi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Brucellosis is actually considered to be the commonest zoonotic infection worldwide; conversely prosthetic infection due to brucella is extremely rare. Although diagnostic is easily achieved, management of such situations is extremely challenging. Aims: To report the case of prosthetic hip loosening due to brucellar infection, discuss management manners and to summarize data about 19 cases reported in the literature. Methods: We report the case of a 73-year-old woman with brucellar prosthetic hip loosening treated with 2-stage exchange of the prosthesis and prolonged double antibiotherapy Results: At two years follow up the patient is pain free with total functional recovery and no clinical and radiographic signs of prosthetic loosening Conclusions: Brucella should be evocated as a cause of total joint arthroplasty infection especially in patients from endemic regions and with occupational exposure. Antibiotic treatment alone can be followed if there are no signs of implant loosening. Tow stage revision should be considered in other cases.

  5. An in vitro comparison of the accuracy of implant impressions with coded healing abutments and different implant angulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdullah, Khaled; Zandparsa, Roya; Finkelman, Matthew; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Fabricating implant definitive casts with CAD/CAM technology (Robocasts) from coded healing abutment impressions represents a simpler and innovative alternative to conventional implant impression techniques. However, information about the accuracy of the impressions and the resultant definitive casts is limited. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Robocasts and compare them to those definitive casts fabricated with conventional implant impression techniques (open tray with splinted impression copings technique). A reference epoxy resin cast was fabricated and shaped to simulate a dental arch. Two regular platform implant replicas (Biomet 3i Certain, 4.1 mm diameter and 15 mm length) with internal connections were placed 10 mm apart with a 10-degree convergence for one side of the reference resin cast and a 30-degree convergence for the other. Coded healing abutments (Encode) were placed at 3 different heights above the level of the soft tissue replication material (approximately 1, 2, and 4 mm) and served as test groups (E1, E2, and E4), and open trays with splinted impression copings (OTSC) served as a control group. The control group was compared to the impressions of the coded healing abutments by using a standardized measurement protocol. Impressions were made for each group (n=18) and poured with vacuum mixed (100 g powder/20 mL water) Type IV dental stone. The vertical discrepancy (Z axis) between 2 prefabricated passively fitting titanium reference frameworks and the platforms of the implant replicas was measured with an optical comparator applying the 1 screw test. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U tests, as well as the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The Bonferroni correction was used to account for multiple comparisons. The significance level (α) used in a given set of tests was equal to .05 divided by the number of tests performed in that set. The median vertical discrepancy of each coded healing

  6. Fracture strength of zirconia implant abutments on narrow diameter implants with internal and external implant abutment connections: A study on the titanium resin base concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Asgeirsson, Asgeir G; Thoma, Daniel S; Fehmer, Vincent; Aspelund, Thor; Özcan, Mutlu; Pjetursson, Bjarni E

    2018-04-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the strength of zirconia abutments with internal and external implant abutment connections and zirconia abutments supported by a titanium resin base (Variobase, Straumann) for narrow diameter implants. To compare the fracture strength of narrow diameter abutments with different types of implant abutment connections after chewing simulation. Hundred and twenty identical customized abutments with different materials and implant abutment connections were fabricated for five groups: 1-piece zirconia abutment with internal connection (T1, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann Switzerland), 1-piece zirconia abutment with external hex connection (T2, Procera abutment-Branemark NP implant, Nobel Biocare, Sweden), 2-piece zirconia abutments with metallic insert for internal connection (T3, Procera abutment-Replace NP implant, Nobel Biocare), 2-piece zirconia abutment on titanium resin base (T4, LavaPlus abutment-VarioBase-Straumann BL-NC implant, 3M ESPE, Germany) and 1-piece titanium abutment with internal connection (C, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann, Switzerland). All implants had a narrow diameter ranging from 3.3 to 3.5 mm. Sixty un-restored abutments and 60 abutments restored with glass-ceramic crowns were tested. Mean bending moments were compared using ANOVA with p-values adjusted for multiple comparisons using Tukey's procedure. The mean bending moments were 521 ± 33 Ncm (T4), 404 ± 36 Ncm (C), 311 ± 106 Ncm (T1) 265 ± 22 Ncm (T3) and 225 ± 29 (T2) for un-restored abutments and 278 ± 84 Ncm (T4), 302 ± 170 Ncm (C), 190 ± 55 Ncm (T1) 80 ± 102 Ncm (T3) and 125 ± 57 (T2) for restored abutments. For un-restored abutments, C and T4 had similar mean bending moments, significantly higher than those of the three other groups (p internal connection had higher bending moments than zirconia abutments with external connection (T2) (p internal connected zirconia

  7. Temporal variation of clear-water scour at compound Abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Aminuddin Ab. Ghani; Reza Mohammadpour

    2016-01-01

    Most of actual abutments in rivers are built on foundation, while there is limited number of study available on the effects of the foundation on the local scour. In this study, temporal variation of local scour around compound abutment was investigated experimentally under clear-water conditions. The results showed that a suitable level of foundation is able to decrease the scour depth and increase scour time during the flood events. The trend of temporal scour depth at compound pier and abut...

  8. Reduction of lateral loads in abutments using ground anchors

    OpenAIRE

    Laefer, Debra F.; Truong-Hong, Linh; Le, Khanh Ba

    2013-01-01

    In bridge design, economically addressing large, lateral earth pressures on bridge abutments is a major challenge. Traditional approaches employ enlargement of the abutment components to resist these pressures. This approach results in higher construction costs. As an alternative, a formal approach using ground anchors to resist lateral soil pressure on bridge abutments is proposed herein. The ground anchors are designed to minimise lateral forces at the pile cap base. Design examples for hig...

  9. Comparison of 3D displacements of screw-retained zirconia implant crowns into implants with different internal connections with respect to screw tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeeah, Hanadi A; Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin; Clelland, Nancy; Brantley, William

    2018-01-01

    Internal conical implant-abutment connections without horizontal platforms may lead to crown displacement during screw tightening and torque application. This displacement may affect the proximal contacts and occlusion of the definitive prosthesis. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the displacement of custom screw-retained zirconia single crowns into a recently introduced internal conical seal implant-abutment connection in 3D during hand and torque driver screw tightening. Stereolithic acrylic resin models were printed using computed tomography data from a patient missing the maxillary right central incisor. Two different internal connection implant systems (both ∼11.5 mm) were placed in the edentulous site in each model using a surgical guide. Five screw-retained single zirconia computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) crowns were fabricated for each system. A pair of high-resolution digital cameras was used to record the relationship of the crown to the model. The crowns were tightened according to the manufacturers' specifications using a torque driver, and the cameras recorded their relative position again. Three-dimensional image correlation was used to measure and compare crown positions, first hand tightened and then torque driven. The displacement test was repeated 3 times for each crown. Commercial image correlation software was used to extract the data and compare the amount of displacement vertically, mesiodistally, and buccolingually. Repeated-measures ANOVA calculated the relative displacements for all 5 specimens for each implant for both crown screw hand tightening and after applied torque. A Student t test with Bonferroni correction was used for pairwise comparison of interest to determine statistical differences between the 2 implants (α=.05). The mean vertical displacements were statistically higher than the mean displacements in the mesiodistal and buccolingual directions for both implants

  10. Geothermal ORC Systems Using Large Screw Expanders

    OpenAIRE

    Biederman, Tim R.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal ORC Systems using Large Screw Expanders Tim Biederman Cyrq Energy Abstract This paper describes a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle Power Recovery system with a screw expander a derivative of developed of Kaishan's line of screw compressors, as its power unit. The screw expander design is a modified version of its existing refrigeration compressor used on water-cooled chillers. Starting the ORC development program with existing refrigeration screw compre...

  11. Effect of mining thickness on abutment pressure of working face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Guang-xiang; Wang Lei [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China). Academy of Energy Sources and Security

    2008-04-15

    The distribution of the abutment pressure on the advancing front and on side of the working face was analyzed. Results show that the distribution of abutment pressure correlates with the thickness of the coal seam. The size of the abutment pressure peak is inversely proportional to the first mining thickness and the distance between peak and working face is proportional to the first mining thickness; that is to say the peak intensity falls as soon as the distribution range spreads. The distribution of side abutment pressure correlates somewhat with time. 6 refs.

  12. A simplified method to reduce prosthetic misfit for a screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture using a luting technique and laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Salvatore; Sartori, Matteo; Davide, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    An important aim of implant-supported prostheses is to achieve a passive fit of the framework with the abutments to limit the amount of stress transfer to the bone-implant interface. An efficient and standardized technique is proposed. A definitive screw-retained, implant-supported complete denture was fabricated for an immediately loaded provisional screw-retained implant-supported complete denture. Precise fit was achieved by the use of industrial titanium components and the passivity, by an intraoral luting sequence and laser welding.

  13. [Clinical effect modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening in treating mild-moderate hallux valgus through internal signal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Qiang; Wu, Qun-Feng; Dong, Wei-Qin; Yu, Li-Xin; Li, Xiong-Feng

    2018-03-25

    To explore clinical effect of modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening for the treatment of mild-moderate hallux valgus through internal signal approach. From July 2015 to June 2016, 26 patients with mild-moderate hallux valgus treated with modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening through internal signal approach, including 2 males and 24 females aged from 45 to 65 years old with an average of(54.6±4.8) years old;the courses of diseases ranged from 1 to 5 months with an average of (7.5±3.3) months. Hallux valgus angle(HVA), inter metatarsal angle(IMA) were measured at 12 months after operation, and AOFAS score was applied to evaluate clinical effect before and after operation. All incisions were healed at stage I. No incision occurred infection, metatarsal necrosis and recurrence of hallux valgus deformity. Two patients occurred skin numbness caused by musculocutaneous nerve injury. Twenty-six patients were followed up from 6 to 12 months with an average of(9.12±2.06) months. HVA, IMA were(30.01±3.71)°, (14.00±1.50)° before operation and(9.41±4.16)°, (7.00±0.60)° after operation, which had significant difference. There was statistical significance in AOFAS score before operation 54.77±9.59 and after operation 92.73±5.47, and 19 cases obtained excellent results and 7 moderate. Modified Chevron osteotomy combined with full thread headless pressure screw fixation and lateral tissue loosening for the treatment of mild-moderate hallux valgus has advantages of excellent exposure, simple operation, stable fixation, rapid recovery. Akin osteotomy with internal capsulorrhaphy were used with lateral loosening and could recover soft tissue balance between lateral and internal, and could receive satisfied clinical effects. Copyright© 2018 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  14. The influence of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Linda J; Shala, Kujtim Sh; Pustina-Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of removable partial dentures (RPD) on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth. A total 107 patients with RPD participated in this study. It was examined 138 RPD, they were 87 with clasp-retained and 51 were RPD with attachments. The following periodontal parameters were evaluated for abutment and non-abutment teeth, plaque index (PLI), calculus index (CI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD) (mm) and tooth mobility (TM) index. These clinical measurements were taken immediately before insertion the RPD, then one and 3 months after insertion. The level of significance was set at (P abutment teeth and non-abutment teeth were no statistically significant at the time of insertion of RPD. After 1-month, PLI was statistically significant (0.57 ± 0.55 for abutment and 0.30 ± 0.46 for non-abutment teeth). After 3 months, there were significant differences between abutment and non-abutment teeth with regard to the BOP (1.53 ± 0.50 and 1.76 ± 0.43 respectively), PD (0.28 ± 0.45 and 0.12 ± 0.33 respectively) and PLI (1.20 ± 0.46 and 0.75 ± 0.64 respectively). No significant mean difference in TM and CI was found between the abutment and non-abutment teeth (P > 0.05). With carefully planned prosthetic treatment and adequate maintenance of the oral and denture hygiene, we can prevent the periodontal diseases.

  15. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p torque than the outboard distal screw (p torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. © IMechE 2016.

  16. Application of an expandable pedicle screw in the severe osteoporotic spine: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zi-xiang; Cui, Geng; Lei, Wei; Fan, Yong; Wan, Shi-yong; Ma, Zhen-sheng; Sang, Hong-xun

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the clinical abstract and radiographic outcome of multi-axial expandable pedicle screws (MEPS) in patients with osteoporosis. One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients received MEPS from the UPASS spinal fixation system to obtain thoracolumbar or lumbosacral stabilization. All patients underwent bone mineral density (BMD) scans. The indications for use of the MEPS were spinal diseases with severe osteoporosis (degenerative diseases 46 cases, compression fractures 28 cases, lumbar tuberculosis 27 cases and revision spine surgery 24 cases). The pre-operative and three months post-operative functional evaluations were graded with JOA and VAS scoring system. One week, six months and 12 months after surgery, plain film and three-dimensional CT scans were obtained to evaluate the spinal fusion and fixation effectiveness of MEPS. The mean follow-up period was 18 months (ranged from 6 to 33 months). All patients suffered from severely osteoporosis with a decrease of 25.3% in BMD. The pre-operative JOA and VAS scores were 11.3±3.0 and 6.7±1.8 mm, respectively. Three months after operation, the JOA and VAS scores were 25.2±2.0 and 2.3±1.7 mm. The recovery rate was 78.1±11.5% and the clinical results were satisfying. There were no instances of screw loosening or pullout of the MEPS and the screw-bone interface was excellent. The radiographic results showed that bone healing, both around the screws and inter-vertebral, was achieved. In osteoporosis spine surgery, excellent bone-screw interface and fixation strength can be achieved by using MEPS. MEPS are a novel approach to increase the pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic and revision spine surgeries.

  17. Physicochemical and microscopic characterization of implant-abutment joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patricia A; Carreiro, Adriana F P; Nascimento, Rubens M; Vahey, Brendan R; Henriques, Bruno; Souza, Júlio C M

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Morse taper implant-abutment joints by chemical, mechanical, and microscopic analysis. Surfaces of 10 Morse taper implants and the correlated abutments were inspected by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) before connection. The implant-abutment connections were tightened at 32 Ncm. For microgap evaluation by FEG-SEM, the systems were embedded in epoxy resin and cross-sectioned at a perpendicular plane of the implant-abutment joint. Furthermore, nanoindentation tests and chemical analysis were performed at the implant-abutment joints. Results were statistically analyzed via one-way analysis of variance, with a significance level of P abutment surfaces. The minimum and maximum size of microgaps ranged from 0.5 μm up to 5.6 μm. Furthermore, defects were detected throughout the implant-abutment joint that can, ultimately, affect the microgap size after connection. Nanoindentation tests revealed a higher hardness (4.2 ± 0.4 GPa) for abutment composed of Ti6Al4V alloy when compared to implant composed of commercially pure Grade 4 titanium (3.2 ± 0.4 GPa). Surface defects produced during the machining of both implants and abutments can increase the size of microgaps and promote a misfit of implant-abutment joints. In addition, the mismatch in mechanical properties between abutment and implant can promote the wear of surfaces, affecting the size of microgaps and consequently the performance of the joints during mastication.

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Abutment Teeth with Gingival Discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Ljubisa; Dakovic, Dragana; Postic, Srdjan; Lazic, Zoran; Bacevic, Miljana; Vucevic, Dragana

    2017-04-06

    The grey-bluish discoloration of gingiva (known as "amalgam tattoo") does not appear only in the presence of amalgam restorations. It may also be seen in cases of teeth restored with cast dowels and porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations. The aim of this article was to determine the clinical characteristics of abutment teeth with gingival discoloration. This research was conducted on 25 patients referred for cast dowel and PFM restorations. These restorations were manufactured from Ni-Cr alloys. Ninety days after cementing the fixed prosthodontic restorations, the abutment teeth (n = 61) were divided into a group with gingival discoloration (GD) (n = 25) and without gingival discoloration (NGD) (n = 36). The control group (CG) comprised the contralateral teeth (n = 61). Plaque index, gingival index, clinical attachment level, and probing depth were assessed before fabrication and also 90 days after cementation of the PFM restorations. The gingival index, clinical attachment level, and probing depths of the abutment teeth that had GD were statistically higher before restoration, in comparison with the abutment teeth in the NGD and control groups. Ninety days after cementation, the abutment teeth with GD had significantly lower gingival indexes and probing depths, compared to the abutment teeth in the NGD group. Both abutment teeth groups (GD and NGD) had significantly higher values of clinical attachment levels when compared to the control group. There were no statistically significant differences in plaque index values between the study groups. The results of this study indicated that impairment of periodontal status of abutment teeth seemed to be related to the presence of gingival discolorations. Therefore, fabrication of fixed prosthodontic restorations requires careful planning and abutment teeth preparation to minimize the occurrence of gingival discolorations. With careful preparation of abutment teeth for cast dowels and crown restorations it may be

  19. Physicochemical and microscopic characterization of implant–abutment joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patricia A.; Carreiro, Adriana F. P.; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Vahey, Brendan R.; Henriques, Bruno; Souza, Júlio C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate Morse taper implant–abutment joints by chemical, mechanical, and microscopic analysis. Materials and Methods: Surfaces of 10 Morse taper implants and the correlated abutments were inspected by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) before connection. The implant–abutment connections were tightened at 32 Ncm. For microgap evaluation by FEG-SEM, the systems were embedded in epoxy resin and cross-sectioned at a perpendicular plane of the implant–abutment joint. Furthermore, nanoindentation tests and chemical analysis were performed at the implant–abutment joints. Statistics: Results were statistically analyzed via one-way analysis of variance, with a significance level of P abutment surfaces. The minimum and maximum size of microgaps ranged from 0.5 μm up to 5.6 μm. Furthermore, defects were detected throughout the implant–abutment joint that can, ultimately, affect the microgap size after connection. Nanoindentation tests revealed a higher hardness (4.2 ± 0.4 GPa) for abutment composed of Ti6Al4V alloy when compared to implant composed of commercially pure Grade 4 titanium (3.2 ± 0.4 GPa). Conclusions: Surface defects produced during the machining of both implants and abutments can increase the size of microgaps and promote a misfit of implant–abutment joints. In addition, the mismatch in mechanical properties between abutment and implant can promote the wear of surfaces, affecting the size of microgaps and consequently the performance of the joints during mastication. PMID:29657532

  20. The effects of simulated bone loss on the implant-abutment assembly and likelihood of fracture: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Behzad; Suleiman, Mahmood; Palmer, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    The crestal bone level around a dental implant may influence its strength characteristics by offering protection against mechanical failures. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of simulated bone loss on modes, loads, and cycles to failure in an in vitro model. Different amounts of bone loss were simulated: 0, 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 mm from the implant head. Forty narrow-diameter (3.0-mm) implant-abutment assemblies were tested using compressive bending and cyclic fatigue testing. Weibull and accelerated life testing analysis were used to assess reliability and functional life. Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher-Exact test and the Spearman ranked correlation. Compressive bending tests showed that the level of bone loss influenced the load-bearing capacity of implant-abutment assemblies. Fatigue testing showed that the modes, loads, and cycles to failure had a statistically significant relationship with the level of bone loss. All 16 samples with bone loss of 3.0 mm or more experienced horizontal implant body fractures. In contrast, 14 of 16 samples with 0 and 1.5 mm of bone loss showed abutment and screw fractures. Weibull and accelerated life testing analysis indicated a two-group distribution: the 0- and 1.5-mm bone loss samples had better functional life and reliability than the 3.0- and 4.5-mm samples. Progressive bone loss had a significant effect on modes, loads, and cycles to failure. In addition, bone loss influenced the functional life and reliability of the implant-abutment assemblies. Maintaining crestal bone levels is important in ensuring biomechanical sustainability and predictable long-term function of dental implant assemblies.

  1. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw-bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw-bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability.

  2. Cleveland Dam East Abutment : seepage control project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, F.; Siu, D. [Greater Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Ahlfield, S.; Singh, N. [Klohn Crippen Consultants Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    North Vancouver's 91 meter high Cleveland Dam was built in the 1950s in a deep bedrock canyon to provide a reservoir for potable water to 18 municipalities. Flow in the concrete gravity dam is controlled by a gated spillway, 2 mid-level outlets and intakes and 2 low-level outlets. This paper describes the seepage control measures that were taken at the time of construction as well as the additional measures that were taken post construction to control piezometric levels, seepage and piping and slope instability in the East Abutment. At the time of construction, a till blanket was used to cover the upstream reservoir slope for 200 meters upstream of the dam. A single line grout curtain was used through the overburden from ground surface to bedrock for a distance of 166 meters from the dam to the East Abutment. Since construction, the safety of the dam has been compromised through changes in piezometric pressure, seepage and soil loss. Klohn Crippen Consultants designed a unique seepage control measure to address the instability risk. The project involved excavating 300,000 cubic meters of soil to form a stable slope and construction bench. A vertical wall was constructed to block seepage. The existing seepage control blanket was also extended by 260 meters. The social, environmental and technical issues that were encountered during the rehabilitation project are also discussed. The blanket extension construction has met design requirements and the abutment materials that are most susceptible to internal erosion have been covered by non-erodible blanket materials such as plastic and roller-compacted concrete (RCC). The project was completed on schedule and within budget and has greatly improved the long-term stability of the dam and public safety. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  4. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  5. Velocity and turbulence at a wing-wall abutment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimental investigation of the 3D turbulent flow field around a 45° wing-wall abutment, resting on a rough rigid bed, is reported. The experiment was conducted ... The shear stresses acting on the bed around the abutment are estimated from the Reynolds stresses and velocity gradients. The data presented in this study ...

  6. Comparison of radiographic and radionuclide hip arthrography in determination of femoral component loosening of hip arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capello, W.N.; Uri, B.G.; Wellman, H.N.; Robb, J.A.; Stiver, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic examination of a patient experiencing pain following total hip arthroplasty is an important step in the systematic approach to evaluating component loosening, even though the information yielded is often equivocal and nondiagnostic in assessing component loosening. The radiographic criteria for loosening are especially difficult to assess following revision surgery, for radiolucent lines frequently exist at the bone-cement interface immediately following implantation. The advent of noncemented hip prostheses poses another problem: the routinely noted disruption of bone-cement of prosthesis-cement interfaces is not present with uncemented prostheses. As the criteria for loosening of the noncemented prostheses are still evolving, plain radiographic examination is frequently nondiagnostic. Femoral component loosening is difficult to detect with standard contrast arthrography because the bone, metal, surrounding radiopaque cement and contrast agents have similar or identical radiographic appearances. In contrast arthrography, if the prosthesis is loose the injected agent opacifies the radiolucent zone encircling the prosthesis or cement mangle. Because of the similarity in the appearances of these agents and the surrounding structures on x-ray films, interpretation is difficult. The inclusion of subtraction techniques in routine contrast arthrography has improved its accuracy; however, these techniques require special equipment and demand precise patient positioning. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new form of hip arthrography using a radionuclide agent in place of the contrast agent. A comparison of the results using these two techniques is presented

  7. Scour around vertical wall abutment in cohesionless sediment bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, M.; Sharma, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.

    2017-12-01

    At the time of floods, failure of bridges is the biggest disaster and mainly sub-structure (bridge abutments and piers) are responsible for this failure of bridges. It is very risky if these sub structures are not constructed after proper designing and analysis. Scour is a natural phenomenon in rivers or streams caused by the erosive action of the flowing water on the bed and banks. The abutment undermines due to river-bed erosion and scouring, which generally recognized as the main cause of abutment failure. Most of the previous studies conducted on scour around abutment have concerned with the prediction of the maximum scour depth (Lim, 1994; Melvill, 1992, 1997 and Dey and Barbhuiya, 2005). Dey and Barbhuiya (2005) proposed a relationship for computing maximum scour depth near an abutment, based on laboratory experiments, for computing maximum scour depth around vertical wall abutment, which was confined to their experimental data only. However, this relationship needs to be also verified by the other researchers data in order to support the reliability to the relationship and its wider applicability. In this study, controlled experimentations have been carried out on the scour near a vertical wall abutment. The collected data in this study along with data of the previous investigators have been carried out on the scour near vertical wall abutment. The collected data in this study along with data of the previous have been used to check the validity of the existing equation (Lim, 1994; Melvill, 1992, 1997 and Dey and Barbhuiya, 2005) of maximum scour depth around the vertical wall abutment. A new relationship is proposed to estimate the maximum scour depth around vertical wall abutment, it gives better results all relationships.

  8. Microbiological and clinical assessment of the abutment and non-abutment teeth of partial removable denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luciana; do Nascimento, Cássio; de Souza, Valéria Oliveira Pagnano; Pedrazzi, Vinícius

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was assessing the changes in both clinical and microbiological parameters of healthy individuals after rehabilitation with removable partial denture (RPD). 11 women received unilateral or bilateral free-end saddle RPD in the mandibular arch. Clinical and microbiological parameters of abutment, non-abutment, and antagonist teeth were assessed at baseline (RPD installation) and after 7, 30, 90, and 180days of function. The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique was used to identify and quantify up to 43 different microbial species from subgingival biofilm samples. Probing depth, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing were also investigated over time. The total and individual microbial genome counts were shown significantly increased after 180days with no significant differences between abutment, non-abutment, or antagonist teeth. Streptococcus spp., Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and other species associated to periodontitis (Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella nigrescens, and Tannerella forsythia), as well as opportunistic Candida spp., were recovered in moderate counts. Abutment teeth presented higher values of gingival recession when compared with non-abutment or antagonist teeth, irrespectively time of sampling (pabutment and non-abutment teeth with no significant differences regarding the microbial profile over time. Bleeding on probing and probing depth showed no significant difference between groups over time whereas gingival recession increased in the abutment teeth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Side abutment pressure distribution by field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-guo Wang; Yang Song; Xing-hua He; Jian Zhang [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, Xuzhou (China)

    2008-12-15

    Given the 7123 working face in the Qidong Coal Mine of the Wanbei Mining Group, nine dynamic roof monitors were installed in the crossheading to measure the amount and velocity of roof convergence in different positions and at different times and three steel bored stress sensors were installed in the return airway to measure rock stress at depth. On the basis of this arrangement, the rule of change of the distribution of the side abutment pressure with the advance of the working face and movement of overlying strata was studied. The rule of change and the stability of rock stress at depth were measured. Secondly, the affected area and stability time of the side abutment pressure were also studied. The results show that: 1) During working, the face advanced distance was from 157 m to 99 m, the process was not effected by mining induced pressure. When the distance was 82 m, the position of peak stress was 5 m away from the coal wall. When the distance was 37 m, the position of peak stress away from the coal wall was about 15 m to 20 m and finally reached a steady state; 2) the time and the range of the peak of side rock pressure obtained from stress sensors were consistent with the results from the dynamic roof monitors; 3) the position of the peak pressure was 25 m away from the coal wall. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Ryogo; Shionoya, Kaori; Kato, Hitoshi; Makino, Naoki

    1996-01-01

    Ulnocarpal abutment syndrome (UAS) is the impingement between lunate and ulnar head. Twenty-two wrists of 19 patients were diagnosed as UAS arthroscopically after having undergone MRI examination. Ten wrists had MRI both before and after ulnar recession arthroplasty. Spin-echo pulse sequences were taken. T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. On T1-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar part of the lunate was decreased in 18 wrists. On T2-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar aspect of the lunate were from high to low in 18 wrists. There was focal and abnormal signal intensity of the triquetrum found in 10 wrists and was abnormal signal intensity of the ulnar head in two wrists. After the operation, on the T1-weighted image signal intensity of the lunate shifted from low through slightly low to iso. On the T2-weighted images it shifted from low to high or iso. Focal low signal intensity of the lunate on T1-weighted images is diagnostic of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. The intensity of the signal from the lunate on T2-weighted images may indicate the severity of the disease. (author)

  11. Correlation of quantitative histopathological morphology and quantitative radiological analysis during aseptic loosening of hip endoprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, S; Kriegsmann, J; Eckardt, A; Delank, K-S; Drees, P; Hansen, T; Otto, M

    2006-01-01

    Aseptic hip prosthesis loosening is the most important long-term complication in total hip arthroplasty. Polyethylene (PE) wear is the dominant etiologic factor in aseptic loosening, which together with other factors induces mechanisms resulting in bone loss, and finally in implant loosening. The single-shot radiograph analysis (EBRA, abbreviation for the German term "Einzel-Bild-Röntgenanalyse") is a computerized method for early radiological prediction of aseptic loosening. In this study, EBRA parameters were correlated with histomorphological parameters of the periprosthetic membrane. Periprosthetic membranes obtained from 19 patients during revision surgery of loosened ABG I-type total hip pros-theses were analyzed histologically and morphometrically. The pre-existing EBRA parameters, the thickness of the PE debris lay-er and the dimension of inclination and anteversion, were compared with the density of macrophages and giant cells. Addi-tionally, the semiquantitatively determined density of lymphocytes, plasma cells, giant cells and the size of the necrotic areas were correlated with the EBRA results. All periprosthetic membranes were classified as debris-induced type membranes. We found a positive correlation between the number of giant cells and the thickness of the PE debris layer. There was no significant correlation between the number of macrophages or all semiquantitative parameters and EBRA parameters. The number of giant cells decreased with implant duration. The morphometrically measured number of foreign body giant cells more closely reflects the results of the EBRA. The semiquantitative estimation of giant cell density could not substitute for the morphometrical analysis. The density of macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells and the size of necrotic areas did not correlate with the EBRA parameters, indicating that there is no correlation with aseptic loosening.

  12. Diabetes Mellitus and Hyperglycemia and the Risk of Aseptic Loosening in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Schleck, Cathy D; Lewallen, Eric A; Larson, Dirk R; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Lewallen, David G

    2017-09-01

    It is unknown to what extent diabetes mellitus modifies the long-term risk of aseptic loosening in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We examined the association between diabetes mellitus, perioperative hyperglycemia, and the likelihood of revisions for aseptic loosening. We studied 16,085 primary THA and TKA procedures performed at a large tertiary care hospital between 2002 and 2009. All blood glucose values around the time of surgery (within 1 week) were retrieved. Subsequent revision surgeries and the reasons for revision were ascertained through the institutional joint registry. Multivariate Cox models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aseptic loosening associated with diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and surgery type. A total of 2911 (18%) surgeries had a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus at the time of surgery. Glucose testing was performed at least once in 7055 (44%) procedures within ±1 week of surgery. Although diabetic patients did not experience a higher risk of revision for aseptic loosening (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.55-1.38), higher preoperative glucose values on the day before surgery were significantly associated with both the overall risk of revisions (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.00-7.85) and revisions for aseptic loosening (HR, 4.95; 95% CI, 1.26-19.54). High preoperative hyperglycemia is a potential risk factor for aseptic loosening in THA and TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fracture Strength of Titanium based Lithium Disilicate and Zirconia Abutment Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    zirconia abutment/lithium-disilicate crown. INTRODUCTION Dental implants and the use of esthetic abutments are widely practiced procedures for dentists...first implant abutments were fabricated from metals of mostly gold or titanium alloy. The downside of these materials, especially in esthetic areas...abutments presented esthetic complications. Because dentists and patients desire more naturally appearing restorations, the dental manufacturers

  14. Loosening and damage mechanism of thread-joined structures in nuclear power equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Hui

    1999-01-01

    The author proposes a loosening mechanism of thread-joined structures under vibrate environments in the nuclear power equipment and structures, which is on the base of the macro and imperceptible-mechanics analysis. It has answered the problems on the seizing, the adhesive wearing, the generation of cracks, the thread-tooth fracture. So it has a conclusion that the loosening of thread-joined structures is essential trend, in other words, the locking property of thread-pair is failure under vibrate environments

  15. Implant-level prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a comparison with conventional abutment-level prostheses after 5 years of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Lars; Smedberg, Jan-Ivan; Pettersson, Mattias; Jemt, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Long-term comparisons of frameworks at the implant or abutment level are not available, and knowledge of the clinical function of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy frameworks is limited. Primarily, the aim of this study was to compare the 5-year clinical performance of frameworks with or without abutment connections to implants. Secondly, the outcomes of prostheses made from Co-Cr alloy with porcelain veneers to those made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) with acrylic veneers were compared. The test groups comprised patients treated with screw-retained fixed prostheses made at the implant level according to the Cresco method in either dental porcelain-veneered Co-Cr alloy (n = 15) or acrylic-veneered CP Ti (n = 25). A control group of 40 randomly selected patients were provided with prostheses made at the standard abutment level in CP Ti with acrylic veneers. For all patients, clinical and radiologic 5-year data were retrospectively collected and evaluated. Five-year implant cumulative survival rates (CSRs) were 98.6% and 97.6% for test and control groups, respectively (P > .05). No major differences in bone level were demonstrated between the groups after 5 years (P > .05). Significantly more complications occurred in the test groups compared to the control group (P level prostheses made of porcelain-veneered Co-Cr or acrylic-veneered CP Ti seem comparable to acrylic-veneered titanium prostheses made at the standard abutment level regarding implant CSR and bone levels. However, more complications were registered in implant-level prostheses compared to the standard abutment-level prostheses.

  16. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrati S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  17. [SCREW-BASED INTERMAXILLARY TRACTION COMBINED WITH OCCLUSAL SPLINT FOR TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC MANDIBULAR CONDYLAR FRACTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cai, Hengxing; Meng, Qinggong; Li, Bo

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the screw-based intermaxillary traction combined with occlusal splint in the treatment of pediatric mandibular condylar fracture. Between June 2005 and December 2013, 35 pediatric patients with 49 mandibular condylar fractures were treated, and the clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. There were 25 boys and 10 girls, aged 3-13 years (mean, 7.3 years). The injury causes included falling (18 cases), traffic accident (14 cases), and violence (3 cases). The time between injury and treatment was 2-30 days (mean, 6.8 days). Restricted mouth opening was observed, and the maximal mouth opening was (22.74 +/- 7.22) mm except 3 patients who were too young to measure. Condylar fractures were located at the left (12 cases), at the right (9 cases), at bilateral (14 cases) based on the sites; and fractures were classified as intracapsular (35 fractures), neck (10 fractures), and subcondylar (4 fractures) based on the fracture line. Four self-drilling titanium screws were inserted into the alveolar bone of both maxilla and mandible. After screw inserting, an occlusal splint with a fulcrum was used on the affected side and elastic band was put to perform anterior intermaxillary traction. After 1 month, the screws and splint were removed. Follow-up examinations were carried out on schedule. All the patients were followed up from 6 months to 8 years and 10 months (median, 71 months). No screw-related complication occurred in the others except one case of screw loosening. The postoperative maximal mouth opening was (38.82 +/- 2.02) nim. Mild joint noise was found in 4 cases and opening deviation occurred in 6 cases. Radiographic results demonstrated complete condyle remodeling was achieved in 24 cases (32 fractures), and moderate remodeling in 11 cases (17 fractures) at last follow-up. The screw-based intermaxillary traction combined with occlusal splint might be an effective method for pediatric mandibular condylar fracture. The screw

  18. Displacement of screw-retained single crowns into implants with conical internal connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Internal conical implant-abutment connections without platforms may lead to axial displacement of crowns during screw tightening. This displacement may affect proximal contacts, incisal edge position, or occlusion. This study aimed to measure the displacement of screw-retained single crowns into an implant in three dimensions during screw tightening by hand or via torque driver. A stereolithic acrylic resin cast was created using computed tomography data from a patient missing the maxillary right central incisor. A 4.0- × 11-mm implant was placed in the edentulous site. Five porcelain-fused-to-metal single crowns were made using "cast-to" abutments. Crowns were tried on the stereolithic model, representing the patient, and hand tightened. The spatial relationship of crowns to the model after hand tightening was determined using three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC), an optical measurement technique. The crowns were then tightened using a torque driver to 20 Ncm and the relative crown positions were again recorded. Testing was repeated three times for each crown, and displacement of the crowns was compared between the hand-tightened and torqued states. Commercial image correlation software was used to analyze the data. Mean vertical and horizontal crown displacement values were calculated after torqueing. The interproximal contacts were evaluated before and after torquing using an 8-μm aluminum foil shim. There were vertical and horizontal differences in crown positions between hand tightening and torqueing. Although these were small in magnitude, detectable displacements occurred in both apical and facial directions. After hand tightening, the 8-μm shim could be dragged without tearing. However, after torque tightening, the interproximal contacts were too tight and the 8-μm shim could not be dragged without tearing. Differences between hand tightening and torque tightening should be taken into consideration during laboratory and clinical

  19. Evaluation of Dynamic Characteristics of the Footbridge with Integral Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pańtak Marek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of dynamic field tests and numerical analysis of the footbridge designed as a three-span composite structure with integral abutments. The adopted design solution which has allowed to achieve a high resistance of the structure to dynamic loads and to meet the requirements of the criteria of comfort of use with a large reserve has been characterized. For comparative purposes, numerical analyzes of three construction variants of the footbridge were presented: F-1 - construction with integral abutments (realized variant, F-2 - construction with girders anchored in the abutments by means of tension rocker bearings, F-3 - construction with concrete side spans.

  20. Evaluation of Dynamic Characteristics of the Footbridge with Integral Abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pańtak, Marek; Jarek, Bogusław

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the results of dynamic field tests and numerical analysis of the footbridge designed as a three-span composite structure with integral abutments. The adopted design solution which has allowed to achieve a high resistance of the structure to dynamic loads and to meet the requirements of the criteria of comfort of use with a large reserve has been characterized. For comparative purposes, numerical analyzes of three construction variants of the footbridge were presented: F-1 - construction with integral abutments (realized variant), F-2 - construction with girders anchored in the abutments by means of tension rocker bearings, F-3 - construction with concrete side spans.

  1. Prosthetic management of malpositioned implant using custom cast abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aishwarya; Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Patil, Sanket; Chatterjee, Debopriya; Dandekeri, Savita; Prabhu, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are reported with malpositioned implants. Both the implants were placed 6–7 months back. They had osseointegrated well with the surrounding bone. However, they presented severe facial inclination. Case I was restored with custom cast abutment with an auto polymerizing acrylic gingival veneer. Case II was restored with custom cast UCLA type plastic implant abutment. Ceramic was directly fired on the custom cast abutments. The dual treatment strategy resulted in functional and esthetic restorations despite facial malposition of the implants. PMID:26538957

  2. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: Single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J.; Marzi, Ingo; Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G.; Schmidt, Sven; Eichler, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation can be performed under CT-imaging. • Guidewires help in precise placement of cannulated sacroiliac screw. • Only a diminishing rate of misplacements can be seen. • The method appears to be a safe and very accurate procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. Methods: 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6 ± 19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. Results: The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5 ± 2.01 mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6 ± 0.53 mm to 1.2 ± 0.54 mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5 mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0 min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7 mGy cm). Conclusions: The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels

  3. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: Single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.fischer@kgu.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Marzi, Ingo [Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, Sven [Orthopaedic University Hospital Friedrichsheim, Marienburgstraße, 260528 Frankfurt (Germany); Eichler, Katrin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation can be performed under CT-imaging. • Guidewires help in precise placement of cannulated sacroiliac screw. • Only a diminishing rate of misplacements can be seen. • The method appears to be a safe and very accurate procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. Methods: 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6 ± 19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. Results: The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5 ± 2.01 mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6 ± 0.53 mm to 1.2 ± 0.54 mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5 mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0 min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7 mGy cm). Conclusions: The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels.

  4. Periodontal Conditions of Abutments and Non-Abutments in Removable Partial Dentures over 7 Years of Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonte Porto Carreiro, Adriana; de Carvalho Dias, Kássia; Correia Lopes, Ana Lílian; Bastos Machado Resende, Camila Maria; Luz de Aquino Martins, Ana Rafaela

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the periodontal conditions and integrity of abutment and non-abutment teeth of patients evaluated 7 years after insertion of the removable partial denture (RPD). Twenty-two patients (17 women, 5 men) were assessed at the moment of denture insertion and 7 years later. The following items were verified in each assessment: bleeding on probing (BP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and mobility (M), comparing direct and indirect abutment teeth, and the teeth not involved in the denture design. Tooth integrity was also evaluated and classified as intact when no caries or fractures were observed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to reveal statistical significance between the groups (p = 0.05) as well as the Bonferrroni-corrected Mann-Whitney test for post hoc comparison. The Wilcoxon test was used for evaluation within the group over time. Fisher's exact test was applied to cross data about abutment integrity. Statistically significant differences were found for GR (baseline, p < 0.001; 7 years, p < 0.001) and PD (baseline, p = 0.001; 7 years = 0.004) between the three groups at baseline and after 7 years of follow-up. Mean BP and M values increased from initial assessment to after 7 years of RPD use in every group, but no statistically significant difference was found between the groups. For abutment integrity, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.028) was observed, and the direct abutment exhibited more (33.3%) caries and fractures. RPDs generated more periodontal damage to direct abutments, since higher gingival recession probing depth indexes, and presence of caries and fractures were observed in comparison to indirect abutments and non-abutments. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Comparative study of radiography and scintigraphy for loosening and infection of prosthetic hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Sook; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won; Song, Han Joon; Ahn, Chi Yul [College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Prosthetic hip replacement is associated with certain complications which result in a painful hip. Many of these, e. g. prosthetic dislocation, fracture, trochanteric avulsion, and heterotopic calcification are easily diagnosed by conventional radiography. However, radiographic evaluation for infection and/pr loosening of prosthesis as major complications requiring reoperation often contributes little to the resolution of the diagnostic problem. The authors made a comparative study of plain radiography and scintigraphy of 39 cases performed revision at Kyung Hee University Hospital from Sep. '81-to Aug. '86. The results were as follows: 1. In 39 revised prosthetic hip replacement, 26 cases (67%) of loosening without infection and 11 cases (28%) of infection were proven. 2. In loosening of prosthesis, plain radiography showed true positive rate of 76% and true negative rate of 60%, and scintigraphy showed true positive rate of 75% and true negative rate of 95%. 3. In infection of prosthesis, plain radiography revealed true positive rate of 55% and true negative rate of 96%, and scintigraphy revealed true positive rate of 100% and true negative rate of 83%. 4. Scintigraphy and plain radiography were useful as complementary procedure in evaluating and differentiating loosening and/or infection of prosthetic component.

  6. Pinning down loosened prostheses : imaging and planning of percutaneous hip refixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malan, Daniel Francois

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines how computer software can be used to analyse medical images of an aseptically loosening hip prosthesis, and subsequently to plan and guide a minimally invasive cement injection procedure to stabilize the prosthesis. We addressed the detection and measurement of periprosthetic

  7. Gene therapy and cement injection for the treatment of hip prosthesis loosening in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, Jolanda de

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one million total hip replacement operations are performed worldwide annually, mostly for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. A major complication in total hip arthroplasties is loosening of the prosthesis leading to pain and walking difficulties and a higher risk for dislocations

  8. Bolt-loosening identification of bolt connections by vision image-based technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Ryu, Joo-Young; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm using image processing techniques is proposed to identify bolt-loosening in bolted connections of steel structures. Its basic concept is to identify rotation angles of nuts from a pictured image, and is mainly consisted of the following 3 steps: (1) taking a picture for a bolt joint, (2) segmenting the images for each nut by image processing techniques, and (3) identifying rotation angle of each nut and detecting bolt-loosening. By using the concept, an algorithm is designed for continuous monitoring and inspection of the bolt connections. As a key imageprocessing technique, Hough transform is used to identify rotation angles of nuts, and then bolt-loosening is detected by comparing the angles before and after bolt-loosening. Then the applicability of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by experimental tests for two lab-scaled models. A bolted joint model which consists of a splice plate and 8 sets of bolts and nuts with 2×4 array is used to simulate inspection of bridge connections, and a model which is consisted of a ring flange and 32 sets of bolt and nut is used to simulate continuous monitoring of bolted connections in wind turbine towers.

  9. Comparative study of radiography and scintigraphy for loosening and infection of prosthetic hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mi Sook; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won; Song, Han Joon; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1987-01-01

    Prosthetic hip replacement is associated with certain complications which result in a painful hip. Many of these, e. g. prosthetic dislocation, fracture, trochanteric avulsion, and heterotopic calcification are easily diagnosed by conventional radiography. However, radiographic evaluation for infection and/pr loosening of prosthesis as major complications requiring reoperation often contributes little to the resolution of the diagnostic problem. The authors made a comparative study of plain radiography and scintigraphy of 39 cases performed revision at Kyung Hee University Hospital from Sep. '81-to Aug. '86. The results were as follows: 1. In 39 revised prosthetic hip replacement, 26 cases (67%) of loosening without infection and 11 cases (28%) of infection were proven. 2. In loosening of prosthesis, plain radiography showed true positive rate of 76% and true negative rate of 60%, and scintigraphy showed true positive rate of 75% and true negative rate of 95%. 3. In infection of prosthesis, plain radiography revealed true positive rate of 55% and true negative rate of 96%, and scintigraphy revealed true positive rate of 100% and true negative rate of 83%. 4. Scintigraphy and plain radiography were useful as complementary procedure in evaluating and differentiating loosening and/or infection of prosthetic component

  10. [Intramedullary nailing combined with cannulated screw in treating femoral condyles fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Hao; Long, Da-Fu; Li, Zheng-Wen; Tan, Ying-Dong

    2017-07-25

    To observe the clinical effects of retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws in the treatment of femoral condylar fracture. From June 2009 to June 2015, 13 patients with femoral condyles fracture were treated by retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws including 6 males and 7 females with an average age of 46.1 years old ranging from 16 to 76 years old. There were 10 cases of closed fractures, 3 cases of open fraetures. According to AO classification criteriam, 4 cases were type C1, 7 cases were type C2, 2 cases were type C3. Postoperative reduction of fracture and the knee joint function recovery were observed. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months with a mean of 24 months. X-ray examination showed that the union time of fracture was 18 to 24 weeks, 21 weeks on average. There were no cases of loosening, breakage of internal fixators and re-fracture. Hospital for Special Surgery(HSS) knee score was 90.07±4.99 at 1 year after the operation. The clinical efficacy for retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screw for the treatment of femoral condyles fracture was excellent. It can improve the anatomical reattachment rate and reduce the complications and promote the knee functional recovery.

  11. Long-term behavior of integral abutment bridges : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Integral abutment bridges, a type of jointless bridge, are the construction option of choice when designing highway bridges in many parts of the country. Rather than providing an expansion joint to separate the substructure from the superstructure to...

  12. Long-term behavior of integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Integral abutment (IA) construction has become the preferred method over conventional construction for use with typical : highway bridges. However, the use of these structures is limited due to state mandated length and skew limitations. To : expand ...

  13. Performance assessment of MSE abutment walls in Indiana : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report presents a numerical investigation of the behavior of steel strip-reinforced mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) direct bridge abutments under static loading. Finite element simulations were performed using an advanced two-surface boundin...

  14. Small Smooth Units ('Young' Lavas?) Abutting Lobate Scarps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliband, C. C.; Rothery, D. A.; Balme, M. R.; Conway, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    We have identified small units abutting, and so stratigraphy younger than, lobate scarps. This post dates the end of large scale smooth plains formation at the onset of global contraction. This elaborates the history of volcanism on Mercury.

  15. Integral abutment bridges under thermal loading : field monitoring and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have gained popularity throughout the United States due to their low construction and maintenance costs. Previous research on IABs has been heavily focused on substructure performance, leaving a need for better unders...

  16. Deterioration of J-bar reinforcement in abutments and piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Deterioration and necking of J-bars has been reportedly observed at the interface of the footing and stem wall during the demolition : of older retaining walls and bridge abutments. Similar deterioration has been reportedly observed between the pier ...

  17. Femoral loosening of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: The effect of posterior cruciate ligament retention and bone quality reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van de Groes, S.A.W.; De Waal Malefijt, M.C.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    High-flexion total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be more sensitive to femoral loosening than conventional TKA as the knee joint force increases during deep flexion. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the probability of femoral loosening is equal in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)

  18. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  19. Accuracy combining different brands of implants and abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo; Senent-Vicente, Gisela; González-de-Cossio, Inés; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the vertical misfit between different brands of dental implants and prosthetic abutments, with or without mechanical torque, and to study their possible combination. Five different brands of implant were used in the study: Biofit (Castemaggiore, Italy), Bioner S.A. (Barcelona, Spain), 3i Biomet (Palm Beach, U.S.A.), BTI (Alava, Spain) and Nobel Biocare (Göteborg, Sweden), with standard 4.1 mm heads and external hexagons, and their respective machined prosthetic abutments. The implant-to-abutment fit/misfit was evaluated at four points (vestibular, lingual/palatine, mesial and distal) between implants and abutments of the same brand and different brands, with or without mechanical torque, using SEM micrographs at 5000X. Image analysis was performed using NIS-Elements software (Nikon Instruments Europe B.V.). Before applying torque, vertical misfit (microgaps) of the different combinations tested varied between 1.6 and 5.4 microns and after applying torque, between 0.9 and 5.9 microns, an overall average of 3.46 ± 2.96 microns. For manual assembly without the use of mechanical torque, the best results were obtained with the combination of the 3i implant and the BTI abutment. The Nobel implant and Nobel abutment, 3i-3i and BTI-BTI and the combination of 3i implant with BTI or Nobel abutment provided the best vertical fit when mechanical torque was applied. The vertical fits obtained were within the limits considered clinically acceptable. The application of mechanical torque improved outcomes. There is compatibility between implants and abutments of different brand and so their combination is a clinical possibility.

  20. THE USE OF A CODED HEALING ABUTMENT AS AN IMPRESSION COPING TO DESIGN AND MILL AN INDIVIDUALIZED ANATOMIC ABUTMENT : A CLINICAL REPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    A coded implant healing abutment makes an impression at the implant level no longer necessary. An impression is made of the healing abutment, which is placed onto the implant directly after implant placement. The codes embedded in the occlusal surface of the healing abutment provide essential

  1. Settling of abutments into implants and changes in removal torque in five different implant-abutment connections. Part 1: Cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seong; Han, Jung-Suk; Lim, Young-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the settling of abutments into implants and the removal torque values (RTVs) before and after cyclic loading. Five different implant-abutment connections were tested: Ext = external butt joint + two-piece abutment; Int-H2 = internal hexagon + two-piece abutment; Int-H1 = internal hexagon + one-piece abutment; Int-O2 = internal octagon + two-piece abutment; and Int-O1 = internal octagon + one-piece abutment. Ten abutments from each group were secured to their corresponding implants (total n = 50). All samples were tested in a universal testing machine with a vertical load of 250 N for 100,000 cycles of 14 Hz. The amount of settling of the abutment into the implant was calculated from the change in the total length of the implant-abutment sample before and after loading, as measured with an electronic digital micrometer. The RTV after cyclic loading was compared to the initial RTV with a digital torque gauge. Statistical analysis was performed at a 5% significance level. A multiple-comparison test showed specific significant differences in settling values in each group after 250 N cyclic loading (Int-H1, Ext abutment type and related to the design characteristics of the implant-abutment connection.

  2. The pedicle screw-rod system is an acceptable method of reconstructive surgery after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemipelvic resections for primary bone tumours require reconstruction to restore weight bearing along anatomic axes. However, reconstruction of the pelvic arch remains a major surgical challenge because of the high rate of associated complications. We used the pedicle screw-rod system to reconstruct the pelvis, and the purpose of this investigation was to assess the oncology, functional outcome and complication rate following this procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the operative indications and technique of the pedicle screw-rod system in reconstruction of the stability of the sacroiliac joint after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours. The average MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumour Society score was 26.5 at either three months after surgery or at the latest follow-up. Seven patients had surgery-related complications, including wound dehiscence in one, infection in two, local necrosis in four (including infection in two, sciatic nerve palsy in one and pubic symphysis subluxation in one. There was no screw loosening or deep vein thrombosis occurring in this series. Using a pedicle screw-rod after resection of a sacroiliac joint tumour is an acceptable method of pelvic reconstruction because of its reduced risk of complications and satisfactory functional outcome, as well as its feasibility of reconstruction for type IV pelvis tumour resection without elaborate preoperative customisation. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study.

  3. Microleakage at the Different Implant Abutment Interface: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Ramesh; Kumari, Shail

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Presence of gap at the implant-abutment interface, leads to microleakage and accumulation of bacteria which can affect the success of dental implants. Aim To evaluate the sealing capability of different implant connections against microleakage. Materials and Methods In January 2017 an electronic search of literature was performed, in Medline, EBSCO host and Pubmed data base. The search was focused on ability of different implant connections in preventing microleakage. The related titles and abstracts available in English were screened, and the articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected for full text reading. Results In this systematic review, literature search initially resulted in 78 articles among which 30 articles only fulfilled the criteria for inclusion and were finally included in the review. Almost all the studies showed that there was some amount of microleakage at abutment implant interface. Microleakage was very less in Morse taper implants in comparison to other implant connections. Majority of studies showed less microleakage in static loading conditions and microleakage increases in dynamic loading conditions. Conclusion In this systematic review maximum studies showed that there was some amount of microleakage at abutment implant interface. External hexagon implants failed completely to prevent microleakage in both static and dynamic loading conditions of implants. Internal hexagon implants mainly internal conical (Morse taper) implants are very promising in case of static loading and also showed less microleakage in dynamic loading conditions. Torque recommended by manufacturer should be followed strictly to get a better seal at abutment implant interface. Zirconia abutments are more to microleakage than Titanium abutments and there use should be discouraged. Zirconia abutments should be only restricted to cases where there was very high demand of aesthetics. PMID:28764310

  4. A Mathematical Model for Temperature Induced Loosening due to Radial Expansion of Rectangle Thread Bolted Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyuan Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a mathematical model to investigate the radial expansion induced loosening of rectangle thread bolted joints that were subjected to cyclic temperature variation, which could cause slippage between contact pairs of engaged threads and bolt bearing. Firstly, integral equations were derived for the shear stress components caused by expansion difference, as well as the bearing and thread friction torque components, which depended on the temperature variation. Secondly, the relationship of displacement components was developed based on quasi-static hypotheses. Then, treating the rotation of bolt as plastic elongation, the bolt tension's evolution was obtained by using a one-dimensional bolted joint model. Numerical results showed that the temperature variation decreased the bearing and thread friction torque components, which could lead bolted joint to loosen. Finally, the effects of some associated factors on the progress were discussed.

  5. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mokhtarpour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05. Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001. The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44. Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns de-creased the fracture load.

  6. Tricortical cervical inter-body screw fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A new tricortical method of screw implantation for anterior cervical interbody plate fixation is described. The screws are placed obliquely such that they engage the anterior cortex of the body and traverse through the cortices adjoining the disc space. By this method the screws not only hold the plate firmly with a tricortical purchase, but by virtue of their course stabilize the two adjoining vertebral bodies by themselves. Sixteen patients were treated by this method. In three of these cases only tricortical screws without the metal plate were used for fixation. The advantages of the technique are discussed.

  7. A Stereophotogrammetric System For The Detection Of Prosthesis Loosening In Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Genant, Harry K.; Hunter, John; Miller, David; Moffitt, Francis; Murray, William R.; Ross, Steven E.

    1980-07-01

    Loosening of the prosthetic device occurs in about 5% of cases following placement of total hip prostheses (THP). Early detection of loosening is much desired but is difficult to achieve using conventional methods. Due to errors of projection, it is quite possible to fail to detect mobility of even as much as 5 mm on single x-ray films. We are attempting to develop a simplified photogrammetric system suitable for general hospital use which could detect loosening of 0.8 mm at the 95 % level of confidence without use of complex stereoplotting equipment. Metal reference markers are placed in the shaft of the femur and in the acetabular region of the pelvis at the time of surgery. The distances between these reference markers and certain unambiguous points on the prostheses are computed analytically using an X-Y acoustical digitizer (accuracy ± 0.1 mm) and software developed previously for craniofacial measurement. Separate stereopairs of the joint region are taken under weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing conditions. Differences in the measured distances between the bo-ne markers and the prosthetic components on the two stereopairs are taken as indicators of prosthesis loosening. Measurements on a phantom using ten different x-ray stereopairs taken from as many different perspectives have established that true linear distances between reference points and prostheses can be measured at the desired reliability with the present low precision system. Preliminary in vivo measurements indicate that the main unresolved problem is the movement of the subject between the two exposures of each single stereopair. Two possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  8. Mitigated infection in so called aseptic loosening of the total endoprosthesis of the big joints

    OpenAIRE

    Koudela, Karel

    2008-01-01

    The theme of the work is infection in the aseptic loosening of total joint replacement of large joints. Thesis topic is very timely, since inflammatory complications accompanying large joint arthroplasty is one of the causes of failure of total joint replacement and subsequent revision surgery represents a major problem of health, social and economic. PhD thesis summarizes the known aspects of this issue.

  9. Development of load calculation techniques on screw and screw press energy consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Татарьянц, Максим Сергеевич; Завинский, Сергей Иванович; Трошин, Алексей Георгиевич

    2015-01-01

    The process of pressing of wood chips in screw machines is researched. It is defined processes taking place in different parts of the screw, formulas allowing to calculate the loads acting on the screw flights, as well as to determine the power required for compression. The unit costs of energy consumption and raw materials in the degree of heat pressing are determined

  10. Total Hip Arthroplasty Loosening Due to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Tebourbi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis with no previous history of pulmonary or extra pulmonary tuberculosis is an extremely rare complication. Aims To report the case of a patient with tuberculous mycobacterial prosthetic hip infection, 14 years after surgery for post traumatic osteoarthritis, with no previous history of tuberculosis. Methods A 46-year-old male presented an acetabular loosening of a cemented total hip arthroplasty with subnormal biologic parameters. A one stage revision surgery was planned. Intraoperative findings suggested mycobacterial tuberculous infection with presence of periacetabular yellowish rice-shaped granules. Results A one-stage prosthesis exchange was performed; Culture on Löwenstein-Jensen medium grew MTB days after inoculation and histological examination confirmed tuberculous infection. Patient was treated by antituberculous agents for 12 months with optimal clinical and biological response and no prosthetic loosening signs at eighteen months follow up. Conclusions Total hip arthroplasty loosening due to mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rare entity, which should be evoked even when no inflammatory signs are shown. Discovery of yellowish rice-shaped granules is an indicator to investigate for tuberculosis. Management of prosthetic joint infection due to M.tuberculosis must involve both medical and surgical approach.

  11. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted. No language or year of publication restriction was applied. The search provided 298 titles. Three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies were characterized by low or moderate risk of bias. Survival of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. There were no significant differences between the two treatment modalities regarding professional or patient-reported outcome measures. Meta-analysis disclosed a mean difference of peri-implant marginal bone loss of 1.56 mm (confidence interval: 0.87 to 2.25), indicating significant more bone loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must be rejected. However, further long-term randomized controlled trials assessing implant treatment outcome with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided about the beneficial use of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection on preservation of the peri-implant marginal bone level.

  12. Mechanism Research of Arch Dam Abutment Forces during Overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research on the abutment forces of a double-curvature arch dam during overload based on numerical calculation results obtained through finite element method by Ansys. Results show that, with an increase in elevation, the abutment forces and bending moment of the arch dam increase first and then decrease from the bottom to the top of the dam. Abutment forces and bending moment reach their maximum at the middle or middle-down portion of the dam. The distributions of abutment forces and moment do not change during overload. The magnitude of each arch layer’s forces and moment increases linearly during overload. This result indicates that each arch layer transmits bearing loads to the rocks of the left and right banks steadily. This research explains the operating mechanism of an arch dam under normal and overload conditions. It provides a simple method to calculate the distribution of forces Fx and Fy and a new method to calculate the overload factor of an arch dam through the estimation of arch layers based on the redistribution characteristic of arch abutment forces.

  13. Fatigue induced changes in conical implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kai; Wiest, Wolfram; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Dittmann, Jonas; Rack, Alexander; Maier, Dominik; Thomann, Ralf; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Kohal, Ralf Joachim; Zabler, Simon; Nelson, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Based on the current lack of data and understanding of the wear behavior of dental two-piece implants, this study aims for evaluating the microgap formation and wear pattern of different implants in the course of cyclic loading. Several implant systems with different conical implant-abutment interfaces were purchased. The implants were first evaluated using synchrotron X-ray high-resolution radiography (SRX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implant-abutment assemblies were then subjected to cyclic loading at 98N and their microgap was evaluated after 100,000, 200,000 and 1 million cycles using SRX, synchrotron micro-tomography (μCT). Wear mechanisms of the implant-abutment connection (IAC) after 200,000 cycles and 1 million cycles were further characterized using SEM. All implants exhibit a microgap between the implant and abutment prior to loading. The gap size increased with cyclic loading with its changes being significantly higher within the first 200,000 cycles. Wear was seen in all implants regardless of their interface design. The wear pattern comprised adhesive wear and fretting. Wear behavior changed when a different mounting medium was used (brass vs. polymer). A micromotion of the abutment during cyclic loading can induce wear and wear particles in conical dental implant systems. This feature accompanied with the formation of a microgap at the IAC is highly relevant for the longevity of the implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Abutment region dosimetry for serial tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa; Dempsey, James F.; Markman, Jerry; Goddu, S. Murty; Purdy, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A commercial intensity modulated radiation therapy system (Corvus, NOMOS Corp.) is presently used in our clinic to generate optimized dose distributions delivered using a proprietary dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) (MIMiC) composed of 20 opposed leaf pairs. On our accelerator (Clinac 600C/D, Varian Associates, Inc.) each MIMiC leaf projects to either 1.00 x 0.84 or 1.00 x 1.70 cm 2 (depending on the treatment plan and termed 1 cm or 2 cm mode, respectively). The MIMiC is used to deliver serial (axial) tomotherapy treatment plans, in which the beam is delivered to a nearly cylindrical volume as the DMLC is rotated about the patient. For longer targets, the patient is moved (indexed) between treatments a distance corresponding to the projected leaf width. The treatment relies on precise indexing and a method was developed to measure the precision of indexing devices. A treatment planning study of the dosimetric effects of incorrect patient indexing and concluded that a dose heterogeneity of 10% mm -1 resulted. Because the results may be sensitive to the dose model accuracy, we conducted a measurement-based investigation of the consequences of incorrect indexing using our accelerator. Although the indexing provides an accurate field abutment along the isocenter, due to beam divergence, hot and cold spots will be produced below and above isocenter, respectively, when less than 300 deg. arcs were used. A preliminary study recently determined that for a 290 deg. rotation in 1 cm mode, 15% cold and 7% hot spots were delivered to 7 cm above and below isocenter, respectively. This study completes the earlier work by investigating the dose heterogeneity as a function of position relative to the axis of rotation, arc length, and leaf width. The influence of random daily patient positioning errors is also investigated. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using 8.0 cm diameter cylindrical target volumes within a homogeneous rectilinear film

  15. Soil-structure interaction studies for understanding the behavior of integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Integral Abutment Bridges (IAB) are bridges without any joints within the bridge deck or between the : superstructure and the abutments. An IAB provides many advantages during construction and maintenance of : a bridge. Soil-structure interactions at...

  16. Unconventional fixation Thoracolumbar fractures using round hole boneplates and transpedicular screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behairy, Yaser M.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to contain the high cost of commercially available pediclescrew systems, several authors have used unconventional alternatives such aslocally made plates or dynamic compression plates (DCP) along with cancellousscrews for transpedicular fixation of the thoracolumbar spine. These plates,however, allow for a wide range of motion at the plate-screw interphase andthe construct does not provide stability in the sagittal plane. Round holebone plates, on the other hand, allow much less mobility at the plate-screwinterphase and the final construct offers better stability in the sagittalplane. Our objective was to determine the clinical, radiologic and functionalstatus of patients who underwent posterior fracture fixation using round holebone plates and cancellous screws and evaluate the construct's ability tomaintain reduction of the fracture. This was a postoperative follow-up ofpatients with fractures around the thoracolumbar junction fixed using roundhole bone plates and cancellous transpedicular screws. Round hole bone platesalong with 6.5 mm transpedicular cancellous screws were used for posteriorspinal instrumentation in neurologically intact patients with isolatedunstable fractures of the last thoracic or first lumbar vertebra. Seventeenpatients were included in this study. There mean follow-up was 10 months(range 5 to 12). All had evidence of fusion at a mean of 5 months (range 4 to7). No patients had breakage or loosening of the screws and none had breakageof the plate. The mean kyphosis angle at the fracture site was 34 degreepreoperatively, -4 degree in the immediate postoperative period, and 3 degreeon final follow-up radiographs. The percentage loss of anterior vertebralbody height was 51% in the immediate postoperative period and 16% on finalfollow-up radiographs. The use of round hole bone plates along with 6.5 mmcancellous screws inserted into the pedicles provides an angle-stableconstruct that allows for better stability in the sagittal plane

  17. Effect of cyclic load on vertical misfit of prefabricated and cast implant single abutment

    OpenAIRE

    de Jesus Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso; Xible, Anuar Antônio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate misfit alterations at the implant/abutment interface of external and internal connection implant systems when subjected to cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Standard metal crowns were fabricated for 5 groups (n=10) of implant/abutment assemblies: Group 1, external hexagon implant and UCLA cast-on premachined abutment; Group 2, internal hexagon implant and premachined abutment; Group 3, internal octagon implant and prefabricate...

  18. Temporal variation of clear-water scour at compound Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminuddin Ab. Ghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of actual abutments in rivers are built on foundation, while there is limited number of study available on the effects of the foundation on the local scour. In this study, temporal variation of local scour around compound abutment was investigated experimentally under clear-water conditions. The results showed that a suitable level of foundation is able to decrease the scour depth and increase scour time during the flood events. The trend of temporal scour depth at compound pier and abutment is similar. The scour depth develops to top of foundation quickly, and then the foundation postpones the scour development (lag–time. Duration of lag–time depends on the foundation level, velocity ratio (U/Uc and foundation dimension. This study highlights that proper design of foundation level increases duration of scouring and provides enough time to treat bridge foundation after the flood events.

  19. Non-rigid connector: The wand to allay the stresses on abutment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Saurav; Khongshei, Arlingstone; Gupta, Tapas; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01

    The use of rigid connectors in 5-unit fixed dental prosthesis with a pier abutment can result in failure of weaker retainer in the long run as the pier abutment acts as a fulcrum. Non-rigid connector placed on the distal aspect of pier seems to reduce potentially excess stress concentration on the pier abutment.

  20. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  1. Dual X-ray absortiometry(DXA) in the detection of loosening in the total hip replacement arthroplasty: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kang, Heung Sik; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Young Min

    1994-01-01

    Algorithms to get cross-sectional bone density pattern(transverse histogram) to predict the loosening of hip prosthesis using DXA(Dual X-ray Absorptiometry) have been developed. We performed this study to analyze the correlation between radiologic findings and densitometric pattern of the THRA(Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty) patients. Thirty-six hips of 32 THRA patients were evaluated. The duration between THRA and DXA was from 1 year 7 months to 15 years. On transverse histogram, the periprosthetic bone density patterns were classified as 3 types; type I , rigid fixation in 17, type II definite loosening in 8, and type III, partial loosening in 11 cases. Surgical findings, plain X-ray findings and transverse histogram using DXA were correlated. Among 14 cases performing revision for acetabular prosthesis loosening, 5 cases revealed loosening of femoral stems while 9 cases revealed rigid fixation of femoral stems. Sensitivity was 100% for either plain X-ray or DXA. Specificity was 88%, 77% for plain X-ray and DXA respectively. This preliminary study reveals that periprosthetic bone density pattern on transverse histogram on DXA may be useful in the evaluation of the loosening. However, further study will be needed for clinical application

  2. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J; Marzi, Ingo; Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G; Schmidt, Sven; Eichler, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6±19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5±2.01mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6±0.53mm to 1.2±0.54mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7mGycm). The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cannulated screw and cable are superior to modified tension band in the treatment of transverse patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun; Zhou, Fang; Ji, Hongquan; Zhang, Zhishan; Guo, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Although the modified tension band technique (eg, tension band supplemented by longitudinal Kirschner wires) has long been the mainstay for fixation of transverse fractures of the patella, it has shortcomings, such as bad reduction, loosening of implants, and skin irritation. We conducted a retrospective comparison of the modified tension band technique and the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band technique. We retrospectively reviewed 101 patients aged 22 to 85 years (mean, 56.6 years) with AO/OTA 34-C1 fractures (n = 68) and 34-C2 fractures (n = 33). Fifty-two patients were in the modified tension band group and 49 were in the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group. Followup was at least 1 year (range, 1-3 years). Comparison criteria were fracture reduction, fracture healing time, and the Iowa score for knee function. The titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group showed improved fracture reduction, reduced healing time, and better Iowa score, compared with the modified tension band group. In the modified tension band group, eight patients experienced wire migration, three of these requiring a second operation. There were no complications in the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group. The titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band technique showed superior results and should be considered as an alternative method for treatment of transverse patellar fractures. Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Unusual way of loosened total hip arthroplasty treatment with an Austin Moore endoprosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    M Erceg; K Becic

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old female patient with aseptic loosening of total cemented hip endoprosthesis and pathologic fracture of the femur at the level of the stem of endoprosthesis was presented. As no appropriate endoprosthesis was available due to the war in Croatia and war priority, the problem was managed by femur osteosynthesis and implantation of a partial Austin Moore hip endoprosthesis. The endoprosthesis is still functioning well (for 20 years).To the best of the author′s knowledge, nobody has e...

  5. Unusual way of loosened total hip arthroplasty treatment with an Austin Moore endoprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Erceg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old female patient with aseptic loosening of total cemented hip endoprosthesis and pathologic fracture of the femur at the level of the stem of endoprosthesis was presented. As no appropriate endoprosthesis was available due to the war in Croatia and war priority, the problem was managed by femur osteosynthesis and implantation of a partial Austin Moore hip endoprosthesis. The endoprosthesis is still functioning well (for 20 years.To the best of the author′s knowledge, nobody has ever treated problem like this using this alternative, an unconventional method, with an Austin Moore endoprosthesis.

  6. Method and ranking of DSA of the hip in detecting loosening of endoprostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, B.K.; Fink, U.; Hansen, M.; Kirsch, C.M.; Pfahler, M.

    1991-01-01

    Digital subtraction arthrography (DSAr) of the operated hip is presented and compared to nuclide bone scan and plain radiograph. Surgical proof was obtained in 47 patients. In the evaluation DSAr proved to be superior to nuclide bone scan and plain radiograph. DSAr had the best predictive value in the diagnosis of loosening of a prosthesis. In contrast to conventional arthrography there is a better differentiation between the contrast medium, the prosthesis, the acryle cement and the bone by using DSAr. In addition DSAr presents the advantage of postprocessing, especially pixelshift. (orig.) [de

  7. Periprosthetic fracture-dislocation in a loosened total knee replacement treated by knee arthrodesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano Moreno, Francisco Jose

    2004-01-01

    We present a patient who was operated four years before performing a total knee replacement. She fell down resulting a periprosthetic femoral fracture and a prosthetic dislocation. After evaluating different treatments, we decided to do prosthetic removal and a knee arthrodesis using an intramedullar nail. The femoral fracture was fixed with wire cerclages. Knee arthrodesis is a procedure uses as a last option for the treatment of infected or loosed arthroplasties. In our case it was difficult to consider any other reconstructive procedure due to the association of fracture, dislocation and loosening. The evolution has been satisfactory with good functional result and without pain

  8. Unusual way of loosened total hip arthroplasty treatment with an Austin Moore endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, M; Becic, K

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old female patient with aseptic loosening of total cemented hip endoprosthesis and pathologic fracture of the femur at the level of the stem of endoprosthesis was presented. As no appropriate endoprosthesis was available due to the war in Croatia and war priority, the problem was managed by femur osteosynthesis and implantation of a partial Austin Moore hip endoprosthesis. The endoprosthesis is still functioning well (for 20 years).To the best of the author's knowledge, nobody has ever treated problem like this using this alternative, an unconventional method, with an Austin Moore endoprosthesis.

  9. Isolated olecranon fractures in children affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I treated with single screw or tension band wiring system: Outcomes and pitfalls in relation to bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiani, Pietro; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Graci, Jole; De Cristo, Claudia; Zambrano, Anna; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Martini, Lorena; Villani, Ciro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the results of 2 techniques, tension band wiring (TBW) and fixation with screws, in olecranon fractures in children affected with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. Between 2010 and 2014, 21 olecranon fractures in 18 children with OI (average age: 12 years old) were treated surgically. Ten patients were treated with the screw fixation and 11 with TBW. A total of 65% of olecranon fractures occurred as a result of a spontaneous avulsion of the olecranon during the contraction of the triceps muscle. The average follow-up was 36 months. Among the children treated with 1 screw, 5 patients needed a surgical revision with TBW due to a mobilization of the screw. In this group, the satisfactory results were 50%. In patients treated with TBW, the satisfactory results were 100% of the cases. The average Z-score, the last one recorded in the patients before the trauma, was -2.53 in patients treated with screw fixation and -2.04 in those treated with TBW. TBW represents the safest surgical treatment for patients suffering from OI type I, as it helps to prevent the rigidity of the elbow through an earlier recovery of the range of motion, and there was no loosening of the implant. In analyzing the average Z-score before any fracture, the fixation with screws has an increased risk of failure in combination with low bone mineral density.

  10. Integral abutment bridge for Louisiana's soft and stiff soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have been designed and constructed in a few US states in the past few : decades. The initial purpose of building such bridges was to eliminate the expansion joints and resolve the : joint-induced problems. Although IA...

  11. Screw-released roller brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  12. Influence of Abutment Angle on Implant Strain When Supporting a Distal Extension Removable Partial Dental Prosthesis: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Toshihito; Tomita, Akiko; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    This study evaluated the impact of angled abutments on strain in implants supporting a distal extension removable partial denture. An in vitro model of an implant supporting a distal extension removable partial denture was developed. The implant was positioned with a 17- or 30-degree mesial inclination, with either a healing abutment or a corrective multiunit abutment. Levels of strain under load were compared, and the results were compared using t test (P = .05). Correcting angulation with a multiunit angled abutment significantly decreased strain (P abutment. An angled abutment decreased the strain on an inclined implant significantly more than a healing abutment when loaded under a distal extension removable partial denture.

  13. A geometrical introduction to screw theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguzzi, E

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces screw theory, a venerable but little known theory aimed at describing rigid body dynamics. This formulation of mechanics unifies in the concept of screw the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the body. It captures a remarkable mathematical analogy between mechanical momenta and linear velocities, and between forces and angular velocities. For instance, it clarifies that angular velocities should be treated as applied vectors and that, under the composition of motions, they sum with the same rules of applied forces. This work provides a short and rigorous introduction to screw theory intended for an undergraduate and general readership. (paper)

  14. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  15. Axial displacements in external and internal implant-abutment connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dae-Gon; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the axial displacement of the abutments during clinical procedures by the tightening torque and cyclic loading. Two different implant-abutment connection systems were used (external butt joint connection [EXT]; internal tapered conical connection [INT]). The master casts with two implant replicas, angulated 10° from each other, were fabricated for each implant connection system. Four types of impression copings were assembled and tightened with the corresponding implants (hex transfer impression coping, non-hex transfer impression coping, hex pick-up impression coping, non-hex pick-up impression coping). Resin splinted abutments and final prosthesis were assembled. The axial displacement was measured from the length of each assembly, which was evaluated repeatedly, after 30 Ncm torque tightening. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis for 1,000,000 cycles, additional axial displacement was recorded. The mean axial displacement was statistically analyzed (repeated measured ANOVA). There was more axial displacement in the INT group than that of the EXT group in impression copings, resin splinted abutments, and final prosthesis. Less axial displacement was found at 1-piece non-hex transfer type impression coping than other type of impression copings in the INT group. There was more axial displacement at the final prosthesis than resin splinted abutments in the INT and the EXT groups. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis, the INT group showed more axial displacement than that of the EXT group. Internal tapered conical connection demonstrated a varying amount of axial displacement with tightening torque and cyclic loading. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Comparison of the impact of scaler material composition on polished titanium implant abutment surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasturk, Hatice; Nguyen, Daniel Huy; Sherzai, Homa; Song, Xiaoping; Soukos, Nikos; Bidlack, Felicitas B; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of the removal of biofilm with hand scalers of different material composition on the surface of implant abutments by assessing the surface topography and residual plaque after scaling using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Titanium implant analogs from 3 manufacturers (Straumann USA LLC, Andover, Maine, Nobel BioCare USA LLC, Yorba Linda, Cali, Astra Tech Implant Systems, Dentsply, Mölndal, Sweden) were mounted in stone in plastic vials individually with authentic prosthetic abutments. Plaque samples were collected from a healthy volunteer, inoculated into growth medium and incubated with the abutments anaerobically for 1 week. A blinded, calibrated hygienist performed scaling to remove the biofilm using 6 implant scalers (in triplicate), 1 scaler for 1 abutment. The abutments were mounted on an imaging stand and processed for SEM. Images were captured in 3 randomly designated areas of interest on each abutment. Analysis of the implant polished abutment surface and plaque area measurements were performed using ImageJ image analysis software. Surface alterations were characterized by the number, length, depth and the width of the scratches observed. Glass filled resin scalers resulted in significantly more and longer scratches on all 3 abutment types compared to other scalers, while unfilled resin scalers resulted in the least surface change (p abutments with regard to plaque removal. The impact of scalers on implant abutment surfaces varies between abutment types presumably due to different surface characteristics with no apparent advantage of one abutment type over the other with regard to resistance to surface damage. Unfilled resin was found consistently to be the least damaging to abutment surfaces, although all scalers of all compositions caused detectable surface changes to polished surfaces of implant abutments.

  17. A Medical Wireless Measurement System for Hip Prosthesis Loosening Detection Based on Vibration Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Sauer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration analysis is a promising approach in order to detect early hip prosthesis loosening, with the potential to extend the range of diagnostic tools currently available in clinical routine. Ongoing research efforts and developments in the area of multi-functional implants, which integrate sensors, wireless power supply, communication and signal processing, provide means to obtain valuable in vivo information otherwise not available. In the current work a medical wireless measurement system is presented, which is integrated in the femoral head of a hip prosthesis. The passive miniaturized system includes a 3-axis acceleration sensor and signal pre-processing based on a lock-in amplifier circuit. Bidirectional data communication and power supply is reached through inductive coupling with an operating frequency of 125 kHz in accordance with the ISO 18000-2 protocol standard. The system allows the acquisition of the acceleration frequency response of the femur-prosthesis system between 500 to 2500 Hz. Applied laboratory measurements with system prototypes on artificial bones and integrated prostheses demonstrate the feasibility of the measurement system approach, clearly showing differences in the vibration behavior due to an implant loosening. In addition a possibility to evaluate the non-linear mechanic system behavior is presented.

  18. Extraction of sunflower oil by twin screw extruder: screw configuration and operating condition effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartika, I.A. [FATETA-IPB, Bogor (Indonesia). Department of Agroindustrial Technology; Pontalier, P.Y.; Rigal, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle, UMR 1010 INRA/INP-ENSIACET, Toulouse (France)

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the screw configuration allowing oil extraction from sunflower seeds with a twin-screw extruder. Experiments were conducted using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Five screw profiles were examined to define the best performance (oil extraction yield, specific mechanical energy and oil quality) by studying the influence of operating conditions, barrel temperature, screw speed and feed rate. Generally, the position and spacing between two reversed screw elements affected oil extraction yield. An increase of oil extraction yield was observed as the reversed screw elements were moved with increased spacing between two elements and with smaller pitch elements. In addition, oil extraction yield increased as barrel temperature, screw speed and feed rate were decreased. Highest oil extraction yield (85%) with best cake meal quality (residual oil content lower than 13%) was obtained under operating conditions of 120 {sup o}C, 75 rpm and 19 kg/h. Furthermore, the operating parameters influenced energy input. A decrease in barrel temperature and feed rate followed by an increase in screw speed increased energy input, particularly specific mechanical energy input. Effect of the operating parameters on oil quality was less important. In all experiments tested, the oil quality was very good. The acid value was below 2 mg of KOH/g of oil and total phosphorus content was low, below 100 mg/kg. (author)

  19. Twin Screw Mixer/Fine Grind Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 40-mm Twin-Screw Mixer/Extruder (TSE) pilot plant is a continuous, remotely operated, flexible facility that can significantly enhance safety and environmental...

  20. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments: A Randomized, Multicenter Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  1. Displacement of screw-retained splinted and nonsplinted restorations into implants with conical internal connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Seidt, Jeremy D; Clelland, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Variable abutment displacement could potentially affect proximal contacts, incisal edge position, or occlusion of implant-supported prostheses. This study aimed to measure and compare displacements of splinted and nonsplinted restorations into implants featuring internal conical connections as screws were tightened by hand or by torque driver. A stereolithic resin model was printed using computed tomography data from a patient missing mandibular left first and second molars. Two 5.0 × 11-mm implants were placed in the edentulous site using a surgical guide. Two sets (splinted and nonsplinted) of gold screw-retained prostheses were made indirectly to fit the implants in the stereolithic model representing the patient. The axial position of the crowns relative to a fixed location on the model was recorded following hand tightening using the three-dimensional image correlation technique and image correlation software. A pair of high-resolution digital cameras provided a synchronized view of the model during the experiment. Relative crown positions were again recorded after tightening with a torque driver to 25 Ncm. Testing was repeated randomly three times for each set of crowns. Displacement data after torque tightening were compared using a factorial analysis of variance with JMP 9.0 software (SAS) followed by a Tukey-Kramer post hoc test (α = .05). Interproximal contacts were evaluated using an 8-μm tin foil shim after tightening by hand and torque driver. Displacements for splinted and nonsplinted restorations differed only in a buccal direction. The nonsplinted crowns displaced significantly more than splinted crowns. Discernible differences were observed for the tin foil shim when dragged through proximal contacts following hand versus torque tightening. Differences between screw tightening by hand or torque driver should be taken into consideration during laboratory and clinical adjustments to prevent esthetic and functional complications.

  2. Screw piles for cold climate foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.; Sakr, M. [Almita Manufacturing Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Almita Manufacturing is an Alberta-based company that designs and builds screw piles with its own installation teams. It also engineers and supplies piles to numerous other companies and independent installers. The company services industries such as oil and gas; power transmission and distribution; and commercial construction. This presentation discussed the design and technical aspects of screw piles. A screw pile was defined as a steel pipe shaft with a 45 degree cut at the bottom and a formed helical plate welded to the outside of the pipe near the base and at a selected point on the shaft. The pile is screwed into the ground with a planetary drive head of suitable torque rating. The helical plate or helix helps facilitate the installation of the pile and gives the screw pile increased bearing capacity and pull-out resistance over a traditional straight-shaft pile. Screw piles were compared against cast in place concrete piles and steel driven piles. Screw piles were reported to have no tailings; no concrete curing time; no rebar, anchor belts, and no liners; and no dewatering. Screw piles can also be installed in all types of weather. Rhe Cree Burn Camp case study near Fort McMurray, Alberta was also presented. This residential camp and recreation complex consists of pre-fabricated units that make up three storey housing buildings and a single floor multi-use building. The case study provided information on soil; design parameter inputs; load testing program and pile configuration; geotechnical and structural design results; compression load test arrangement; pile test setup; and test results. The presentation also discussed fabrication as well as installation equipment. Various applications were also presented through a series of project pictures. Last, the presentation provided a simple cost analysis. tabs., figs.

  3. Fracture resistance of zirconia-based implant abutments after artificial long-term aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahhaf, Abdulaziz; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the survival rate, fracture strength, bending moments, loading to fracture and fracture modes of different designs of zirconia abutments after dynamic loading with thermocycling, and compare these values to titanium abutments. A total of 80 abutment samples were divided into 5 test groups of 16 samples in each group. The study included the following groups, "Group 1" CAD/CAM produced all-zirconia abutments, "Group 2" titanium abutments, "Group 3" zirconia-abutments adhesively luted to a titanium base, "Group 4" prefabricated all-zirconia abutments and "Group 5" zirconia-abutments glass soldered to a titanium base. Half the number of samples in each group was exposed to 1.2 million loading cycles (5-years simulation) in the chewing simulator. The samples that survived the artificial aging were later tested for fracture strength in a universal testing machine. The remaining 8 samples of the group were directly tested for fracture strength. All samples exposed to the 5-years artificial aging survived except of six samples in one group (Group 1). The surviving samples were later fracture tested in the universal testing machine. The bending moments (Ncm) values were as follow: Exposed groups: "Group 1" 94.5Ncm; "Group 2" 599.2Ncm; "Group 3" 477.5Ncm; "Group 4" 314.4Ncm; "Group 5" 509.4Ncm. Non-exposed groups: "Group 1" 269.3Ncm; "Group 2" 474.2Ncm; "Group 3" 377.6Ncm; "Group 4" 265.4Ncm; "Group 5" 372.4Ncm. Except in Group 1, the values were higher in the exposed groups, although, statistically there was no difference (p>0.05). The one-piece ZrO2-abutment group (Group 1 and Group 4) exhibited lower values, while the two-piece ZrO2-abutment groups (Group 3 and Group 5) showed similar values and fracture modes like the titanium abutment group. The titanium abutment group showed the highest values of bending moments among all groups. The implant-abutment connection area appeared to influence the bending moment value and the fracture mode of the tested

  4. Two Different Percutaneous Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Abutment Systems: Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; İşeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Yılmazer, Ayça Başkadem; Enver, Necati; Ceylan, Didem; Kara, Ahmet; Güldiken, Yahya; Çomoğlu, Şenol

    2016-04-01

    To compare two different percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) abutment systems regarding operation time, scar healing, quality of life, implant stability, audiologic results, and complications. The study involves a prospective multi-center clinical evaluation. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had undergone BAHA surgery from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary centers were included in the study. The Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was used to assess the patients at least 6 months after surgery. The operation time and complications were recorded. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Holger's classification was used to evaluate skin reactions. The mean length of the operation was 39.2±4 min for standard abutment and 18.3±5.7 min for hydroxyapatite-coated abutment. ISQ scores were significantly better for standard abutment in all tests. The mean total Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was 39.3±19 for the standard abutment and 46.3±24.5 for the hydroxyapatite-coated abutment groups, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups. There was no difference in audiological improvement between the two groups after surgery. Hydroxyapatite-coated abutment provided a shorter operation time that was significantly different from standard abutment. There were no significant differences between standard abutment and hydroxyapatite-coated abutment regarding audiologic improvement, quality of life, loading time, and complications.

  5. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  6. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dasht

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial dentures for his lower mandible. Due to the lack of parallelism in the supporting implants, prefabricated ball abutment could not be used. As a result, a customized ball abutment was fabricated in order to correct the non-parallelism of the implants. Conclusion: Using UCLA abutments could be a cost-efficient approach for the correction of misaligned implant abutments in implant-supported overdentures.

  7. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  8. Numerical simulation of abutment pressure redistribution during face advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishin, S. V.; Lavrikov, S. V.; Revuzhenko, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation data on the abutment pressure redistribution in rock mass during face advance, including isolines of maximum shear stress and pressure epures. The stress state of rock in the vicinity of a breakage heading is calculated by the finite element method using a 2D nonlinear model of a structurally heterogeneous medium with regard to plasticity and internal self-balancing stress. The thus calculated stress field is used as input data for 3D discrete element modeling of the process. The study shows that the abutment pressure increases as the roof span extends and that the distance between the face breast and the peak point of this pressure depends on the elastoplastic properties and internal self-balancing stress of a rock medium.

  9. Evaluation of abutment scour prediction equations with field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, S.T.; Deshpande, N.; Aziz, N.M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with FHWA, compared predicted abutment scour depths, computed with selected predictive equations, with field observations collected at 144 bridges in South Carolina and at eight bridges from the National Bridge Scour Database. Predictive equations published in the 4th edition of Evaluating Scour at Bridges (Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18) were used in this comparison, including the original Froehlich, the modified Froehlich, the Sturm, the Maryland, and the HIRE equations. The comparisons showed that most equations tended to provide conservative estimates of scour that at times were excessive (as large as 158 ft). Equations also produced underpredictions of scour, but with less frequency. Although the equations provide an important resource for evaluating abutment scour at bridges, the results of this investigation show the importance of using engineering judgment in conjunction with these equations.

  10. Immunoscintigraphy with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of septic loosening of hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubaker, A.; Bischof Delaloye, A.; Blanc, C.H.; Dutoit, M.; Leyvraz, P.F.; Delaloye, B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of immunoscintigraphy (IS) with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibodies (Mab) in the diagnosis of subacute or chronic infection of hip prostheses, we prospectively studied 57 patients (23 women and 34 men; age 29-92 years, mean 72.7 years) sent to our institution in the past 6 years for clinical suspicion of septic loosening of a hip prosthesis. Nineteen patients had bilateral prostheses and one of them was studied twice. A total of 78 prostheses were examined. All patients had three-phase bone scans followed by IS with technetium-99m antigranulocyte Mab BW 250/183. Intervals between bone scans and IS varied from 2 days to 4 weeks. Final diagnosis was assessed by culture in 48 cases (articular puncture or intraoperative sampling) and by clinical follow-up of at least 8 months in 30 cases. Twelve prostheses were considered septic and 66 non-septic. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 64% respectively for bone scans, 67% and 75% for IS and 67% and 84% for both modalities together. In three cases, IS was doubtful and the final clinical diagnosis was negative for infection. False-positive results were observed in the presence of massive loosening of the prosthesis or in association with metaplastic peri-articular bone formation. In three of the four false-negative results, infection was proven only after enrichment of the culture, and the bacterium was Staphylococcus epidermidis. In 12/33 (36%) positive bone scans IS allowed the diagnosis of infection to be excluded. Overall accuracy of both modalities together was 81% and the negative predictive value was 93%, which compares favourably with the results reported for other non-invasive methods. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of full scale impact into an abutment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullard, K.; Dowler, H.J.; Soanes, T.P.T.

    1985-01-01

    A 60mph impact into a tunnel abutment, of a flask on a railway flatrol with following vehicles, is shown to be a much less severe event for the flask than a 9 metre drop test to IAEA regulations. This involves the use of mathematical models of the full scale event of the same type as were employed in studying the behaviour of quarter scale models. The latter were subject to actual impact testing as part of the validation process. (author)

  12. Accuracy combining different brands of implants and abutments

    OpenAIRE

    Sol?-Ru?z, Mar?a F.; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo; Senent-Vicente, Gisela; Gonz?lez-de-Cossio, In?s; Amig?-Borr?s, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the vertical misfit between different brands of dental implants and prosthetic abutments, with or without mechanical torque, and to study their possible combination. Study design: Five different brands of implant were used in the study: Biofit (Castemaggiore, Italy), Bioner S.A. (Barcelona, Spain), 3i Biomet (Palm Beach, U.S.A.), BTI (Alava, Spain) and Nobel Biocare (G?teborg, Sweden), with standard 4.1 mm heads and external hexagons, and their respective machined prost...

  13. Transpedicular screw fixation in the thoracic and lumbar spine with a novel cannulated polyaxial screw system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Weise

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutz Weise, Olaf Suess, Thomas Picht, Theodoros KombosNeurochirurgische Klinik, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyObjective: Transpedicular screws are commonly and successfully used for posterior fixation in spinal instability, but their insertion remains challenging. Even using navigation techniques, there is a misplacement rate of up to 11%. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a novel pedicle screw system.Methods: Thoracic and lumbar fusions were performed on 67 consecutive patients for tumor, trauma, degenerative disease or infection. A total of 326 pedicular screws were placed using a novel wire-guided, cannulated, polyaxial screw system (XIA Precision®, Stryker. The accuracy of placement was assessed post operatively by CT scan, and the patients were followed-up clinically for a mean of 16 months.Results: The total medio-caudal pedicle wall perforation rate was 9.2% (30/326. In 19 of these 30 cases a cortical breakthrough of less than 2 mm occurred. The misplacement rate (defined as a perforation of 2 mm or more was 3.37% (11/326. Three of these 11 screws needed surgical revision due to neurological symptoms or CSF leakage. There have been no screw breakages or dislocations over the follow up-period.Conclusion: We conclude that the use of this cannulated screw system for the placement of pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar spine is accurate and safe. The advantages of this technique include easy handling without a time-consuming set up. Considering the incidence of long-term screw breakage, further investigation with a longer follow-up period is necessary.Keywords: spinal instrumentation, pedicle screws, misplacement, pedicle wall perforation

  14. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2016-01-01

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  15. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  16. On the Performance of Super-Long Integral Abutment Bridges: Parametric Analyses and Design Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "integral abutment bridge" has recently become a topic of remarka-ble interest among bridge engineers, not only for newly built bridges but also during refurbishment processes. The system constituted by the substructure and the superstructure can achieve a composite action responding as a single structural unit; the elimination of expansion joint and bearings on the abutments, greatly reduce the construction and maintenance costs. To maximize the benefits from integral abutment...

  17. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an ac...

  18. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The total occlusal convergence of the abutment of a partial fixed dental prosthesis: A definition and a clinical technique for its assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The abutment(s) of a partial fixed dental prosthesis (PFDP) should have a minimal total occlusal convergence (TOC), also called a taper, in order to ensure adequate retention of a PFDP that will be made for the abutment(s), given the height of the abutment(s). This article reviews the concept of PFDP abutment TOC and presents an alternative definition of what TOC is, defining it as the extent to which the shape of an abutment differs from an ideal cylinder shape of an abutment. This article also reviews experimental results concerning what is the ideal TOC in degrees and explores clinical techniques of estimating the TOC of a crown abutment. The author suggests that Dentists use high magnification loupes (×6-8 magnification or greater) or a surgical operating microscope when preparing crown abutments, to facilitate creating a minimum abutment TOC. PMID:24932130

  20. Application of reverse engineering in the production of individual dental abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusov, A. V.; Kashapov, R. N.; Kashapov, L. N.; Statsenko, E. O.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop a method of manufacturing individual dental abutments for a variety of dental implants. System of industrial X-ray microtomography Phoenix V|tome|X S 240 has been applied for creation of highly accurate model of the dental abutment. Scanning of dental abutment and the optimization of model was produced. The program of milling the individual abutment with a standard conical neck of hexagon was produced for the five-axis milling machine imes - icore 450i from the materials titanium and zirconium oxide.

  1. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  2. Kinematics of Planetary Roller Screw Mechanism considering Helical Directions of Screw and Roller Threads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangjun Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differential principle of thread transmission, an analytical model considering helical directions between screw and roller threads in planetary roller screw mechanism (PRSM is presented in this work. The model is critical for the design of PRSM with a smaller lead and a bigger pitch to realize a higher transmission accuracy. The kinematic principle of planetary transmission is employed to analyze the PRSM with different screw thread and roller thread directions. In order to investigate the differences with different screw thread and roller thread directions, the numerical model is developed by using the software Adams to validate the analytical solutions calculated by the presented model. The results indicate, when the helical direction of screw thread is identical with the direction of roller thread, that the lead of PRSM is unaffected regardless of whether sliding between screw and rollers occurs or not. Only when the direction of screw thread is reverse to the direction of roller thread, the design of PRSM with a smaller lead can be realized under a bigger pitch. The presented models and numerical simulation method can be used to research the transmission accuracy of PRSM.

  3. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-01-01

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three direction on {1 1 0} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction

  4. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  5. An investigation of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface when drilling through a zirconia crown attached to a titanium or zirconia abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Amy G; Sutton, Alan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-11-01

    Thermal injury to the implant-bone interface may lead to bone necrosis and loss of osseointegration. This is a concern during manipulation of the implant throughout the restorative phase of treatment. The risk of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface during abutment preparation or prosthesis removal should be considered. The purpose of the study was to examine the amount of heat transferred to the implant-bone interface when a zirconia crown is drilled to access the screw channel or section a crown with a high-speed dental handpiece. Of the 64 ceramic-veneered zirconia crowns fabricated, 32 had a coping thickness of 0.5 mm and 32 had a coping thickness of 1.0 mm. The crowns were cemented on either titanium stock abutments or zirconia stock abutments. Each group was further subdivided to evaluate heat transfer when the screw channel was accessed or the crown was sectioned with a high-speed handpiece with or without irrigation. Temperature change was recorded for each specimen at the cervical and apical aspect of the implant with thermocouples and a logging thermometer. ANOVA was used to assess the statistical significance in temperature change between the test combinations, and nonparametric Mann-Whitney U tests were used to evaluate the findings. The use of irrigation during both crown removal processes yielded an average temperature increase of 3.59 ±0.35°C. Crown removal in the absence of irrigation yielded an average temperature increase of 18.76 ±3.09°C. When all parameter combinations in the presence of irrigation were evaluated, the maximum temperature change was below the threshold of thermal injury to bone. The maximum temperature change was above the threshold for thermal injury at the coronal aspect of the implant and below the threshold at the apical aspect in the absence of irrigation. Within the limitations of this investigation, the use of irrigation with a high-speed dental handpiece to remove a ceramic-veneered zirconia crown results in

  6. Differentiation between peri-prosthetic infection and aseptic loosening using quantitative analysis of triphasic 99Tcm-MDP bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinxin; Zhang Yanyan; Zhang Weifang; Mao Yuan; Zhao Meixin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To differentiate between peri-prosthetic infection and aseptic loosening using quantitative analysis of triphasic bone scintigraphy. Methods: Twenty-eight patients (9 males, 19 females; mean age 67.5 years, range 49-80 years) with recurrent joint pain after arthroplasty were retrospectively assessed. All patients underwent triphasic bone scintigraphy. ROI of each joint was drawn and the ratios of affected to unaffected side were calculated. The ratios of blood flow phase, blood pool phase, static phase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation (ESR) were quantitatively analyzed by ROC curve. The final diagnosis was based on microbiological and histological examinations. The optimal cut-off value was chosen based on the ideal sensitivity and specificity. Results: Nine patients were diagnosed as septic loosening, 17 patients aseptic loosening, 1 patient bursitis of hip joint and 1 patient suture reaction. Taking the positive results of blood flow phase or blood pool phase as standard for diagnosing septic loosening, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of bone scintigraphy were 7/9, 78.9% (15/19) and 78.6% (22/28), respectively. The AUC of blood pool phase was 0.942, and the sensitivity and specificity were 8/9 and 78.9% (15/19), respectively, with the optimal cut-off value of 1.40. The AUCs of blood flow ratio and CRP were 0.816 and 0.795, with cut-off values of 1.53 and 1.20, respectively. The AUCs of static phase ratio and ESR were 0.474 and 0.722, respectively, both P>0.05. Conclusions: For the diagnosis of septic loosening, quantitative analysis of triphasic 99 Tc m -MDP bone scintigraphy, particularly with the ratio of blood pool phase, is more accurate than qualitative analysis. (authors)

  7. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  8. Assessment of the stress transmitted to dental implants connected to screw-retained bars using different casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Klaus; Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Weiss, Claudia; Suleiman, Lubna; Wolfart, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Passive fit of the prosthetic superstructure is important to avoid complications; however, evaluation of passive fit is not possible using conventional procedures. Thus, the aim of this study was to check and locate mechanical stress in bar restorations fabricated using two casting techniques. Fifteen patients received four implants in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and a bar was fabricated using either the cast-on abutment or lost-wax casting technique. The fit accuracy was checked according to the Sheffield's test criteria. Measurements were recorded on the master model with a gap-free, passive fit using foil strain gauges both before and after tightening the prosthetic screws. Data acquisition and processing was analyzed with computer software and submitted to statistical analysis (ANOVA). The greatest axial distortion was at position 42 with the cast-on abutment technique, with a mean distortion of 450 μm/m. The lowest axial distortion occurred at position 44 with the lost-wax casting technique, with a mean distortion of 100 μm/m. The minimal differences between the means of axial distortion do not indicate any significant differences between the techniques (P = 0.2076). Analysis of the sensor axial distortion in relation to the implant position produced a significant difference (P casting techniques, with no significant difference between the sides.

  9. [Clinical application of accurate placement of lumbar pedicle screws using three-dimensional printing navigational templates under Quadrant system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuanhuang; Yu, Zhengxi; Wu, Changfu; Li, Xing; Chen, Xu; Zhang, Guodong; Zheng, Zugao; Lin, Haibin

    2017-02-01

    with preoperative ones ( t =14.842, P =0.006; t =36.927, P =0.002; t =-36.031, P =0.001). Thirty-one patients were followed up 8-24 months (mean, 18.7 months). All incision healed by first intention, and no complication occurred. During the follow-up, X-ray film and CT showed that pedicle screw was accurately placed without loosening or breakage, and with good fusion of intervertebral bone graft. 3D-printing navigational templates in Quadrant minimally invasive system can help lumbar surgery gain minimal invasion, less radiation, and accurate placement.

  10. Bipolar hip arthroplasty as salvage treatment for loosening of the acetabular cup with significant bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Revision arthroplasty of the hip is becoming increasingly important in recent years. Early primary arthroplasty and longer life expectancy of the patients increases the number of revision surgery. Revision surgery of hip arthroplasty is major surgery for the patients, especially the elderly, with significant risks concerning the general condition of the patient. The aim of this work is to evaluate the outcome of bipolar hip arthroplasty as a salvage procedure for treatment of loosening of the acetabular cup with significant acetabular bone defects after total hip replacement (THR in multi-morbid patients.Patients and methods: During the period from January 1 2007 to December 31 2011 19 revision hip surgeries were performed in , in which the loosened acetabular cup was replaced by a bipolar head. The examined patient group consisted exclusively of female patients with an average of 75 years. The predominant diagnosis was “aseptic loosening” (84.2%. All patients in our study were multi-morbid. We decided to resort to bipolar hip arthroplasty due to the compromised general condition of patients and the major acetabular bone defects, which were confirmed intraoperatively. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 67 months (average 19.1 months. Results: Evaluation of the modified Harris Hip Score showed an overall improvement of the function of the hip joint after surgery of approximately 45%.Surgery was less time consuming and thus adequate for patients with significantly poor general health condition. We noticed different complications in a significant amount of patients (68.4%. The most common complication encountered was the proximal migration of the bipolar head.The rate of revision following the use of bipolar hip arthroplasty in revision surgery of the hip in our patients was high (21%. Despite the high number of complications reported in our study, we have noticed significant improvement of hip joint function as well

  11. A comparative finite elemental analysis of glass abutment supported and unsupported cantilever fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishaniah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Elsharawy, Mohamed A; Alsaleh, Ayman K; Ismail Mohamed, Karem M; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the load distribution and displacement of cantilever prostheses with and without glass abutment by three dimensional finite element analysis. Micro-computed tomography was used to study the relationship between the glass abutment and the ridge. The external surface of the maxilla was scanned, and a simplified finite element model was constructed. The ZX-27 glass abutment and the maxillary first and second premolars were created and modified. The solid model of the three-unit cantilever fixed partial denture was scanned, and the fitting surface was modified with reference to the created abutments using the 3D CAD system. The finite element analysis was completed in ANSYS. The fit and total gap volume between the glass abutment and dental model were determined by Skyscan 1173 high-energy spiral micro-CT scan. The results of the finite element analysis in this study showed that the cantilever prosthesis supported by the glass abutment demonstrated significantly less stress on the terminal abutment and overall deformation of the prosthesis under vertical and oblique load. Micro-computed tomography determined a gap volume of 6.74162 mm(3). By contacting the mucosa, glass abutments transfer some amount of masticatory load to the residual alveolar ridge, thereby preventing damage to the periodontal microstructures of the terminal abutment. The passive contact of the glass abutment with the mucosa not only preserves the health of the mucosa covering the ridge but also permits easy cleaning. It is possible to increase the success rate of cantilever FPDs by supporting the cantilevered pontic with glass abutments. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual-worm screw compressors; Compresseurs bi-vis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleydier, J P [Bitzer France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1998-12-31

    Low power worm-screw moto-compressors are used in any king of refrigerating machineries and more and more in air conditioning systems. This paper presents the principle of dual-screw moto-compressors: worm-screw technology, role of oil (lubrication, tightness, cooling), compression, internal pressure, power reduction, lubrication, economizer, operation, model selection and accessories. (J.S.)

  13. A Novel Pedicle Screw with Mobile Connection: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Tokuhashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent adjacent disc problems after spinal fusion, a pedicle screw with a mobile junction between the head and threaded shaft was newly developed. The threaded shaft of the screw has 10 degrees mobility in all directions, but its structure is to prevent abnormal translation and tilting. This screw was evaluated as follows: (1 endurance test: 106 times rotational stress was applied; (2 biological reactions: novel screws with a mobile head and conventional screws with a fixed head were inserted into the bilateral pedicles of the L3, L4, and L5 in two mini pigs with combination. Eight months after surgery, vertebral units with the screw rod constructs were collected. After CT scan, the soft and bony tissues around the screws were examined grossly and histologically. As a result, none of the screws broke during the endurance test stressing. The mean amount of abrasion wear was 0.0338 g. In the resected mini pig section, though zygapophyseal joints between fixed-head screws showed bony union, the amount of callus in the zygapophyseal joints connected with mobile-head screws was small, and joint space was confirmed by CT. No metalloses were noted around any of the screws. Novel screws were suggested to be highly durable and histologically safe.

  14. Dual-worm screw compressors; Compresseurs bi-vis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleydier, J.P. [Bitzer France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    Low power worm-screw moto-compressors are used in any king of refrigerating machineries and more and more in air conditioning systems. This paper presents the principle of dual-screw moto-compressors: worm-screw technology, role of oil (lubrication, tightness, cooling), compression, internal pressure, power reduction, lubrication, economizer, operation, model selection and accessories. (J.S.)

  15. The effects of splinting periodontally compromised removable partial denture abutments on bone stresses: a three-dimensional finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: Splinting a very weak abutment to an adjacent healthy tooth might not be beneficial. The acceptable crown to root ratio for fixed splinting a weak abutment to an adjacent normal tooth was around 1.65-2.

  16. A novel abutment construction technique for rapid bridge construction : controlled low strength Materials (CLSM) with full-height concrete panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    One of the major obstacles facing rapid bridge construction for typical span type bridges is the time required to construct bridge abutments and foundations. This can be remedied by using the controlled low strength materials (CLSM) bridge abutment. ...

  17. Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screw and Polymethylmethacrylate-Augmented Pedicle Screw in Osteoporotic Sheep Lumbar Vertebrae: Biomechanical and Interfacial Evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Da; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Qing-yun; Wang, Cai-ru; Liu, Jin-biao; Liao, Dong-fa; Jiang, Kai; Lei, Wei; Pan, Xian-ming

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was reported that expansive pedicle screw (EPS) and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw (PMMA-PS) could be used to increase screw stability in osteoporosis. However, there are no studies comparing the two kinds of screws in vivo. Thus, we aimed to compare biomechanical and interfacial performances of EPS and PMMA-PS in osteoporotic sheep spine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After successful induction of osteoporotic sheep, lumbar vertebrae in each sheep were random...

  18. Percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation: salvage of failed percutaneous odontoid screw fixation for odontoid fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ai-Min; Jin, Hai-Ming; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Chi, Yong-Long; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate the outcomes and safety of using percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation as a salvage technique for odontoid fracture if percutaneous odontoid screw fixation fails. Methods Fifteen in 108 odontoid fracture patients (planned to be treated by percutaneous anterior odontoid screw fixation) were failed to introduce satisfactory odontoid screw trajectory. To salvage this problem, we chose the percutaneous anterior C1/2 trans...

  19. Antibacterial effect of doxycycline-coated dental abutment surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Rui; Tiainen, Hanna; Shabestari, Maziar; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Haugen, Håvard J; Witsø, Ingun L; Lönn-Stensrud, Jessica; Jugowiec, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation on dental abutment may lead to peri-implant mucositis and subsequent peri-implantitis. These cases are clinically treated with antibiotics such as doxycycline (Doxy). Here we used an electrochemical method of cathodic polarization to coat Doxy onto the outer surface of a dental abutment material. The Doxy-coated surface showed a burst release in phosphate-buffered saline during the first 24 h. However, a significant amount of Doxy remained on the surface for at least 2 weeks especially on a 5 mA–3 h sample with a higher Doxy amount, suggesting both an initial and a long-term bacteriostatic potential of the coated surface. Surface chemistry was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Surface topography was evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and blue-light profilometry. Longer polarization time from 1 h to 5 h and higher current density from 1 to 15 mA cm −2 resulted in a higher amount of Doxy on the surface. The surface was covered by a layer of Doxy less than 100 nm without significant changes in surface topography. The antibacterial property of the Doxy-coated surface was analyzed by biofilm and planktonic growth assays using Staphylococcus epidermidis. Doxy-coated samples reduced both biofilm accumulation and planktonic growth in broth culture, and also inhibited bacterial growth on agar plates. The antibacterial effect was stronger for samples of 5 mA–3 h coated with a higher amount of Doxy compared to that of 1 mA–1 h. Accordingly, an abutment surface coated with Doxy has potential for preventing bacterial colonization when exposed to the oral cavity. Doxy-coating could be a viable way to control peri-implant mucositis and prevent its progression into peri-implantitis. (paper)

  20. Stereo-radiographic analysis of loosening processes of alloplastic hip joint replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probst, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-aided diagnostic system has been developed by which implant dislocation of an order of 0.2 mm can be detected in all three dimensions. The diagnostic system is based on a point-by-point evaluation of stereoradiographic pictures; precise localisation of the implant relative to its place of insertion is made possible by special mathematical operations which are discussed in detail in the methodical part of the book. The method has been tested in clinical practice in 351 cases (208 patients) in the period between September 1, 1977, and May 31, 1979. By taking functional pictures during adduction and abduction of the extremity carrying the endoprosthesis and then evaluating these pictures, the diagnostic system can detect dislocations of the endoprosthesis inside the bone at a given moment. Also, the fate of hip joints with endoprostheses can be followed in the framework of longitudinal research. The method described here may also help to solve other problems of clinical relevance. The only precondition for this is the imaging of the structures of interest in the X-ray picture. A program to analyze loosening processes of alloplastic knee joint implants is new being worked on which will be of great use to the increasing number of patients with alloplastic knee joint implants. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Squatting-Related Tibiofemoral Shear Reaction Forces and a Biomechanical Rationale for Femoral Component Loosening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin Thambyah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous gait studies on squatting have described a rapid reversal in the direction of the tibiofemoral joint shear reaction force when going into a full weight-bearing deep knee flexion squat. The effects of such a shear reversal have not been considered with regard to the loading demand on knee implants in patients whose activities of daily living require frequent squatting. In this paper, the shear reversal effect is discussed and simulated in a finite element knee implant-bone model, to evaluate the possible biomechanical significance of this effect on femoral component loosening of high flexion implants as reported in the literature. The analysis shows that one of the effects of the shear reversal was a switch between large compressive and large tensile principal strains, from knee extension to flexion, respectively, in the region of the anterior flange of the femoral component. Together with the known material limits of cement and bone, this large mismatch in strains as a function of knee position provides new insight into how and why knee implants may fail in patients who perform frequent squatting.

  2. Surgical treatment of isolated aseptic acetabular loosening of the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvereva К.Р.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aseptic acetabular loosening is one of the most common complications of primary hip arthroplasty Its treatment is possible in the volume of replacement of only the endoprosthesis cup with the preservation of a stable correctly oriented femoral component. The sequence of actions consists of provision of access to the acetabulum component and its replacement, after which the necessary offset is selected by changing the size of the head and installing a new pair of friction. Currently, the vast majority of the installed heads during the primary and revision hip replacement have a standard size forthe cone of the femoral component 12/14mm. According to the observations, in 3% of cases, there are femoral components with non-standard cone sizes 11/13 mm, usually established 7-8 years ago. The absence of heads forthe necessary cone leads to the need to replace the stable correctly oriented femoral component, which is accompanied by an increase in the time of intervention, the volume of intraoperative blood loss and the risk of intraopera-tive peri-prosthetic fracture. We represent the clinical case of a 75-year-old patient with a dislocation of the acetabular component and a stable correctly oriented femoral component, which during the audit intervention due to the lack of heads for an irregular cone size, total replacement of the components was made.

  3. Study of displacements of a bridge abutment using FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymysłowski Michał

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Steel sheet piles are often used to support excavations for bridge foundations. When they are left in place in the permanent works, they have the potential to increase foundation bearing capacity and reduce displacements; but their presence is not usually taken into account in foundation design. In this article, the results of finite element analysis of a typical abutment foundation, with and without cover of sheet piles, are presented to demonstrate these effects. The structure described is located over the Więceminka river in the town of Kołobrzeg, Poland. It is a single-span road bridge with reinforced concrete slab.

  4. Study of displacements of a bridge abutment using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymysłowski, Michał; Kurałowicz, Zygmunt

    2016-06-01

    Steel sheet piles are often used to support excavations for bridge foundations. When they are left in place in the permanent works, they have the potential to increase foundation bearing capacity and reduce displacements; but their presence is not usually taken into account in foundation design. In this article, the results of finite element analysis of a typical abutment foundation, with and without cover of sheet piles, are presented to demonstrate these effects. The structure described is located over the Więceminka river in the town of Kołobrzeg, Poland. It is a single-span road bridge with reinforced concrete slab.

  5. Mechanical resistance of zirconium implant abutments: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of aesthetic demands, together with the successful outcome of current implants, has renewed interest in the search for new materials with enough mechanical properties and better aesthetic qualities than the materials customarily used in implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Among these materials, zirconium has been used in different types of implants, including prosthetic abutments. The aim of the present review is to analyse current scientific evidence supporting the use of this material for the above mentioned purposes. We carried out the review of the literature published in the last ten years (2000 through 2010) of in vitro trials of dynamic and static loading of zirconium abutments found in the databases of Medline and Cochrane using the key words zirconium abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. Although we have found a wide variability of values among the different studies, abutments show favourable clinical behaviour for the rehabilitation of single implants in the anterior area. Such variability may be explained by the difficulty to simulate daily mastication under in vitro conditions. The clinical evidence, as found in our study, does not recommend the use of implanto-prosthetic zirconium abutments in the molar area. Key words: Zirconium abutment, zirconium implant abutment, zirconia abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. PMID:22143702

  6. Soft tissue response to zirconia and titanium implant abutments : an in vivo within-subject comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brakel, Ralph; Meijer, Gert J.; Verhoeven, Jan Willem; Jansen, John; de Putter, Cornelis; Cune, Marco S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To compare the health of the soft tissues towards zirconia and titanium abutments in man, as observed using histological data. Material and Methods Twenty patients received two mandibular implants with either a zirconia or titanium abutment (split mouth study design, left-right randomization).

  7. Fitting of an 8.5-millimeter abutment for bone conduction devices: indications and postintervention course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dun, C.A.J.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We present indications and clinical outcomes of fitting an 8.5-mm abutment for bone conduction devices. METHODS: In 39 cases with a follow-up time of more than 12 months after fitting of an 8.5-mm abutment, the preintervention and postintervention courses were retrospectively evaluated.

  8. Soft tissue response to zirconia and titanium implant abutments: an in vivo within-subject comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakel, R. van; Meijer, G.J.; Verhoeven, J.W.; Jansen, J.A.; Putter, C. de; Cune, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the health of the soft tissues towards zirconia and titanium abutments in man, as observed using histological data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients received two mandibular implants with either a zirconia or titanium abutment (split mouth study design, left-right randomization).

  9. The upper bound of abutment scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of abutment scour with the larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published abutment-scour data, and selected data, consisting of 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements, were compiled for the analysis. These data encompassed a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 6 states within the United States. The data set was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment-scour envelope curves. Additionally, the data were used to evaluate a dimensionless abutment-scour envelope curve developed by Melville (1992), highlighting the distinct difference in the upper bound for laboratory and field data. The envelope curves evaluated in this investigation provide simple but useful tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment-scour depth in the field setting.

  10. Abutment-to-fixture load transfer and peri-implant bone stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, R.F.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To uncover design principles for the abutment-fixture complex that reduce the stress concentration on the bone. Methods: A 3-dimensional finite element model was used to vary shape, elasticity, and connectivity of the abutment-fixture complex. We compared peri-implant bone stress of these

  11. A phenomenological study on twin screw extruders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1976-01-01

    Although more and more twin screw extruders are being used in the polymer industry, the theoretical background is relatively undeveloped. The literature abounds in contradictions and often informs the reader that all extrusion problems can be solved if a certain new design is considered. The

  12. Sacroiliac screw fixation for tile B fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, E.W. van den; Zwienen, C.M. van; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this comparative cadaveric study was to investigate whether the stability of partially unstable pelvic fractures can be improved by combining plate fixation of the symphysis with a posterior sacroiliac screw. METHODS: In six specimens, a Tile B1 (open-book) pelvic fracture

  13. Fracture Strength and Failure Mode of Maxillary Implant-Supported Provisional Single Crowns : A Comparison of Composite Resin Crowns Fabricated Directly Over PEEK Abutments and Solid Titanium Abutments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, H.J.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Ozcan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. Purpose: The objectives of this

  14. Comparison Study of Percutaneous Osseointegrated Bone Conduction Device Complications When Using the 9 mm Abutment Versus 6 mm Abutment at Initial Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sean R; LaRouere, Jacqueline S; Bojrab, Dennis I; LaRouere, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    To assess differences in the incidence, type, and management of complications encountered with implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices when using a 9 mm abutment versus 6 mm abutment at initial implantation. Retrospective cohort study. One hundred thirty consecutive patients between January 2010 and December 2011 underwent single-stage percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction device implantation using a 9 or 6 mm abutment. Clinical outcomes assessed for the two groups included the incidence, type, and management of postoperative complications. Abutment size, age, sex, indication for surgery, implant device type, duration of follow-up, and patient comorbidities were evaluated as potential factors affecting outcomes. Average duration of follow-up was 16 months (range 6-29 mo). Postoperative complications occurred in 38 (29.2%) patients. Twenty-four (18.4%) patients experienced minor complications requiring simple, local care; eight (6.1%) patients required in-office procedural intervention; and six (4.6%) patients required revision surgery in the operating room. Implant extrusion occurred in three (2.3%) patients. Eleven (8.5%) patients required placement of a longer abutment. Patients receiving the 6 mm abutment at initial surgery were significantly more likely to encounter a complication requiring in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery (p = 0.001). Minor complications after implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices are common. The vast majority of these complications are due to localized skin reactions, most of which are readily addressed through local care. Patients receiving the 9 mm abutment during initial implantation are significantly less likely to require in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery postoperatively as compared with those receiving the shorter, 6 mm abutment.

  15. [A computer aided design approach of all-ceramics abutment for maxilla central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-chun; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Wang, Yong; Han, Jing-yun; Lin, Ye; Lü, Pei-jun

    2010-10-01

    To establish the computer aided design (CAD) software platform of individualized abutment for the maxilla central incisor. Three-dimentional data of the incisor was collected by scanning and geometric transformation. Data mainly included the occlusal part of the healing abutment, the location carinae of the bedpiece, the occlusal 1/3 part of the artificial gingiva's inner surface, and so on. The all-ceramic crown designed in advanced was "virtual cutback" to get the original data of the abutment's supragingival part. The abutment's in-gum part was designed to simulate the individual natural tooth root. The functions such as "data offset", "bi-rail sweep surface" and "loft surface" were used in the process of CAD. The CAD route of the individualized all-ceramic abutment was set up. The functions and application methods were decided and the complete CAD process was realized. The software platform was basically set up according to the requests of the dental clinic.

  16. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkut, Ahmad; Abu-Hammad, Osama; Frazer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations. PMID:29563457

  17. Evaluation of Maryland abutment scour equation through selected threshold velocity methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Maryland State Highway Administration, used field measurements of scour to evaluate the sensitivity of the Maryland abutment scour equation to the critical (or threshold) velocity variable. Four selected methods for estimating threshold velocity were applied to the Maryland abutment scour equation, and the predicted scour to the field measurements were compared. Results indicated that performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation was sensitive to the threshold velocity with some threshold velocity methods producing better estimates of predicted scour than did others. In addition, results indicated that regional stream characteristics can affect the performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation with moderate-gradient streams performing differently from low-gradient streams. On the basis of the findings of the investigation, guidance for selecting threshold velocity methods for application to the Maryland abutment scour equation are provided, and limitations are noted.

  18. A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Kutkut

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations.

  19. Abutment Material Effect on Peri-implant Soft Tissue Color and Perceived Esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Campbell, Stephen D; Viana, Marlos A G; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant abutment material on peri-implant soft tissue color using intraoral spectrophotometric analysis and to compare the clinical outcomes with patient and clinician perception and satisfaction. Thirty patients and four prosthodontic faculty members participated. Abutments were zirconia, gold-hued titanium, and titanium. Peri-implant mucosa color of a single anterior implant restoration was compared to the patient's control tooth. Spectrophotometric analysis using SpectroShade TM Micro data determined the color difference (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*) between the midfacial peri-implant soft tissue for each abutment material and the marginal gingiva of the control tooth. Color difference values of the abutment groups were compared using ANOVA (α = 0.05). Patient and clinician satisfaction surveys were also conducted using a color-correcting light source. The results of each patient and clinician survey question were compared using chi-square analysis (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation analyses identified the relationship between the total color difference (ΔE) and the patient/clinician perception and satisfaction, as well as between ΔE and tissue thickness. Zirconia abutments displayed significantly smaller spectrophotometric gingival color difference (ΔE) compared to titanium and gold-hued titanium abutments (respectively, 3.98 ± 0.99; 7.22 ± 3.31; 5.65 ± 2.11; p abutment materials, and no correlation between ΔE and the patient and clinician satisfaction. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher than clinician, and patient-perceived differences were lower than clinicians' (p abutments demonstrated significantly lower mean color difference compared to titanium or gold-hued titanium abutments as measured spectrophotometrically; however, no statistical difference in patient or clinician perception/satisfaction among abutment materials was demonstrated. Patients were significantly more satisfied than

  20. Histological evaluations and inflammatory responses of different dental implant abutment materials: A human histology pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampatanukul, Teeratida; Serichetaphongse, Pravej; Pimkhaokham, Atiphan

    2018-04-01

    Improvements of soft tissue to the abutment surface results in more stable peri-implant conditions, however, few human histological studies have compared soft tissue responses around different abutment materials. To describe the peri-implant tissue around 3 abutment materials; titanium, zirconia, and gold alloy, over an 8-week healing period. Fifteen edentulous sites were treated with implants. Eight weeks later, peri-implant tissue was harvested and processed using a nonseparation resin embedded technique. The tissue attachment characteristics were assessed at clinical stages using the gingival index (GI) score, surgical stage (surgical score), and histological stage (histological attachment percentage). Additionally, the inflammatory responses were evaluated using inflammatory extent and inflammatory cellularity grades. Nonparametrical statistics were used to describe the GI and surgical scores, and analytical statistics were used to analyze the histological attachment percentages as well as the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades amongst the 3 groups. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups for GI score (P = .071) and surgical score (P = .262). Titanium and zirconia exhibited nearly similar mean histological attachment percentages while gold alloy had a significantly lower percentage (P = .004). For the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades, the odds of being one grade higher for gold alloy abutment was 5.18 and 17.8 times that of titanium abutment, respectively. However, for the zirconia abutment, the odds were 0.87 and 7.5 times higher than the titanium group. The tissue around the gold alloy abutments resulted in worse attachment conditions compared with the titanium and zirconia abutments. Inflammation tended to be higher in the tissue around the gold alloy abutments than the titanium and zirconia abutments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Accuracy of computer-assisted cervicle pedicle screw installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honglei; Zhou Dongsheng; Jang Zhensong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy of computer-assisted cervical pedicle screw installation and the reason of screw malposition. Methods: A total of 172 cervical pedicle screws were installed by computer-assisted navigation for 30 patients with lower cervical spinal diseases. All the patients were examined by X-ray and CT after operation. Screw's position and direction were measured on the sagittal and transectional images of intraoperative navigation and post-operative CT. Then linear regression analysis was taken between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Results: Two screws perforated the upper pedicle wall, 3 perforated the lateral pedicle wall.There was a positive linear correlation between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Conclusion: Computer-assisted navigation can provide the high accuracy of cervical pedicle screw installation and excursion phenomenon is reason of screw malposition. (authors)

  2. A Nearly Lethal Screw: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Bradycardia and Asystole Episodes after Fixation of the Cervical Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Frenkel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 51-year-old man who was injured in a bicycle accident. His main injury was an unstable fracture of the cervical and thoracic vertebral column. Several hours after his arrival to the hospital the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of the cervical and thoracic spine. The patient was hospitalized in our critical care unit for 99 days. During this time patient had several episodes of severe bradycardia and asystole; some were short with spontaneous return to sinus and some required pharmacological treatment and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Initially, these episodes were attributed to the high cervical spine injury, but, later on, CT scan suggested that a fixation screw abutted on the esophagus and activated the vagus nerve by direct pressure. After repositioning of the cervical fixation, the bradycardia and asystole episodes were no longer observed and the patient was released to a rehabilitation ward. This case is presented in order to alert practitioners to the possibility that, after operative fixation of cervical spine injuries, recurrent episodes of bradyarrhythmia can be caused by incorrect placement of the fixation screws and might be confused with the natural history of the high cervical cord injury.

  3. Uncertainty Instability Risk Analysis of High Concrete Arch Dam Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties associated with concrete arch dams rise with the increased height of dams. Given the uncertainties associated with influencing factors, the stability of high arch dam abutments as a fuzzy random event was studied. In addition, given the randomness and fuzziness of calculation parameters as well as the failure criterion, hazard point and hazard surface uncertainty instability risk ratio models were proposed for high arch dam abutments on the basis of credibility theory. The uncertainty instability failure criterion was derived through the analysis of the progressive instability failure process on the basis of Shannon’s entropy theory. The uncertainties associated with influencing factors were quantized by probability or possibility distribution assignments. Gaussian random theory was used to generate random realizations for influence factors with spatial variability. The uncertainty stability analysis method was proposed by combining the finite element analysis and the limit equilibrium method. The instability risk ratio was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method and fuzzy random postprocessing. Results corroborate that the modeling approach is sound and that the calculation method is feasible.

  4. Determining the degree of break up of coal strata and clay interlayers by looseners at the Chukurovo pit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, A B; Stoyanov, D S; Yordanov, Y M

    1983-01-01

    One of the rational technologies for selective mining of thin coal strata with complex geological structure is that one in which different types of mechanical looseners are used. Identification of the degree of break up of the rock is accomplished most rapidly and precisely using seismoacoustical methods. The evaluation is conducted relative to the speed of propagation of elastic waves in the mass. SVM seismic receivers were used at the Chukurovo pit to determine the speed of propagation of an elastic wave in coals and clays. Shafts 10 meters long were drilled in three experimental fields using the SVB-2 machine. The speed of propagation of an elastic wave in the coals and in sandy clays was determined for different shaft depths every meter. After comparing the obtained results with standard tables from different companies, the possibility of breaking up the coal and clay interlayers in the experimental sectors by looseners with motors different in type and capacity was determined.

  5. Are We Underestimating the Significance of Pedicle Screw Misplacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwahi, Vishal; Wendolowski, Stephen F; Gecelter, Rachel C; Amaral, Terry; Lo, Yungtai; Wollowick, Adam L; Thornhill, Beverly

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective review of charts, x-rays (XRs) and computed tomography (CT) scans was performed. To evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a novel classification system to determine potentially significant screw misplacement. The accuracy rate of pedicle screw (PS) placement varies from 85% to 95% in the literature. This demonstrates technical ability but does not represent the impact of screw misplacement on individual patients. This study quantifies the rate of screw misplacement on a per-patient basis to highlight its effect on potential morbidity. A retrospective review of charts, XRs and low-dose CT scans of 127 patients who underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screws for spinal deformity was performed. Screws were divided into four categories: screws at risk (SAR), indeterminate misplacements (IMP), benign misplacements (BMP), accurately placed (AP). A total of 2724 screws were placed in 127 patients. A total of 2396 screws were placed accurately (87.96%). A total of 247 screws (9.07%) were BMP, 52 (1.91%) were IMP, and 29 (1.06%) were considered SAR. Per-patient analysis showed 23 (18.11%) of patients had all screws AP. Thirty-five (27.56%) had IMP and 18 (14.17%) had SAR. Risk factor analysis showed smaller Cobb angles increased likelihood of all screws being AP. Sub-analysis of adolescent idiopathic scoliotic patients showed no curve or patient characteristic that correlated with IMP or SAR. Over 40% of patients had screws with either some/major concern. Overall reported screw misplacement is low, but it does not reflect the potential impact on patient morbidity. Per-patient analysis reveals more concerning numbers toward screw misplacement. With increasing pedicle screw usage, the number of patients with misplaced screws will likely increase proportionally. Better strategies need to be devised for evaluation of screw placement, including establishment of a national database of deformity surgery, use of intra-operative image guidance, and

  6. Radionuclide arthrogram with SPECT/CT for the evaluation of mechanical loosening of hip and knee prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, C.G.; Lewis, P.; Middleton, F.; Wijngaard, R. van den; Deshaies, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Objective of this study was to evaluate the value of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT in radionuclide arthrogram (RNA) for the assessment of mechanical loosening of hip and knee prostheses. A retrospective audit of 117 RNA SPECT/CTs evaluated by a single reader- 40 hips, (1 hemiarthroplasty) and 77 knees (12 unicompartmental). The detection of any radiotracer within the bone/prosthetic interface was deemed positive for loosening. The operative assessment of 29 hip and 44 knee prosthetic joints was known and used as the gold standard. A subsequent blinded reassessment of the planar images was performed and compared with the SPECT/CT results for 26 of the 29 hip and 42 of the 44 knee prostheses. The respective SPECT/CT versus planar results were as follows: hips- acetabular cup: sensitivity: 73 versus 0%; specificity: 71 versus 100%; positive predictive value: 62% versus indeterminate; negative predictive value: 80% versus 72% (p=0.0044). Hips- femoral component: sensitivity: 78 versus 63%; specificity: 90 versus 94%; positive predictive value: 78 versus 83%; negative predictive value: 90 versus 85% (p=0.2482). Knees- femoral component: sensitivity: 75 versus 17%; specificity 63 versus 97%; positive predictive value: 43 versus 67%; negative predictive value: 87 versus 74% (p=0.0001). Knees- tibial component: sensitivity: 86 versus 63%; specificity: 86 versus 76%; positive predictive value: 55 versus 38%; negative predictive value: 97 versus 90% (p=0.6831). For evaluation of mechanical loosening of the hip prosthesis SPECT/CT was significantly better than planar scanning for the acetabular cup, but not for the femoral stem. For evaluation of the knee prosthesis, a significant improvement was noted using SPECT/CT for the femoral component, and although superior results were also noted for the tibial component, statistical significance was not reached. Taking into account the limitations of this retrospective audit, the value of using RNA SPECT

  7. Association between Apoptotis and CD4+/CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Ratio in Aseptic Loosening after Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraeber, Stefan; von Knoch, Marius; Löer, Franz; Brankamp, Jochen; Tsokos, Michael; Grabellus, Florian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Totsch, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening after total joint replacement. While the osteolytic cascade initiated by cytokine release from macrophages has been studied extensively, the involvement of T-lymphocytes in this context is controversial and has been addressed by only a few authors. In a former study we detected that the quantity of T-lymphocytes may be influenced by apoptosis in patients with aseptic loosening. In this study we intended to find out more details about the apoptosis-induced shifting of the T-cell number. We focused our interest on the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and their relative ratio. Caspase-3 cleaved was evaluated immunohistochemically to detect apoptotic T-cells in capsules and interface membranes from patients with aseptic hip implant loosening and a varying degree of caspase-3 cleaved expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes was detected. Moreover, a relationship between the intensity of the apoptotic reactions and the radiological extent of osteolysis was observed. The number of CD4+ cells was decreased in the presence of strong apoptotic reactions, respectively extensive osteolysis, while CD8+ cells were affected to a much lower degree. Thus, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio changed from 1.0 in cases with only small areas of periprosthetic osteolysis and minimally intense apoptosis to 0.33 in cases with large areas of osteolysis. This may suggest a causal relationship between the apoptosis-induced shift in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio and the osteolysis respectively aseptic loosening. It is possible that these findings may lead to a new understanding of particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:19214244

  8. [Effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiaobing; Yang, Shuangshi; Cao, Haiquan; Jing, Xingquan; Yin, Jun

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults. Between January 2008 and December 2011, 32 patients with lumbar spondylolysis underwent U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting. All patients were male with an average age of 22 years (range, 19-32 years). The disease duration ranged from 3 to 24 months (mean, 14 months). L3 was involved in spondylolysis in 2 cases, L4 in 10 cases, and L5 in 20 cases. The preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores were 8.0 +/- 1.1 and 75.3 +/- 11.2, respectively. The operation time was 80-120 minutes (mean, 85 minutes), and the blood loss was 150-250 mL (mean, 210 mL). Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients without complications of infection and nerve symptom. Thirty-two patients were followed up 12-24 months (mean, 14 months). Low back pain was significantly alleviated after operation. The VAS and ODI scores at 3 months after operation were 1.0 +/- 0.5 and 17.6 +/- 3.4, respectively, showing significant differences when compared with preoperative ones (t = 30.523, P = 0.000; t = 45.312, P = 0.000). X-ray films and CT showed bone fusion in the area of isthmus defects, with the bone fusion time of 6-12 months (mean, 9 months). During follow-up, no secondary lumbar spondyloly, adjacent segment degeneration, or loosening or breaking of internal fixator was found. The U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting is a reliable treatment for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults because of a high fusion rate, minimal invasive, and maximum retention of lumbar range of motion.

  9. Clinical efficacy of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-10-01

    .05. Based on the ODI score, the excellent/fine rate was 90.6% and 92.5% for 3 months after operation and the last follow-up, respectively. During the period of following up, no loss of the correction degrees, no loosening of the screws, and 19 cases were noted bony fusion with the fusion success rate of 90.5%. Conclusion  The treatment effect of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system and intervertebral fusion for lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis is satisfied. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.12

  10. Can the Hydroxyapatite-Coated Skin-Penetrating Abutment for Bone Conduction Hearing Implants Integrate with the Surrounding Skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Marc; Wigren, Stina; Duimel, Hans; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Flynn, Mark; Stokroos, Robert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous implants, such as bone conduction hearing implants, suffer from complications that include inflammation of the surrounding skin. A sealed skin-abutment interface can prevent the ingress of bacteria, which should reduce the occurrence of peri-abutment dermatitis. It was hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated abutment in conjunction with soft tissue preservation surgery should enable integration with the adjacent skin. Previous research has confirmed that integration is never achieved with as-machined titanium abutments. Here, we investigate, in vivo, if skin integration is achievable in patients using a HA-coated abutment. One titanium abutment (control) and one HA-coated abutment (case) together with the surrounding skin were surgically retrieved from two patients who had a medical indication for this procedure. Histological sections of the skin were investigated using light microscopy. The abutment was qualitatively analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The titanium abutment only had a partial and thin layer of attached amorphous biological material. The HA-coated abutment was almost fully covered by a pronounced thick layer of organized skin, composed of different interconnected structural layers. Proof-of-principle evidence that the HA-coated abutment can achieve integration with the surrounding skin was presented for the first time.

  11. Method of Retention Control for Compromised Periodontal Bone Support Abutment of Conical Crown Retained Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Hsiang Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Conical crown-retained dentures (CCRD show a higher survival rate and greater patient satisfaction than transitional removable partial dentures during long-term follow-up. However, unsustainable denture retention force on supporting abutments after initial delivery and loss retention are frequently seen in long-term follow-up of clinical cases. The main causes are insufficient information concerning denture retention designs and the retention-tolerance of the supporting abutments. Monitoring by dental technicians of the quality of dental prostheses is critical. This case report describes an optimal method for CCRD construction that determines and distributes an optimal denture retention force on the supporting abutments to allow the patient to easily remove the denture while ensuring that the CCRD remains in place during physiologic activities. Oral rehabilitation with CCRD should consider the condition of the abutment periodontal support, the interarch occlusal relationship, supplemental fatigue of the terminal abutment, and patient's estimated bite force. The effects of friction on the abutment's inner crown were based on an optimal a angle. The dental laboratory used these measurements to fabricate a CCRD using a Koni-Meter to adjust the retention of the inner crown. This method protects the abutments and reduces the wear between the inner and outer crowns. The CCRD achieved good esthetic results and physiologic functions. Periodic long-term follow-up of the patient and CCRD after initial placement is recommended.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of abutted fields using asymmetric collimators for treatment of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Krishna, Komanduri V.; Enke, Charles A.; Hussey, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to reevaluate the dose nonuniformity of abutted fields defined using asymmetric collimators and one isocenter for treatment of the head and neck region. Methods and Materials: Bilateral parallel-opposed fields abutted to the anterior field at one isocenter were implemented in the treatment of head and neck. The effect of digital display tolerance can produce dose nonuniformity at the junction of the abutted fields. The amount of dose nonuniformity was quantified using both mathematical summation of dose profiles and by direct measurement of doses at the junction of the two abutted fields. The dose nonuniformity was obtained by irradiating the superior part of a film using bilateral parallel-opposed fields and the inferior part by an anterior field with a gap or an overlap. Dose profiles were taken at the depth of maximum dose for the anterior field across the abutted fields. The dose nonuniformity was determined for the case where the asymmetric jaw was set at -2 mm, -1 mm, 0, +1 mm, and +2 mm from the beam central axis. Results: The dose at the junction increases systematically as the abutment of the fields changes from a gap to an overlap. The dose nonuniformity with 1-mm gap and 1-mm overlap is about 15% underdose and overdose, respectively. Conclusion: Imperfect abutment of split fields due to digital display tolerance (no. +-no. 1 mm) of asymmetric collimator can cause an underdose or overdose of 15% of the delivered dose

  13. Analysis of the Generating and Influencing Factors of Vertical Cracking in Abutments during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the causes of cracking in abutments subject to concrete shrinkage and temperature variation during the construction process and to determine factors affecting the mechanical properties of the abutment, nonlinear calculations capturing abutment behavior are conducted with Midas/FEA software. Using these calculations, the cracking mechanism is identified, and the influence of the evaluated factors is analyzed. It is concluded that the deformation between the pile cap and abutment backwall as constrained by a pile foundation when subjected to concrete shrinkage and temperature changes is the basic cause of abutment cracks during construction; these cracks form over the piles and develop upward. For a given reinforcement ratio, the distribution of horizontal crack-control steel using small, closely spaced bars is more beneficial. When pile-bearing capacity meets the standard, the width of the generated cracks tends to decrease with the decrease in the diameter of the piles. The existence of a postcast strip in the abutment backwall also contributes to the decrease in the depth of the crack. Finally, the impact of age difference between the pile cap concrete and abutment backwall concrete on cracking is inconsequential.

  14. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-10-01

    The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this paper describes a practical method for chair-side fabrication of non-occlusal loaded provisional crowns used by the authors for several years successfully. Twenty two patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age, 36,72 years) with one missing anterior tooth were treated by using the presented method. Metal definitive abutments instead of provisional abutments were used and provisional crowns were fabricated on the definitive abutments for all of the patients. The marginal fit was finished on a laboratory analogue and temporarily cemented to the abutments. The marginal adaptation of the crowns was evaluated radiographically. The patients were all satisfied with the final appearance and no complications occurred until the implants were loaded with permanent restorations. The use of the definitive abutments for provisional crowns instead of provisional abutments reduces the costs and the same results can be obtained.

  15. Mechanical instability and titanium particles induce similar transcriptomic changes in a rat model for periprosthetic osteolysis and aseptic loosening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Amirhosseini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wear debris particles released from prosthetic bearing surfaces and mechanical instability of implants are two main causes of periprosthetic osteolysis. While particle-induced loosening has been studied extensively, mechanisms through which mechanical factors lead to implant loosening have been less investigated. This study compares the transcriptional profiles associated with osteolysis in a rat model for aseptic loosening, induced by either mechanical instability or titanium particles. Rats were exposed to mechanical instability or titanium particles. After 15 min, 3, 48 or 120 h from start of the stimulation, gene expression changes in periprosthetic bone tissue was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray data were analyzed by PANTHER Gene List Analysis tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. Both types of osteolytic stimulation led to gene regulation in comparison to unstimulated controls after 3, 48 or 120 h. However, when mechanical instability was compared to titanium particles, no gene showed a statistically significant difference (fold change ≥ ±1.5 and adjusted p-value ≤ 0.05 at any time point. There was a remarkable similarity in numbers and functional classification of regulated genes. Pathway analysis showed several inflammatory pathways activated by both stimuli, including Acute Phase Response signaling, IL-6 signaling and Oncostatin M signaling. Quantitative PCR confirmed the changes in expression of key genes involved in osteolysis observed by global transcriptomics. Inflammatory mediators including interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL2, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (Ptgs2 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF showed strong upregulation, as assessed by both microarray and qPCR. By investigating genome-wide expression changes we show that, despite the different nature of mechanical implant instability and titanium particles, osteolysis seems to be induced through similar biological

  16. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, Miquela S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brake, Matthew Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vangoethem, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  17. Chirality-controlled crystallization via screw dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Baeckkyoung; de la Cotte, Alexis; Grelet, Eric

    2018-04-11

    Chirality plays an important role in science from enantiomeric separation in chemistry to chiral plasmonics in nanotechnology. However, the understanding of chirality amplification from chiral building blocks to ordered helical superstructures remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that topological defects, such as screw dislocations, can drive the chirality transfer from particle to supramolecular structure level during the crystallization process. By using a model system of chiral particles, which enables direct imaging of single particle incorporation into growing crystals, we show that the crystallization kinetic pathway is the key parameter for monitoring, via the defects, the chirality amplification of the crystalline structures from racemic to predominantly homohelical. We provide an explanation based on the interplay between geometrical frustration, racemization induced by thermal fluctuations, and particle chirality. Our results demonstrate that screw dislocations not only promote the growth, but also control the chiral morphology and therefore the functionality of crystalline states.

  18. Evaluation of Bond Strength between Grooved Titanium Alloy Implant Abutments and Provisional Veneering Materials after Surface Treatment of the Abutments: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Gowtham; Krishnan, Murugesan; Srinivasan, Suganya; Balasubramanian, Muthukumar

    2017-01-01

    Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell-Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc test. The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this study confirmed that a combination of surface treatments and bond agents enhances the

  19. Influence of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic crown systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Armağanci, Arzu; Ceylan, Gözlem; Celik, Ersan; Cankaya, Soner; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-11-01

    Ceramics are widely used for anterior restorations; however, clinical color reproduction still constitutes a challenge particularly when the ceramic crowns are used on titanium implant abutments. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic material systems. Forty disks (11×1.5 mm, shade A2) were fabricated from medium-opacity (mo) and high-translucency (ht) lithium disilicate (IPS e.max) blocks, an aluminous ceramic (VITA In-Ceram Alumina), and a zirconia (Zirkonzahn) ceramic system. Disks were fabricated to represent 3 different implant abutments (zirconia, gold-palladium, and titanium) and dentin (composite resin, A2 shade) as background (11×2 mm). Disk-shaped composite resin specimens in A2 shade were fabricated to represent the cement layer. The color measurements of ceramic specimens were made on composite resin abutment materials using a spectrophotometer. CIELab color coordinates were recorded, and the color coordinates measured on composite resin background served as the control group. Color differences (ΔE 00 ) between the control and test groups were calculated. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and compared with the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The ceramics system, abutment material, and their interaction were significant for ΔE 00 values (P2.25) were observed for lithium disilicate ceramics on titanium abutments (2.46-2.50). The ΔE 00 values of lithium disilicate ceramics for gold-palladium and titanium abutments were significantly higher than for other groups (P2.25) of an implant-supported lithium disilicate ceramic restoration may be clinically unacceptable if it is fabricated over a titanium abutment. Zirconia may be a more suitable abutment material for implant-supported ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calculating Characteristics of the Screws with Constant And Variable Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to creating a technique for calculating power characteristics of the screws with constant and variable step for the centrifugal pumps. The technique feature is that the reverse currents, which are observed in screws working at low flow, are numerically taken into account. The paper presents a diagram of the stream in the screw with flow to the network Q=0, and the static pressure of the screw in this mode is computed according to reverse current parameters. Maximum flow of screw is determined from the known formulas. When calculating the power characteristics and computing the overall efficiency of the screw, for the first time a volumetric efficiency of the screw is introduced. It is defined as a ratio between the flow into the network and the sum of the reverse current flows and a flow into the network. This approach allowed us to determine the efficiency of the screw over the entire range of flows.A comparison of experimental characteristics of the constant step screw with those of calculated by the proposed technique shows their good agreement.The technique is also used in calculating characteristics of the variable step screws. The variable step screw is considered as a screw consisting of two screws with a smooth transition of the blades from the inlet to the outlet. Screws in which the step at the inlet is less than that of at the outlet as well as screws with the step at the inlet being more than that of at the outlet were investigated. It is shown that a pressure of the screw with zero step and the value of the reverse currents depend only on the parameters of the input section of the screw, and the maximum flow, if the step at the inlet is more than the step at the outlet, is determined by the parameters of the output part of the screw. Otherwise, the maximum flow is determined a little bit differently.The paper compares experimental characteristics with characteristics calculated by the technique for variable step

  1. Energy saving screw compressor technology; Energiebesparende schroefcompressortechnologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, A. [RefComp, Lonigo (Italy); Neus, M. [Delta Technics Engineering, Breda (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    Smart solutions to reduce the energy consumption are continuously part of investigation in the refrigeration technology. This article subscribed the technology on which way energy can be saved at the operation of screw compressors which are used in air conditioners and refrigerating machinery. The combination of frequency control and Vi-control (intrinsic volumetric ratio) such as researched in the laboratory of RefComp is for the user attractive because the energy efficiency during part load operation is much better. Smart uses of thermodynamics, electric technology and electronic control are the basics of these applications. According to the manufacturer's information it is possible with these new generation screw compressors to save approx. 26% energy in comparison with the standard screw compressor. [Dutch] In dit artikel wordt de technologie omschreven waarmee veel energie bespaard kan worden bij schroefcompressoren die worden gebruikt in airconditioningsystemen en koel- en vriesinstallaties. De combinatie van frequentieregeling en Vi- regeling (Vi is de intrinsieke volumetrische verhouding) zoals onderzocht in het laboratorium van RefComp biedt de gebruiker veel voordelen doordat de energie-efficintie van de compressor tijdens deellast enorm wordt verbeterd. Slim gebruik van thermodynamika, elektrotechniek en elektronica vormen de basis van deze toepassing. Volgens de fabrikant kan met deze nieuwe generatie schroefcompressoren circa 26 procent op het energiegebruik tijdens deellast worden bespaard in vergelijking met de standaard serie schroefcompressoren.

  2. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  3. Assessment of the NCHRP abutment scour prediction equations with laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in coopeation with nthe National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) is assessing the performance of several abutment-scour predcition equations developed in NCHRP Project 24-15(2) and NCHRP Project 24-20. To accomplish this assssment, 516 laboratory and 329 fiels measurements of abutment scor were complied from selected sources and applied tto the new equations. Results will be used to identify stregths, weaknesses, and limitations of the NCHRP abutment scour equations, providing practical insights for applying the equations. This paper presents some prelimiray findings from the investigation.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of Individual All-Ceramic Abutments Used in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziębowicz B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of finite element analysis and experimental testing under simulated physiological loading conditions on issues shaping the functional properties of individual all-ceramic abutments manufactured by CAD/CAM technology. The conducted research have cognitive significance showing the all-ceramic abutment behavior, as a key element of the implantological system, under the action of cyclic load. The aim of this study was evaluation the fatigue behavior of yttria-stabilized zirconia abutment submitted to cyclic stresses, conducted in accordance with EN ISO 14801 applies to dynamic fatigue tests of endosseous dental implants.

  5. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshagh Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. Materials and Methods : A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel. In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Results : Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds for every 4 mm of expansion. Conclusion : In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  6. In vitro analysis of post-fatigue reverse-torque values at the dental abutment/implant interface for a unitarian abutment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Paul M; Schneider, Robert L; Schneider, Galen B; Stanford, Clark M; Clancy, James M; Qian, Fang

    2011-10-01

    This study analyzed baseline and post-fatigue reverse-torque values (RTVs) for a specific brand control abutment relative to a third party compatible abutment. The purpose of this study was to compare the abutments' fatigue resistance to simulated function, using RTVs as an indication of residual preload at the implant/abutment interface. Forty Straumann tissue-level implants were mounted in resin and divided into four groups (n = 10). Forty abutments were seated, 20 control and 20 third-party abutments, according to manufacturer guidelines. Ten abutments from each manufacturer were evaluated for RTV without fatigue loading, using a calibrated digital torque gauge to provide a baseline RTVs. Fatigue loading was carried out on the remaining ten specimens from each manufacturer according to ISO 14801 guidelines. A moving-magnet linear motor was used to load one specimen per sequence, alternating from 10 to 200 N at 15 Hz for 5×10(6) cycles. RTV was recorded post-fatigue loading. The results were subjected to two-sample t-testing and two-way ANOVA. Scanning electron microphotography was carried out on three specimens from both manufacturers at baseline and post-fatigue cycling to visualize thread geometry and the abutment/implant interface. The data indicated that mean post-fatigue RTV observed for the control group was significantly higher than the third-party group (RTV 42.65 ± 6.70 N vs. 36.25 ± 2.63 N, p= 0.0161). Visual differences at the macro/microscopic level were also apparent for thread geometry, with third-party abutments demonstrating considerably greater variation in geometrical architecture than control specimens. Within the limitations of this in vitro model, the effect of component manufacturer resulted in a significantly higher RTV in the control group (two-way ANOVA, p= 0.0032) indicating greater residual preload; however, there was no significant decrease in post-fatigue RTV for either manufacturer compared to baseline. © 2011 by The American

  7. Experimental study of pedicle screw stability on low BMD vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi; Wu Yiwei; Wang Yijin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct biomechanical study of different pedicle screws stability on spinal specimen, discuss the relationship between design parameter of screw, insertion torgue and BMD, establish the theoretical foundation for application of pedicle screw on osteoporotic patients. Methods: Six fixed lumbar cadavers were collected, the effects of design parameter, insertion torque and etc on fixation stability were determined under various BMD by using biomechanical ways. Results: According to in vitro study: (1) There was a significant difference among pullout strength of all screws (P 2 >U 1 >SF 1 >SF 2 >RF. Conclusions: There is a close correlated between type of screw, BMD and stability. The U-type screw displays the best fixation effect on specimen of low BMD. (authors)

  8. Hydraulic screw fastening devices - design, maintenance, operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachner.

    1976-01-01

    With hydraulic screw fastening devices, pretension values with a maximum deviation of +-2.5% from the rated value can be achieved. This high degree of pretension accuracy is of considerable importance with regard to the safety factor required for the screw connection between reactor vessel head and reactor vessel. The operating rhythm of a nuclear power station with its refuelling art regular intervals makes further demands on the screw fastening device, in particular in connection with the transport of screws and for nuts. The necessary installations extend the screw fastening device into a combination of a high-pressure hydraulic cylinder system with an electrical or pneumoelectrical driving unit and an electrical control unit. Maintenance work is complicated by the large number of identical, highly stressed structural elements in connection with an unfavourable relation operating time/outage time. The problems have been perpetually reduced by close cooperation between the manufacturers and users of screw fastening devices. (orig./AK) [de

  9. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  10. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav, K. V.; Kovacevic, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an in...

  11. On Loosening Plastic Composite under Active Load and Its Influence on the Deformation and Strength Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Komkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing the test results of the composite, which is a mechanical mixture of metal particles with a plastic polymer binder, has shown that its deformation and strength properties are substantially different from those of stable plastic material. The specimen tests for tensile and compression with measuring transverse deformations, as well as torsion tests of tubular samples have revealed that the process of its deformation is accompanied by a change in the original structure.The composite instability is caused by the fact that during this process, it acquires considerable loosening that depends on the type of the stress-state. Hard metal particles are hardly deformed at any stress-state, but they form a layer of bonds that affect the mixture behavior under force action. The total deformation is the plastic flow of the binder on which deformation, caused both by sliding and by loss of the surface layer bonds, is superimposed.The analysis shows that with destruction at tensile test the non-linear part of the bulk deformation (dilatancy is 6 times more than "conditionally" elastic (3.5 times compressed. The objective of this work is to develop a technique for determining a dilatancy, define its influence on deformation and strength properties of the composite, and improve the mathematical model of the material. The proposed model based on the tensor-nonlinear equations describes loosening, as an additional component of the mean deformation and as a mean stress component, hereinafter referred to as: the first - by the deformation, the second – by the stress. A ratio value of the nonlinear part of deformation with the quadratic tensor argument to the linear part, which reaches 0.3, shows the need for such equations. It also shows the influence of deformation on the relationship between the deviators.To enhance capabilities of mathematical model is possible after including therein the equations for the spherical part of the tensor of deformation

  12. Process and apparatus for optimizing screwing position for closure stud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdonne, J.C.; Briand, A.

    1987-01-01

    The stud is fixed to a screwing and unscrewing device. The vertical position and alignment of the stud with the axis of the threated hole is checking. The stud is descended into the hole and rotated in the unscrewing direction. After detection of the point of engagement, the stud is rotated in the screwing direction. When a gamming is detected the descent is stopped and the screwing device is positioned in a new position. When the screwing couple returns below the disconnection couple, the stud is rotated with a reduced speed and then with a normal speed until the end [fr

  13. Accuracy of pedicle screw placement in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Xu; Qian, Bangping; Jiang, Qing; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong

    2017-03-21

    There is no study concerning safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement in Marfan syndrome. The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy and safety of pedicle screw placement in scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome. CT scanning was performed to analyze accuracy of pedicle screw placement. Pedicle perforations were classified as medial, lateral or anterior and categorized to four grades: ≤ 2 mm as Grade 1, 2.1-4.0 mm as Grade 2, 4.1-6.0 mm as Grade 3, ≥6.1 mm as Grade 4. Fully contained screws or with medial wall perforation ≤ 2 mm or with lateral wall perforation ≤ 6 mm and without injury of visceral organs were considered acceptable, otherwise were unacceptable. 976 pedicle screws were placed, 713 screws (73.1%) were fully contained within the cortical boundaries of the pedicle. 924 (94.7%) screws were considered as acceptable, and 52 (5.3%) as unacceptable. The perforation rate was higher using free-hand technique than O-arm navigation technique (30.8% VS. 11.4%, P Marfan syndrome is accuracy and safe. O-arm navigation was an effective modality to ensure the safety and accuracy of screw placement. Special attention should be paid when screws were placed at the lumber spine and the concave side of spine deformity to avoid the higher rate of complications.

  14. Thermal behavior of IDOT integral abutment bridges and proposed design modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) has increasingly constructed integral abutment bridges (IABs) : over the past few decades, similar to those in many other states. Because the length and skew limitations : currently employed by IDOT ha...

  15. Effect of the vitality of the overdenture abutment tooth on stability of the tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ahmad Omar Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It was concluded that the overdenture over vital abutment teeth was more stable, with a lower incidence of tooth mobility and less attachment loss than overdentures placed on nonvital teeth.

  16. Nonlinear load-deflection behavior of abutment backwalls with varying height and soil density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    We address the scaling of abutment wall lateral response with wall height and compaction condition through testing and analytical work. The : analytical work was undertaken to develop hyperbolic curves representing the load-deflection response of bac...

  17. Integral abutment bridge for Louisiana's soft and stiff soils : Tech summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this project, fi eld-instrumentation, monitoring, and analyzing the design and : construction of full integral abutment bridges for Louisianas fi ne sand and silty sand : deposit and clay soil conditions were conducted. Comparison of results wa...

  18. Proposal for monitoring concrete painting as a preventive maintenance tool (Abutments and pier caps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    One of the growing number of preventive bridge maintenance activities conducted by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) is washing and applying thin film protective coatings to bridge abutments and piers. Previous work conducted by Kentucky Tra...

  19. Integral abutment bridges under thermal loading : numerical simulations and parametric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have become of interest due to their decreased construction and maintenance costs in : comparison to conventional jointed bridges. Most prior IAB research was related to substructure behavior, and, as a result, most :...

  20. Soil Structure Interaction for Integral Abutment Bridge Using Spring Analogy Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanoon, W A; Abdulrazeg, A A; Jaafar, M S; Kohnehpooshi, O; Noorzaei, J

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of the backfill behind the abutments and adjacent to the piles plays a significant role in the behavior of the Integral bridge. The handling of soil-structure interaction in the analysis and design of integral abutment bridges has always been problematic due to its complexity. This study describes the implementation of a 2-D finite element model of IAB system which explicitly incorporates the soil response. The superstructure members and the pile have been represented by means of three-node isoperimetric beam elements with three degree of freedom per node. The Eight node isoperimetric quadrilateral element has been used to model the abutment. The backfill was idealized by uncoupled 'Winkler' spring. The applic1ability of this model is demonstrated by analyzing a single span IA bridge. The results have shown that the shear forces at the tops of the supported piles were only 12% to 16% of the load which at the top of abutment.

  1. Soil Structure Interaction for Integral Abutment Bridge Using Spring Analogy Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanoon, W A [Faculty Engineering, Nizwa University (Oman); Abdulrazeg, A A; Jaafar, M S; Kohnehpooshi, O [Department of Civil Engineering, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Noorzaei, J, E-mail: jamal@eng.upm.edu.my [Institute of Advance Technology, University Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The reaction of the backfill behind the abutments and adjacent to the piles plays a significant role in the behavior of the Integral bridge. The handling of soil-structure interaction in the analysis and design of integral abutment bridges has always been problematic due to its complexity. This study describes the implementation of a 2-D finite element model of IAB system which explicitly incorporates the soil response. The superstructure members and the pile have been represented by means of three-node isoperimetric beam elements with three degree of freedom per node. The Eight node isoperimetric quadrilateral element has been used to model the abutment. The backfill was idealized by uncoupled 'Winkler' spring. The applic1ability of this model is demonstrated by analyzing a single span IA bridge. The results have shown that the shear forces at the tops of the supported piles were only 12% to 16% of the load which at the top of abutment.

  2. [A study on the mechanical behaviors of abutment teeth with various coping designs under overdenture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, M S; Cho, J H

    1990-04-01

    An overdenture is a complete denture supported by both soft tissue and a few remaining natural teeth. The purpose of this study was to analyze the stress distribution of the teeth and supporting structures when various type of coping under overdenture was applied. The analysis was conducted by using the finite element method and changing the condition such as the direction of the load, the shape of coping on the abutment: The model included overdenture copings, abutment tooth and supporting structures. The results of analysis were as follows: 1. The short dome coping showed well distribution of stress. 2. The dome shaped design produced higher stress distribution than square and inclined plane design. 3. As the height of copings on the abutment was increased, the displacements increased. 4. The magnitude and direction of the abutment displacements were influenced by the direction of load application.

  3. Live-bed scour experiments with 45° wing-wall abutments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Live-bed scour experiments with 45° wing-wall abutments ... Department of Civil Engineering, Silchar Polytechnic, Silchar 788 010, India; Department of Civil ... Manuscript received: 19 December 2012; Manuscript revised: 13 November 2013 ...

  4. Thermal response of integral abutment bridges with mechanically stabilized earth walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The advantages of integral abutment bridges (IABs) include reduced maintenance costs and increased useful life spans. : However, improved procedures are necessary to account for the impacts of cyclic thermal displacements on IAB components, : includi...

  5. Evaluation of concordance between CAD/CAM and clinical positions of abutment shoulder against mucosal margin: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruski, Jan K; Skurska, Anna; Bernaczyk, Anna; Milewski, Robert; Pietruska, Maria Julia; Gehrke, Peter; Pietruska, Małgorzata D

    2018-05-02

    While working on CAD/CAM-customized abutments, the use of standard impression copings with a circular diameter produces inconsistency within the emergence profile. It may begin with a collapse of the supra-implant mucosa during impression taking, then lead to a computer-generated mismatch of the position and outline of the abutment shoulder, and consequently result in a compromised outcome of anticipated treatment. The aim of the study was to compare the virtual and clinical positions of the abutment shoulder in relation to the mucosal margin after the abutment delivery. Conventional open-tray impression takings followed uncovering surgery. Master casts were scanned with a desktop scanner. Clinical examinations took place after abutment's insertion and temporization (T1) and prior to cementation of the definitive crown (T2). The distances between the abutment shoulder and marginal soft tissue were measured intraorally in four aspects and juxtaposed with those on the virtual model. The study evaluated 257 dental implants and CAD/CAM-customized abutments. As T1 and T2 showed, there was a positive correlation between the virtually designed abutment shoulder position and matching clinical location relative to the mucosal margin. In 42.1% of cases, the distance between the mucosal margin and the abutment shoulder did not change. It increased in 36.3% of cases while a decrease occurred in 21.6% of them. Computer-set position of the abutment shoulder in relation to the mucosal margin can be predictably implemented in clinical practice.

  6. Removal Torque and Biofilm Accumulation at Two Dental Implant-Abutment Joints After Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge; Morsch, Carolina S; Henriques, Bruno; Nascimento, Rubens M; Benfatti, Cesar Am; Silva, Filipe S; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio Cm

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque and in vitro biofilm penetration at Morse taper and hexagonal implant-abutment joints after fatigue tests. Sixty dental implants were divided into two groups: (1) Morse taper and (2) external hexagon implant-abutment systems. Fatigue tests on the implant-abutment assemblies were performed at a normal force (FN) of 50 N at 1.2 Hz for 500,000 cycles in growth medium containing human saliva for 72 hours. Removal torque mean values (n = 10) were measured after fatigue tests. Abutments were then immersed in 1% protease solution in order to detach the biofilms for optical density and colony-forming unit (CFU/cm²) analyses. Groups of implant-abutment assemblies (n = 8) were cross-sectioned at 90 degrees relative to the plane of the implant-abutment joints for the microgap measurement by field-emission guns scanning electron microscopy. Mean values of removal torque on abutments were significantly lower for both Morse taper (22.1 ± 0.5 μm) and external hexagon (21.1 ± 0.7 μm) abutments after fatigue tests than those recorded without fatigue tests (respectively, 24 ± 0.5 μm and 24.8 ± 0.6 μm) in biofilm medium for 72 hours (P = .04). Mean values of microgap size for the Morse taper joints were statistically signicantly lower without fatigue tests (1.7 ± 0.4 μm) than those recorded after fatigue tests (3.2 ± 0.8 μm). Also, mean values of microgap size for external hexagon joints free of fatigue were statistically signicantly lower (1.5 ± 0.4 μm) than those recorded after fatigue tests (8.1 ± 1.7 μm) (P abutments (Abs630nm at 0.06 and 2.9 × 10⁴ CFU/cm²) than that on external hexagon abutments (Abs630nm at 0.08 and 4.5 × 10⁴ CFU/cm²) (P = .01). The mean values of removal torque, microgap size, and biofilm density recorded at Morse taper joints were lower in comparison to those recorded at external hexagon implant-abutment joints after fatigue tests in a simulated oral environment for 72 hours.

  7. Performance of conical abutment (Morse Taper) connection implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christian M; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Lai, Jim Yuan; Brito, Carlos; Döring, Hendrik; Nonhoff, Jörg

    2014-02-01

    In this systematic review, we aimed to compare conical versus nonconical implant-abutment connection systems in terms of their in vitro and in vivo performances. An electronic search was performed using PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases with the logical operators: "dental implant" AND "dental abutment" AND ("conical" OR "taper" OR "cone"). Names of the most common conical implant-abutment connection systems were used as additional key words to detect further data. The search was limited to articles published up to November 2012. Recent publications were also searched manually in order to find any relevant studies that might have been missed using the search criteria noted above. Fifty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. As the data and methods, as well as types of implants used was so heterogeneous, this mitigated against the performance of meta-analysis. In vitro studies indicated that conical and nonconical abutments showed sufficient resistance to maximal bending forces and fatigue loading. However, conical abutments showed superiority in terms of seal performance, microgap formation, torque maintenance, and abutment stability. In vivo studies (human and animal) indicated that conical and nonconical systems are comparable in terms of implant success and survival rates with less marginal bone loss around conical connection implants in most cases. This review indicates that implant systems using a conical implant-abutment connection, provides better results in terms of abutment fit, stability, and seal performance. These design features could lead to improvements over time versus nonconical connection systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Influence of Abutment Design on Clinical Status of Peri-Implant Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Taiyeb-Ali, T. B.; Toh, C. G.; Siar, C. H.; Seiz, D.; Ong, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical soft tissue responses around implant tooth-supported 3-unit bridges using tapered abutments with those using butt-joint abutments. Methods: In a split-mouth design study, 8 mm Ankylos (Dentsply Friadent, Germany) implants were placed in the second mandibular molar region of 8 adult Macaca fascicularis monkeys about I month after extraction of all mandibular molars. After 3 months of submerged healing, 3-unit metal bridges were constructed. Clinical data was ...

  9. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    /osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. "Control" samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies...... of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies....

  10. Cracking Behavior of a Concrete Arch Dam with Weak Upper Abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cracking behavior and failure mode of a 78 m high concrete double-curvature arch dam with weak upper abutment are investigated through performing cracking analysis. The mechanical behavior of concrete is simulated using a smeared crack model, in which a combination of the compression yield surface and the crack detection surface with a damaged elasticity concept is employed to describe the failure of concrete. The arch dam with practical mechanical properties of the upper and lower abutments is firstly studied with emphasis on its cracking behavior during overloading. Then, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the influence of the ratio of the mechanical properties of upper abutment to those of lower abutment on dam failure with prime attention placed on the failure mode. Simulation results indicate the adopted smeared crack model is well-suited to the crack analysis of concrete arch dam. It is shown that cracking is localized around the interface between upper and lower abutments, which leads to a fast crack growth in the through-thickness direction of dam and finally causes the dam failure. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis presents three types of failure modes corresponding to different ratio value, wherein Modes II and III should be avoided since the weak upper abutment plays a predominant role in the cracking and failure of concrete arch dam.

  11. A new system of implant abutment connection: how to improve a two piece implant system sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecchi, F; DI Girolamo, M; Cura, F; Candotto, V; Carinci, F

    2017-01-01

    Implant dentistry has become one of the most successful dentistry techniques for replacing missing teeth. The success rate of implant dentistry is above 80%. However, peri-implantitis is a later complication of implant dentistry that if untreated, can lead to implant loss. One of the hypotized causes of peri-implantis is the bacterial leakage at the level of implant-abutment connection. Bacterial leakage is favored to the presence of a micro gap at the implant-abutment interface, allowing microorganisms to penetrate and colonize the inner part of the implant leading to biofilm accumulation and consequently to peri-implantitis development. To identify the capability of the implant to protect the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified Escherichia coli across implant-abutment interface was evaluated. Implants were immerged in a bacterial culture for twenty-four hours and then bacteria amount was measured inside implant-abutment interface with Real-time PCR. Bacteria were detected inside all studied implants, with a median percentage of 9%. The reported results are better to those of previous studies carried out on different implant systems. Until now, none implant-abutment system has been proven to seal the gap between implant and abutment.

  12. Abutment height influences the effect of platform switching on peri-implant marginal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; León-Cano, Ana; Monje, Alberto; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; O'Valle, Francisco; Catena, Andrés

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to radiographically analyze and compare the marginal bone loss (MBL) between implants with different mismatching distance and to study the influence of the prosthetic abutment height on the MBL in association with the related mismatching distances. This retrospective study included 108 patients in whom 228 implants were placed, 180 with diameter of 4.5 mm and 48 with diameter of 5 mm. All patients received OsseoSpeed™ implants with internal tapered conical connection (Denstply Implants). Different mismatching distances were obtained, given that all implants were loaded with the same uni-abutment type (Lilac; Denstply Implants). Data were gathered on age, gender, bone substratum, smoking habits, previous history of periodontitis, and prosthetic features. MBL was analyzed radiographically at 6 and 18 months post-loading. Mixed linear analysis of mesial and distal MBL values yielded significant effects of abutment, implant diameter, follow-up period, bone substratum, smoking, and abutment × time interaction. MBL was greater at 18 vs. 6 months, for short vs. long abutments, for grafted vs. pristine bone, for a heavier smoking habit, and for implants with a diameter of 5.0 vs. 4.5 mm. Greater mismatching does not minimize the MBL; abutment height, smoking habit, and bone substratum may play a role in the MBL over the short- and medium term. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The effects of rock joint geometrical parameters on safety of concrete arch dam abutments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, S.; Yazdani, M.; Joorabchi, A.E. [Tarbiat Modares Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD) has stated that foundation failure is the primary cause of dam failure following overtopping. As such, concrete arch dams require strong and stiff abutments. The failure of jointed rock mass at abutments is one of the key mechanisms that may lead to uncontrolled leakage. For that reason, this study investigated the affect of the joint geometrical parameters on the stability of the concrete arch dam abutments. The study also considered the role of joints on the behaviour mechanism of rock mass because it is governed by mechanical and hydraulic properties. The orientation of joints was considered since kinematic conditions are needed for a block to move. The hydromechanical influence of joint apertures on the stability of the foundation was also investigated through nonlinear analyses of different joint orientations and apertures on a hypothetical jointed abutment. Dam abutment safety was estimated by finding the values of maximum sliding and maximum opening and determining the water flow along discontinuities. The values of these 3 indices were derived for different orientations of joints. It was concluded that abutment safety was highly dependent on the geometrical characteristics of joints. 8 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  14. Heat Generation on Implant Surface During Abutment Preparation at Different Elapsed Time Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Keraidis, Abdullah; Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Al-Tahawi, Hamdi; Hsu, Ming-Lun; Lynch, Edward; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate heat generation at the implant surface caused by abutment preparation using a diamond bur in a high-speed dental turbine in vitro at 2 different water-coolant temperatures. Thirty-two titanium-alloy abutments were connected to a titanium-alloy implant embedded in an acrylic resin placed within a water bath at a controlled temperature of 37°C. The specimens were equally distributed into 2 groups (16 each). Group 1: the temperature was maintained at 20 ± 1°C; and group 2: the temperature was maintained at 32 ± 1°C. Each abutment was prepared in the axial plane for 1 minute and in the occlusal plane for 1 minute. The temperature of the heat generated from abutment preparation was recorded and measured at 3 distinct time intervals. Water-coolant temperature (20°C vs 32°C) had a statistically significant effect on the implant's temperature change during preparation of the abutment (P water-coolant temperature of 20 ± 1°C during preparation of the implant abutment decreased the temperature recorded at the implant surface to 34.46°C, whereas the coolant temperature of 32 ± 1°C increased the implant surface temperature to 40.94°C.

  15. A novel dental implant abutment with micro-motion capability--development and biomechanical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Yin; Chen, Weng-Pin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel dental implant abutment with a micro-motion mechanism that imitates the biomechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament, with the goal of increasing the long-term survival rate of dental implants. Computer-aided design software was used to design a novel dental implant abutment with an internal resilient component with a micro-motion capability. The feasibility of the novel system was investigated via finite element analysis. Then, a prototype of the novel dental implant abutment was fabricated, and the mechanical behavior was evaluated. The results of the mechanical tests and finite element analysis confirmed that the novel dental implant abutment possessed the anticipated micro-motion capability. Furthermore, the nonlinear force-displacement behavior apparent in this micro-motion mechanism imitated the movement of a human tooth. The slope of the force-displacement curve of the novel abutment was approximately 38.5 N/mm before the 0.02-mm displacement and approximately 430 N/mm after the 0.03-mm displacement. The novel dental implant abutment with a micro-motion mechanism actually imitated the biomechanical behavior of a natural tooth and provided resilient function, sealing, a non-separation mechanism, and ease-of-use. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  17. Analysis of 18 F-FDG uptake patterns in PET for diagnosis of septic and aseptic loosening after total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremerius, U.; Niethard, F.U.; Mumme, T.; Reinartz, P.; Wirtz, D.; Buell, U.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Identification of typical patterns for fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) to detect aseptic loosening of hip prosthesis (acetabular and/or femoral component) and prosthetic infection. Methods: 18 patients with painful hip prosthesis underwent PET using a dedicated full ring scanner after application of 200-300 MBq FDG. The interface between bone and surrounding soft tissue or bone as displayed on coronal slices was divided into 12 segments in accordance with the classifications of Delee and Gruen. FDG uptake in each of the segments was scored (0-3) by two independent observers. Intraoperative findings were regarded as the gold standard. Results: After surgical revision 14 acetabular components and 9 femoral components were found to be loose and prosthetic infection was present in 7 prostheses. Loosening of the acetabular component was correlated to enhanced uptake in the middle of the acetabular interface, while loosening of the femoral component was correlated to enhanced uptake in the proximal and middle segment of the lateral femoral interface and the proximal segment of the medial femoral interface. A similar pattern was found in prosthetic infection with high uptake along the middle portion of the lateral femoral interface. In 6 of 7 infected prostheses loosening of the acetabular and of the femoral component was present. Taking the typical uptake patterns as criteria for loosening and grade 3 uptake as an additional criterion for septic loosening the accuracy of PET imaging in the detection of loosening of the acetabular or the femoral component and of prosthetic infection was 72, 78 and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot study presents FDG-PET as a promising diagnostic tool for patients with painful hip prostheses. Its clinical value should be evaluated in a larger patient population. (orig.) [de

  18. Determination of Abutment Pressure in Coal Mines with Extremely Thick Alluvium Stratum: A Typical Kind of Rockburst Mines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sitao; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Fuxing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the abutment pressure distribution in coal mines with extremely thick alluvium stratum (ETAS), which is a typical kind of mines encountering frequent intense rockbursts in China. This occurs due to poor understanding to abutment pressure distribution pattern and the consequent inappropriate mine design. In this study, a theoretical computational model of abutment pressure for ETAS longwall panels is proposed based on the analysis of load transfer mechanisms of key stratum (KS) and ETAS. The model was applied to determine the abutment pressure distribution of LW2302S in Xinjulong Coal Mine; the results of stress and microseismic monitoring verified the rationality of this model. The calculated abutment pressure of LW2302S was also used in the terminal mining line design of LW2301N for rockburst prevention, successfully protecting the main roadway from the adverse influence of the abutment pressure.

  19. Evaluation of two styles of slotted, flat-head screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, C.A. Jr.; Johnson, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed to evaluate the relative merits of two different flat-head screws fabricated from a uranium--6% niobium alloy. The screws tested were machined with both normal, straight-through slots in the head and with slots having radiused bottoms. Test results indicate that both designs easily surpass the required 20-inch-pound-proof torque

  20. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...

  1. Isolation and characterization of beta-glucan synthase: A potential biochemical regulator of gravistimulated differential cell wall loosening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    In plants, gravity stimulates differential growth in the upper and lower halves of horizontally oriented organs. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the activity of Golgi-localized Beta-1,4-glucan synthase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. The primary objective is to determine if auxin induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase and increases the level of this glucan synthase mRNA. This shall be accomplished by (a) preparation of a monoclonal antibody to the synthase, (b) isolation, and characterization of the glucan synthase, and (c) examination for cross reactivity between the antibody and translation products of auxin induced mRNAs in pea tissue. The antibody will also be used to localize the glucan synthase in upper and lower halves of pea stem tissue before, during and after the response to gravity.

  2. In vitro comparison of the biological activity of alumina ceramic and titanium particles associated with aseptic loosening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yue; Qin Chuqiang; Xu Jie; Huang Dongsheng; Fu Yuru

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic wear particles are thought to play a central role in the initiation and development of periprosthetic osteolysis, leading to aseptic loosening of prostheses. This study aimed to compare the biological activity of ceramic and titanium particles that are associated with particle-induced, aseptic joint loosening. Different sizes of alumina-ceramic particles and titanium particles were prepared to stimulate murine macrophage cells RAW 264.7, of which the expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) were measured by qPCR and ELISA at various time points. In the presence of all particles, the expression of TNF-alpha increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas the expression of RANKL showed no regular expression patterns. Notably, particles of smaller sizes provoked significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha and RANKL than those of larger sizes. Compared to the titanium particles, the ceramic particles provoked a significantly lower production of TNF-alpha. Thus, the bioactivities of titanium and alumina ceramic particles were inversely proportional to the sizes of the particles, and the expression of RANKL was not parallel to that of TNF-alpha. The successful outcome of ceramic-on-ceramic artificial joint prostheses may be attributed to the low biological activity of ceramic particles, as evidenced here. (paper)

  3. Multifactorial risk assessment for survival of abutments of removable partial dentures based on practice-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Sayaka; Ikebe, Kazunori; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the tooth survival is such a great challenge for evidence-based dentistry. To prevent further tooth loss of partially edentulous patients, estimation of individualized risk and benefit for each residual tooth is important to the clinical decision-making. While there are several reports indicating a risk of losing the abutment teeth of RPDs, there are no existing reports exploring the cause of abutment loss by multifactorial analysis. The aim of this practice-based longitudinal study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting the survival period of RPD abutments using a multifactorial risk assessment. One hundred and forty-seven patients had been previously provided with a total of 236 new RPDs at the Osaka University Dental Hospital; the 856 abutments for these RPDs were analyzed. Survival of abutment teeth was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted by Cox's proportional hazard modelling. The 5-year survival rates were 86.6% for direct abutments and 93.1% for indirect abutments, compared with 95.8% survival in non-abutment teeth. The multivariate analysis showed that abutment survival was significantly associated with crown-root ratio (hazard ratio (HR): 3.13), root canal treatment (HR: 2.93), pocket depth (HR: 2.51), type of abutments (HR: 2.19) and occlusal support (HR: 1.90). From this practice-based longitudinal study, we concluded that RPD abutment teeth are more likely to be lost than other residual teeth. From the multifactorial risk factor assessment, several prognostic factors, such as occlusal support, crown-root ratio, root canal treatment, and pocket depth were suggested. These results could be used to estimate the individualized risk for the residual teeth, to predict the prognosis of RPD abutments and to facilitate an evidence-based clinical decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of repeated manual disassembly and reassembly on the position stability of various implant-abutment complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Semper, Wiebke

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment the precision of manually repositioned abutments in five implant systems with various implant-abutment interfaces was evaluated. Material und Method Of these five implant systems (Straumann, Astra Tech, Replace Select, Camlog, SteriOss) six angled (0°, 5°, 15°) implants each were fixated in a prefabricated metal block. Three persons with differing experience and knowledge of the hypothesis placed and removed a prefabricated abutment with anti-rotational features ...

  5. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasinski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    The application of screw displacement piles (SDP) is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque) during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  6. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  7. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  8. A four lumen screwing device for multiparametric brain monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, T H; Langemann, H; Gratzl, O; Mendelowitsch, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe multiparametric monitoring in severe head trauma using a new screwing device. Our aim was to create a screw which would make the implantation of the probes and thus multiparametric monitoring easier. The new screw allows us to implant 3 probes (microdialysis, Paratrend and an intracranial pressure device) through one burr hole. The screw has four channels, the fourth being for ventricular drainage. We monitored 13 patients with severe head trauma (GCS = 3-8) for up to 7 days. Brain tissue pO2, pCO2, pH, and temperature were measured on-line with the Paratrend 7 machine. The microdialytic parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate were determined semi on-line with a CMA 600 enzymatic analyser. There were no complications in any of the patients that could be ascribed to the screw.

  9. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  10. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Abrisham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  11. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional Luting Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ganbarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  12. Undertapping of Lumbar Pedicle Screws Can Result in Tapping With a Pitch That Differs From That of the Screw, Which Decreases Screw Pullout Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Toy, Jason O; Matheis, Erika A; Bucklen, Brandon S; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-06-15

    Survey of spine surgeons and biomechanical comparison of screw pullout forces. To investigate what may be a suboptimal practice regularly occurring in spine surgery. In order for a tap to function in its intended manner, the pitch of the tap should be the same as the pitch of the screw. Undertapping has been shown to increase the pullout force of pedicle screws compared with line-to-line tapping. However, given the way current commercial lumbar pedicle screw systems are designed, undertapping may result in a tap being used that has a different pitch from that of the screw (incongruent pitch). A survey asked participants questions to estimate the proportion of cases each participant performed in the prior year using various hole preparation techniques. Participant responses were interpreted in the context of manufacturing specifications of specific instrumentation systems. Screw pullout forces were compared between undertapping with incongruent pitch and undertapping with congruent pitch using 0.16 g/cm polyurethane foam block and 6.5-mm screws. Of the 3679 cases in which participants reported tapping, participants reported line-to-line tapping in 209 cases (5%), undertapping with incongruent pitch in 1156 cases (32%), and undertapping with congruent pitch in 2314 cases (63%). The mean pullout force for undertapping with incongruent pitch was 56 N (8%) less than the mean pullout force for undertapping with congruent pitch. This is equivalent to 13 lb. This study estimates that for about 1 out of every 3 surgical cases with tapping of lumbar pedicle screws in the United States, hole preparation is being performed by undertapping with incongruent pitch. This study also shows that undertapping with incongruent pitch results in a decrease in pullout force by 8% compared with undertapping with congruent pitch. Steps should be taken to correct this suboptimal practice. 3.

  13. Evaluation of bond strength between grooved titanium alloy implant abutments and provisional veneering materials after surface treatment of the abutments: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowtham Venkat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Materials and Methods: Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell–Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman–Keuls post hoc test. Results: The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Conclusion: Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this

  14. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Hosseini Ghavam, Fereshteh; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly ( P =.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant ( P =.40). Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement.

  15. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). RESULTS The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly (P=.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant (P=.40). CONCLUSION Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement. PMID:29503708

  16. Evaluation of resilient abutment components on measured strain using dynamic loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D; Stanford, C M; Aquilino, S A

    1998-07-01

    Factors that affect transmission of strain from prostheses to bone may affect the long-term success of loaded implants. Current in vitro models are theoretically predictive (finite element modeling) or facsimile (photoelastic) in nature. A more clinically relevant in vitro model for strain evaluation should be investigated. This study attempted: (1) to validate a human cadaver bone model for vitro measurement of cortical bone strain, and (2) to evaluate the effect on cortical strain measurements of a resilient plastic component incorporated within a titanium implant in response to variable dynamic loading. Two IMZ (Interpore International) abutment alternatives were used: the titanium Abutment Complete and the polyoxymethylene Intra-mobile Element. The model system consisted of two implants placed in unfixed human cadaver ulna bone to simulate an implant bound edentulous region. Four biaxial rosette strain gauges simultaneously recorded cortical bone strain immediately mesial and distal to each implant. During experimentation a simulated prosthetic framework supported by either titanium or polyoxymethylene abutments was dynamically loaded 6 min from the terminal abutment along a cantilever extension. Cyclic nominal peak loads were applied with a materials testing machine at 20-N intervals from 20 to 200 N at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute. The protocol allowed frequency of load application to vary. A Newtonian linear correlation (r2 > or = 0.98) between load application and strain output was determined for each gauge position except for the terminal gauge located opposite the cantilever. Cortical strains recorded were within reported physiologic ranges involved in bone modeling and remodeling. Further, the polyoxymethylene abutment components did not result in reduction of peak microstrain at any gauge position. The Intra-mobile Element abutments, however, did increase the time required to complete 10 loading cycles when compared with the titanium Abutment

  17. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S. [Dept. of Informatics, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to {+-} 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This

  18. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to ± 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This overdose could be smoothed

  19. Safety and surgical techniques of C1 lateral mass screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Shinichiro; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Hanado, Shoji; Hamanaka, Hideaki; Inomata, Naoki; Kuroki, Shuji; Chosa, Etsuo

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the proper insertion techniques of C1 lateral mass screws. Eighteen consecutive patients were examined after upper cervical fusion using twenty-nine C1 lateral mass screws. Screws were placed by three different techniques; Goel's technique (4), Tan's technique (20), Notching technique (5). Pre and post-operative CT scans with multiplanar reconstruction were used to detect cortical breaches and direction of screws. No transverse foramen and vertebral groove violation was found in CT scans. Three had breached superior articular facet of the atlas. However, the range of motion (R.O.M) of atlanto-occipital joints had not changed postoperatively. Theses screws were inserted with Tan's technique and two of three were directed medially. It is feasible to safely insert C1 lateral mass screws when correct insertion point and direction are considered preoperatively. However, care should be taken because screws can violate the atlanto-occipital joint especially with Tan's technique. (author)

  20. Experiments on screw-pinch plasmas with elongated cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassing, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described carried out with SPICA II, a toroidal screw-pinch plasma device. this device is the last one in a series of plasma machines of the toroidal screw-pinch differing from its predecessor in its race-track shaped section. In devices of the type toroidal screw-pinch stable confinement is possible of plasmas with larger β values than in a tokamak discharge. In a pinch the plasma is screwed up, during the formation, in such a way that in a relatively small volume a plasma is formated with a high pressure. During the screwing up the plasma is heated by shock heating as well as adiabatic compression. With the modified snowplow model the density and temperature after the formation can be calculated, starting from the initial conditions. When all ions arrive into the plasma column, the density in the column is determined by the volume compression. First purpose of the experiments was to find a stable discharge. Subsequently discharges have been made with a high as possible β in order to investigate at which maximum β it is possible to confine screw-pinch plasmas stably. When these had been found, the nature and importance could be investigated of the processes following which the screw-pinch plasma looses its energy. (author), 75 res.; 95 figs.; 8 tabs

  1. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  2. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  3. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  4. Metal is not inert: role of metal ions released by biocorrosion in aseptic loosening--current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-12-15

    Metal implants are essential therapeutic tools for the treatment of bone fractures and joint replacements. The metals and metal alloys used in contemporary orthopedic and trauma surgery are well tolerated by the majority of patients. However, complications resulting from inflammatory and immune reactions to metal implants have been well documented. This review briefly discusses the different mechanisms of metal implant corrosion in the human body, which lead to the release of significant levels of metal ions into the peri-implant tissues and the systemic blood circulation. Additionally, this article reviews the effects of the released ions on bone metabolism and the immune system and discusses their involvement in the pathophysiological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and metal hypersensitivity in patients with metal implants.

  5. Loosening the link between childhood poverty and adolescent smoking and obesity: the protective effects of social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Kutcher, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Pervasive, lifelong inequalities in physical health begin in early childhood and are driven, in part, by social gradients in risk factors such as smoking and obesity. Yet not all low-income children have elevated physical-health risks as adults. The relation between income-to-needs ratio at age 9 and smoking prevalence and body fat (body mass index) at age 17 was examined in a sample of 196 rural adolescents. Income-to-needs ratio is the U.S. federal government's defined index of household income as a proportion of the poverty line. This is the first study to show that links between childhood poverty and subsequent physical-health outcomes can be loosened. At-risk youth in communities with a relatively rich array of social capital did not smoke more or have greater excess body fat compared with their more affluent counterparts.

  6. Statistical time series methods for damage diagnosis in a scale aircraft skeleton structure: loosened bolts damage scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis P; Fassois, Spilios D

    2011-01-01

    A comparative assessment of several vibration based statistical time series methods for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is presented via their application to a scale aircraft skeleton laboratory structure. A brief overview of the methods, which are either scalar or vector type, non-parametric or parametric, and pertain to either the response-only or excitation-response cases, is provided. Damage diagnosis, including both the detection and identification subproblems, is tackled via scalar or vector vibration signals. The methods' effectiveness is assessed via repeated experiments under various damage scenarios, with each scenario corresponding to the loosening of one or more selected bolts. The results of the study confirm the 'global' damage detection capability and effectiveness of statistical time series methods for SHM.

  7. A power recirculating test rig for ball screw endurance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giberti Hermes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual design of an innovative test rig for endurance tests of ball screws is presented in this paper. The test rig layout is based on the power recirculating principle and it also allows to overtake the main critical issues of the ball screw endurance tests. Among these there are the high power required to make the test, the lengthy duration of the same and the high loads between the screw and the frame that holds it. The article describes the test rig designed scheme, the kinematic expedients to be adopted in order to obtain the required performance and functionality and the sizing procedure to choose the actuation system.

  8. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  9. Grid deformation strategies for CFD analysis of screw compressors

    OpenAIRE

    Rane, S.; Kovacevic, A.; Stosic, N.; Kethidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Customized grid generation of twin screw machines for CFD analysis is widely used by the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry today, but is currently not suitable for topologies such as those of single screw, variable pitch or tri screw rotors. This paper investigates a technique called key-frame re-meshing that supplies pre-generated unstructured grids to the CFD solver at different time steps. To evaluate its accuracy, the results of an isentropic compression-expansion process in a r...

  10. Analysis of Material Flow in Screw Extrusion of Aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bjoern; Oernskar, Magnus; Welo, Torgeir; Wideroee, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Screw extrusion of aluminum is a new process for production of aluminum profiles. The commercial potential could be large. Little experimental and numerical work has been done with respect to this process.The material flow of hot aluminum in a screw extruder has been analyzed using finite element formulations for the non-Newtonian Navier-Stokes equations. Aluminum material properties are modeled using the Zener-Holloman material model. Effects of stick-slip conditions are investigated with respect to pressure build up and mixing quality of the extrusion process.The numerical results are compared with physical experiments using an experimental screw extruder.

  11. Comparison of open reduction versus minimally invasive surgical approaches on screw position in canine sacroiliac lag-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déjardin, Loïc M; Marturello, Danielle M; Guiot, Laurent P; Guillou, Reunan P; DeCamp, Charles E

    2016-07-19

    To compare accuracy and consistency of sacral screw placement in canine pelves treated for sacroiliac luxation with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or minimally invasive osteosynthesis (MIO) techniques. Unilateral sacroiliac luxations created experimentally in canine cadavers were stabilized with an iliosacral lag screw applied via ORIF or MIO techniques (n = 10/group). Dorsoventral and craniocaudal screw angles were measured using computed tomography multiplanar reconstructions in transverse and dorsal planes, respectively. Ratios between pilot hole length and sacral width (PL/SW-R) were obtained. Data between groups were compared statistically (p sacroiliac luxations provides more accurate and consistent sacral screw placement than ORIF. With proper techniques, iatrogenic neurological damage can be avoided with both techniques. The PL /SW-R, which relates to safe screw fixation, also demonstrates that screw penetration of at least 60% of the sacral width is achievable regardless of surgical approach. These findings, along with the limited dissection needed for accurate sacral screw placement, suggest that MIO of sacroiliac luxations is a valid alternative to ORIF.

  12. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  13. Comparison of effectiveness between cork-screw and peg-screw electrodes for transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takenori; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials by transcranial electric stimulation is popular in neurosurgery for monitoring motor function preservation. Some authors have reported that the peg-screw electrodes screwed into the skull can more effectively conduct current to the brain compared to subdermal cork-screw electrodes screwed into the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of electrode design on transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring. We estimated differences in effectiveness between the cork-screw electrode, peg-screw electrode, and cortical electrode to produce electric fields in the brain. We used the finite element method to visualize electric fields in the brain generated by transcranial electric stimulation using realistic three-dimensional head models developed from T1-weighted images. Surfaces from five layers of the head were separated as accurately as possible. We created the "cork-screws model," "1 peg-screw model," "peg-screws model," and "cortical electrode model". Electric fields in the brain radially diffused from the brain surface at a maximum just below the electrodes in coronal sections. The coronal sections and surface views of the brain showed higher electric field distributions under the peg-screw compared to the cork-screw. An extremely high electric field was observed under cortical electrodes. Our main finding was that the intensity of electric fields in the brain are higher in the peg-screw model than the cork-screw model.

  14. [Evaluation of cermet fillings in abutment teeth in removable partial prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulic, S; Tihacek-Sojic, Lj

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical process of setting the purpose filling on abutment teeth, after finishing the removable partial dentures. The aim was also to investigate the use of cermet glass-ionomer cement for the purpose filling in the abutment teeth for removable partial dentures, as well as to investigate the surface of the purpose filling. For the clinical evaluation of purpose filling slightly modified criteria according to Ryg's were used in 20 patients with different type of edentulousness. Changes occurring on the surface of purpose filling have been experimentally established by the method of scanning electron microscopy on the half-grown third molars in seven patients. It could be concluded that cement glass-ionomer was not the appropriate material for the purpose fillings in abutment teeth for removable partial dentures.

  15. Evaluation of the Periodontal Status of Abutment Teeth in Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, André Ricardo Maia; da Silva Lobo, Fábio Daniel; Miranda, Mónica Célia Pereira; Framegas de Araújo, Filipe Miguel Soares; Santos Marques, Tiago Miguel

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of removable partial dentures affects the periodontal status of abutment teeth. An observational cross-sectional study was done on a sample of patients rehabilitated with removable partial dentures (2010 to 2013). At a recall appointment, a clinical examination was done to collect data related to the rehabilitation and periodontal status of the abutment teeth. Of 145 invited patients, 54 attended the requested follow-up appointment (37.2%). Mean patient age was 59.1 years, and the study population was 42.6% male and 57.4% female. The mean follow-up time for the prosthesis was 26 months. Abutment teeth had higher values in all periodontal variables (P removable partial dentures is affected by these rehabilitations. A recall program for these patients involving removable prosthodontics and periodontology appointments is mandatory.

  16. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    , the selection of restoration materials should be based on proper optical characteristics in addition to biocompatibility and sufficient strength of materials. Abutments and crowns based on zirconia are one of the most recent alternatives to metal abutments and metal-ceramic crowns. To date, only few comparative...... and to estimate long-term biomechanical results of zirconia-based versus metal-based restorations. The aim of study I was to analyse the mode of fracture and number of cyclic loadings until veneering fracture of zirconia-based all-ceramic restorations compared to metal-ceramic restorations. The aim of study II...... was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical...

  17. Bacterial microleakage at the abutment-implant interface, in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrucea, Carlos; Conrado, Aparicio; Olivares, Denise; Padilla, Carlos; Barrera, Andrea; Lobos, Olga

    2018-02-15

    In implant rehabilitation, a microspace is created at the abutment-implant interface (AII). Previous research has shown that oral microbiome can proliferate in this microspace and affect periimplant tissues, causing inflammation in peri-implant tissues. Preventing microbial leakages through the AII is therefore an important goal in implantology. To determine the presence of marginal bacterial microleakage at the AII according to the torque applied to the prosthetic implant in vitro. Twenty-five Ticare Inhex internal conical implants (MG Mozo-Grau, Valladolid, España) were connected to a prosthetic abutment using torques of micro TC, while the rest were mounted on devices according to the bacterial leakage model with Porphyromonas gingivalis. Bacterial leakage was observed only in the implant adjustment as determined by micro-CT. The different torques applied to the abutment-implant system condition the bacterial leakage at the implant interface. No microleakage was observed at 20 and 30 N. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Marginal Bone Remodeling around healing Abutment vs Final Abutment Placement at Second Stage Implant Surgery: A 12-month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nabih; Aboulhosn, Maissa; Berberi, Antoine; Manal, Cordahi; Younes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The periimplant bone level has been used as one of the criteria to assess the success of dental implants. It has been documented that the bone supporting two-piece implants undergoes resorption first following the second-stage surgery and later on further to abutment connection and delivery of the final prosthesis. The aim of this multicentric randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the crestal bone resorption around internal connection dental implants using a new surgical protocol that aims to respect the biological distance, relying on the benefit of a friction fit connection abutment (test group) compared with implants receiving conventional healing abutments at second-stage surgery (control group). A total of partially edentulous patients were consecutively treated at two private clinics, with two adjacent two-stage implants. Three months after the first surgery, one of the implants was randomly allocated to the control group and was uncovered using a healing abutment, while the other implant received a standard final abutment and was seated and tightened to 30 Ncm. At each step of the prosthetic try-in, the abutment in the test group was removed and then retightened to 30 Ncm. Horizontal bone changes were assessed using periapical radiographs immediately after implant placement and at 3 (second-stage surgery), 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up examinations. At 12 months follow-up, no implant failure was reported in both groups. In the control group, the mean periimplant bone resorption was 0.249 ± 0.362 at M3, 0.773 ± 0.413 at M6, 0.904 ± 0.36 at M9 and 1.047 ± 0.395 at M12. The test group revealed a statistically significant lower marginal bone loss of 20.88% at M3 (0.197 ± 0.262), 22.25% at M6 (0.601 ± 0.386), 24.23% at M9 (0.685 ± 0.341) and 19.2% at M9 (0.846 ± 0.454). The results revealed that bone loss increased over time, with the greatest change in bone loss occurring between 3 and 6 months. Alveolar bone loss was significantly greater in the

  19. CT-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty in the treatment of painful bone metastases with fractures or a high risk of pathological fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusceddu, Claudio; Ballicu, Nicola; Fele, Rosa Maria; Sotgia, Barbara; Melis, Luca [Oncological Hospital ' ' A. Businco' ' , Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Cagliari (Italy); Fancellu, Alessandro [University of Sassari, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Sassari (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty (PSFPC), for either treatment of painful metastatic fractures or prevention of pathological fractures, in patients who are not candidates for surgical stabilization. Twenty-seven patients with 34 metastatic bone lesions underwent CT-guided PSFPC. Bone metastases were located in the vertebral column, femur, and pelvis. The primary end point was the evaluation of feasibility and complications of the procedure, in addition to the length of hospital stay. Pain severity was estimated before treatment and 1 and 6 months after the procedure using the visual analog scale (VAS). Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. All sessions were completed and well tolerated. There were no complications related to either incorrect positioning of the screws during bone fixation or leakage of cement. All patients were able to walk within 6 h after the procedure and the average length of hospital stay was 2 days. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.1 (range, 4-9) before treatment to 1.6 (range, 0-6), 1 month after treatment, and to 1.4 (range 0-6) 6 months after treatment. Neither loosening of the screws nor additional bone fractures occurred during a median follow-up of 6 months. Our results suggest that PSFPC might be a safe and effective procedure that allows the stabilization of the fracture and the prevention of pathological fractures with significant pain relief and good recovery of walking ability, although further studies are required to confirm this preliminary experience. (orig.)

  20. Percutaneous Image-Guided Screw Fixation of Bone Lesions in Cancer Patients: Double-Centre Analysis of Outcomes including Local Evolution of the Treated Focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: v.catena@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    AimTo review outcomes and local evolution of treated lesions following percutaneous image-guided screw fixation (PIGSF) of pathological/insufficiency fractures (PF/InF) and impeding fractures (ImF) in cancer patients at two tertiary centres.Materials and methodsThirty-two consecutive patients (mean age 67.5 years; range 33–86 years) with a range of tumours and prognoses underwent PIGSF for non/minimally displaced PF/InF and ImF. Screws were placed under CT/fluoroscopy or cone-beam CT guidance, with or without cementoplasty. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a simple 4-point scale (1 = worse; 2 = stable; 3 = improved; 4 = significantly improved). Local evolution was reviewed on most recent follow-up imaging. Technical success, complications, and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsThirty-six lesions were treated with 74 screws mainly in the pelvis and femoral neck (58.2 %); including 47.2 % PF, 13.9 % InF, and 38.9 % ImF. Cementoplasty was performed in 63.9 % of the cases. Technical success was 91.6 %. Hospital stay was ≤3 days; 87.1 % of lesions were improved at 1-month follow-up; three major complications (early screw-impingement radiculopathy; accelerated coxarthrosis; late coxofemoral septic arthritis) and one minor complication were observed. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging occurred in 3/24 lesions (12.5 %) at mean 8.7-month follow-up, including poor consolidation (one case) and screw loosening (two cases, at least 1 symptomatic). There were no cases of secondary fractures.ConclusionsPIGSF is feasible for a wide range of oncologic patients, offering good short-term efficacy, acceptable complication rates, and rapid recovery. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging may be relatively frequent, and requires close clinico-radiological surveillance.

  1. Correction Capability in the 3 Anatomic Planes of Different Pedicle Screw Designs in Scoliosis Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Coleman, John; Rawlinson, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations to compare the correction capabilities of different pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) instrumentations. To compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with different pedicle screws in scoliosis instrumentations. Pedicle screw fixation is widely used in surgical instrumentation for spinal deformity treatment. Screw design, correction philosophies, and surgical techniques are constantly evolving to achieve better control of the vertebrae and correction of the spinal deformity. Yet, there remains a lack of biomechanical studies that quantify the effects and advantages of different screw designs in terms of correction kinematics. The correction capabilities of fixed-angle, multiaxial, uniaxial, and saddle axial screws were kinematically analyzed, simulated, and compared. These simulations were based on the screw patterns and correction techniques proposed by 2 experienced surgeons for 2 AIS cases. Additional instrumentations were assessed to compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with each type of screw. The fixed-angle, uniaxial and saddle axial screws had similar kinematic behavior and performed better than multiaxial screws in the coronal and transverse planes (8% and 30% greater simulated corrections, respectively). Uniaxial and multiaxial screws were less effective than fixed-angle and saddle axial screws in transmitting compression/distraction to the anterior spine because of their sagittal plane mobility between the screw head and shank. Only the saddle axial screws allow vertebra angle in the sagittal plane to be independently adjusted. Pedicle screws of different designs performed differently for deformity corrections or for compensating screw placement variations in different anatomic planes. For a given AIS case, screw types should be determined based on the particular instrumentation objectives, the deformity's stiffness and characteristics so as to make the best of

  2. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection evaluated by linear mixed model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Hyon-Woo; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kim, Shin-Koo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection after cyclic loading. Three groups of external abutments (Ext group), an internal tapered one-piece-type abutment (Int-1 group), and an internal tapered two-piece-type abutment (Int-2 group) were prepared. Cyclic loading was applied to implant-abutment assemblies at 150 N with a frequency of 3 Hz. The amount of axial displacement, the Periotest values (PTVs), and the removal torque values(RTVs) were measured. Both a repeated measures analysis of variance and pattern analysis based on the linear mixed model were used for statistical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the surface of the implant-abutment connection. The mean axial displacements after 1,000,000 cycles were 0.6 μm in the Ext group, 3.7 μm in the Int-1 group, and 9.0 μm in the Int-2 group. Pattern analysis revealed a breakpoint at 171 cycles. The Ext group showed no declining pattern, and the Int-1 group showed no declining pattern after the breakpoint (171 cycles). However, the Int-2 group experienced continuous axial displacement. After cyclic loading, the PTV decreased in the Int-2 group, and the RTV decreased in all groups. SEM imaging revealed surface wear in all groups. Axial displacement and surface wear occurred in all groups. The PTVs remained stable, but the RTVs decreased after cyclic loading. Based on linear mixed model analysis, the Ext and Int-1 groups' axial displacements plateaued after little cyclic loading. The Int-2 group's rate of axial displacement slowed after 100,000 cycles.

  4. Minimum Abutment Height to Eliminate Bone Loss: Influence of Implant Neck Design and Platform Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinato, Sergio; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Bernardello, Fabio; Zaffe, Davide

    This retrospective study quantitatively analyzed the minimum prosthetic abutment height to eliminate bone loss after 4.7-mm-diameter implant placement in maxillary bone and how grafting techniques can affect the marginal bone loss in implants placed in maxillary areas. Two different implant types with a similar neck design were singularly placed in two groups of patients: the test group, with platform-switched implants, and the control group, with conventional (non-platform-switched) implants. Patients requiring bone augmentation underwent unilateral sinus augmentation using a transcrestal technique with mineralized xenograft. Radiographs were taken immediately after implant placement, after delivery of the prosthetic restoration, and after 12 months of loading. The average mesial and distal marginal bone loss of the control group (25 patients) was significantly more than twice that of the test group (26 patients), while their average abutment height was similar. Linear regression analysis highlighted a statistically significant inverse relationship between marginal bone loss and abutment height in both groups; however, the intercept of the regression line, both mesially and distally, was 50% lower for the test group than for the control group. The marginal bone loss was annulled with an abutment height of 2.5 mm for the test group and 3.0 mm for the control group. No statistically significant differences were found regarding marginal bone loss of implants placed in native maxillary bone compared with those placed in the grafted areas. The results suggest that the shorter the abutment height, the greater the marginal bone loss in cement-retained prostheses. Abutment height showed a greater influence in platform-switched than in non-platform-switched implants on the limitation of marginal bone loss.

  5. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  6. Management of broken dental implant abutment in a patient with bruxism: A rare case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al-Almaie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This rare case report describes prosthodontic complications resulting from a dental implant was placed surgically more distally in the area of the missing mandibular first molar with a cantilever effect and a crest width of >12 mm in a 59-year-old patient who had a history of bruxism. Fracture of abutment is a common complication in implant was placed in area with high occlusal forces. Inability to remove the broken abutment may most often end up in discarding the implant. Adding one more dental implant mesially to the previously placed implant, improvisation of technique to remove the broken abutment without sacrificing the osseointegrated dental implant, fabrication with cemented custom-made abutment to replace the broken abutment for the first implant, and the use of the two implants to replace a single molar restoration proved reliable and logical treatment solutions to avoid these prosthodontic complications.

  7. Management of Broken Dental Implant Abutment in a Patient with Bruxism: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2017-01-01

    This rare case report describes prosthodontic complications resulting from a dental implant was placed surgically more distally in the area of the missing mandibular first molar with a cantilever effect and a crest width of >12 mm in a 59-year-old patient who had a history of bruxism. Fracture of abutment is a common complication in implant was placed in area with high occlusal forces. Inability to remove the broken abutment may most often end up in discarding the implant. Adding one more dental implant mesially to the previously placed implant, improvisation of technique to remove the broken abutment without sacrificing the osseointegrated dental implant, fabrication with cemented custom-made abutment to replace the broken abutment for the first implant, and the use of the two implants to replace a single molar restoration proved reliable and logical treatment solutions to avoid these prosthodontic complications.

  8. Lumbar pedicle screw placement: Using only AP plane imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Placement of pedicle screws under fluoroscopic guidance using AP plane imaging alone with tactile guidance is safe, fast, and reliable. However, a good understanding of the radiographic landmarks is a prerequisite.

  9. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    countries. The known alternative in such condition is ... Key words: Hollow mill, stripped screws, titanium locked plates ... used a locally manufactured stainless steel hollow mill, ... head ‑ plate hole” assembly as a mono‑block single unit. In.

  10. scaphoid dimensions and appropriate screw sizes in a kenyan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no side to side differences in the total length or the distal pole. Conclusion: Scaphoid screws .... gender differences in prehension may contribute to .... differences between males and females. Sports. Med Arthroscopy Review. 2002 ...

  11. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hole Y plates with monocortical screws. 150 N incisal occlusal loads were simulated on the models. The commercial ANSYS software was utilized to calculate the Von Mises stresses on fixative appliances. Results: The highest Von Mises stress ...

  12. Effect of twin-screw extrusion parameters on mechanical hardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 2-level–4-factor factorial experimental design was used to investigate the influ- ... ture content, screw speed and temperature are found to influence, while feed rate ... of the food product that can be adequately evaluated by the consumer.

  13. Intermaxillary Fixation Screw Morbidity in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florescu, Vlad-Andrei; Kofod, Thomas; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity of screws used for intermaxillary fixation (IMF) in the treatment of mandibular fractures. A review of the published data was also performed for a comparison of outcomes. Our hypothesis was that the use of screws...... for IMF of mandibular fractures would result in minimal morbidity. Materials and Methods Patients treated for mandibular fractures from 2007 to 2013, using screws for IMF, using the international diagnosis code for mandibular fracture, DS026, were anonymously selected (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial...... Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark). The fracture type, radiographic findings, treatment modality, screw type and number, and root damage were recorded. For the outcome comparison, a review of the published data regarding iatrogenic dental root damage caused...

  14. Kinematic analysis of parallel manipulators by algebraic screw theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gallardo-Alvarado, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the fundamentals of screw theory concerned with velocity analysis of rigid-bodies, confirmed with detailed and explicit proofs. The author additionally investigates acceleration, jerk, and hyper-jerk analyses of rigid-bodies following the trend of the velocity analysis. With the material provided in this book, readers can extend the theory of screws into the kinematics of optional order of rigid-bodies. Illustrative examples and exercises to reinforce learning are provided. Of particular note, the kinematics of emblematic parallel manipulators, such as the Delta robot as well as the original Gough and Stewart platforms are revisited applying, in addition to the theory of screws, new methods devoted to simplify the corresponding forward-displacement analysis, a challenging task for most parallel manipulators. Stands as the only book devoted to the acceleration, jerk and hyper-jerk (snap) analyses of rigid-body by means of screw theory; Provides new strategies to simplify the forward kinematic...

  15. Assessment of reliability of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Nuno Marques; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Zheng, Cheng; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-08-01

    Information is lacking about the fatigue resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) tooth-colored implant custom abutment materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the reliability of different types of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments. Zirconia (Lava Plus), lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD), and resin-based composite (Lava Ultimate) abutments were fabricated using CAD-CAM technology and bonded to machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy inserts for conical connection implants (NobelReplace Conical Connection RP 4.3×10 mm; Nobel Biocare). Three groups (n=19) were assessed: group ZR, CAD-CAM zirconia/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; group RC, CAD-CAM resin-based composite/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; and group LD, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments. Fifty-seven implant abutments were secured to implants and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin according to ISO standard 14801. Static failure load (n=5) and fatigue failure load (n=14) were tested. Weibull cumulative damage analysis was used to calculate step-stress reliability at 150-N and 200-N loads with 2-sided 90% confidence limits. Representative fractured specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to observe fracture patterns. Weibull plots revealed β values of 2.59 for group ZR, 0.30 for group RC, and 0.58 for group LD, indicating a wear-out or cumulative fatigue pattern for group ZR and load as the failure accelerating factor for groups RC and LD. Fractographic observation disclosed that failures initiated in the interproximal area where the lingual tensile stresses meet the compressive facial stresses for the early failure specimens. Plastic deformation of titanium inserts with fracture was observed for zirconia abutments in fatigue resistance testing. Significantly higher reliability was found in group ZR, and no significant differences in reliability were

  16. Innovation in abutment-free bone-anchored hearing devices in children: Updated results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shaun; Centric, Aaron; Chennupati, Sri Kiran

    2015-10-01

    Bone-anchored hearing devices are an accepted treatment option for hearing restoration in various types of hearing loss. Traditional devices have a percutaneous abutment for attachment of the sound processor that contributes to a high complication rate. Previously, our institution reported on the Sophono (Boulder, CO, USA) abutment-free system that produced similar audiologic results to devices with abutments. Recently, Cochlear Americas (Centennial, CO, USA) released an abutment-free bone-anchored hearing device, the BAHA Attract. In contrast to the Sophono implant, the BAHA Attract utilizes an osseointegrated implant. This study aims to demonstrate patient benefit abutment-free devices, compare the results of the two abutment-free devices, and examine complication rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for the first eleven Sophono implanted patients and for the first six patients implanted with the BAHA Attract at our institution. Subsequently, we analyzed patient demographics, audiometric data, clinical course and outcomes. Average improvement for the BAHA Attract in pure-tone average (PTA) and speech reception threshold (SRT) was 41dB hearing level (dBHL) and 56dBHL, respectively. Considering all frequencies, the BAHA Attract mean improvement was 39dBHL (range 32-45dBHL). The Sophono average improvement in PTA and SRT was 38dBHL and 39dBHL, respectively. The mean improvement with Sophono for all frequencies was 34dBHL (range 24-43dBHL). Significant improvements in both pure-tone averages and speech reception threshold for both devices were achieved. In direct comparison of the two separate devices using the chi-square test, the PTA and SRT data between the two devices do not show a statistically significant difference (p-value 0.68 and 0.56, respectively). The complication rate for these abutment-free devices is lower than that of those featuring the transcutaneous abutment, although more studies are needed to further assess this potential advantage

  17. Probing and Tapping: Are We Inserting Pedicle Screws Correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vishal; Mesfin, Addisu; Lee, Robert; Reigrut, Julie; Schmidt, John

    2016-11-01

    Although there are a significant number of research publications on the topic of bone morphology and the strength of bone, the clinical significance of a failed pedicle screw is often revision surgery and the potential for further postoperative complications; especially in elderly patients with osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this report is to quantify the mechanical strength of the foam-screw interface by assessing probe/pilot hole diameter and tap sizes using statistically relevant sample sizes under highly controlled test conditions. The study consisted of two experiments and used up to three different densities of reference-grade polyurethane foam (ASTM 1839), including 0.16, 0.24, and 0.32 g/cm 3 . All screws and rods were provided by K2M Inc. and screws were inserted to a depth of 25 mm. A series of pilot holes, 1.5, 2.2, 2.7, 3.2, 3.7, 4.2, 5.0, and 6.0 mm in diameter were drilled through the entire depth of the material. A 6.5 × 45-mm pedicle screw was inserted and axially pulled from the material (n = 720). A 3.0-mm pilot hole was drilled and tapped with: no tap, 3.5-, 4.5-, 5.5-, and 6.5-mm taps. A 6.5 × 45-mm pedicle screw was inserted and axially pulled from the material (n = 300). The size of the probe/pilot hole had a nonlinear, parabolic effect on pullout strength. This shape suggests an optimum-sized probe hole for a given size pedicle screw. Too large or too small of a probe hole causes a rapid falloff in pullout strength. The tap data demonstrated that not tapping and undertapping by two or three sizes did not significantly alter the pullout strength of the screws. The data showed an exponential falloff of pullout strength when as tap size increased to the diameter of the screw. In the current study, the data show that an ideal pilot hole size half the diameter of the screw is a starting point. Also, that if tapping was necessary, to use a tap two sizes smaller than the screw being implanted. A similar optimum pilot hole or tap size may be

  18. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  19. Pull out Strength of Dual Outer Diameter Pedicle Screws Compared to Uncemented and Cemented Standard Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Leichtle, Carmen I; Frantz, Sandra; Bumann, Marte; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Shiozawa, Thomas; Leichtle, Ulf G

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the potential of the dual outer diameter screw and systematically evaluate the pull-out force of the dual outer diameter screw compared to the uncemented and cemented standard pedicle screws with special regard to the pedicle diameter and the vertebra level. Sixty vertebrae of five human spines (T 6 -L 5 ) were sorted into three study groups for pairwise comparison of the uncemented dual outer diameter screw, the uncemented standard screw, and the cemented standard screw, and randomized with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebra level. The vertebrae were instrumented, insertion torque was determined, and pull-out testing was performed using a material testing machine. Failure load was evaluated in pairwise comparison within each study group. The screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio was determined and the uncemented dual outer diameter and standard screws were compared for different ratios as well as vertebra levels. Significantly increased pull-out forces were measured for the cemented standard screw compared to the uncemented standard screw (+689 N, P dual outer diameter screw (+403 N, P dual outer diameter screw to the uncemented standard screw in the total study group, a distinct but not significant increase was measured (+149 N, P = 0.114). Further analysis of these two screws, however, revealed a significant increase of pull-out force for the dual outer diameter screw in the lumbar region (+247 N, P = 0.040), as well as for a screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio between 0.6 and 1 (+ 488 N, P = 0.028). For clinical application, cement augmentation remains the gold standard for increasing screw stability. According to our results, the use of a dual outer diameter screw is an interesting option to increase screw stability in the lumbar region without cement augmentation. For the thoracic region, however, the screw-to-pedicle diameter should be checked and attention should be paid to screw cut out, if the dual outer diameter screw is considered.

  20. Analysis of load distribution in tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures by the use of resilient abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisić, Mirko; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Grbović, Aleksandar; Todorović, Aleksandar; Marković, Aleksa; Trifković, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Differences between the tooth and implant response to load can lead to many biological and technical implications in the conditions of occlusal forces. The objective of this study was to analyze load distribution in tooth/implant-supported fixed partial dentures with the use of resilient TSA (Titan Shock Absorber, BoneCare GmbH, Augsburg, Germany) abutment and conventional non-resilient abutment using finite element method. This study presents two basic 3D models. For one model a standard non-resilient abutment is used, and on the implant of the second model a resilient TSA abutment is applied. The virtual model contains drawn contours of tooth, mucous membranes, implant, cortical bones and spongiosa, abutment and suprastructure. The experiment used 500 N of vertical force, applied in three different cases of axial load. Calculations of von Mises equivalent stresses of the tooth root and periodontium, implants and peri-implant tissue were made. For the model to which a non-resilient abutment is applied, maximum stress values in all three cases are observed in the cortical part of the bone (maximum stress value of 49.7 MPa). Measurements of stress and deformation in the bone tissue in the model with application of the resilientTSA abutment demonstrated similar distribution; however, these values are many times lower than in the model with non-resilient TSA abutment (maximum stress value of 28.9 MPa). Application of the resilient TSA abutment results in more equal distribution of stress and deformations in the bone tissue under vertical forces. These values are many times lower than in the model with the non-resilient abutment.

  1. Modeling and Analyzing the Slipping of the Ball Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Xu

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper aims to set up the ball systematic slipping model and analyze the slipping characteristics caused by different factors for a ball screw operating at high speeds. To investigate the ball screw slipping mechanism, transformed coordinate system should be established firstly. Then it is used to set up mathematical modeling for the ball slipping caused by the three main reasons and the speed of slipping can be calculated. Later, the influence of the contact angle, helix angle and screw diameter for ball screw slipping will be analyzed according to the ball slipping model and slipping speeds equation and the slipping analysis will be obtained. Finally, curve of slipping analysis and that of mechanical efficiency of the ball screw analysis by Lin are compared, which will indirectly verify the correctness of the slipping model. The slipping model and the curve of slipping analysis established in this paper will provide theory basis for reducing slipping and improving the mechanical efficiency of a ball screw operating at high speeds.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  3. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-01-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening. - Highlights: • SCPP/UHMWPE composites could enhance biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. • SCPP would improve biological efficacy with a few sacrifice of wear resistance. • The results might provide a promising wear-resistant material for fabricating acetabular cup.

  4. Wear Particles Promote Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Inflammation via the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase Pathway in Macrophages Surrounding Loosened Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishen Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Prosthesis loosening is closely associated with chronic inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages, which are activated by wear particles or inflammatory stimulants such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are critical regulators of inflammation, but their enzymatic sources in response to wear particles and their effects on peri-implant LPS-tolerance remain unclear. Methods: Three ROS-related enzymes—nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX-1 and -2 and catalase—were investigated in interface membrane tissues and in titanium (Ti particle-stimulated macrophages in vitro. The generation of ROS and downstream inflammatory effects were measured with or without pre-incubation with apocynin, an NOX inhibitor. Results: Pre-exposure to Ti particles attenuated NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated macrophages, indicating that wear particles suppress immune response, which may lead to chronic inflammation. NOX-1 and -2 were highly expressed in aseptically loosened interface membranes and in macrophages stimulated with Ti particles; the particles induced a moderate amount of ROS generation, NF-κB activation, and TNF-a secretion in macrophages, and these effects were suppressed by apocynin. Conclusion: Wear particles induce ROS generation through the NOX signaling pathway, resulting in persistent inflammation and delayed loosening. Thus, the suppression of NOX activity may be a useful strategy for preventing prosthesis loosening.

  5. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhipeng [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Tian, Meng [Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Li [Department of Oncology, the 452 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Chengdu 610021 (China); Yu, Xixun, E-mail: yuxixun@163.com [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening. - Highlights: • SCPP/UHMWPE composites could enhance biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. • SCPP would improve biological efficacy with a few sacrifice of wear resistance. • The results might provide a promising wear-resistant material for fabricating acetabular cup.

  6. Fabrication of a Customized Ball Abutment to Correct a Nonparallel Implant Abutment for a Mandibular Implant-Supported Removable Partial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Dasht; Mohammadreza Nakhaei; Nafiseh teimouri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: While using an implant-supported removable partial prosthesis, the implant abutments should be parallel to one another along the path of insertion. If the implants and their attachments are placed vertically on a similar occlusal plane, not only is the retention improved, the prosthesis will also be maintained for a longer period. Case Report: A 65-year-old male patient referred to the School of Dentistry in Mashhad, Iran with complaints of discomfort with the removable partial ...

  7. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam K Saraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD, diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10-L2 were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation; b screw with medial cortical perforation; and c screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra ( P = 0.105, but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD ( P = 0.901. Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different.

  8. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  9. Developmental dysplasia of the hip, age, BMI, place of residence and tobacco abuse increase the odds of aseptic loosening in Chinese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlong Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this hospital-based case-control study was to evaluate the patient-related risk factors for aseptic loosening after total hip arthroplasty (THA and total knee arthroplasty (TKA in Chinese patients. METHODS: From January 2000 to December 2012, 67 patients undergoing THA and TKA who developed aseptic loosening were detected as case subjects and 336 patients without aseptic loosening, matched by the year of index surgery and type of surgery, were selected as controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: The demographic factors and comorbid conditions associated with a risk-adjusted increase in aseptic loosening (in decreasing order of significance were a rural place of residence (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.21-4.30; p = 0.011, body mass index (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2 (vs. 18.5-28 kg/m(2 (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.19-4.41; p = 0.013, developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH (OR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.11-7.66; p = 0.030, tobacco abuse (OR = 2.88; 95% CI: 1.05-7.89; p = 0.039, and age <45 years (vs. 45-65 years (OR = 2.63; 95% CI: 1.01-6.80; p = 0.047. CONCLUSIONS: Patients aged <45 years and those with a BMI of ≥ 28 kg/m(2, a preoperative diagnosis of DDH, history of tobacco abuse, or living in rural areas are at increased risk for aseptic loosening after THA and TKA in Chinese population. Additional systematic large-scale studies are needed to verify these results.

  10. Experimental study of the density distribution of the particles of the material in screw installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidov S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available the experimental studies of density distribution of the particles of a mixture of wheat, oats, rye to feed pigs by infrared heating at the time of stay and temperature at the exit of the installation. The purpose of the work is to study the quality of treatment of the product with the settings with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. Screw installations with infrared emitters of selected wavelength give the opportunity for intense and continuous heat treatment process. The authors used the optimal parameters of the process with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. The parameters of screw installation during the study were the following: the number of revolutions of the screw was 10 rpm, density of heat flux was 12 kW/m2, output capacity – 250 kg/h.

  11. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  12. CT provides precise size assessment of implanted titanium alloy pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael J; Slakey, Joseph B

    2014-05-01

    After performing instrumented spinal fusion with pedicle screws, postoperative imaging using CT to assess screw position may be necessary. Stainless steel implants produce significant metal artifact on CT, and the degree of dist